Skip Navigation
*To search for student contact information, login to FlashLine and choose the "Directory" icon in the FlashLine masthead (blue bar).

Applied Mathematics - M.A., M.S. and Ph.D. PDFDownload to print

College
College of Arts and Sciences

Department
Department of Mathematical Sciences

Mathematics and Computer Science Building
E-mail: math@math.kent.edu
Tel: 330-672-2430
Fax: 330-672-2209
Web: www.kent.edu/cas/math

Description

The Master of Arts (M.A) in Applied Mathematics comprises a flexible program of coursework in mathematics beyond the bachelor's degree emphasizing areas relevant to applications in the sciences (including engineering, biological, financial and physical sciences). There is no thesis requirement or option. Students in the applied mathematics Ph.D. program can apply for this M.A. degree after completing the requisite number of credit hours.

The Master of Science (M.S.) in Applied Mathematics is primarily a terminal, pre-professional degree comprising coursework beyond the bachelor's degree emphasizing areas relevant to applications in the sciences (including the engineering, biological, financial and physical sciences). Students are required to write and defend a thesis in an area agreed upon with a faculty advisor.

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Applied Mathematics is for those interested in becoming professional scholars, college and university teachers, or independent workers in private, industrial or government research institutions.

Admission Requirements

M.A. and M.S.: Official transcript(s), goal statement, three letters of recommendation and résumé or vita. Students applying for either master's degree are not required to have an undergraduate degree in applied mathematics; however, they are expected to have proficiency in numerical analysis and statistics at the level of Introduction to Statistical Concepts (MATH 40012) and Introduction to Numerical Computing II (MATH 42202). They are also expected to have taken computer science coursework equivalent to Computer Science I—Programming and Problem Solving (CS 13001). Those who do not meet these specific requirements may be granted conditional admission by the Graduate Studies Committee.

Ph.D.: Admission into the Ph.D. also requires passing the departmental qualifying examination at the master’s level.

Please refer to the University policy for graduate admissions.

 

Graduation Requirements

M.A. and M.S.: The Master of Arts and Master of Science programs require a total of 32 semester hours of graduate credit. Each student should submit a detailed plan of study for approval by the advisor by the time the first 16 semester hours of graduate credit have been completed.

Ph.D.: Students who wish to pursue the Ph.D. must pass the qualifying examination at the Ph.D. level. A minor of up to 10 hours will be counted toward the completion of the degree subject to the approval of the student’s advisor and the graduate studies committee.

Program Learning Outcomes

M.S. Applied Mathematics

Graduates of this program will be able to:

1. Engage effectively in problem solving, including exploring examples, devising and testing conjectures, and assessing the correctness of solutions. 

2. Reason in mathematical arguments at a level appropriate to the discipline, including posing problems precisely, articulating assumptions, and reasoning logically to conclusions. 

3. Approach mathematical problems creatively, including trying multiple approaches and modifying problems when necessary to make them more tractable.

4. Communicate mathematics clearly both orally and in writing.

5. To teach mathematics at the college-level.

6. Obtain depth in some subdisciple of applied mathematics.

Ph.D. Applied Mathematics

Graduates of this program will be able to:

1. Understand and appreciate connections between mathematics and other disciplines.

2. Be aware of and understand a broad range of mathematical subdisciplines.

3. Obtain a broader and deeper understanding of core applied mathematics subdisciplines including numerical analysis, probability, and mathematical statistics.

4. Obtain a deep understanding of some subdiscipline.

5. Engage effectively in problem solving, including exploring examples, devising and testing conjectures, and assessing the correctness of solutions.

6. Reason in mathematical arguments at a level appropriate to the discipline, including posing problems precisely, articulating assumptions, and reasoning logically to conclusions.

7. Approach mathematical problems creatively, including trying multiple approaches and modifying problems when necessary to make them more tractable.

8. Develop and carry out a research program in applied mathematics.

9. Communicate mathematics clearly both orally and in writing.

10. Teach university-level mathematics effectively.

Candidacy

This examination will be a comprehensive examination in the field of the major subject, and will be a substantially deeper test than the qualifying examination.