Spring 2015

Course descriptions provided on this page are provided by the faculty member responsible for the particular section in a course. Course information (including descriptions) is subject to change based upon instructor assignment.

ACCT 23021 003 Introduction to Managerial Accounting - Honors 
CRN: 10213
TR 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Linda Zucca

The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the principles and concepts of managerial accounting, including (1) a foundation of managerial accounting terms, concepts, and classifications, (2) an exposure to business planning and control, and (3) an introduction to using accounting information in decision making. Active learning techniques are used extensively throughout this course. Students will work in groups in class, applying the concepts introduced by the instructor. The class will include hands-on learning. 

Text: Braun and Tietz, Managerial Accounting, 4th Edition, 2015, Pearson 

 


ANTH 18210 002 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - Honors 
CRN: 10392
MWF 11:00-11:50 
Instructor: Joy St. James

Students have come of age in a world where the human population is rapidly growing while technological advances are breaking down barriers of distance and language. As a result, there are more opportunities for interactions across cultures than ever before in human history. But what is a culture? What is it worth to keep a culture from changing or to keep a language alive? Is it worth dying for? Answers to these questions shape our lives and inform foreign and domestic policies for all governments. Cultural Anthropology seeks to strengthen students understanding of our world by focusing attention on contemporary cultural diversity and the opportunities and challenges presented by such diversity. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of cultural anthropology and a broad sampling of the ways that these concepts can aid us in understanding the world today. More specifically, the primary objectives of this course are for students to: gain factual knowledge of the terms, concepts, and methods used by anthropologists to describe the characteristics of cultures; become familiar with the fundamental principles and theories that guide the discipline of anthropology; analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view from class readings and discussion; and develop an interest in the field and confidence in your ability to formulate good questions and seek satisfying answers from anthropological literature. Traditional lectures, PowerPoint presentations, movies, discussions and exercises will be part of this class. Assessments will include three exams, one small project (e.g. making a genealogy chart), and one 6 - 10 page paper on an appropriate topic of the student’s choice that will be due toward the end of the semester. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Global


ANTH 18630 004 Human Evolution - Honors 
CRN: 10406
MWF 9:55-10:45 
Instructor: Linda Spurlock

The theory of evolution is a unifying theory that helps explain the unity of all life forms, as well as their diversity. Evolutionary mechanisms have shaped all of life including humans and other primates, and evolution is still occurring in the present. This course seeks to enhance the way students think about our physical and behavioral diversity and how we interact with and modify our environment. The study of human evolution involves many fascinating lines of evidence including genetics, the behavior and anatomy of non-human primates, the anatomy of our fossil ancestors, human disease, and the genetic variation seen in modern human populations. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of biological anthropology and to current theories of how we became human. Primary learning outcomes of the course include: integrate concepts and facts related to molecular genetics and human variation; conservation of environments; primate and human ecology and reproduction; understand that humans are not only products of the environment, but they are also in a position to extensively modify it; philosophically, we are not ‘above’ other creatures; there are no more or less evolved creatures; understand that the scientific method is a helpful way to work through complex problems (including how humankind originated). Method of instruction includes lectures, classroom discussions, and exercises. Assessments include three exams, a zoo project pertaining to primate behavior, and one 5-8 page paper on a genetic disorder of the student's choice.

Kent Core-Basic Sciences
 


ARCH 10012 002 Survey of Architectural History II - Honors 
CRN: 10489
TR 5:30-6:45 E 
Instructor: Steve Rugare

This course covers the major monuments of western architecture from the 14th century to the present, with particular attention to basic issues of architectural analysis, historiography, and social and intellectual history. The class format will be lectures with opportunity for discussion. Student evaluation will be based on slide identification quizzes, essay exams, and a few brief assignments (some involving drawing). Honors students will read key primary texts in modern architecture theory and participate in several discussion meetings with the instructor. They will also do a brief research paper on a topic of their choice in place of one of the topics assigned to the general section. 

Texts: Moffett, Marian, et al., Buildings Across Time; Additional readings from primary texts in architectural and urban theory 

Kent Core-Fine Arts

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


ARTH 22007 025 Art History II - Honors 
CRN: 10814
MW 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: Diane Scillia

This course aims to give an understanding of some of the most significant artists, styles, and ideas of the western artistic tradition, from the fourteenth century to the present. The course is also an introduction to the history of art as a discipline. Alongside the completion of reading assignments in the survey text and three examinations based on the text, course notes, and internet research, students will be expected to take part in class discussions focused upon a selection of scholarly articles on reserve. 

Texts: Stokstad-Cothren, Art History (Portable Edition): Volume 4—14th to 17th Century Art; Stokstad-Cothren, Art History (Portable Edition): Volume 6—18th to 21st Century Art 

Kent Core-Fine Arts
 


ARTH 22007 026 Art History II - Honors 
CRN: 10815
MW 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Diane Scillia

This course aims to give an understanding of some of the most significant artists, styles, and ideas of the western artistic tradition, from the fourteenth century to the present. The course is also an introduction to the history of art as a discipline. Alongside the completion of reading assignments in the survey text and three examinations based on the text, course notes, and internet research, students will be expected to take part in class discussions focused upon a selection of scholarly articles on reserve. 

Texts: Stokstad-Cothren, Art History (Portable Edition): Volume 4—14th to 17th Century Art; Stokstad-Cothren, Art History (Portable Edition): Volume 6—18th to 21st Century Art 

Kent Core-Fine Arts
 


BSCI 10120 002 Biological Foundations - Honors 
CRN: 11155
MWF 2:15-3:05 R 2:15-5:15 
Instructor: Staff

The foundations of biology—cell biology, energetics, heredity, molecular biology, and organismal integration are presented. In lecture there will be four exams, including the final exam. Honors students will take different exams, with greater emphasis on essay and short answer questions. The Honors component will also include enrichment exercises, such as keeping a portfolio of current topics in biology, more in-depth analysis of laboratory exercises and/or classroom presentations. The laboratory includes investigative, as well as observational, exercises with additional experiments possible in the small group setting. Short laboratory quizzes and laboratory practical exams are given, and reports about some laboratory exercises are required. NOTE: Lecture is mixed Honors/non-Honors; lab is all Honors. NOTE: The above information is subject to change once an instructor has been assigned. Texts: Selections from: Raven & Johnson, Biology, 9th ed., WCB/McGraw-Hill, 2010 

Kent Core-Basic Sciences

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


BSCI 40099 TBA Senior Honors Thesis - Honors 
CRN: 11297
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Honors thesis research project completed during the senior year with BSCI faculty mentor and research committee. Maximum of 4 credit hours to count toward BSCI degrees as upper division elective hours. 

 


BSCI 40195 001 ST: Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease - Honors 
CRN: 11316
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Derek Damron

In this course, we will be covering the how the disease diabetes develops (Type I vs Type II), normal physiology of the heart and vasculature (structure, contractile properties, signaling in response to catecholamines and other hormones, important biochemical changes within cells, etc.) and subsequent pathophysiology of the heart and vasculature following inception of the disease. Selected publications relevant to the topics will be presented and discussed by the Honors and Graduate students. Laboratory experiences using animal models of diabetes to demonstrate changes in cardiovascular dynamics will be provided. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course


CACM 11001 008 Introduction to Conflict Management - Honors 
CRN: 11525
MW 3:45-5:00 
Instructor: Theresa Repicky

We begin from the premise that conflict is part of everyday life. It is as common as laughter, anger, love, hope, work, play and is probably no less important than any of these. Conflict is neither good nor bad in and of itself. If managed constructively, it can reveal injustices, usher in much-needed change, and be a source of personal growth, reconciliation, even social and political transformation. On the other hand, if managed destructively conflict can also breed resentments and alienation, and may be waged with all manner of destructive violence, including war. So our question becomes: what tools can individuals, groups, and governments use to manage, transform, or wage their conflicts in largely constructive ways? The answers this course provides include potentially positive conflict management tools like active listening and communication skills, principled negotiation, various forms of mediation, and nonviolent action. Course material and exercises should bring about greater personal awareness of our individual “conflict styles,” including your habits, attitudes, and beliefs related to conflict, and to organizing for change. We will develop knowledge about the nature of conflict, the growing field of conflict management and various ways to constructively approach conflict. But in this course students should also build usable skills in active listening, assertion, principled negotiation, and informal mediation. We will use hands-on exercises, role-plays, small group activities, discussions, and lectures to engage the material. Writing assignments will include a mix of self-reflective and analytical short pieces as well as some exercises designed to help you master skills. There will also be three written examinations. 

Texts: Course Reader (purchased at WordSmiths Copy Center) Bolton, R. (1986). People Skills: How to Assert Yourself, Listen to Others, and Resolve Conflicts, NY: Simon and Schuster; Fisher, R., and Ury, W. (1990). Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In, NY: Penguin; Harper, G. (2004). The Joy of Conflict Resolution: Transforming Victims, Villains, and Heroes in the Workplace and at Home. New Society Publishers. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Domestic


CHEM 10961 001 Honors General Chemistry II - Honors 
CRN: 11753
MTWF 11:00-11:50 R 2:15-5:15 
Instructor: Barry Dunietz

A continuation of CHEM 10960. Emphasis is placed on both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of mixtures, equilibria in solution, chemical kinetics, and energy relationships. This course provides an introduction to various topics of chemistry such as organic, electrochemical, polymer, environmental, and biochemistry. Applications of these different subjects to the medical field will be discussed. The grade for the course will be based on exams, quizzes, and homework sets. 

Text: Silberberg. (2006). Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 4th ed., McGraw Hill. 

Kent Core-Basic Sciences
 


CHEM 10961 003 Honors General Chemistry II - Honors 
CRN: 11755
MTWF 11:00-11:50 R 2:15-5:15 
Instructor: Barry Dunietz

A continuation of CHEM 10960. Emphasis is placed on both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of mixtures, equilibria in solution, chemical kinetics, and energy relationships. This course provides an introduction to various topics of chemistry such as organic, electrochemical, polymer, environmental, and biochemistry. Applications of these different subjects to the medical field will be discussed. The grade for the course will be based on exams, quizzes, and homework sets. 

Text: Silberberg. (2006). Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 4th ed., McGraw Hill. 

Kent Core-Basic Sciences
 


CHEM 10961 002 Honors General Chemistry II - Honors 
CRN: 11754
MTWF 11:00-11:50 R 7:45-10:45 
Instructor: Barry Dunietz

A continuation of CHEM 10960. Emphasis is placed on both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of mixtures, equilibria in solution, chemical kinetics, and energy relationships. This course provides an introduction to various topics of chemistry such as organic, electrochemical, polymer, environmental, and biochemistry. Applications of these different subjects to the medical field will be discussed. The grade for the course will be based on exams, quizzes, and homework sets. 

Text: Silberberg. (2006). Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 4th ed., McGraw Hill. 

 


CHEM 40099 TBA Senior Honors Thesis - Honors 
CRN: 14537
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

For departmental honors may be started summer prior to senior year. Register each semester during senior year. Minimum total credit 5-hours. Experiential Learning Requirement

 


CLAS 41503 002 Greek Literature in Translation - Honors 
CRN: 11913
MW 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Jennifer Larson

In this course we will explore the genres of ancient Greek lyric and choral poetry from its origins in the eighth century BCE through the Hellenistic period. Beginning with the antecedents of Greek lyric in Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns, we will examine the flowering of lyric poetry in the seventh and sixth centuries by focusing on its religious, political, erotic, and sympotic dimensions. Special emphasis will be given to issues of translation in lyric poetry, and various translations (e.g. of Sappho) will be compared. The course will also examine the role of Pindar’s epinician poetry in the culture of the early Classical Greek states. We will use modern song lyrics as a starting point in understanding ancient lyrics, and we will consider issues of personal aesthetics and pleasure in the appreciation of poetry ancient and modern. This is a small, discussion-oriented, writing intensive course. Honors requirements: 5 writing assignments Term paper Midterm and Final Participation 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course


COMM 15000 026 Introduction to Human Communication - Honors 
CRN: 11982
MW 5:30-6:45 E 
Instructor: TBA

Honors Introduction to Human Communication emphasizes communication as a mutually shared process. Students will explore both classical and contemporary theories and concepts drawn from a variety of disciplines including communication, philosophy, psychology, and sociology to develop an understanding of the nature and functions of human communication in interpersonal, group, and public contexts. 

Kent Core-Additional
 


COMM 26000 002 Criticism of Public Discourse - Honors 
CRN: 12078
MW 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: David Trebing

A critical examination of selected public speeches representing diverse viewpoints on a variety of historic and contemporary issues, including the U.S. Civil War, World War II, the civil rights movement, political rhetoric, feminist rhetoric, gay rhetoric, and other contemporary social controversies, emphasizing methods of evaluating public oral communication and the heritage of public discourse in free society. The purpose of the course is to train students to be critics of public discourse in a diverse society. As a Kent Core Requirement, the course will require students to understand key concepts within the discipline, engage in critical thinking, and develop skills for clear communication. It will emphasize methods of rhetorical criticism and the role of public discussion and debate in the resolution of selected issues in a democratic society. As a Diversity Requirement, the course will examine rhetorical responses to significant historical and contemporary controversies with particular attention to minority voices and visions; and it will focus on the analysis of persuasive appeals that are grounded in the cultural history, values and attitudes of the participants. The course will address specific diversity criteria by requiring students to examine diversity issues, particularly those involving unequal and/or discriminatory treatment; to understand the implications of differing speaker and audience cultures, perceptions, attitudes and values; and to explore ways to communicate and participate constructively in a diverse society. Students will prepare oral and written critiques that identify, analyze, and evaluate the use of rhetorical resources and that emphasize the resolution of differences. Upon completion of the course, each student should have acquired knowledge, attitudes, and skills that enable: understanding the purposes, process, and fundamental methods of rhetorical criticism; recognition of the role and value of public oral discourse in the development and resolution of selected controversies in a diverse society; the analysis of rhetorical problems faced by speakers, emphasizing those created by differing audience cultures, perceptions, ideologies, and values; the discovery of rhetorical resources available for dealing with rhetorical problems that grow out of social diversity; evaluation of public oral communication by applying criteria to judge effects, ethics, truth, and aesthetics; the communication of critical insights about rhetorical events and social diversity based on the preceding. In addition to the basic course material and assignments, Honors students will examine modern and post-modern critical theories beyond the neo-Aristotelian method including Burkean, feminist and ideological theories. Supplemental readings will inform student efforts in expanded critical methodologies. Post-modern methods will then be applied to the diversity section of the course. In addition to the 8-10-page paper required for the standard course, Honors students will be required to write two additional 10-12-page papers that will provide the basis for their two oral presentations. The objective of these written assignments is to expand and improve academic writing skills (as opposed to creative, journalistic, or other types) with emphasis on the production and written presentation of humanistic research. 

Text: Campbell, Karlyn Kohrs, Susan Schultz Huxman and Thomas R. Burkholder, The Rhetorical Act, 5th ed., Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 2015. 

Kent Core-Humanities
Diversity Course-Domestic
Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


COMM 45007 002 Freedom of Speech - Honors 
CRN: 12136
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: David Trebing

Freedom of Speech is a senior-level course with senior-level expectations. Each student is expected to develop as a writer as well as know the topical material. Some objectives are to develop an understanding of speech and the maturing individual, freedom of speech, and nature and responsibilities; to develop an awareness of specific issues and current controversies regarding freedom of speech in the United States and elsewhere; to develop an awareness of specific issues regarding local and regional free speech issues as well as those issues specific to various organizations and institutions. Honors students will be expected to research a topic of contemporary significance, for example, an examination of recent or pending court cases involving the First Amendment. They will then be expected to present their research to the class at the end of the semester. The Honors student will produce a more lengthy paper and will be evaluated at an Honors level. 

Texts: Tedford, T. L., & Herbeck, D. A., Freedom of Speech in the United States, 7th edition, State College, PA: Strata Publishing, 2013 Outside readings from journals, law reviews, and court cases are assigned during the semester. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


ECON 22061 001 Principles of Macroeconomics - Honors 
CRN: 12677
TR 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: Nasr El-Bahnasawy

By the end of this course, students should be able to: Understand concepts such as nominal and real gross domestic product, nominal and real interest rates, the unemployment rate, and the inflation rate. Use the concepts of aggregate demand and aggregate supply to analyze changes in output, unemployment and the price level. Determine the effects of monetary and fiscal policies on output, unemployment and the price level. The course relies on in-class development of central ideas using lectures presented by the instructor, integrating student discussion whenever possible, extensions and applications developed as group work during workshop sessions and homework assignments. Course grades will be based on the following: Examinations: This course will include three midterm exams and one cumulative final exam. The lowest of the 4 scores will be dropped. Workshops: There are in-class group assignments and discussions. They offer an opportunity to practice some application of the economic theory interacting with other students and the instructor. Homework Assignments: The course involves homework assignments to help students understanding the material. Lots of applications and daily life macroeconomic situations will be provided. Optional Extra-Credit Presentations: Students may choose to present a topic related to the material covered in class and representing a direct application to the real world for extra credit. 

Text: N. Gregory Mankiw, Brief Principles of Macroeconomics, 6th edition, Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western, 2012 Access to the Aplia website. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
 


ECON 42295 002 ST: European Issues - Honors 
CRN: 12707
M 6:35-9:20 E 
Instructor: Donald Williams

This course examines current economic issues in the European Union, including the monetary union and Euro, unemployment, immigration, health care, social security, poverty and inequality, and plans for expansion. The historical development and structure of the EU will also be covered. Students completing the course will develop an awareness of the role that the EU plays in the world economy, and the special challenges it faces in coordinating monetary, fiscal, and social policy. Students will be able to compare EU social policy with that in the United States. They also will be able to analyze current social and demographic trends and their effects on key economic variables. Finally, students will develop their written and oral communication skills. 

The course includes a required 11-day trip to Brussels, Luxembourg and Paris over the Spring Break (March 23-29), and will have an additional course fee of approximately $2100. Honors students registered for the Honors section will receive a $500 scholarship to support travel expenses prior to the trip. 

Learning will be assessed through examinations, short papers, and in-class presentations. 

Text: Senior Nello, The European Economic Union: Economics, Policies and History, 2nd edition. Also available from the KSU bookstore under the course and instructor name as a McGraw Hill CREATE book. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course


ENG 43092 002 Teaching Poetry in Schools - Honors 
CRN: 13315
R 5:30-8:15 E 
Instructor: Nicole Robinson

This course will explore different approaches to teaching poetry writing to students (grades 3-12) with the aim of increasing your understanding of and appreciation for the practice of both writing and teaching creative writing. We will also study and discuss the uses of creative writing as a means of developing literacy and promoting human growth within the context of schools and communities. We will spend the first part of the semester creating and discussing a variety of writing prompts and using them ourselves, so that we will have a chance to experience the assignments that we will ask our students to do. During the second half of the semester we will teach in pairs, using these prompts in local schools. Some flexibility of scheduling is required, since, in addition to our evening class, you will be visiting local classrooms during the day beginning mid-semester. At the end of the semester each student will compile a short anthology with an introduction and commentary of their students’ poetry and will participate in a large poetry reading on campus, entitled Giving Voice, with local-area students in the Spring in the KSU Ballroom. Honors students will meet with the instructor at the beginning of the semester to design the Honors component to the course which will involve regular meetings as a group throughout the semester, possibly more in-depth analysis of teaching prompts, and a final essay reflecting on your teaching experience. Texts: Jack Collom & Sheryl Noethe, Poetry Everywhere (Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 2006) Dorothea Lasky, Dominic Luxford & Jesse Nathan, Open the Door: How to Excite Young People about Poetry (McSweeney's Books, 2013) 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


ENG 49095 002 ST: Writing Internship - Honors 
CRN: 13320
TBA 
Instructor: Sara Cutting

The Writing Internship Program is a cooperative endeavor between students, the community, and the English Department. As such, it has a number of interrelated goals. Your own goals might include expanding your interests and experiences, finding out if you are suited for work as a professional or technical writer, and gaining valuable work experience before you graduate. For the community groups or businesses that place interns, the goals may be to maintain good relationships with the university, to introduce "fresh blood" and new ideas into their organizations, and (frankly) to acquire smart, energetic, able workers without cost. For the Department, the goals of the program include, of course, continued good relations with the community and successful placement of students into jobs after graduation. However, the most important goal of the program from our point of view is to enrich your education as a careful reader and competent writer, and to complement your classroom learning as a student of language and discourse. For instance, your work as a writing intern should involve a great deal of writing, and this writing may differ in important ways from the writing you do in most courses. In fact, the program provides opportunities for you to gain experience in "real-life" writing situations. As an intern, you are placed into an internship position in Kent either working for a news organization, gathering information and writing weekly columns of events or feature articles; working for an on-campus office organization, writing public relations documents or reporting of Kent State activities for the public; or working for a public service organization, providing services and information to the community. From the variety of writing projects you will be working on, you can learn about researching stories and conducting interviews, writing copy, editing, and layout of a final document. Moreover, your "audience" will consist not of a teacher (whom you know) or even your contemporaries (such as your classmates). Your notions of readers will enlarge to include multiple audiences—your immediate supervisor and other members of the organization, as well as some segment of "the public" whose interests you must meet and whose backgrounds, knowledge, and values may be quite different from your own. This kind of writing, in a rich and immediate rhetorical situation, will teach you a great deal about writing itself and about the functions and uses of writing in particular contexts. The requirements of the course include both job-related and academic responsibilities. Students enroll for 3 credit hours, and the workload includes approximately 10 hours per week "on the job," in addition to coursework requirements (periodic meetings, mid-term, a completion of English coursework above freshman level—usually 30064 or 30065—a completed application which includes writing samples and faculty recommendations, and interviews with the Internship Program Director and site supervisors). Questions about the Writing Internship program should be directed to: Sara Cutting Writing Internship Program Director Department of English (330) 672-1745 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


EPSY 29525 004 Educational Psychology - Honors 
CRN: 13378
MW 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Anne Morrison

The course examines major theories of human development and learning, motivation, instructional Strategies, assessment, and similarities and differences in learners. The approach to relational learning used in this class is based on social constructionist theory. Learning will occur through engaged-learning activities, through on-line and in-class discussions led by students and the professor. Active participation is required of all enrolled students. The instructor is not the sole source of information, we are all actively learning together. Class sessions will provide a space for critical thinking, rich discussion and reflection. Teacher candidates will create lessons dealing with real life problems for “real live” teachers and students using engaged learning environments as a backdrop for lesson designs. We will work in classrooms and take “field trips” to Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Lake View Cemetery, and on-line with a scientist from Oregon who studies the molecular structure of food. 

Text: Santrock, J. (2009). Educational Psychology, 4th ed., Boston: McGraw Hill. The Mentoring Project supports this relational learning class. You may choose to participate in the mentor project and receive support from an EdPsych Mentors who have been successful in this class in previous semesters 

 


FDM 20013 002 History of Costume - Honors 
CRN: 13550
TR 3:45-5:00 
Instructor: Jean Druesedow

The focus of this course will be the chronological study of historic costume and accessories from pre-history through the present day. It will include a consideration of the political, economic, and social history that influenced past fashions. The Honors section includes greater opportunity to study actual garments in the classroom. Honors students will write short reports that relate specific historic fashions to clothing currently on the market. 

Texts: Totora, P., & K. Eubank, Survey of Historic Costume, 5th ed., New York: Fairchild Publications, 2009 Boucher, François, 20,000 Years of Fashion: The History of Costume and Personal Adornment (optional) 

 


FIN 36053 003 Business Finance - Honors 
CRN: 13652
MW 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: William Billik

This is an introductory course in finance. Students will be exposed to the basic concepts and tools needed to understand the financial aspects of business management. For finance majors, the course will provide the foundation for upper level finance course work. For other majors, the course will provide a base of knowledge and skills in business finance that will assist anyone who needs to make or understand financial decisions, either for their personal benefit or for a business. Many of the topics covered in this course will helps advance the personal financial sophistication of the students in areas such as loans, mortgages, saving, investing, and retirement planning. This is a combined Honors/non-Honors class. The course is taught in a lecture format and tested through three (3) exams and a comprehensive final. Honors College members will be required to perform research, analysis, and report writing, in addition to the non-Honors requirements, through an Honors College project. The Honors College project is intended to provide students with a deeper and more detailed understanding of financial decision making by examining topics such as capital structure, financial markets, and firm valuation. In the project, the students will work individually, with the instructor and/or within a group setting. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


HONR 10096 001 Individual Honors Work - Honors 
CRN: 14374
TBA 
Instructor: 

Directed independent study for freshmen in any department 

 


HONR 10297 TBA Freshman Honors Colloquium II - Honors 
CRN: 
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Continuation of HONR 10197. 

 


HONR 20096 001 Individual Honors Work - Honors 
CRN: 14404
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Directed independent study for sophomores in any department. 

 


HONR 30096 001 Individual Honors Work - Honors 
CRN: 14413
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Directed independent study for juniors in any department. 

 


HONR 30297 001 Coll: Brainchild Magazine - Honors 
CRN: 14447
F 11:00-11:50 
Instructor: Aaron Hanlin

Development and production of a regional Honors art and literary magazine. Involves editorial, design, typesetting, promotional, and operations management functions necessary to create a successful magazine. Student staff members gain skills in magazine editing and publishing. 

 


HONR 30297 002 Coll: Exploring Whedonverse - Honors 
CRN: 14448
MW 3:45-5:00 
Instructor: Jenna Bates

Writer/Director Joss Whedon has been attracting the attention of scholars for more than a decade. To attempt to understand the popular as well as academic relevance of Joss Whedon, students enrolled in this class will study Whedon’s works, including Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly, Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog, and The Avengers. Students will investigate Whedon’s treatment of heroes, particularly his injection of feminism into classic hero archetypes. Within this broader context, students will also study Whedon’s treatment of language, death, religion, and the concept of family. 

Most works will be viewed in class; however, students signing up for the class are strongly encouraged to begin watching BtVS on their own as soon as possible. Although no prior knowledge of Whedon’s works are necessary for taking the class, watching as many episodes as possible will be of benefit. 

 


HONR 40085 001 Senior Honors Portfolio - Honors 
CRN: 14449
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Construction of a senior portfolio, consisting of a collection of artifacts and a reflective essay interpreting the student's growth during the college years. 

 


HONR 40096 001 Individual Honors Work - Honors 
CRN: 14454
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Directed independent study for seniors in any department. 

 


HONR 40099 001 Senior Honors Thesis/Project - Honors 
CRN: 14537
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Thesis or creative project. 

 


HONR 40297 001 Coll: Brainchild - Honors 
CRN: 20563
F 11:00-11:50 
Instructor: Aaron Hanlin

Development and production of a regional Honors art and literary magazine. Involves editorial, design, typesetting, promotional, and operations management functions necessary to create a successful magazine. Student staff members gain skills in magazine editing and publishing. 

 


ITEC 19525 004 Educational Technology - Honors 
CRN: 14712
T 4:25-7:05 
Instructor: Aaron Hanlin

Develops skills associated with identifying, designing, utilizing, and evaluating educational technologies as instructional resources in the classroom, to enhance both teaching and learning. 

 


JMC 26001 001 Multimedia Newswriting - Honors 
CRN: 14804
MW 7:45-10:30 
Instructor: Candace Bowen

This course will introduce you to significant elements of covering and writing news including: timeliness and context (what makes news), basic reporting skills (gathering and evaluating information), understanding principles of accuracy and fairness, and learning basic multimedia storytelling skills. The emphasis throughout this course is on clear, concise writing. At the end of this course, you should be able to recognize and write different types of news stories on deadline. You should be able to put stories into context for your audience, produce and package them for maximum impact and you should be grounded in the journalistic tenets of accuracy, objectivity and ethics. Course Objectives: 1. Know where and how to find news and develop story ideas; 2. Conduct interviews; find and develop good sources for basic news stories; 3. Learn how to effectively interview live sources and how to evaluate other sources such as reports, documents, press releases, websites; 4. Think, organize and package reporting for print and consider multimedia storytelling options; 5. Report and write good multi-source news stories; 6. Report and write good news stories for online and broadcast; 7. Understand and use different social media for journalism and PR; 8. Use proper AP style and grammar in all journalistic writing. 

Texts: Harrower, Tim, Inside Reporting: A Practical Guide to the Craft of Journalism (Paperback); 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill, 2011; The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual from The Associated Press, New York, 2011 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


JMC 28001 002 Principles of Public Relations - Honors 
CRN: 14825
TR 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: Stephanie Smith

Principles of Public Relations is the foundational course for students majoring in the field and a stimulating elective for those who seek a better understanding of the strategic communications, persuasion, and relationship-building practices used by businesses and organizations. This course provides a basic understanding of the public relations profession and the strategies and tactics used by its practitioners. Students will examine public relations in practice through relevant case studies and exercises. Students will gain an appreciation of the history, growth, and societal impact of public relations, as well as fundamental theories of communications and public opinion theory. They will develop an appreciation of public relations ethics and law. This course will introduce students to public relations career paths in the business, nonprofit, and public sectors. Finally, Principles of Public Relations introduces students to the global practice of PR and global issues that influence cross-cultural communications. Students in this class are challenged to apply PR theory to practice with a wide variety of assigned clients. In addition, each student will be required to select a client to represent throughout the semester. Course assignments will require students to write clearly, cogently, frequently, and on deadline – all critical public relations skills. Students will learn and apply primary and secondary PR research skills, including surveys, polling, focus groups, and interviews. This class uses several forms of instruction: in-class lecture with emphasis on discussion and debate; individual exercises that focus on learning application, critical thinking, problem-solving, creativity, and writing; and team exercises that require students to work together on PR problems. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


JMC 40010 001 Ethics and Issues in Mass Communication - Honors 
CRN: 14843
TR 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Janet Leach

Preqrequisite: 18 hours of JMC courses; Senior Standing; 3.0 GPA; Prefer students to be in last two semesters of undergraduate coursework The goal of this course is to help identify media ethics dilemmas and refine ethical problem-solving skills for media practitioners whose decisions have power and influence on vast and varied audiences. The course introduces applied ethics through theory, real-world case studies, in-depth discussion, activities and projects. It is the Writing-Intensive Course for all JMC undergraduates so writing skills are emphasized and writing competency is expected. Participation is imperative. Requirements include written learning logs (5-10), quizzes (5-10), reading and writing case studies, “journal” assignments, supplemental reading(s), possible blogging or discussion boards, and a research paper. Honors students are required to do all the work described above and two to three additional assignments that usually include an additional essay or book report, a podcast and a multimedia project with a presentation to the rest of the class. 

Texts: Patterson and Wilkins, Media Ethics, Issues, and Cases, 7th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2010; Rushworth Kidder, How Good People Make Tough Choices, Resolving the Dilemmas of Ethical Living, Fireside,1995 OR David Callahan, The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2004 Possible supplemental texts: Rachels and Rachels, Elements of Moral Philosophy, 6th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2010; Randy Pausch with Jeffrey Zaslow, The Last Lecture, Hyperion, 2008; Lee Wilkins and Clifford Christians, eds., Handbook of Media Ethics, Taylor & Francis Group, 2009 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course


JMC 40095 027 ST: Introduction to Film - Honors 
CRN: 14865
R 2:15-5:00 
Instructor: Ron Russo

Analyze films from different American genres (documentary, comedy, indies, animation, suspense, etc.), historical Western movements (Dada, German Expressionism, Film Noir, French New Wave, etc.), and other cultures (Senegal, New Zealand, etc.), with Johnny Depp, Breathless, Stranger Than Fiction, Ted, Coraline 3D, and icons like Hitchcock's Rear Window, Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, the Bond series and Skyfall, Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's, and many more films-which may include one of your suggestions. Possibly a field trip to a local theater for a film premiere. 

You can tailor your project to your major or area of interest. It is an introductory level course so no background skills or prerequisite courses are required. Options for final project: 2D - a storyboard, an animatic, a section of a script or screenplay; a short animated or live-action film; a title sequence; a photo recreation of film stills; an illustrated book; a drawing or painting; poetry; a chapbook; an architectural drawing; a research paper; etc. 3D - a costume(s); jewelry; a sculpture/bust; a live performance of a scene (with or without music and dance); etc., or audio record - a musical composition(s); a voice track with ambient sound and foleys; etc. 

A quality film involves personnel from many disciplines: writers, camera/audio operators, actors, dancers, musicians, costumers, set designers, etc. This is not a single group project; each student works on one or more disciplines and the film of their choice. 

Text: Russo, Ron. Adult Swim and Comedy, Glow In the Dark edition, 2012 

 


MATH 12003 002 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II - Honors 
CRN: 15272
MTWRF 9:55-10:45 
Instructor: Donald White

A continuation of MATH 12002. In this semester, we study techniques of integration, applications of integration, and sequences and series. We also introduce parametric equations and vectors. Students can expect four in-class (hour) exams, weekly quizzes, and a comprehensive final. There will be work with partners and in small groups as well as some “hands-on” projects. 

Text: Stewart, Calculus, Kent State custom edition, Brooks/Cole Publishing 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


MIS 24053 003 Introduction to Computer Applications - Honors 
CRN: 15527
MW 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: Geoffrey Steinberg

Students in the Honors section will explore the Internet and the wide variety of services that it provides. Students will learn various search strategies to employ while "surfing" and will also learn how to publish their own information for the world to share. Different types of data (text, numeric, graphic, sound, and video) will be investigated and discussed. The students working as one team will develop a web-based database driven web-site for a real client. All work will be conducted in the College of Business computer lab and on an Internet server provided by Dr. Steinberg. The material in this special section is supplemental to the regular MIS 24053 section. Students in this section will be expected to complete all assignments that the main 24053 section requires. The main section covers Windows, spreadsheet, database, e-mail, data communications, and Internet. NOTE: Online lecture is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class; separate lab time is all Honors. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


MIS 44285 004 Integrated Policy/Strategy - Honors 
CRN: 15620
TR 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Ilgas Arikan

This is a "capstone" course. Unlike other business courses that concentrate narrowly on a particular business function, this course takes a broader perspective and is concerned with making the total organization successful. A basic understanding of the basic business disciplines is therefore assumed, as students will build upon prior work completed in economics, finance, marketing, organizational behavior, etc. This course will provide an opportunity for integrating the previous material and delving into it in greater depth. Through a presentation of theory and discussion of business cases, the course will teach managerial decision making by practicing critical thinking and debating. The overall goal being to develop participants’ ability to understand how different organizations choose to compete in a given marketplace, and understand why some succeed and others fail, the course will present a number of theoretical concepts, principles and analytical frameworks, as well as some practical managerial ideas and devices, not excluding reward systems and governance mechanisms. The course pedagogy will combine lectures on strategic management theory and discussion of relevant business cases. Through the use of the case-method, students are placed “in the shoes” of practitioner general managers and asked to analyze business situations and make recommendations for action. Finally, honors students are expected to meet with the professor and participate in designing one or two research projects that would be matched to their abilities and interests -- or occasionally be complementary to them. Grades will be awarded on the basis of exam performance, written case analyses, honors research project(s) and active participation in class discussions. Writing-Intenstive Course 

Text: C W Hill & G R Jones. (2012). Essentials of Strategic Management. 3rd ed. South-Western/CENGAGE. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


MKTG 35035 003 Consumer Behavior - Honors 
CRN: 15667
TR 12:30-1:45 
Instructor: Jennifer Wiggins Johnson

This course will examine the complexities of consumer behavior, examine theories explaining why individual consumers behave differently, and explore social and cultural influences on consumer behavior. This course is organized around five major units of study that will enable students to explore how consumers gather information, make decisions, shop for products, purchase products, and consume products as part of their interactions with their social and cultural world. While a textbook will be used for background readings, the course will be taught as a hands-on, discussion based seminar. Students will discuss theories of consumer behavior, apply them to an analysis of their own consumption decisions, and conduct a research project to understand and segment the consumers of a particular brand. 

 


MUS 22121 018 Music as a World Phenomenon - Honors 
CRN: 15803
TR 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Marjorie Tyler-Rounds

Students are exposed to a variety of world music traditions and extra-musical associations. Students will be asked to identify and associate musical traditions and related cultural aspects of various regions through aural recognition and analysis. A sampling of musics from around the world (ie. Oceania, India, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, the Caribbean, the Americas, Asia, etc.) will be provided. Written project includes a travel report researching an area of the student's choice. 

Text: Miller, Terry and Shahriari, Andew, World Music: A Global Journey, 3rd ed., ISBN 978-0-415-98878-0 

Kent Core-Fine Arts
Diversity Course-Global


NURS 20020 004 Foundations of Assessment and Communication in Nursing - Honors 
CRN: 16171
M 12:05-2:00 T 9:55-10:45 
Instructor: Mary Bacha

The course content for Honors NURS 20020 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 20020. This Honors course is for nursing students enrolled in the first nursing course having a laboratory component. Students enrolled in the Honors program will be socialized to the greater context of professional nursing and role development by engaging in an Honors Colloquium. Each student explores a specialty in nursing of particular interest to that student. Students have the opportunity to learn about scholarly faculty projects and consider potential mentored opportunities for Honors theses or projects within the College of Nursing. 

Texts: Same as texts required for non-Honors NURS 20020. Only Honors students participate in the colloquium on Tuesdays. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course


NURS 20030 011 Foundations of Nursing Interventions - Honors 
CRN: 16187
M 2:15-4:10 T 12:45-1:45 T 9:00-11:00 W 8:00-2:30 
Instructor: Lynne Crawford

The course content for Honors NURS 20030 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 20030. This Honors course is for nursing students enrolled in the second nursing course having a clinical component. Each student or small group explores a patient problem and evidence based practice interventions to address the concern. Students choosing to pursue an Honors thesis or project begin working with a faculty mentor with whom they will complete their work. Honors Colloquium participation continues. 

Texts: Outlined in course syllabus for N20030; syllabus is available on Blackboard. 

 


NURS 20030 008 Foundations of Nursing Intervention - Honors 
CRN: 16174
M 2:15-4:10 T 12:45-1:45 T 9:00-11:00 W 8:00-2:30 
Instructor: Debra Cifani

The course content for Honors NURS 20030 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 20030. This Honors course is for nursing students enrolled in the second nursing course having a clinical component. Each student or small group explores a patient problem and evidence based practice interventions to address the concern. Students choosing to pursue an Honors thesis or project begin working with a faculty mentor with whom they will complete their work. Honors Colloquium participation continues. 

Texts: Outlined in course syllabus for N20030; syllabus is available on Blackboard. 

 


NURS 20030 001 Foundations of Nursing Intervention - Honors 
CRN: 16177
M 2:15-4:10 T 12:45-1:45 T 9:00-11:00 R 7:00-1:30 
Instructor: 

The course content for Honors NURS 20030 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 20030. This Honors course is for nursing students enrolled in the second nursing course having a clinical component. Each student or small group explores a patient problem and evidence based practice interventions to address the concern. Students choosing to pursue an Honors thesis or project begin working with a faculty mentor with whom they will complete their work. Honors Colloquium participation continues. 

Texts: Outlined in course syllabus for N20030; syllabus is available on Blackboard. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


NURS 40872 002 Introduction to Nursing Research - Honors 
CRN: 16297
M 3:20-4:10 
Instructor: Staff

The course content for Honors NURS 40872 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 40872. This Honors course is for students in the third semester of the nursing sequence concurrently enrolled in one of the four statistics courses required in the College of Nursing curriculum. Faculty-led project participation continues during this term. Honors students register for Introduction to Nursing Research and receive focused material to enhance their abilities to conduct a successful honors project. Students explore opportunities to contribute to the faculty-led project and develop preliminary plans to conduct an independent honors project within the scope of the faculty member’s expertise. Initial honors project planning occurs. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


PH 30005 002 Social and Behavioral Theories in Public Health - Honors 
CRN: 16680
TR 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Dana Kingsbury

An overview of the contributions of the social and behavioral sciences to human health behavior, including application of studies in the area of health promotion, health protection and disease prevention in public health. 

 


PHIL 11001 004 Introduction to Philosophy - Honors 
CRN: 16722
MW 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Frank Ryan

Does our existence have a purpose or meaning? Should we find an answer, could we be certain of its truth? And how might such knowledge affect our lives and those of others in our community? This course invites exploration into fundamental questions that have fascinated thoughtful humans for millennia. Using a continuum approach that ranges from objectivism to relativism, we’ll see how Western philosophy offers answers to basic questions of metaphysics (what is real?) and epistemology (what is knowledge?) that lead to a variety of moral and social consequences. We’ll also supplement the Western tradition with perspectives from other cultures. Critically evaluating these options will help you embark on a lifelong quest for self-empowerment. 

In addition to unit tests, a final exam, and unit discussion questions, the unique aptitude of Honors students will be engaged with class debates and two paper assignments. 

Texts: (1) Plato, Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo, Transl. G.M.A. Grube, 2nd edition, Hackett Publishing Company, Indianapolis; Rene Descartes, Discourse on Methods and Meditations on First Philosophy, Trans. by Donald A. Cress, 4th edition, Hackett Publishing Company, Indianapolis; David Hume, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, Trans. Eric Steinberg, 2nd edition, Hackett Publishing Company, Indianapolis.; Some reading materials will be distributed to students in PDF format via e-mail attachments. 

Kent Core-Humanities
Diversity Course-Global


PHY 40099 TBA Senior Honors Thesis - Honors 
CRN: TBA
TBA 
Instructor: Staff

Thesis for departmental, general or university honors must be 1-10 hours with continuous registration throughout the senior year beginning in the summer prior to the senior year. Students taking this course must consult with their department and the Honors College and receive approval prior to the first semester of the senior year. 

 


POL 10500 005 World Politics - Honors 
CRN: 17000
MW 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Gabriella Paar-Jakli

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of world politics (a.k.a. “international relations”). Students in this course will develop an understanding of the major ideas of the various theoretical approaches and will be provided with an historical overview of the field. Also, we will focus on issues of international organization and global governance as well as on the international political economy. Overall, we will explore the interplay between conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Additionally, students will learn to identify worldviews and major issues in the study of world politics. Learning to recognize how historical, geographical, social, economic and cultural traditions and circumstances affect one's understanding of what is important in world politics is also of vital importance not only for those students who will further study the field, but also for those who simply wish to become more informed global citizens. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Global


PSYC 11762 006 General Psychology - Honors 
CRN: 17079
MWF 1:10-2:00 
Instructor: Christopher Flessner

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. As such, a broad number of topics that cover the diversity of behavior studied by psychologists will be covered, including sensation and perception; human development; memory, language, and problem solving; personality; psychopathology and therapy; and social interactions. Class meetings will be a mixture of presentations, discussion, exercises, and demonstrations. By the end of this course, it is expected that students will be able to: Describe psychological theories, principles and concepts relevant to the following topics: history and methods, physiology (biology of behavior, consciousness, perception), cognition (learning, thought, language), social, organizational, developmental, personality and psychopathology and its treatment. Articulate knowledge of classic as well as contemporary research in each of the major subfields of psychology. Recognize diversity and individual differences and similarities in a variety of contexts. Be able to think critically about research findings and apply what you have learned to real world situations. Students will be expected to demonstrate how well they have achieved these objectives through class discussion, exams, and homework assignments. Assignments will include short papers, application/reflection papers, and application questions. 

Text: Weiten, W. (2013). Psychology: Themes and Variations. Briefer Version, 9th edition. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. (ISBN-13: 978-1-133-93906-1). You have several options for the textbook. There are e-book and loose-leaf (ISBN-13: 978-1-133-95910-6) versions available from the publisher at reduced prices; you can also rent it directly from the publisher or get only the chapters that we cover (www.cengagebrain.com). 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Domestic


PSYC 11762 007 General Psychology - Honors 
CRN: 17080
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: TBA

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of the human mind in all of its manifestations, including sensation and perception; human development; memory, language, and problem solving; motivation and emotion; personality; psychopathology and therapy; and social interactions. Class meetings will be a mixture of discussion, student and faculty presentations, exercises, and demonstrations. The primary objectives are for the student to understand the human mind by learning how psychologists use behavior to understand mental processes. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Domestic


PSYC 20651 002 Child Psychology - Honors 
CRN: 17124
MW 9:15-10:30 
Instructor: Josefina Grau

In this course, we will review the data, concepts and theories of psychology that contribute to the understanding of child development from conception to age 18. We will explore the biological, cognitive, cultural, and social factors in the development of infants, children, and adolescents. By the end of this course, it is expected that students will be able to: 1. Assess the biological, cognitive, cultural, environmental and social factors that influence development throughout childhood. 2. Evaluate current and past research in childhood guided by theories within developmental psychology 3. Describe methodological approaches used to study development. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Domestic


PSYC 41573 002 Lab Experience: Social Clinical - Honors 
CRN: 21042
MW 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Dr. Kathryn Kerns

 


SOC 22778 001 Social Problems - Honors 
CRN: 17667
MWF 2:15-3:05 
Instructor: Stephen Webster

This course will consider a range of current sociological topics (inequality, poverty, health and illness, drug use) from a social problems perspective. We will consider how sociologists, journalists, politicians and activists define a given social problem, hypothesize about its causes and offer solutions. True to the sociological tradition, emphasis will be placed on the contested and socially constructed nature of social problems. In each unit, we will consider possibilities for social change, in an effort to understand how social actors shape their environments through policy, activism and collective action. Social Problems is a service-learning course, which means that each student will be required to complete approximately 20-30 hours of volunteer work with one of four community partners over the course of the semester. Service experiences will provide students with an opportunity to observe first hand how local organizations/agencies define and address social problems. Learning Goals/Objectives •To stimulate active learning through in-class exercises and group discussion. •To enhance critical writing and thinking skills. •To stimulate and cultivate the “sociological imagination.” •To connect emergent social problems to course material. •To encourage students to become critical consumers of news media. •To give students “hands on” learning experiences in the community. 

Texts: American Sociological Association. 2008. The Contexts Reader. Jeff Goodwin and James M. Jasper, eds. New York: Norton and Company. Nazario, Sonia. 2007. Enrique’s Journey: The Story of a Boy’s Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite With His Mother. New York: Random House. Venkatesh, Sudhir. 2008 Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets. Penguin. 

Kent Core-Social Sciences
Diversity Course-Global


SOC 42478 002 Adolescence in Society - Honors 
CRN: 17743
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Richard E. Adams

Consideration of the social, cultural and historical forces that shape the experience of this period of the life cycle. Includes examination of gender, class, and race differences in adolescence the significance of youth movements with an emphasis on music as a dominant expression of youth culture. 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course


THEA 41113 Theatre in Multi-Cultural America - Honors 
CRN: 18387
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Yuko Kurahashi

By reading and discussing diverse materials created by artists of the following ethnic groups—African American, Latino American, Asian American, Native American, Middle-Eastern American—we will examine culturally and ethnically specific issues that are manifested in the texts and performances. In addition to reading the texts and conduct literary analysis, the students are expected to learn and understand the changing demographic, economic, political, and cultural fabrics of the United States and to understand the interrelationship between dramatic works and sociopolitical. In order to obtain knowledge and ability to engage in theatre and performing arts in global society, students are encouraged to learn different contemporary multicultural theatre activities in the world. Honors students are required to participate in a special service learning project in addition to completing regular assignments. 

Honors students are required to make an additional class presentation on one of the topics taught/discussed in the class. While a performance review is optional for regular students, honors students are required to see one of the suggested performances (the Cleveland area, including Karamu House). 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors course


THEA 11000 016 The Art of the Theatre - Honors 
CRN: 18285
TR 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Tracee Patterson

This course is designed to increase theatre audience awareness and understanding of theatrical production process, theatre traditions and rules, and the role of theatre in different cultures. It is a participation course; class discussions, creative projects, and writing are strong components of the course. Students are required to attend plays on campus and to write reaction papers (theatre reviews) afterwards. In addition to class participation and preparation, writing assignments, and projects, students will be evaluated via exams and quizzes. Group and service learning projects may be included. Students will be expected to think creatively and critically in all their work for the course. 

Kent Core-Fine Arts
Diversity Course-Global


THEA 41306 001 Professional Aspects: Design & Technology - Honors 
CRN: 18392
MW 11:00-12:15 
Instructor: Jakyung Seo

A study of the practical demands and requirements of a professional career in design and technology, including portfolio development, resumes, unions, job market, financial matters and career prospects. Use of computers as a resource and tool emphasized. 

 


THEA 41499 002 NYC Musical Theatre Showcase - Honors 
CRN: 18396
TR 2:15-3:30 
Instructor: Jonathan Swoboda

Development, promotion, and presentation of a Musical Theatre showcase for industry casting personnel in New York City. Audition required prior to registration for this course. 

 


VCD 40052 002 Graphic Design Travel & Field Experience - Honors 
CRN: 21005
MW 7:45-10:30 
Instructor: Christopher Darling and Aoife Mooney

'Visual Language: Forms for experience and expression', is a 7-week Special Topics course focused on illustration, typography and hand-lettering. The course will culminate in a trip to Dublin and London in Spring of 2015 (May 14th-30th) and will be run in tandem with the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, encouraging cross-collaboration and sharing of experiences with a wider network of Kent students. While abroad, students will immerse themselves in the visual culture of these two historic cities, performing visual research and responding to their environments in visual terms, as well as meeting with industry professionals, local design and illustration students, visiting local design educational institutes, museums and cultural hubs. This will allow students to gain exposure to a wider range of influences and insights into the diversity of global expression. 

 


VCD 45000 002 Graphic Design Perspectives - Honors 
CRN: 18645
Web Course 
Instructor: TBA

Comprehensive exploration of design starting with Gutenberg and moving into present day. Topics include font development, print processes, illustration, photography, architecture, industrial design, 19th & 20th century art as well as graphic design. This course relates how historical events impacted design through these periods and will help students recognize how present design trends have correlation to the past, encouraging them to explore their environment for influences and inspiration. All students will do a research project and Honors students will be required to do additional reading and write a lengthier dissertation than non-Honors students. Writing Intensive Course 

Mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate course