College of Arts & Sciences News tagged with Research

Posted: Wednesday, July 5, 2017 - 9:45am

Scientists at Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands and Kent State University in Ohio have developed a new material that can undulate and therefore propel itself forward under the influence of light. To achieve this, the scientists clamp a strip of this polymer material in a rectangular frame. When illuminated, it goes for a walk all on its own. This small device, the size of a paperclip, is the world’s first machine to convert light directly into walking, simply using one fixed light source.

Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 11:28am

Kent State University faculty and students in the Department of Physics, in the College of Arts and Sciences, recently played a key role in using a new silicon detector technology to examine nuclear collisions that recreate the Big Bang on a tiny scale in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, on Long Island. 

Posted: Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 2:32pm

Approximately 13,500 years after nomadic Clovis hunters crossed the frozen land bridge from Asia to North America, researchers are still asking questions and putting together clues as to how they not only survived in a new landscape with unique new challenges but adapted with stone tools and weapons to thrive for thousands of years. 

Posted: Monday, March 27, 2017 - 2:58pm

According to the American Cancer Society, there will be an estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases diagnosed and 600,920 cancer deaths in the U.S. in 2017.

Photo of Hanbin MaoThese numbers are stark and sobering, and worse yet, we still do not know exactly why cancer develops in its victims or how to stop it.

Posted: Tuesday, December 13, 2016 - 11:16am

University partners with i-Health and Stow-Glen Retirement Village

Kent State University, in partnership with the Stow-Glen Retirement Village in Stow, Ohio, recently received an industry-funded grant of $430,000 from i-Health Inc., a subsidiary of DSM Nutritional Products, to examine whether taking a probiotic dietary supplement, commonly sold over the counter, can improve the mood and memory of middle-aged and older adults.

Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 12:00pm

It could be argued that no science is more valuable to us than that which helps to ensure the survival of our species by solving the problems that challenge it.

Posted: Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 11:22am

Physical activity is essential to fighting obesity, and scientists are constantly working to make this activity more effective and beneficial.

A $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health will help biology professor Colleen Novak, Ph.D., from Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences better understand how the body allocates energy and burns fat.

Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 9:36am

Photo of Cynthia BarnettThe fourth annual Water and Land Symposium at Kent State University will be held Oct. 5-6 at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center in downtown Kent, Ohio. This year, the symposium is co-sponsored by Kent State’s College of Arts and Sciences and the Cleveland Water Alliance.

Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 9:41am

A group of researchers in Kent State University's College of Arts and Sciences have published a breakthrough article on new properties of liquid crystals in the May 27 issue of Physical Review Letters. The article, which describes some recent surprising results involving nematic liquid crystals induced by a high magnetic field, is currently featured on the American Physical Society website as an “Editors’ Suggestion.”

Posted: Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 3:31pm

Two Kent State University researchers from the College of Arts and Sciences have been awarded more than $1 million in federal grants for their research projects.

The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging awarded Gemma Casadesus-Smith, Ph.D., from Kent State’s Department of Biological Sciences, a three-year $444,000 grant to research the mechanisms associated with the benefits of Pramlintide — a synthetic hormone — in models of Alzheimer’s disease.

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