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KSU 2006 Honors Week Interdisciplinary Symposium: Why and What We Teach: Stories of Our Lives in the Arts

Posted Apr. 11, 2006

whyandwhat

As a way to ignite the spirit of interdisciplinary collaborations and spark conversations within the College of The Arts and beyond, the Art Education division organized an interdisciplinary symposium from 5:30 till 7:30pm on Tuesday, April 11 2006. The two-hour event was held in room 310 in the Kent Student Center. Three workshops were held concurrently after a panel discussion chaired by Dr. Christine Havice (Director, School of Art). A sharing and reflection session immediately followed while light refreshments were being served.

During the panel discussion, three educators in the arts (dance, music and visual art) shared successful and meaningful tales of their lives that motivated them and inspired their works.  More than 80 workshop participants had the opportunity to experience possibilities of integrating the arts in teaching and learning, and collaborated with others to explore multiple ways of knowing. Structured improvisation guided by the presenters enriched participants’ experiential self-exploration, and facilitated the discovery of personal voice in the arts through movements, sound, and visual images.

This symposium tapped into the expertise of three educators in the arts, and capitalized on their more than half a century of teaching experience in sum total:

  • Linda Hoeptner-Poling, PhD (2005 Ohio Art Education Association Higher Education Division Award);
  • Barbara Allegra Verlezza, MFA (2005 Dance Teacher Magazine Award for Outstanding Dance Teacher in Higher Education), and
  • Dwayne Wasson, PhD (Music Educator, National Board Certified Teacher).

This special opportunity reinforced the School of Art’s dedication and determination to initiate innovative partnership across disciplines at the college level, and promoted artistic mode of thought in all classroom’s teaching and learning.