Freshman Honors Colloquium

The Freshman Honors Colloquium is a two-semester sequence, HONR 10197 and 10297, which totals six credit hours and takes the place of the regular College Writing sequence, ENG 11011 and 21011.

Freshman Honors Colloquium (FHC) is designed to be a rigorous course for all incoming Honors students. 

Reading, thinking, and writing about literature and other humanities are stressed. This course encourages you to read carefully, speak thoughtfully, and write lucidly. The goal of FHC is to foster habits of intellectual inquiry and expression that are indispensable to success in most university courses (especially in Honors) and essential to a well-rounded liberal education.

It may well be the most valuable and, ultimately, most memorable course you will take at Kent State.

Although instructors design their own courses and themes, each section of Freshman Honors Colloquium will stress works, ideas, and values significant in our literary and intellectual history as they shape and are shaped by today's culture. Additionally, instructors will make you aware of how the prevailing Western tradition is subject to challenge and interrogation by other value systems and cultural viewpoints.

You will read in the basic literary genres- fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry. Readings may vary widely, from key texts in our intellectual heritage (e.g., the Bible, works by Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Darwin, Marx) and recognized masterpieces (e.g., by Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, Votaire, Austen, Dickinson, Joyce) to other significant but less famous works and works outside the Euro-American tradition. Instructors may also enrich their courses with interdisciplinary materials from fields such as music, art, and film.

You will be expected to write approximately 4,000-5,000 words each semester (primarily essays and at least one research paper). Other requirements, such as exams, quizzes, and oral reports, will vary with each instructor. Class size is small enough to encourage discussion, student-teacher dialogue, and individual student responsibility.