Fall 2014 Honors Courses

ACCT 23020 (004) Introduction to Financial Accounting - Honors 
CRN: 10902
MW 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Linda Zucca

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the principles and concepts of financial accounting, which will allow them to analyze financial statements in order to make business and economic decisions. The course emphasizes the areas of 1) the basic accounting equation, 2) the effects of transactions on financial statements, 3) the interrelationships among financial statements, and 4) the interpretation of financial statements. In this course short lectures are supplemented with active learning tasks, group work, and discussions. Additionally, students may complete business writing assignments, real world cases, group presentations, written exams, and quizzes. 

Text: Harrison, Horngren and Thomas, Financial Accounting, Prentice Hall. 

 


ANTH 18210 (001) Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - Honors 
CRN: 11092
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Joy St. James

Students have come of age in a world where the human population is rapidly growing while technological advances are breaking down barriers of distance and language. As a result, there are more opportunities for interactions across cultures than ever before in human history. But what is a culture? What is it worth to keep a culture from changing or to keep a language alive? Is it worth dying for? Answers to these questions shape our lives and inform foreign and domestic policies for all governments. Cultural Anthropology seeks to strengthen students understanding of our world by focusing attention on contemporary cultural diversity and the opportunities and challenges presented by such diversity.

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of cultural anthropology and a broad sampling of the ways that these concepts can aid us in understanding the world today. More specifically, the primary objectives of this course are for students to: gain factual knowledge of the terms, concepts, and methods used by anthropologists to describe the characteristics of cultures; become familiar with the fundamental principles and theories that guide the discipline of anthropology; analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view from class readings and discussion; and develop an interest in the field and confidence in your ability to formulate good questions and seek satisfying answers from anthropological literature. 

Traditional lectures, PowerPoint presentations, movies, discussions and exercises will be part of this class. Assessments will include three exams, one small project (e.g. making a genealogy chart), and one 6 - 10 page paper on an appropriate topic of the student’s choice that will be due toward the end of the semester. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Global


ANTH 18630 (006) Human Evolution - Honors 
CRN: 21747
MW 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Linda Spurlock

The theory of evolution is a unifying theory that helps explain the unity of all life forms, as well as their diversity. Evolutionary mechanisms have shaped all of life including humans and other primates, and evolution is still occurring in the present.  This course seeks to enhance the way students think about our physical and behavioral diversity and how we interact with and modify our environment.  The study of human evolution involves many fascinating lines of evidence including genetics, the behavior and anatomy of non-human primates, the anatomy of our fossil ancestors, human disease, and the genetic variation seen in modern human populations. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of biological anthropology and to current theories of how we became human. Primary learning outcomes of the course include: integrate concepts and facts related to molecular genetics and human variation; conservation of environments; primate and human ecology and reproduction; understand that humans are not only products of the environment, but they are also in a position to extensively modify it; philosophically, we are not ‘above’ other creatures; there are no more or less evolved creatures; understand that the scientific method is a helpful way to work through complex problems (including how humankind originated). Method of instruction includes lectures, classroom discussions, and exercises. Assessments include three exams, a zoo project pertaining to primate behavior, and one 5-8 page paper on a genetic disorder of the student's choice. 

Kent Core-Basic Sciences
 


ARCH 10011 (002) Survey of Architectural History I - Honors 
CRN: 11169
TR 5:30-6:45 E 
Instructor: Steve Rugare

This course covers the major monuments of western architecture from pre-history to the 14th century, with particular attention to basic issues of architectural analysis, historiography, and social and intellectual history. The class format will be lectures with opportunity for discussion. Student evaluation will be based on slide identification quizzes, essay exams, and a few brief assignments (some involving drawing) Honors students will be expected to complete a moderate-length (6-8 pp) research essay on a topic of their choice. They will also provide written notes in response to a number of supplemental readings from primary sources.

Texts: Moffet et al., Building Across Time. Additional readings from Vitruvius, Ten Books on Architecture, and 19th Century sources on the Gothic (Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc, Victor Hugo) 

Kent Core-Fine Arts

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


ARCH 44611 (003) Portfolio - Honors 
CRN: 19323
TBA 
Instructor: Jonathan Fleming

Architectural drawings and other allied work of the student reproduced and assembled in a professional portfolio suitable for job and graduate application. Prerequisite: ARCH 40101 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


ARTH 22006 (020) Art History I - Honors 
CRN: 11498
MW 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Albert Reischuck

The art (including architecture) of the Western World from the prehistoric to Late Gothic periods. I include Islamic art as part of the Western development. Lectures illustrated with slides make up the class meetings. I assume that students have only the barest knowledge of art coming into the course and hope that they will have a better understanding of art after taking the course. There are three exams during the semester. These have sections on which specific knowledge is tested as well as an essay section in which students can bring in their own ideas. No papers are required. Class participation can include discussions or critical questioning. 

Texts (Subject to change): Barnet, Sylvan, A Short Guide to Writing About Art, 9th ed. Boston:  Little, Brown, 2007; Kleiner, Fred S., Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, 13th ed., Boston:  Thomson Higher Education, 2009; Other up-dated introductory textbooks, like Stokstad's and Janson's, are also acceptable. 

Kent Core-Fine Arts
 


ARTH 22006 (019) Art History I - Honors 
CRN: 11499
TR 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: Diane Scillia

Through lecture and discussion in what is hopefully a relaxed environment the course content as it moves from the Paleolithic era to the Italian Gothic world provides advanced students with weekly exposure to reasons why art and architecture were created in terms of specific historical periods. The course includes study of Islamic art to further understanding of non-Western creativity and religious beliefs. The students realize how art is interrelated to human survival and religious life perhaps more in this course than in many others. The students soon dismiss the naïve notion of a work of art as a decorative adornment to architecture or the home.

The course material includes the roles of art in early burial customs and ancient societies as well as varying belief systems about the spiritual world and the roles of divinities in culture. Houses of worship are examined during various historical periods covered and provide students with a sense of the persistence of religion and art and their various manifestations in each culture.

We will consider in class how a work of art functions in terms of the social, cultural, and religious aspects of human life. The advanced students will realize that art history is integral to the milieu in which it was created. They will also understand the relationship of art history to the other humanities and fields of study. Recognition of the great importance of art throughout the ages is one of the major objectives for students in this course.

Examinations will be based on the classroom lectures and assigned readings in the text. There will be four tests. Study guides listing works of art and terms for which students are responsible on the exams are sent by e-mail prior to each exam. Quizzes will be given by surprise in the periods before a test is given; their point value will be added to the score of the upcoming exam. Each student will submit an investigative research paper to supplement classroom learning. The focus can be on a specific work of art in the Cleveland Museum of Art from their collections relating to course content. Another option is to discuss a societal issue in which discussion of art work is included. For example, if a student wishes to realize what the Olympics in the ancient world involved, works of art in which appropriate athletic events are depicted would be included. The medical treatment of Egyptians can be examined and illustrated so that the advanced student realizes the belief systems of this important civilization and find visual examples to support their findings.

Texts: Barnet, Sylvan, A Short Guide to Writing About Art, 9th ed., Boston: Little, Brown, 2007 (Optional); Stokstad, Marilyn and Cothren, Michael, Art: A Brief History, 5th ed., Boston: Pearson, 2013 (Required)

Kent Core-Fine Arts
 


BSCI 10120 (004) Biological Foundations - Honors 
CRN: 11872
MWF 1:10-2:00 M 2:15-5:15 
Instructor: Jennifer Marcinkiewicz

Principles of biology—cell biology, energetics, reproduction and heredity, molecular genetics, animal systems—presented within an evolutionary perspective. In lecture there will be four exams, including the final exam. The Honors component may include a series of readings from biological literature and scientific journals. The laboratory includes investigative, as well as observational, exercises. Short laboratory quizzes and laboratory practical exams are given, and reports about some laboratory exercises are required. Lecture is a mixed Honors/non-Honors course. Lab is Honors only.

The Honors students will have the following work that differs from non-Honors students:

  • Separate lab with additional assignments involving writing about biology in the news
  • Lab quizzes are designed to be more challenging
  • Lecture exams will have a different format for Honors students—not just multiple choice but some short answer/essay questions

Texts: Ravens & Johnson, Biology, 7th ed., WBC/McGraw-Hill, 2005; Morgan & Carter, Investigating Biology, 2nd. ed., Benjamin-Cummings Publishers.

Kent Core-Basic Sciences

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


BSCI 10120 (006) Biological Foundations - Honors 
CRN: 11874
MWF 1:10-2:00 T 5:30-8:30 
Instructor: Jennifer Marcinkiewicz

Principles of biology—cell biology, energetics, reproduction and heredity, molecular genetics, animal systems—presented within an evolutionary perspective. In lecture there will be four exams, including the final exam. The Honors component may include a series of readings from biological literature and scientific journals. The laboratory includes investigative, as well as observational, exercises. Short laboratory quizzes and laboratory practical exams are given, and reports about some laboratory exercises are required. Lecture is a mixed Honors/non-Honors course. Lab is Honors only.

The Honors students will have the following work that differs from non-Honors students:

  • Separate lab with additional assignments involving writing about biology in the news
  • Lab quizzes are designed to be more challenging
  • Lecture exams will have a different format for Honors students—not just multiple choice but some short answer/essay questions

Texts: Ravens & Johnson, Biology, 7th ed., WBC/McGraw-Hill, 2005; Morgan & Carter, Investigating Biology, 2nd. ed., Benjamin-Cummings Publishers.

Kent Core-Basic Sciences

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


BSCI 40099 (001) Senior Honors Thesis - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Honors thesis research project completed during the senior year with BSCI faculty mentor and research committee. Maximum of 4 credit hours to count toward BSCI degrees as upper division elective hours. 

 


BUS 10123 (011) Exploring Business - Honors 
CRN: 12189
MW 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Eric Von Hendrix

This course provides an introduction to the basic areas of business with an integrated perspective on how the various areas work together. The Honors section of Exploring Business will provide more in-depth study of the functional areas of business, such as accounting, finance, marketing, and operations management. In addition, the honors section will utilize the case study method and team projects to provide students a hands-on, practical understanding of up-to-date actual and relevant business issues. Significant emphasis on written and oral communication skills. Open to any major. 

 


CACM 11001 (001) Introduction to Conflict Management - Honors 
CRN: 12226
TR 3:45-5:00 
Instructor: Patrick Coy

We begin from the premise that conflict is part of everyday life. It is as common as laughter, anger, love, hope, work, play and is probably no less important than any of these. Conflict is neither good nor bad in and of itself. If managed constructively, it can reveal injustices, usher in much-needed change, and be a source of personal growth, reconciliation, even social and political transformation. On the other hand, if managed destructively conflict can also breed resentments and alienation, and may be waged with all manner of destructive violence, including war. So our question becomes: what tools can individuals, groups, and governments use to manage, transform, or wage their conflicts in largely constructive ways? The answers this course provides include potentially positive conflict management tools like active listening and communication skills, principled negotiation, various forms of mediation, and nonviolent action. Course material and exercises should bring about greater personal awareness of our individual “conflict styles,” including your habits, attitudes, and beliefs related to conflict, and to organizing for change. We will develop knowledge about the nature of conflict, the growing field of conflict management and various ways to constructively approach conflict. But in this course students should also build usable skills in active listening, assertion, principled negotiation, and informal mediation. We will use hands-on exercises, role-plays, small group activities, discussions, and lectures to engage the material. Writing assignments will include a mix of self-reflective and analytical short pieces as well as some exercises designed to help you master skills. There will also be three written examinations.

Texts: Course Reader (purchased at WordSmiths Copy Center) Bolton, R. (1986). People Skills: How to Assert Yourself, Listen to Others, and Resolve Conflicts, NY: Simon and Schuster; Fisher, R., and Ury, W. (1990). Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In, NY: Penguin; Harper, G. (2004). The Joy of Conflict Resolution: Transforming Victims, Villains, and Heroes in the Workplace and at Home. New Society Publishers. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Domestic


 

CHEM 10960 (001) Honors General Chemistry I - Honors 
CRN: 12484
MTWF 11:00-11:50 R 7:45-10:45 
Instructor: TBA

Chemistry 10960 is the first part of a two-semester sequence of mathematically-based, college-level general chemistry. Students will first be introduced to modern atomic and molecular structure theories, chemical bonding, and the periodic law. These basic principles will then be applied to the discussion of chemical stoichiometry, acid and base reactions, intermolecular forces in gases, liquids, and solids. The classroom time will be divided into lectures, discussion, and problem-solving sessions. Sections 001-003 will attend the same classroom, but be divided into different lab sections. 

Text: Robinson, Odom, & Holtzclaw, General Chemistry, 10th ed., 1997. 

Kent Core-Basic Sciences
 


CHEM 10960 (002) Honors General Chemistry I - Honors 
CRN: 12485
MTWF 11:00-11:50 R 2:15-5:15 
Instructor: TBA

Chemistry 10960 is the first part of a two-semester sequence of mathematically-based, college-level general chemistry. Students will first be introduced to modern atomic and molecular structure theories, chemical bonding, and the periodic law. These basic principles will then be applied to the discussion of chemical stoichiometry, acid and base reactions, intermolecular forces in gases, liquids, and solids. The classroom time will be divided into lectures, discussion, and problem-solving sessions. Sections 001-003 will attend the same classroom, but be divided into different lab sections.

Text: Robinson, Odom, & Holtzclaw, General Chemistry, 10th ed., 1997

Kent Core-Basic Sciences
 


CHEM 10960 (003) Honors General Chemistry I - Honors 
CRN: 12486
MTWF 11:00-11:50 R 2:15-5:15 
Instructor: TBA

Chemistry 10960 is the first part of a two-semester sequence of mathematically-based, college-level general chemistry. Students will first be introduced to modern atomic and molecular structure theories, chemical bonding, and the periodic law. These basic principles will then be applied to the discussion of chemical stoichiometry, acid and base reactions, intermolecular forces in gases, liquids, and solids. The classroom time will be divided into lectures, discussion, and problem-solving sessions. Sections 001-003 will attend the same classroom, but be divided into different lab sections.

Text: Robinson, Odom, & Holtzclaw, General Chemistry, 10th ed., 1997

Kent Core-Basic Sciences
 


CHEM 40099 (001) Senior Honors Thesis - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

For departmental honors. May be started summer prior to senior year. Register each semester during senior year. Minimum total credit 5-hours. Prerequisite: Special approval. 

 


CLAS 41097 (002) Colloquium: The Search for Immortality - Honors 
CRN: 12648
M 4:25-7:05 
Instructor: Radd Ehrman

This course surveys important issues relative to the notion of immortality and eternity found in the written documents of antiquity and beyond (Assyrian/Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, medieval, modern), such as the epic of Gilgamesh, epics of Homer and Vergil, the Hebrew and Christian scriptures, Dante, Bram Stoker, J.K. Rowling, etc.   Attention is paid to ancient and current ideas of the meaning of immortality, its desirability, the various kinds of immortality, resurrection, ghosts, vampires, etc.   This course is highly recommended for anyone interested in literature of all ages and provenances, art, music, theater, and religion. Lecture/discussion with PowerPoint.

General course requirements: 2 midterm examinations (objective and subjective questions); A term paper; Final examination

Specific requirements for Honors and graduate students:  in addition to the two midterm examinations and final examination:

  • Write a paper on a topic pertinent to the subject of immortality and/or eternity;
  • Honors and graduate students will also be required to write brief (1-2 pages) answers to problems that will require some research and critical thinking. There will be 5 of these, given at regular intervals throughout the semester (i.e., about every third week throughout the semester). 

Texts: Texts will be hyperlinked on Blackboard Learn. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course


CLAS 41301 (002) Classical Mythology - Honors 
CRN: 12650
MW 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Jennifer Larson

This course surveys the major myths of the ancient Greeks and examines theories of their interpretation. Some attention is also paid to the impact of Greek mythology upon the Romans.

The main goals of the course are as follows: establish a basic familiarity with the deities, heroes and heroines of Classical mythology and their significance for the Greeks; gain a working knowledge of mythology in Western art, especially Greek vase painting, the richest source of these images. 

Students will also gain an understanding of the following concepts and the ability to discuss them in writing: the relationship between Greek myths and Mediterranean geography; the relationship between local and Panhellenic myths and the roles of epic poetry and Athenian tragedy in disseminating myths; the relationship between Greek mythology and the practice of Greek religion.    

For the study of Greek myth, it is important to read original versions as they were told by ancient poets; the Morford and Lenardon text contains a generous sampling of these texts and we will be reading several Greek tragedies. 

This course is highly recommended for anyone interested in literature of all ages and provenances, art, music, theater, and religion. Lecture/discussion with PowerPoint.    

Specific requirements for Honors students:  In addition to the two mid-term examinations and final examination: 

  • Write a research paper on a topic in Greco-Roman or comparative mythology in lieu of the essay assigned to undergraduates (10-12 pages, 10%). You must decide on a paper topic in consultation with me and have the topic pre-approved. You also have the option of a creative writing project. Please consult with me on your idea if you wish to take this option.
  • Read two additional books about mythology (check with me to approve your choices or get suggestions) and write reviews of them (2-5 pages each, due on the two midterm dates).
  • You will have an additional essay on the final exam.

Texts: Morford and Lenardon, Classical Mythology (9th edition); Grene and Lattimore, Greek Tragedies, Vol. 3. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course


CLAS 41305 (002) Classical Literary Studies: Tragedy - Honors 
CRN: 12652
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Radd Ehrman

This course examines the nature and history of ancient tragedy from its earliest inceptions up through the Roman empire.  We will consider its religious and political functions, its developing structure and competitive nature, and its importance for both ancient and modern times. This course is highly recommended for anyone interested in literature of all ages and provenances, art, music, theater, and religion.

General course requirements: Reports on tragedies not covered in class; Midterm examination (take-home); An oral report (see below); Final examination (take-home).

In addition, Honors students will present an oral report (15-20 minutes) on a Greek tragedy which survives only in fragments (including what we know about its author, time of his activity, degree of success in the genre, etc.).  This oral report will be presented during our final session. 

Texts: Texts will be provided online by the instructor.

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course


COMM 15000 (052) Introduction to Human Communication - Honors 
CRN: 12752
TR 7:00-8:15 E 
Instructor: Aaron Hanlin

Honors Introduction to Human Communication emphasizes communication as a mutually shared process. Students will explore both classical and contemporary theories and concepts drawn from a variety of disciplines including communication, philosophy, psychology, and sociology to develop an understanding of the nature and functions of human communication in interpersonal, group, and public contexts. 

Kent Core-Additional
 


COMM 26000 (002) Criticism of Public Discourse - Honors 
CRN: 12831
MW 3:45-5:00 
Instructor: David Trebing

A critical examination of selected public speeches representing diverse viewpoints on a variety of historic and contemporary issues, including the U.S. Civil War, World War II, the civil rights movement, political rhetoric, feminist rhetoric, gay rhetoric, and other contemporary social controversies, emphasizing methods of evaluating public oral communication and the heritage of public discourse in free society. The purpose of the course is to train students to be critics of public discourse in a diverse society.

As a Kent Core Requirement, the course will require students to understand key concepts within the discipline, engage in critical thinking, and develop skills for clear communication. It will emphasize methods of rhetorical criticism and the role of public discussion and debate in the resolution of selected issues in a democratic society. As a Diversity Requirement, the course will examine rhetorical responses to significant historical and contemporary controversies with particular attention to minority voices and visions; and it will focus on the analysis of persuasive appeals that are grounded in the cultural history, values and attitudes of the participants. The course will address specific diversity criteria by requiring students to examine diversity issues, particularly those involving unequal and/or discriminatory treatment; to understand the implications of differing speaker and audience cultures, perceptions, attitudes and values; and to explore ways to communicate and participate constructively in a diverse society. Students will prepare oral and written critiques that identify, analyze, and evaluate the use of rhetorical resources and that emphasize the resolution of differences.  

Upon completion of the course, each student should have acquired knowledge, attitudes, and skills that enable: understanding the purposes, process, and fundamental methods of rhetorical criticism; recognition of the role and value of public oral discourse in the development and resolution of selected controversies in a diverse society; the analysis of rhetorical problems faced by speakers, emphasizing those created by differing audience cultures, perceptions, ideologies, and values; the discovery of rhetorical resources available for dealing with rhetorical problems that grow out of social diversity; evaluation of public oral communication by applying criteria to judge effects, ethics, truth, and aesthetics; the communication of critical insights about rhetorical events and social diversity based on the preceding.

Honors students will examine modern and post-modern critical theories beyond the neo-Aristotelian method including Burkean, feminist and ideological theories. Supplemental readings will inform student efforts in expanded critical methodologies. Post-modern methods will then be applied to the diversity section of the course. In addition to the 8-10-page paper required for the standard course, Honors students will be required to write two additional 10-12-page papers that will provide the basis for their two oral presentations. The objective of these written assignments is to expand and improve academic writing skills (as opposed to creative, journalistic, or other types) with emphasis on the production and written presentation of humanistic research. Prerequisite: COMM 15000 or permission.

Text: Campbell, Karlyn Kohrs and Susan Schultz Huxman, The Rhetorical Act, 5th ed., Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 2015.

Kent Core-Humanities

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


COMM 45007 (002) Freedom of Speech - Honors 
CRN: 12881
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: David Trebing

Freedom of Speech is a senior-level course with senior-level expectations. Each student is expected to develop as a writer as well as know the topical material. 

Some objectives are to develop an understanding of speech and the maturing individual, freedom of speech, and nature and responsibilities; to develop an awareness of specific issues and current controversies regarding freedom of speech in the United States and elsewhere; to develop an awareness of specific issues regarding local and regional free speech issues as well as those issues specific to various organizations and institutions.

The Honors student will produce a more lengthy paper and will be evaluated at an Honors level.

Texts: Tedford, T. L., & Herbeck, D. A., Freedom of Speech in the United States, 7th edition, State College, PA: Strata Publishing, 2013; Outside readings from journals, law reviews, and court cases are assigned during the semester.

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course


CULT 29535 (008) Education in a Democratic Society - Honors 
CRN: 13179
TR 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Natasha Levinson

Education in a Democratic Society invites you into a conversation about the many purposes of schooling in our society, the political pressure increasingly placed on schools to improve the quality of American education, and the challenges new teachers face in increasingly high pressured school environments. The course begins with a brief historical overview of the many purposes of schooling in the U.S. We explore the emergence and development of the common school, with a view to understanding the accomplishments, shortcomings and aspirations of public schooling. We then turn our attention to contemporary efforts to reform American education. We will try to understand what these efforts hope to accomplish. In the second half of the course, the class will become an educational think tank which consults with school districts and advises them on aspects of district policy and practice that will need to change in light of these school reform initiatives. This part of the course is highly participatory, because the think tank has to research the issue in question, deliberate about the issues in question, and come to a collective decision about what the school district ought to do about the issue at hand.

The particular issues we will explore will be determined partly by the interests of the class and partly by contemporary events in the world of educational policy. We will settle these issues by week 5 of the course, after which the syllabus will be revised to reflect the policy issues we’ve decided to examine. This is a talkative class that requires active participation. Passive learners (if there is such a thing!) need not apply. 

This course is open to education majors, undeclared majors and anyone else interested in educational policy and the role of schools in a democratic society.

 


ECON 22060 (001) Principles of Microeconomics - Honors 
CRN: 13369
WF 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: Sherry Creswell

This is an introductory course in microeconomic theory and its applications. It is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and to apply principles of economic analysis to the day-to-day decision-making of individuals and households (consumers) and to different types of firms. Students are introduced to the basic models of market structure and how firms behave under these different structures.  We will examine concepts such as what determines market supply and demand, how firms decide how much to produce in order to maximize profits under different circumstances, and a wide range of economic policy issues. The classroom presentation will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and in-class exercises. Students will have opportunities to apply economic theory to a number of policy issues in written assignments, class presentations, and discussions.

Text: Boyes & Melvin, 9th ed., with Aplia homework bundle: available with a discount through publisher.

Kent Core-Social Sciences
 


ENG 22073 (002) Major Modern Writers - Honors 
CRN: 13921
MW 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Michael Sanders
 

This course will examine a selection of twentieth-century American and British fiction.  Paying attention to both theme and style, we will examine how literature addresses the most compelling issues of our time.  Our examination of these texts will explore a series of geographical, cultural, temporal, and philosophical contexts that have permeated, characterized, connected, and occasionally separated, the literature of Britain and the United States over the past century. Additionally, we will discuss issues of "high" versus "low” art and “modernism” versus “postmodernism,” considering the differences between "popular" forms of literature and the established literary canon. Two exams, a final exam, and a critical analysis paper. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

Kent Core-Humanities
 


 

ENG 39095 (001) ST: Shakespeare in Performance - Honors 
CRN: 21128
TR 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: Don-John Dugas Rosemarie Bank

The course is designed around two field trips: a four-day trip to the American Shakespeare Center in Staunton, VA to hear period-style performances of several early modern plays by the ASC’s resident professional company in its replica Blackfriars Playhouse, and a shorter outing to Orrville, OH to hear performance(s) by the ASC’s professional touring company. We will attend performances of Edward II, Much Ado about Nothing, Hamlet, Macbeth, and Pericles, all of which will be taught in the course.  Readings, discussion, video viewings, and written work will be designed to maximize the educational value of the trips.  Graded assignments will include analytical essays, an annotated bibliography, a mid-term exam, a final exam, and a creative, participatory scene performance with guided task/objective.

Learning Outcomes: 

  • Students will demonstrate careful and intelligent reading of selected plays.
  • Students will analyze selected plays in terms of the traditional dramatic genres, elements, and themes.
  • Students will discuss and write about the early modern historical-cultural context and the ways these play reflect it.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of the theatrical performance of the plays in early modern London.
  • Students will be able to describe characters and actions in a play on an early modern stage

NOTE: There is a special course fee for this course of approximately $150. This fee will be paid directly to the Honors College. This course satisfies a literary history elective for English majors. 

 


ENG 49095 (002) ST: Writing Internship - Honors 
CRN: 14032
TBA 
Instructor: Sara Cutting

The Writing Internship Program is a cooperative endeavor between students, the community, and the English Department. As such, it has a number of interrelated goals. Your own goals might include expanding your interests and experiences, finding out if you are suited for work as a professional or technical writer, and gaining valuable work experience before you graduate. For the community groups or businesses that place interns, the goals may be to maintain good relationships with the university, to introduce "fresh blood" and new ideas into their organizations, and (frankly) to acquire smart, energetic, able workers without cost.

For the Department, the goals of the program include, of course, continued good relations with the community and successful placement of students into jobs after graduation.  However, the most important goal of the program from our point of view is to enrich your education as a careful reader and competent writer, and to complement your classroom learning as a student of language and discourse.   For instance, your work as a writing intern should involve a great deal of writing, and this writing may differ in important ways from the writing you do in most courses. In fact, the program provides opportunities for you to gain experience in "real-life" writing situations. 

As an intern, you are placed into an internship position in Kent either working for a news organization, gathering information and writing weekly columns of events or feature articles; working for an on-campus office organization, writing public relations documents or reporting of Kent State activities for the public; or working for a public service organization, providing services and information to the community. From the variety of writing projects you will be working on, you can learn about researching stories and conducting interviews, writing copy, editing, and layout of a final document. Moreover, your "audience" will consist not of a teacher (whom you know) or even your contemporaries (such as your classmates). Your notions of readers will enlarge to include multiple audiences—your immediate supervisor and other members of the organization, as well as some segment of "the public" whose interests you must meet and whose backgrounds, knowledge, and values may be quite different from your own. This kind of writing, in a rich and immediate rhetorical situation, will teach you a great deal about writing itself and about the functions and uses of writing in particular contexts.

The requirements of the course include both job-related and academic responsibilities. Students enroll for 3 credit hours, and the workload includes approximately 10 hours per week "on the job," in addition to coursework requirements (periodic meetings, mid-term, a completion of English coursework above freshman level—usually 30064 or 30065—a completed application which includes writing samples and faculty recommendations, and interviews with the Internship Program Director and site supervisors). Prerequisite: Application to the program.

Questions about the Writing Internship program should be directed to:

Sara Cutting
Writing Internship Program Director
Department of English
(330) 672-1745

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


FIN 36053 (001) Business Finance - Honors 
CRN: 14332
MW 7:45-9:00 
Instructor: William Billik

This is an introductory course in finance. Students will be exposed to the basic concepts and tools needed to understand the financial aspects of business management. For finance majors, the course will provide the foundation for upper level finance course work. For other majors, the course will provide a base of knowledge and skills in business finance that will assist anyone who needs to make or understand financial decisions, either for their personal benefit or for a business. Many of the topics covered in this course will helps advance the personal financial sophistication of the students in areas such as loans, mortgages, saving, investing, and retirement planning.    

This is a combined Honors/non-Honors class. The course is taught in a lecture format and tested through three (3) exams and a comprehensive final. Honors College members will be required to perform research, analysis, and report writing, in addition to the non-Honors requirements, through an Honors College project. The Honors College project is intended to provide students with a deeper and more detailed understanding of financial decision making by examining topics such as capital structure, financial markets, and firm valuation. In the project, the students will work individually, with the instructor and/or within a group setting. Prerequisites: ECON 22061 and ACCT 23020

Text: Business Finance, FIN35053, Special Edition for Kent State University, ISBN 1-25-911648-4.

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


GEOL 21062 (001) Environmental Earth Science - Honors 
CRN: 14563
TR 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Anne Jefferson

Familiarizes students with the application of geology to environmental problems including natural resource extraction, impacts of hydraulic fracturing, water usage and supply, pollution, global warming, waste disposal, landslides, floods and land use planning.  The course’s learning outcomes are: Explain the dynamic behavior of the Earth as a complex system; Discuss issues related to human population growth and its impact on the natural world; Discuss evidence of global climate change and impacts of anthropogenic effects; Describe appropriate locations for nuclear waste disposal; Explain the causes of soil, air and water pollution. In addition to lectures, assignments and exams, students will participate in 10 hands-on experiments and demonstrations which will parallel the course themes. A highlight of the course will be a fieldtrip to the Huff Run Watershed; a site of historic coal mining where exposure of the coal has resulted in the production of acid seeps and metal release into surface waters. 

Kent Core-Basic Sciences
 


HIST 31040 (002) American History Through Popular Music - Honors 
CRN: 22106
MW 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Kenneth Bindas

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

Allows students to develop an understanding of the interconnection between the rise of popular music in the period after 1865 to the social, political, and technological changes that this period witnessed and how this helps to understand the meaning and significance of cultural identity in modern American history.

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


HONR 10197 (001-020) Freshman Honors Colloquium I - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

See Freshman Honors Colloquium Course Descriptions. 

Kent Core-Composition
 


HONR 13597 (001-004) The Western Identity - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

See Western Identity

Kent Core-Additional
 


HONR 20096 (001) Individual Honors Work - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Directed independent study for sophomores in any department. Read More 

 


HONR 30096 (001) Individual Honors Work - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Directed independent study for sophomores in any department. Read More 

 


HONR 30197 (003) Brainchild Magazine - Honors 
CRN: 21998
TBA 
Instructor: Aaron Hanlin

 


HONR 40085 (001) Senior Honors Portfolio - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Construction of a senior portfolio, consisting of a collection of artifacts and a reflective essay interpreting the student's growth during the college years. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

 


HONR 40096 (001) Individual Honors Work - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Directed independent study for sophomores in any department. Read More 

 


HONR 40099 (001) Senior Honors Thesis/Project - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Thesis or creative project. 

 


HONR 40197 (002) US Law & Legal Reasoning: The 1st Amendment - Honors 
CRN: 21263
MW 3:45-5:00 
Instructor: Bart Bixenstine

In this course, students will “create” a body of First Amendment law on select issues, by acting as Justices of the Supreme Court, and advocates before the Court, addressing a series of factual scenarios that present the issues upon which, in part, our First Amendment jurisprudence is based. In effect, the students will create their own substantive law of the “jurisdiction of KSU” as to the select First Amendment areas, and will then compare their results to the actual Supreme Court First Amendment decisions from which the factual scenarios were derived. In carrying out their roles as both advocates and justices, students will gain a hands-on appreciation of the foundations of and tensions underlying key areas of our First Amendment law, and of the strengths and limitations of our precedent-based Anglo Saxon system of law.  Students will also gain presentation and persuasive writing skills broadly applicable to their academic career and beyond.  Each student as a Justice will be expected to write 7-8 “opinions” setting forth their decisions on the “cases” presented to them. They will also be expected to advocate positions to the “court” as advocates, and review the “opinions” written by others (anonymously) so they can then select the opinions to stand as the official opinions of the “court.” The course will require steady and regular doses of work outside class to prepare for advocacy, to judge, or to write an opinion.  It will also involve intense participation by students in most class sessions, which will be primarily devoted to presenting oral argument to the “court”, choosing between alternative opinions, and assessing the arguments presented by the advocates. There will be a single examination, in which each student will write “decide” a new case and explain his or her reasoning.

Text: Farnsworth, Ward, The Legal Analyst: A Toolkit for Thinking about the Law [Paperback]

 


HONR 41097 (003) Brainchild Magazine - Honors 
CRN: 

Instructor: 

 


JMC 20001 (012) Media, Power & Culture - Honors 
CRN: 22161
Web + F 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Mitchell McKenney

This course combines the strengths of Kent State's award-winning Media, Power, & Culture Online curriculum with a once-a-week, seminar-style class meeting for Honors students. You will study who controls the mass media, how media make money, how technology is transforming them and how they affect society. You'll learn how to evaluate the media impact on events, institutions and people, and explore the legal, ethical and diversity issues related to mass communication. The online portion of the course -- a combination of video lectures, readings and quizzes -- is designed to make you a more knowledgeable consumer of TV, movies, radio, magazines, newspapers and advertising. The face-to-face Honors section meetings add discussion, presentations and papers that allow us to examine the forces that shape the various media and consider the limitations governments and others have placed on them. 
NOTE: In-person class sessions are exclusive to Honors students. Online course assignments are due on Sunday evenings.

Kent Core-Social Sciences
 


JMC 26001 (001) Multimedia Newswriting - Honors 
CRN: 15422
MW 7:45-10:30 
Instructor: Candace Bowen

This course will introduce you to significant elements of covering and writing news including: timeliness and context (what makes news), basic reporting skills (gathering and evaluating information), understanding principles of accuracy and fairness, and learning basic multimedia storytelling skills. The emphasis throughout this course is on clear, concise writing. At the end of this course, you should be able to recognize and write different types of news stories on deadline. You should be able to put stories into context for your audience, produce and package them for maximum impact and you should be grounded in the journalistic tenets of accuracy, objectivity and ethics.

Course Objectives: 1. Know where and how to find news and develop story ideas; 2. Conduct interviews; find and develop good sources for basic news stories; 3. Learn how to effectively interview live sources and how to evaluate other sources such as reports, documents, press releases, websites; 4. Think, organize and package reporting for print and consider multimedia storytelling options; 5. Report and write good multi-source news stories; 6. Report and write good news stories for online and broadcast; 7. Understand and use different social media for journalism and PR; 8. Use proper AP style and grammar in all journalistic writing.  

Texts: Harrower, Tim, Inside Reporting: A Practical Guide to the Craft of Journalism (Paperback); 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill, 2011; The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual from The Associated Press, New York, 2011

 


JMC 28001 (002) Principles of Public Relations - Honors 
CRN: 15442
TR 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Stephanie Smith

Principles of Public Relations is the foundational course for students majoring in the field and a stimulating elective for those who seek a better understanding of the strategic communications, persuasion, and relationship-building practices used by businesses and organizations.

This course provides a basic understanding of the public relations profession and the strategies and tactics used by its practitioners.  Students will examine public relations in practice through relevant case studies and exercises.  Students will gain an appreciation of the history, growth, and societal impact of public relations, as well as fundamental theories of communications and public opinion theory.  They will develop an appreciation of public relations ethics and law.  This course will introduce students to public relations career paths in the business, nonprofit, and public sectors.  Finally, Principles of Public Relations introduces students to the global practice of PR and global issues that influence cross-cultural communications.

Students in this class are challenged to apply PR theory to practice with a wide variety of assigned clients. In addition, each student will be required to select a client to represent throughout the semester. Course assignments will require students to write clearly, cogently, frequently, and on deadline – all critical public relations skills.    

Students will learn and apply primary and secondary PR research skills, including surveys, polling, focus groups, and interviews. This class uses several forms of instruction:  in-class lecture with emphasis on discussion and debate; individual exercises that focus on learning application, critical thinking, problem-solving, creativity, and writing; and team exercises that require students to work together on PR problems.

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


JMC 40010 (001) Ethics & Issues in Mass Communication - Honors 
CRN: 21087
MW 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Janet Leach

Preqrequisite: 18 hours of JMC courses; Senior Standing; 3.0 GPA; Prefer students to be in last two semesters of undergraduate coursework

The goal of this course is to help identify media ethics dilemmas and refine ethical problem-solving skills for media practitioners whose decisions have power and influence on vast and varied audiences. The course introduces applied ethics through theory, real-world case studies, in-depth discussion, activities and projects. It is the Writing-Intensive Course for all JMC undergraduates so writing skills are emphasized and writing competency is expected. Participation is imperative. Requirements include written learning logs (5-10), quizzes (5-10), reading and writing case studies, “journal” assignments, supplemental reading(s), possible blogging or discussion boards, and a research paper.

Honors students are required to do all the work described above and two to three additional assignments that usually include an additional essay or book report, a podcast and a multimedia project with a presentation to the rest of the class.

Texts: Patterson and Wilkins, Media Ethics, Issues, and Cases, 7th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2010; Rushworth Kidder, How Good People Make Tough Choices, Resolving the Dilemmas of Ethical Living,
    Fireside,1995 OR David Callahan, The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans are Doing Wrong to Get
    Ahead
, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2004
Possible supplemental texts: Rachels and Rachels, Elements of Moral Philosophy, 6th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2010; Randy Pausch with Jeffrey Zaslow, The Last Lecture, Hyperion, 2008; Lee Wilkins and Clifford Christians, eds., Handbook of Media Ethics, Taylor & Francis Group, 2009

 


JMC 40095 (027) ST: Film Comedy - Honors 
CRN: 15488
T 11:00-1:45 
Instructor: Ron Russo

Learn about film and comedy from the works of Will Ferrell, Kristen Wiig, John C. Reilly, Tim and Eric, Zach Galifianakis, Richard Pryor, Andy Samberg, Adam Sandler, Stephen Colbert, Mel Brooks, Dave Chappelle, The Three Stooges, Andy Kaufman, Sacha Baron Cohen, Molly Shannon, Lucille Ball, Gabriel Iglesias, Jerry Lewis, Chris Rock, Mitch Hedberg, Monty Python, Hunter S. Thompson, Amy Schumer, Eric Andre, Seth MacFarlane, Louis C.K., Bo Burnham, Jenna Marbles, and many more.

Options for Honors final project: you can create a short comic film; perform a song, dance, skit or scene from a comic film; create original, or provide a cover of, comic theme or background music; write part of an original comic script/screenplay; recreate or create comic costumes, and/or a costume analysis; recreate or create comic set props (paintings, sculpture, furniture, etc.); recreate or create an architectural set drawing; construct a marketing plan; etc. So, you can tailor your project (or paper) to your major or area of interest. A quality (comic) film involves personnel from many disciplines: comic writers, camera/audio operators, actors, dancers, musicians, costumers, set designers, etc. This is not a single group project; each student works on one or more disciplines and the films/comedians of their choice.  

Text: Adult Swim and Comedy: Glow in the Dark Edition, 2012, Ron Russo

 


MATH 12002 (002) Analytic Geometry and Calculus I - Honors 
CRN: 15848
MTWRF 9:55-10:45 
Instructor: TBA

Prerequisite: minimum C (2.0) grade in MATH 11010 and MATH 11022; or ALEKS math upper-level minimum score 70; or ALEKS math single assessment minimum score of 78. Students who have not taken a previous mathematics course at Kent State must see an academic advisor for placement.

Material covered will include limits, continuity, and derivatives. Also, we will introduce definite and indefinite integrals for functions in one real variable. Applications include maximization, related rates, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course will include regular homework assignments and several exams. The main method of presentation will be lecture, but we may break into small groups on several occasions.   A TI-81 (or equivalent) graphing calculator will be required.

Text: Stewart, James, Essential Calculus, KSU custom edition

NOTE: The above description is subject to change once an instructor is assigned. 

Kent Core-Mathematics & Critical Reasoning

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


MIS 24053 (003) Introduction to Computer Applications - Honors 
CRN: 16055
Web + TR 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Geoffrey Steinberg

Students in the Honors section will explore the Internet and the wide variety of services that it provides. Students will learn various search strategies to employ while "surfing" and will also learn how to publish their own information for the world to share. Different types of data (text, numeric, graphic, sound, and video) will be investigated and discussed. The students working as one team will develop a web-based database driven web-site for a real client. All work will be conducted in the College of Business computer lab and on an Internet server provided by Dr. Steinberg.

The material in this special section is supplemental to the regular MIS 24053 section. Students in this section will be expected to complete all assignments that the main 24053 section requires. The main section covers Windows, spreadsheet, database, e-mail, data communications, and Internet.

NOTE: Online lecture is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class; separate lab time is all Honors. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


MIS 44285 (002) Integrated Policy/Strategy - Honors 
CRN: 16154
MW 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: TBA

Prerequisite: Must have applied for December graduation

This is a "capstone" course. Unlike other business courses that concentrate narrowly on a particular business function, this course takes a broader perspective and is concerned with making the total organization successful. A basic understanding of the basic business disciplines is therefore assumed, as students will build upon prior work completed in economics, finance, marketing, organizational behavior, etc. This course will provide an opportunity for integrating the previous material and delving into it in greater depth.    

Through a presentation of theory and discussion of business cases, the course will teach managerial decision making by practicing critical thinking and debating. The overall goal being to develop participants’ ability to understand how different organizations choose to compete in a given marketplace, and understand why some succeed and others fail, the course will present a number of theoretical concepts, principles and analytical frameworks, as well as some practical managerial ideas and devices, not excluding reward systems and governance mechanisms.    

The course pedagogy will combine lectures on strategic management theory and discussion of relevant business cases. Through the use of the case-method, students are placed “in the shoes” of practitioner general managers and asked to analyze business situations and make recommendations for action. Finally, honors students are expected to meet with the professor and participate in designing one or two research projects that would be matched to their abilities and interests -- or occasionally be complementary to them. Grades will be awarded on the basis of exam performance, written case analyses, honors research project(s) and active participation in class discussions.    

Text:  C W Hill & G R Jones. (2012). Essentials of Strategic Management. 3rd ed. South-Western/CENGAGE.

NOTE: The above information is subject to change once an instructor has been assigned. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


MUS 22111 (011) The Understanding of Music - Honors 
CRN: 21499
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Linda Walker

The primary objectives of this course are to facilitate the student’s:

  1. awareness of the role of music in culture
  2. understanding and aural recognition of the elements of music and how these elements are utilized in various styles of music literature
  3. knowledge and understanding of the historical development of Western art music
  4. recognition of different genres and styles of concert music
  5. development of a greater understanding and consequently enhanced appreciation and enjoyment of music  

There will be one quiz on music terminology and three examinations covering the different time periods and genres/styles learned. None of the exams is comprehensive, including the last exam which is given during the final exam period. The point value of each of the examinations varies and will be specified in the course syllabus. In addition to multiple choice questions, each exam will include short answer and essay questions. Each exam will also include identification of musical examples from a previously distributed listening list. 

In addition, one brief concert report and a paper are required. The concert report should summarize the student’s observations, descriptions, impressions, etc. of a pre-approved musical performance outside class. The paper must be on a pre-approved recording relevant to the material presented in class. It should demonstrate knowledge acquired in the course in the use of terminology, informed awareness as to techniques, procedures, forms used in the music, etc., and should reflect some study and observation on the student’s part beyond the material that is given in the textbook. 

Texts: Kamien, Roger, Music, An Appreciation, 7th Brief Edition. McGraw Hill This is a paperback book. The ISBN number is 978-0-07-802509-9. All of the sound materials related to this text are available on line, so it will not be necessary to order any CDs.

Kent Core-Fine Arts
 


NURS 20020 (004) Foundations of Assessment &Communication in Nursing - Honors 
CRN: 16669
M 9:55-11:50 T 9:55-10:55 W 9:15-12:15 
Instructor: Staff

The course content for Honors NURS 20020 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 20020. This Honors course is for nursing students enrolled in the first nursing course having a laboratory component. Students enrolled in the Honors program will be socialized to the greater context of professional nursing and role development by engaging in an Honors Colloquium. Each student explores a specialty in nursing of particular interest to that student. Students have the opportunity to learn about scholarly faculty projects and consider potential mentored opportunities for Honors theses or projects within the College of Nursing.

Texts: Same as texts required for non-Honors NURS 20020.

Only Honors students participate in the colloquium on Tuesdays. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


NURS 20030 (011) Foundations of Nursing Interventions - Honors 
CRN: 16696
M 11:00-11:50 M 12:05-2:00 T 9:00-11:00 W 8:00-2:30 
Instructor: Staff

The course content for Honors NURS 20030 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 20030. This Honors course is for nursing students enrolled in the second nursing course having a clinical component. Each student or small group explores a patient problem and evidence based practice interventions to address the concern. Students choosing to pursue an Honors thesis or project begin working with a faculty mentor with whom they will complete their work. Honors Colloquium participation continues.

Texts: Outlined in course syllabus for N20030; syllabus is available on Blackboard.

NOTES: The above information is subject to change once an instructor has been assigned. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


NURS 40872 (002) Introduction to Nursing Research - Honors 
CRN: 21735
Web + M 3:20-4:20 
Instructor: Staff

The course content for Honors NURS 40872 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 40872. This Honors course is for students in the third semester of the nursing sequence concurrently enrolled in one of the four statistics courses required in the College of Nursing curriculum. Faculty-led project participation continues during this term. Honors students register for Introduction to Nursing Research and receive focused material to enhance their abilities to conduct a successful honors project. Students explore opportunities to contribute to the faculty-led project and develop preliminary plans to conduct an independent honors project within the scope of the faculty member’s expertise. Initial honors project planning occurs. 
NOTES: The above description is subject to change once an instructor has been assigned. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


PH 30007 (005) Prevention and Control of Disease - Honors 
CRN: 22243
TR 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Chris Woolverton

Provides an overview of concepts involved in biological mechanisms of disease at cell, individual and community levels, provides insight into strategies used in preventing and controlling diseases at the population and/or community level within this framework. 

 


PHIL 11001 (002) Introduction to Philosophy - Honors 
CRN: 17262
MW 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Polycarp Ikuenobe

This course will explore the nature and value of philosophy, in terms of why we should study philosophy, practice or live a philosophical life. It will explore some of the basic issues and questions in philosophy regarding the existence of God and the nature of reality. It will try to answer questions such as, what is real? and whether reality is material or non-material. It will also explore questions about the nature of a person and whether a person is a physical and mental entity or both. If a person is a combination of both, then what is the relationship between both aspects of a person. It will explore questions regarding the nature of knowledge such as what is knowledge, belief, justification, or truth? Must knowledge be certain? It will examine questions such as: how do we know? Is human knowledge based solely on reason or is it also based on the senses?  

Cultural Diversity Element: We will examine various texts, thought systems, and writings regarding the above issues from other cultures and traditions such as African among others, in order to identify and evaluate features that characterize the different types of reasoning and belief systems in the cultures. 

Requirements:There will be paper assignments (4-7 pages), and exams/quizzes. Also required are attendance, class participation, and a thorough reading of the assigned texts prior to class. All these requirements will be factored into the final grade.             

Texts: (1) Plato, Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo, Transl. G.M.A. Grube, 2nd edition, Hackett Publishing Company, Indianapolis; Rene Descartes, Discourse on Methods and Meditations on First Philosophy, Trans. by Donald A. Cress, 4th edition, Hackett Publishing Company, Indianapolis; David Hume, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, Trans. Eric Steinberg, 2nd edition, Hackett Publishing Company, Indianapolis.; Some reading materials will be distributed to students in PDF format via e-mail attachments.

Kent Core-Humanities
Diversity Course-Global


PHY 11030 (007) Seven Ideas That Shook the Universe - Honors 
CRN: 17348
TRF 1:10-2:00 
Instructor: Spyridon Margetis

This course deals with seven significant ideas or concepts in the development of physics: Big Bang Cosmology, Newtonian mechanics, energy, entropy, relativity theory, quantum theory, and conservation principles and symmetry. We will discuss the origin and significance of these ideas, how they evolved and were established, their limitations, and their interplay with each other and other areas of knowledge. The course is primarily non-mathematical in nature, but some material and homework exercises will involve mathematical maturity at about the level of high school algebra. Subject matter will be presented through a combination of lectures and classroom demonstrations. Grading will be based on in-class examinations and a written project. Examination questions will include a mixture of short answers, and simple problems.

Text: No specific book is required. The instructor’s notes will be available on the web.

Kent Core-Basic Sciences
 


PHY 40099 (001) Senior Honors Thesis - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Thesis for departmental, general or university honors must be 1-10 hours with continuous registration throughout the senior year beginning in the summer prior to the senior year. Students taking this course must consult with their department and the Honors College and receive approval prior to the first semester of the senior year. 

 


POL 30820 (002) International Organization & Law - Honors 
CRN: 22050
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Richard Robyn

Prerequisite:POL 10300 or POL 10500

In the latter half of the twentieth century international organizations (IOs) – both intergovernmental (IGOSs) and international non-governmental (INGOs) - proliferated and became more prominent actors on the world stage. And yet, throughout that time and into the twenty-first century and our post-9/11era especially, they have shared power and influence uneasily with nation-states, arguably still the most powerful actors in world affairs. Daily headlines from places such as Syria, Egypt and Afghanistan attest to the importance IOs have in peoples’ lives.

The overall objective of this course is to provide a solid grounding for both a theoretical and practical understanding of international organizations: their relationship to international law, their raison d'etre, their formation, growth, place in the contemporary world and impact on world politics. We will first examine IOs in the broad context of international relations theory, and then look more closely at several IOs in particular: the United Nations (and especially its International Court of Justice, International War Crimes Tribunals and International Criminal Court), the European Union, NATO, and others, although we will not necessarily limit ourselves to those organizations.
 
We will grapple with a practical understanding of IOs through simulating a Security Council meeting of the UN; by analyzing case studies of IOs working in the field; by discussing service learning opportunities in IOs and through reading and reacting to UN Wire, the UN Foundation daily clearinghouse of news related to IOs around the world. Throughout the course, I will bring in insights I have learned from more than 10 years as director of KSU’s program in Washington DC, “the center of the world” and the site of many hundreds of IGOs and NGOs.

For Honors students, there will be special meetings, focused attention to critical issues and a group project.

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


PSYC 11762 (006) General Psychology - Honors 
CRN: 17610
MW 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Christopher Flessner

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. As such, a broad number of topics that cover the diversity of behavior studied by psychologists will be covered, including sensation and perception; human development; memory, language, and problem solving; personality; psychopathology and therapy; and social interactions. Class meetings will be a mixture of presentations, discussion, exercises, and demonstrations. By the end of this course, it is expected that students will be able to:

  • Describe psychological theories, principles and concepts relevant to the following topics: history and methods, physiology (biology of behavior, consciousness, perception), cognition (learning, thought, language), social, organizational, developmental, personality and psychopathology and its treatment.
  • Articulate knowledge of classic as well as contemporary research in each of the major subfields of psychology.
  • Recognize diversity and individual differences and similarities in a variety of contexts.
  • Be able to think critically about research findings and apply what you have learned to real world situations.  

Students will be expected to demonstrate how well they have achieved these objectives through class discussion, exams, and homework assignments. Assignments will include short papers, application/reflection papers, and application questions.  

Text: Weiten, W. (2013). Psychology: Themes and Variations. Briefer Version, 9th edition. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. (ISBN-13: 978-1-133-93906-1). You have several options for the textbook. There are e-book and loose-leaf (ISBN-13: 978-1-133-95910-6) versions available from the publisher at reduced prices; you can also rent it directly from the publisher or get only the chapters that we cover (www.cengagebrain.com).

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Domestic


PSYC 11762 (007) General Psychology - Honors 
CRN: 17611
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: TBA

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of the human mind in all of its manifestations, including sensation and perception; human development; memory, language, and problem solving; motivation and emotion; personality; psychopathology and therapy; and social interactions. Class meetings will be a mixture of discussion, student and faculty presentations, exercises, and demonstrations. The primary objectives are for the student to understand the human mind by learning how psychologists use behavior to understand mental processes. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Domestic


PSYC 20651 (004) Child Psychology - Honors 
CRN: 21775
TR 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: Kathryn Kerns

In this course, we will review the data, concepts and theories of psychology that contribute to the understanding of child development from conception to age 18. We will explore the biological, cognitive, cultural, and social factors in the development of infants, children, and adolescents. By the end of this course, it is expected that students will be able to: 1. Assess the biological, cognitive, cultural, environmental and social factors that influence development throughout childhood. 2. Evaluate current and past research in childhood guided by theories within developmental psychology 3. Describe methodological approaches used to study development. Prerequisite: PSYC 11762. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Domestic


SOC 12050 (001) Introduction to Sociology - Honors 
CRN: 18112
MW 3:45-5:00 
Instructor: TBA

The course is intended to be a high-level introduction to sociological analysis stressing the manner in which sociologists approach and deal with questions rather than "facts." The manner of presentation will be part lecture, part discussion. Course objectives are contained in the course outline. Most likely three examinations will be given, trisecting the class. Examinations are essay type. A course paper of no more than 20 pages is required. You should expect that the course will be stimulating, far-reaching, AND rigorous. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Domestic


THEA 11000 (016) The Art of the Theatre - Honors 
CRN: 18722
MW 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Tracee Patterson

This course is designed to increase theatre audience awareness and understanding of theatrical production process, theatre traditions and rules, and the role of theatre in different cultures. It is a participation course; class discussions, creative projects, and writing are strong components of the course. Students are required to attend plays on campus and to write reaction papers (theatre reviews) afterwards. 

In addition to class participation and preparation, writing assignments, and projects, students will be evaluated via exams and quizzes. Group and service learning projects may be included. Students will be expected to think creatively and critically in all their work for the course.

Kent Core-Fine Arts
Diversity Course-Global


THEA 41191 (003) SEM: Shakespeare in Performance - Honors 
CRN: 21945
TR 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: Rosemarie Bank Don-John Dugas

The course is designed around two field trips: a four-day trip to the American Shakespeare Center in Staunton, VA to hear period-style performances of several early modern plays by the ASC’s resident professional company in its replica Blackfriars Playhouse, and a shorter outing to Orrville, OH to hear performance(s) by the ASC’s professional touring company. We will attend performances of Edward II, Much Ado about Nothing, Hamlet, Macbeth, and Pericles, all of which will be taught in the course.  Readings, discussion, video viewings, and written work will be designed to maximize the educational value of the trips. 

Graded assignments will include analytical essays, an annotated bibliography, a mid-term exam, a final exam, and a creative, participatory scene performance with guided task/objective.  

Learning Outcomes:  

  • Students will demonstrate careful and intelligent reading of selected plays.
  • Students will analyze selected plays in terms of the traditional dramatic genres, elements, and themes.
  • Students will discuss and write about the early modern historical-cultural context and the ways these play reflect it.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of the theatrical performance of the plays in early modern London.
  • Students will be able to describe characters and actions in a play on an early modern stage. 

NOTES: There is a special course fee for this course of approximately $150. This fee will be paid directly to the Honors College. This course satisfies a drama and history elective for theater majors. 

 


VCD 40053 (002) Graphic Design Studio-Glyphix - Honors 
CRN: 19267
MW 11:00-1:45 
Instructor: Staff

Students are selected by portfolio review and VCD faculty recommendations. A "realistic" graphic design studio in which students, under the direction of a "creative director" (VCD faculty member) solve "real" problems in a "real" studio environment for "real" clients. Students participate in staff meetings, client meetings and presentations, vendor meetings, field trips to service bureaus and printers, photo shoots, and press checks. Students prepare production schedules, requests for quotations, budgets, thumbnails, roughs, comprehensives, and finished art. Students are exposed to the day-to-day operations of a design studio. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


VCD 45000 (002) Graphic Design Perspectives - Honors 
CRN: 19281
TBA 
Instructor: TBA

Comprehensive exploration of design starting with Gutenberg and moving into present day. Topics include font development, print processes, illustration, photography, architecture, industrial design, 19th & 20th century art as well as graphic design. This course relates how historical events impacted design through these periods and will help students recognize how present design trends have correlation to the past, encouraging them to explore their environment for influences and inspiration. All students will do a research project and Honors students will be required to do additional reading and write a lengthier dissertation than non-Honors students. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course