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Research

 Bilde The civil rights exhibit "They Led the Way," created by Ann Schierhorn with photography by David LaBelle, has opened at the Riley House Center/Museum of African American History and Culture in Tallahassee, Fla., where it will remain until February. The exhibit features eight former students who desegregated the schools in Tallahassee 50 years ago. Most of the  eight live in other cities in the Southeast, but six were able to attend the opening reception Sept. 27 and participated in a panel Schierhorn moderated.  They were met with a standing room only crowd. "There were many Tallahassees in the South – cities that desegregated without violence but with great sacrifice," Schierhorn said.

Read the full story here.

The Others  This work is from Grace Murray, a senior magazine journalism major. Of this project, Grace writes: "My decision to research the Romani minority in the Czech Republic stemmed from the desire to share the story of those who are often left without a voice. Discrimination of the Romani people is deeply rooted throughout Europe, and I felt it was time to turn the tables."

See the full project here.


 Memphis trip Daniel Moore, senior news major, and Jacob Byk, junior visual journalism major, traveled to Memphis with professor Christina McVay during spring break 2013 for a service trip. Both Byk and Moore share a fascination with the culture and history of the Deep South, and this provided a unique opportunity to see it firsthand. Since 2003, McVay has led volunteers from Kent State to join the Zion Community Project, Inc. to clear and maintain the oldest all-black cemetery in Memphis. See the collaborative work between Moore and Byk featured in the May 2013 issue of the Burr in their essay, "Forgotten But Not Gone".

Read the full story here.


 Gene Shelton Moral Agency and Ethnic Minorities: Are Television Networks Doing the Right Thing?

Professor Eugene Shelton's Thesis