The School of Psychology is designed to prepare students for either employment in settings requiring behavioral principles or admission to graduate study. Advising can help undergraduates tailor their courses of study to their particular interests. The department occupies all three floors of Kent Hall which contains classrooms, seminar rooms, faculty offices, research space, as well as the Psychological Clinic and the Applied Psychology Center.

Program Requirements

All students pursuing bachelor’s degrees at Kent State complete a series of Kent Core requirements. Psychology majors take courses in the areas of English composition, mathematics or logic, foreign language, humanities, fine arts, social sciences and basic sciences.

The following are the core B.A. in psychology major courses:

  • General Psychology
  • Quantitative Methods in Psychology
  • Research Methods in Psychology
  • Developmental: Child Psychology OR Psychology of Aging OR Adolescent Psychology
  • Clinical/Counseling: Psychology of Adjustment OR Abnormal Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience/Learning: Basic Learning Processes OR Biopsychology
  • Social/ Personality: Social Psychology OR Personality
  • Cognition: Cognitive Psychology OR Perception OR Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Application of Psychological Science: Lab Experience in Psych. Research: Social/Clinical OR Lab Experience in Psych. Research Cognitive/Learning OR Writing in Psychology OR Senior Honors Thesis OR Individual Investigation

PLUS 9 credit hours of upper-division psychology electives. B.A. in Psychology majors will complement these requirements with a variety of other offerings from the department or other academic fields. Students must complete a minimum of 121 semester hours to earn the Bachelor of Arts degree.

The following are the core B.S. in psychology major courses:

  • General Psychology
  • Quantitative Methods in Psychology I
  • Research Methods in Psychology
  • Quantitative Methods in Psychology II
  • Biopsychology
  • Abnormal Psychology
  • Developmental: Child Psychology OR Psychology of Aging OR Adolescent Psychology
  • Social/Personality: Social Psychology OR Personality
  • Cognition/Learning: Cognitive Psychology OR Cognitive Neuroscience OR Basic Learning Processes
  • Application of Psychological Science: Lab Experience in Psych. Research: Social/Clinical OR Lab Experience in Psych. Research Cognitive/Learning OR Writing in Psychology OR Undergraduate Research OR Senior Honors Thesis OR Individual Investigation

PLUS 18 hours of elective credits with a minimum of 12 elective credits being in Psychology. In addition, B.S. in Psychology students must choose 2 of the following courses to fulfill their interdisciplinary science requirement:

  • Biological Diversity
  • Biological Foundations
  • General Chemistry I
  • General Chemistry II

Students must complete a total of 121 semester hours to earn the Bachelor of Science degree.

Special Departmental Programs

Undergraduate Research

The Individual Investigation and Undergraduate Research courses provide students with the opportunity to pursue their own interests and learn how psychologists work in research settings. Students have received credit for assisting faculty members with ongoing research, conducting their own research projects under faculty supervision and doing library research projects.

Internships

Internship opportunities are readily available to students. The Psychology Advisor and Internship Coordinator assists students with the process of finding an internship or volunteer experience that suits specific interests. Approximately 100 approved internship sites are available on the Undergraduate Psychology website. Students may obtain course credit for both research and internships.

Internship and Volunteer Opportunities

Study Abroad In Florence

Three Psychology courses will be offered in Florence, Italy offering students the opportunity to study abroad for credit. The courses are Abnormal Psychology, Social Psychology and Cognitive Psychology.

Professional Development Workshop Series

The professional development workshop series consists of six total workshops that will take place throughout the whole year. The purpose is to provide students with the tools and information necessary to be successful after college. The workshops each focus on a different topic about career and graduate school preparation. All psychology students, regardless of academic year, are encouraged to attend as many workshops as possible.

Peer Mentor Program

The peer mentor program accepts applications for Mentor positions as well as Mentee positions. In order to be a Mentor, students must be a Junior or Senior, have a minimum of a 3.0 GPA, and have an intrinsic desire to help their fellow students.

Graduate Training

For students who wish to continue their education, graduate studies are available in many areas within psychology (e.g., clinical, cognitive, social, developmental, biopsychology, industrial/organizational, health psychology or school psychology). In addition, psychology provides an excellent undergraduate background for such fields as law, medicine, the ministry, social work, sociology, counseling, recreation, gerontology and several other disciplines. While the doctoral degree affords the highest paid and greatest range of jobs in psychology, the number of psychology students who pursue a terminal master’s degree has increased sixfold since 1960. Approximately 20 percent of master’s graduates continue their education in pursuit of a doctoral degree, and about two-thirds of master’s graduates seek employment outside of psychology. Many persons with master’s degrees in psychology handle research and data collection and analysis in universities, government, and private companies. Others find jobs in health, industry and education, the primary work settings for psychology professionals with master’s degrees. With growing recognition of the role of psychology in the community, more jobs for master’s degree holders may become available in community mental health centers. With a doctoral degree, psychologists are finding increasing opportunities in for-profit and self-employment sectors, including, but not limited to, health service provider subfields, industrial-organizational psychology, educational psychology and related fields. Roughly one-third of new doctoral-level clinical psychologists and more than half of new Ph.D.s in the various research subfields of psychology obtain academic positions.