Dr. Marilyn Norconk Leads 3rd Annual Primate Ecology And Conservation Workshop in Suriname | Kent State University

Dr. Marilyn Norconk Leads 3rd Annual Primate Ecology And Conservation Workshop in Suriname

 Students and instructors of the 2015 Primate Ecology and Conservation Workshop in Suriname

Students and instructors of the 2015 Primate Ecology and Conservation Workshop in Suriname

Professor Marilyn Norconk organized and led the 3rd Annual Primate Ecology and Conservation Workshop in Suriname, South America, September 11-19, 2015. Marilyn coordinated the workshop with instructors from the Advanced Teachers Training Institute (IOL) and Anton de Kom University of Suriname (AdeK), both in Paramaribo. Instructors included former KSU/Anthropology graduate student, Ari Vreedzaam, and Chantal Landburg – both currently biology instructors at IOL. The eleven workshop participants were undergraduate students from Suriname, majoring in biology or environmental science. Students heard lectures on primate socioecology, tropical forest conservation, mapping and use of GIS, pros and cons of primate ecotourism, and Suriname-specific wildlife laws and conservation issues. The 6-day field portion of the workshop took place at Brownsberg Nature Park, where Dr. Norconk and KSU students have been conducting research since 2003. Workshop students worked on projects that contributed to the long-term monitoring of seven species of monkeys at the site, re-measured trees that were first identified and measured in 2004 to determine species specific- and habitat-specific growth patterns over the last decade, and conducted nutrient assessment surveys in disturbed habitats.

 

The workshop series was developed by Marilyn Norconk, Sylvia Atsalis (Northeastern Illinois University) and former KSU PhD student, Cynthia Thompson (Assistant Professor, Grand Valley State University) specifically to expose undergraduate students in Suriname to the wild primates and habitats of their country. The workshops have been funded by Primate Conservation, Inc., Conservation International – Primate Action Fund, International Primatological Society – Larry Jacobsen Education Development Award, and the National Geographic Society Conservation Trust. The workshops could not be conducted without support from Ms. Joelaika Behari-Ramdas (Program Coordinator of the Biology program, IOL), Ms. Sonja Carilho (Head of the Environmental Sciences program, AdeK), Dr. Paul Ouboter (Director of the National Zoological Collection, AdeK) and Ms. Claudine Sakimin (Director of the Foundation for Nature Conservation in Suriname—STINASU that manages Brownsberg Nature Park).

More than 800 trees were remeasured in permanent plots set up in 2004.

 Former KSU graduate student, Ari Vreedzaam, pointing at howler monkeys above them.

M. Norconk measuring the diameter of a small tree.

M. Norconk with workshop students on the last day in the field. From the far left: Niven Williams (course TA), Marie Fortune, Meriam Kalloe, M. Norconk, and Luciano Doest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image captions from left to right:

More than 800 trees were remeasured in permanent plots set up in 2004.

Former KSU graduate student, Ari Vreedzaam, pointing at howler monkeys above them.

M. Norconk measuring the diameter of a small tree.

Bottom left:

M. Norconk with workshop students on the last day in the field. From the far left: Niven Williams (course TA), Marie Fortune, Meriam Kalloe, M. Norconk, and Luciano Doest.

 

 

POSTED: Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 4:05pm
UPDATED: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 - 3:32pm