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Chemical Physics - M.S. and Ph.D. PDFDownload to print

College
College of Arts and Sciences
Department
Chemical Physics Interdisciplinary Program-College of Arts and Sciences

Liquid Crystal and Materials Science Building
Tel: 330-672-2654
Web: www.kent.edu/cas/cpip/

Description

The Chemical Physics Interdisciplinary Program at Kent State University provides graduate students with extensive scientific training, cutting-edge research opportunities and engineering skills necessary for a variety of careers in the academy and in industry. Program faculty and students conduct research in Kent State's Liquid Crystals Institute in liquid crystal synthesis and molecular design, liquid crystal materials and properties, lyotropic liquid crystals and bio-related materials, optoelectronics, and nanoscience and nanotechnologies. These important research foci are inherently interdisciplinary.

Admission Requirements

Official transcript(s), goal statement and three letters of recommendation. Submission of GREs (general and subject test–physics or chemistry) is not required, but strongly recommended. Admission will be granted by examination of the student's background on an individual basis. Students from a variety of undergraduate majors, such as physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science are invited to apply to the Chemical Physics Interdisciplinary Program. Please refer to the University policy for graduate admissions.
 

Graduation Requirements

M.S.: A total of 30 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree are required to earn the Master of Science in Chemical Physics. Students are required to complete 15 credit hours of core courses and 15 credit hours of electives selected in consultation with the student's faculty advisor. Elective hours may include research and thesis.

Ph.D.: The Ph.D. in Chemical Physics requires 90 hours beyond the baccalaureate degree. Students are required to complete 15 credit hours of core courses and a minimum of 45 credit hours of electives chosen in consultation with the student's faculty advisor. The elective coursework may include faculty-approved research. Additionally, the Ph.D. requires a minimum of 30 hours of dissertation.

Program Learning Outcomes

M.S. Chemical Physics

Graduates of this program will be able to:

1. Develop an advanced understanding of the fundamental science of liquid crystals and ability to apply acquired knowledge of physical and chemical properties of liquid crystals in achieving development of liquid crystal materials and devices.

2. Gain experience in presenting scientific data in research publications, articles, posters and oral presentations.

3. Apply acquired knowledge to the development of new liquid crystal materials, new theories and effects, and liquid crystal based devices.

Ph.D. Chemical Physics

Graduates of this program will be able to:

1. Develop an advanced understanding of the fundamental science of liquid crystals and ability to apply acquired knowledge of physical and chemical properties of liquid crystals in achieving understanding of novel phenomena in liquid crystals.

2. Gain experience in presenting scientific data in research publications, articles, posters and oral presentations.

3. Apply acquired knowledge to the discovery of new liquid crystal effects, new liquid crystal materials and development of liquid crystal based devices and applications.

Thesis/ Dissertation

M.S.: Candidates may choose to do a master's thesis by registering for CPHY 60199, Thesis I, for a total of 6 credit hours. The thesis for the Master of science degree will present and interpret results of original research and must be defended before a committee of the Chemical Physics graduate faculty.

Ph.D.: A prospectus of the dissertation research project is required for all Ph.D. candidates. The prospectus is prepared jointly with the student’s dissertation advisor. The prospectus must be approved by the members of the student’s dissertation committee.

A dissertation presenting and interpreting results of original research is required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. The areas of research are outlined under the various concentrations. Following acceptance of the dissertation by the dissertation committee, the final degree requirement is the satisfactory completion of the final oral exam (defense of dissertation) before a committee of the graduate Chemical Physics faculty.
 

Candidacy

Ph.D.: In addition to satisfying the course and computer language requirements, the student must pass the Chemical Physics Interdisciplinary Program candidacy examination. The examination will cover material in the core courses of the chemical physics program. A student may make two attempts at passing the examination. If the student fails the second attempt, he/she will not be permitted to continue toward the doctoral degree but may complete the requirements for the Master of Science degree. The student’s first attempt at candidacy should come following the first year of study. In exceptional cases, a student may defer taking the candidacy examination until the beginning of the third year of graduate study.
 

Students are required to complete 90 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate--15 credit hours of core courses, 45 credit hours of elective courses and 30 credit hours of dissertation. The choice of electives must be approved by the student's faculty advisor. If a required core course is not available, an equivalent course may be substituted with permission of the graduate coordinator.

 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (90 credits)
Course Title Credits
CPHY 72241 Soft Matter 3
  72245 Fundamentals of Liquid Crystal Science 4
  72248 Liquid Crystal Optics and Photonics 4
  72335 Advanced Liquid Crystalline and Polymeric Materials 4
  80199 Dissertation I* 30
Approved Elective Coursework, including research 45
TOTAL 90

*Each doctoral candidate, upon admission to candidacy, must register for CPHY 80199 Dissertation I for a total of 30 hours. It is expected that a doctoral candidate will continuously register for Dissertation I, and thereafter CPHY 80299 Dissertation II, each semester, including one term each summer, until all requirements for the degree have been met.