College of Architecture and Environmental Design

Kent State University architecture students partnered with officials from the city of Sandusky, Ohio, for an opportunity to create new theoretical designs for some of downtown Sandusky’s vacant buildings and empty sites.

Scholar of the Month
Elwin C. Robison
Professor
College of Architecture and Environmental Design
1985-present

Scholar of the Month
Elwin C. Robison
Professor
College of Architecture and Environmental Design
1985-present

To enable Kent State University to continue its multifaceted efforts to provide students with a high-caliber educational experience, the Kent State Board of Trustees today (May 28, 2014) increased tuition by 2 percent for undergraduate and graduate students on the university’s eight campuses. The increase, which is in keeping with a state-mandated limit on full-time, in-state undergraduate tuition increases for the 2014-15 academic year, is expected to leave Kent State’s tuition ranked in the middle of Ohio’s 13 public universities.

Kent State University graduate students Jeff Jasinski of Wickliffe, Ohio, and Matt Dureiko of Stow, Ohio, both enrolled in the architecture and urban design program, placed second in an international design competition. The DawnTown 2014 Alternative Mobilities design competition, sponsored by the Miami Downtown Development Authority, asked designers to create a central hub where routes people take to move around downtown could meet. The proposal would boost Miami’s transportation network.

On March 22, 2014, a massive fire swept though historic Garrettsville, Ohio, destroying an entire commercial block and 13 businesses. Residents in the quaint Portage County village of just over 2,200 people immediately began pulling together, with efforts to relocate the local food bank, which was consumed in the blaze. Some business owners promised to rebuild, but it was clear that the tragedy dramatically changed the character of the village forever.

The groundbreaking for Kent State University’s new Center for Architecture and Environmental Design will be Oct. 3 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

The building will serve as the new home of Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design, bringing all of the programs of the college under one roof. The building will be located between South Lincoln and South Willow streets, just south of the Lefton Esplanade and across the street from Franklin Hall.

One of the most all-encompassing transformations in university history is taking place right now at Kent State University. The Foundations of Excellence: Building the Future initiative includes the construction of new buildings, facility upgrades and establishment of dynamic, new spaces. These projects support academic success, while demonstrating Kent State’s leadership in campus safety, accessibility and sustainability and serving as a powerful magnet for top students, employees and partners.

The groundbreaking for Kent State University’s new Center for Architecture and Environmental Design occurred Oct. 3. The building will serve as the new home of Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design, bringing all of the programs of the college under one roof. It will be located between South Lincoln and South Willow streets, just south of the Lefton Esplanade and across the street from Franklin Hall.

In October 2014, three Foundations of Excellence: Building the Future events took place on the Kent Campus: the College of Architecture and Environmental Design broke ground on its new building, the College of the Arts celebrated the launch of the new Center for the Visual Arts, and the Department of Residence Services dedicated the newly remodeled Tri-Towers residence hall complex.

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