Criteria for Determining Merit Awards | Ashtabula Handbook | Kent State University

Criteria for Determining Merit Awards

Because of the significant variation in the roles and responsibilities, disciplines and departments, as well as college or school expectations, the formulation or application of one specific, narrowly circumscribed definition of “Merit” is inappropriate in the determination of Merit. However, a more general and useful conception of “Merit” can be applied, which is based on a few guiding criteria and certain identifiable qualities, activities, and issues common to all excellent faculty members, regardless of their varied roles and responsibilities. Thus, the following guiding criteria shall apply in determining “Merit.”

 

“Merit” is demonstrated by the following:

 

  1. The evident performance by a faculty member in Teaching.
  2. The evident performance by a faculty member in Research (including creative productivity) above and beyond expectations of standard, acceptable faculty performance.
  3. The evident performance by a faculty member in campus, university, professional, and appropriate community Service that is above and beyond time commitments and contributions usually expected of faculty members.

 

In determining the extent to which the performance, contributions, or achievements of a faculty member satisfy these guiding criteria for “Merit,” it is useful to consider some examples of (1) expected or “baseline” faculty performance, and (2) meritorious faculty performance.

 

A.  Being mindful of the significant variation in faculty roles and responsibilities, disciplines and departments, as well as college or school expectations, examples of expected or “baseline” faculty performance during the “merit period” may be evidenced by:

 

  1. Average classroom performance teaching 24 load hours/year as evaluated by student surveys;
  2. Regular attendance at office hours;
  3. Writing student recommendations;

Some effort to remain current in pedagogy;

  1. Some participation in campus service activities, e.g., service on a campus, department, or university committee or two;
  2. Some effort to remain current in the area of expertise, e.g., a conference attendance or two.

 

B.  Being mindful of the significant variation in faculty roles and responsibilities, disciplines and departments, as well as college or school expectations, examples of meritorious faculty performance during the “merit period” may be evidenced by:

 

  1. Consistent above-average classroom performance as indicated by student surveys and/or peer reviews;
  2. Assisting students with publications or presentations;
  3. Recruitment and retention activities;
  4. Classroom pedagogical and technological innovations;
  5. Teaching or service awards;
  6. Extensive, positive contributions of time and effort to campus, department, university, professional, and public service;
  7. Significant scholarly or creative contributions as determined by the faculty member’s discipline;
  8. Efforts in campus or university outreach;
  9. Bringing recognition to Kent State Ashtabula.