People | Institute for Applied Linguistics | Kent State University

Dr. Brian Baer

Hired in 1996, Professor Brian Baer shares his knowledge about the development of the translation programs at Kent State since his arrival. He tells the fascinating story of how the programs first started, preferring to say that the translation programs at Kent were in fact ‘’born in Leipzig’’. He then touches upon some of the turning points and milestones that have led to the creation of the programs. Also, he explains how the translation programs at Kent have been responding to the market demands throughout the years, demonstrating the dynamic nature of the programs. He also tells us about the history of ATISA, justifying the need for its foundation and mentioning the names of those who took part in its inception in 2003. Debates and arguments that have been had to found the programs are also included in the video as Dr. Baer shares his experience about some of them and how the were solved. He finally concludes with his own expectations about the future of Translation Studies, sending a personal message for future comers (students and faculty members) to the field.

See full interview here: https://youtu.be/ycF2IOpy62w

 

Dr. Françoise Massardier-Kenney

Professor Kenney talks about how the program has started and developed. She also explains how instructors were selected when the MA program was launched. She speaks about the challenges in the B.S program and why it was necessary to start a PhD program. Professor Kenney concludes by talking about the future of the program and the possibility of offering distance-learning courses.

See full interview here: https://youtu.be/hWrvAq-KjgA

 

Dr. Geoffrey Koby

Dr. Geoffrey Koby talks about his background and first involvement as a faculty member in the Institute of Applied Linguistic at its first inception. He also talks about the development of curriculum from the beginning of IAL establishment to today and highlights a period when there was a change by focusing more on translation and translation technology instead of interpreting studies. He also elaborates the history of ATISA, who firstly had the idea of setting up the association, who came to the first meeting and who was appointed as the first chair. He concludes with his own expectations about the future of Translation Studies, sending a personal message for future comers (students and faculty members) to the field.

See full interview here: https://youtu.be/3YoEIlcZfG0

 

Dr. Christina Schäffner

Professor Christina Schaeffner was a graduate student at the University of Leipzig when Dr. Shreve went there in the mid-80’s on an exchange. She was then a visiting professor at Kent, helping to set up the translation program—that is, to develop curricula, and she was also involved in hiring the first faculty members.  Professor Schaeffner was one of the early supporters of the translation programs at Kent State. In the video interview, she gives a historical narrative of the early stages of the founding of the translation programs, talking about key figures and major events that have led to the creation of the programs. The vision of the program is also touched upon, demonstrating how that vision behind its inception guided the staffing decisions that were made by the faculty at that time. She also describes the curriculum and the courses that were taught when the program first started. Besides, she tells about the various types of academic activities that were organized by the department back then, giving details about her involvement and in them.

See full interview here: https://youtu.be/taCQGnXHkAU

 

Dr. Gregory Shreve

In this video, Dr. Gregory Shreve, the founder of the translation program at Kent State University, recounts how the program was established, including motivations and important events, such as his trip to the University of Leipzig. It was there that he met Albert Neubert and Christina Schaffner who were both essential in creating the original curriculum.

See full interview here: https://youtu.be/vpynECZ1Tmg

 

Dr. Sue Ellen Wright

Professor Sue Ellen Wright talks about how the program has started and developed. She stresses the importance of technology for translators, explaining how the localization and terminology courses developed. She also talks about how the program is keeping up with what is happening in the language industry. In addition, she talks about successful the PhD program is and how research-oriented the program is. 

See full interview here: https://youtu.be/f4oO131P6M8