APPENDIX C | Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies Handbook | Kent State University

APPENDIX C

GENERAL ADVICE FOR PROBATIONARY FACULTY

Reappointment, tenure, and promotion reviews require that candidates present evidence, in the form of a Candidate File, representing their accomplishments in scholarship, teaching, and service. This file is initiated during a faculty member’s first year and is then updated and refined in ensuing years. The School Director will provide faculty with deadlines and other information for compiling and submitting required components of the Candidate File, based on current academic year University policies and procedures. For untenured (tenure-track) Faculty members, the faculty mentor should also play a supportive role in the preparation of the Candidate File.

  • Meet with your mentor regularly to discuss how you are planning to make an original contribution to an identifiable disciplinary community.
  • Focus on a sustained and clearly articulated line(s) of inquiry; three or fewer is recommended.
  • Articles in scholarly peer-reviewed journals are considered more important than any other kind of publication for the purposes of promotion and tenure because of the robust peer review involved; use feedback from reviewers to improve your submissions.
  • Focus on publishing articles in peer-reviewed journals with acceptance rates of 20% or less; these will be the most helpful for building a case for tenure and promotion.
  • Try to have scholarly projects in all phases of the research cycle. Identify manuscripts “under review” and “in progress/development” in your contextual statement. This will assist in maintaining a steady publication schedule.
  • Joint publications and/or presentations should include percentages of effort of the candidate’s relative contribution.
  • Show leadership by being the lead author on multiple publications and presentations.
  • Try to be a PI or Co-PI on a grant if grants are available in your field.
  • Structure your time consistently to account for the many demands of the professorship.  Writing time, research time, teaching/grading time, committee work, and life demands need to be realistic and habitual to sustain all facets of your academic work.  Early habits can set the stage for continued success. Think about forming a writing group to support on-going writing efforts, a set of writing colleagues to trade work, sustain research goals, and maintain accountability for your scholarship.
  • When the time comes, choose outside reviewers strategically (at arm’s length and at institutions which are at KSU’s Carnegie rating or higher).  When applying for promotion to Associate Professor, reviewers must be at that rank or higher; when applying for promotion to Professor, reviewers must be at that rank.  Professor emeriti are not typically considered appropriate; only in special cases are faculty outside of the United States considered appropriate.
  • If you have a challenging class, find a teaching mentor, someone who can observe your teaching on a consistent basis and be a “thinking partner” about refinements.  Discuss these strategies with your mentor.
  • Be sure to hyperlink your articles/documents in at least one document:  your CV, contextual statement or scholarship grid; consider linking them multiple places.

1.  Curriculum Vita (CV)

  • Ensure that your CV is in APA format and that ALL information is included, especially page numbers of publications that are already in print.
  • Have colleagues and/or mentor read and critique your CV. Some positions may not be clear. Some dates might not make sense. Be sure to be accurate about the nature and extent of what you have done. If you don’t know what to call something or where it goes in your file, ask your School director.
  • If an article or book is “in press,” and the editor has provided an anticipated publication date or issue/volume, provide such information in the form of a letter/email.
  • Manuscripts in progress do not yet belong on your curriculum vitae, but manuscripts which are under review may be listed in its own category.
  • Sort publications into categories, such as journal articles, books, chapters in books, book reviews, non-refereed journals, conference proceedings, and instructional materials.
  • Designate whether a publication is refereed or not. If possible, supply the acceptance rate of the journal or other indicators of quality (e.g. international or national readership; how extensive the readership, i.e. number of subscribers; impact factor, etc.).
  • Divide articles not only by whether it is refereed or not, but also whether it is a national/international or regional/state publication.
  • Be sure to cite the date (at least the month), along with the city/state or country for each presentation; again, note whether the presentation acceptance was refereed and place it in the appropriate category:  international, national, regional, state or local.
  • For continuing positions, such as being a manuscript reviewer, state the beginning date and then write the word “present”; providing an ending date, even if it is the current year, suggests to the reader that you are no longer fulfilling that responsibility.  For example:  Reviewer, Journal of Literacy Education, 2005 – present
  • Be sure to list all Ph.D. advisees and distinguish whether they are in the advisory phase or dissertation phase; further, be sure to include your role, especially if you are serving as either a co-chair or chair of a dissertation. For completed Ph.D. students, list the title (and year) of their dissertation.

2.  Contextual Statement

  • State your line(s) of inquiry in the opening section of your contextual statement and reference it/them within your discussions of research and teaching, and service, if applicable.
  • Be concise; contextualize your work. You don’t have to discuss everything.  Faculty in TLC believe five pages—at most—is sufficient to make your case.  In the early years, five pages may not even be needed.
  • Include the acceptance rate of a journal, if available, as well as any kind of journal ranking data when available. Anything you can do to convince those outside of your discipline that you are publishing in high quality journals will help your case.
  • Write out all acronyms the first time; do not make any assumptions about the readers’ backgrounds.
  • Double check that any information included in your contextual statement is also included on your CV, and that the language matches exactly, especially titles of articles and presentations.
  • Include a chart that shows your line(s) of inquiry and how your publications, presentations, grants, service activities—whatever, support those line(s) of inquiry. For example:

Overview of Work by Inquiry Strands

PLEASE NOTE:  While this example does not have complete citations, COMPLETE CITATIONS should be included.

Connecting teachers with texts/ Students with books

(Literature)

Reading compre-hension strategies

Writing

Social studies / Social justice/ integration

REFEREED ARTICLES:

Nurturing Thoughtful Revision (2006)

 

 

 

X

 

Literature … Girls to Soar (2006)

X

 

 

 

Friendship’s Effect on Writing (2005)

 

 

X

 

Standing Tall in Middle School (2005)

X

X

X

X

BOOKS:

Teaching Reading Strategies (2006)

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

Linking Literature with Life (2002)

X

X

X

X

CHAPTERS:

Exploring Connections … (In press)

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

Joyce Hansen (2005)

X

 

 

 

GRANTS:

2005-2006 to present in Jamaica

 

X

 

X

 

 

2004-2005 to study in Belize

 

X

X

X

1995-2004 National Writing Project

 

 

X

 

INTERNATIONAL/ NATIONAL PRESENTATIONS:

Connection Readers to Text (2006)  International Reading Association

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

What’s a schema? (2006)  National Council of Teachers of English

X

X

X

 

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS:

Rodman Philbrick (2002)

 

X

 

X

 

 

BOOK REVIEWS:

Toledo Blade (quarterly, since 1997)

 

X

 

 

 

CONSULTANT:

Social Studies or reading, since 2000

 

40

 

 

 

3.  Teaching

Create a chart with every course taught, grouped by semester; do not combine sections of the same class.  Include the most recent semester first and include a summary of scores for each year, as well as summary scores across all years as a “Grand Total.”

Please remember to link syllabi in this Teaching Grid; do consider linking them in other places as well.

Base the chart on Summary Question 19, “Overall, how would you rate your learning experience in this course?” (or its current equivalent).  Please include both numbers of students and the percentage of each category, as well as both the individual mean and school mean* (not included here because this is a fabricated example and so there is no way to know that this might be). For example:

Name of course

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Poor

Omitted

Course Mean /

School Mean

Spring 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCED 50007

Teaching Reading with Literature

N= 20 

 

 

8 / 40%

 

 

6 / 30%

 

 

4 / 20%

 

 

2 / 10%

 

 

 

 

4.0 / _*_

MCED 40007

N= 10

8 / 80%

2 /20%

 

 

 

 

 

Fall 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCED 50005

Teaching Reading with Phonics

N = 20

 

 

12 / 60%

 

 

6 / 30%

 

 

2 / 10% 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.5 / _*_

MCED 50007

Teaching Reading with Literature

N= 20

 

16 / 80%

 

4 / 20%

 

 

 

 

 

TOTALS  for year

N=70

44/ 63%

18 / 26%

6 / 9%

2 / 3%

 

 

4.25 / _*_

Spring 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCED 50007

Teaching Reading with Literature

N= 20 

 

 

6 / 40%

 

 

6 / 30%

 

 

6 / 20%

 

 

2 / 10%

 

 

 

 

4.0 / _*_

MCED 40007

N= 10

6 / 80%

4 /20%

 

 

 

 

 

Fall 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCED 50005

Teaching Reading with Phonics

N = 20

 

 

10/ 60%

 

 

5 / 30%

 

 

5 / 10% 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.5 / _*_

MCED 50007

Teaching Reading with Literature

N= 20

 

16 / 80%

 

4 / 20%

 

 

 

 

 

TOTALS for year

N=70

38 / 54%

19 / 27%

11 / 16%

2 / 3%

 

 

4.25 / _*_

OVERALL TOTALS

N= 140

82 / 59%

37 / 26%

17 / 12%

4 / 3%

 

 

 

After this grid, attach the two-page summary grid for each course, in the order in which it is listed in the grid. After each two-page summary, include the written compilation of student comments.

4.  Peer Reviews
Create a chart which lists each peer review, such as:

Date of Observation

Name of Observer

Class Prefix/

Number

Name of Course

March 12, 2016

Dr. M Mentor

CI XXXXX

Teaching Well

October 25, 2015

Dr. F Mentor

MCED XXXXX

Starting Well

After the chart, include the faculty member’s review letter, the most recent one listed and included first.

Be strategic in asking for feedback on your teaching.  Across the years, ask both Faculty in your program area, as well as Full professors.  Be sure to include a variety of perspectives.  For untenured faculty, at least one peer review of teaching is expected each year.