Participating Units/External Partners

Participating Units

One distinctive feature of the Brain Health Research Institute at Kent State is the wide diversity and range of its research. These researchers represent over 25 departments throughout the Kent State University system in the following colleges, both at the Kent State main and regional campuses:

College of Architecture and Environmental Studies

College of Arts and Sciences

College of the Arts

College of Business

College of Communication Studies

College of Education, Health and Human Services

College of Nursing

College of Public Health

 

External Partners

Working together with external partners that include Akron Children’s Hospital, the Cleveland Clinic and the Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED), the goal of the BHRI is to translate basic neuroscience discoveries into new treatments and care for brain and nervous system diseases.

The BHRI is a also member of the Cleveland Brain Health Initiative based at Case Western Reserve University. Additionally, BHRI members collaborate with researchers at other healthcare entities in Northeast Ohio, including University Hospitals and Aultman Hospital.

Akron Children's Hospital

Akron Children’s Hospital includes pediatric experts in developmental and behavioral pediatrics, neurobehavioral psychology, neurology, neurosurgery and physical medicine and rehabilitation.

Cleveland Clinic

The Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute is at the forefront of discovery, with scientists working to uncover novel biological pathways and develop new medical devices, diagnostics and therapies for cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, brain and eye diseases, and diseases of the inflammation and immune systems. 

Northeast Ohio Medical University

The Northeast Ohio Medical University conducts research within its colleges as well as through six Research Focus Areas:

  • Community-Based Mental Health
  • Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
  • Hearing
  • Heart and Blood Vessel Disease
  • Musculoskeletal
  • Neurodegenerative Disease and Aging