Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Systems Engineering Technology

The Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Systems Engineering Technology program is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org and AABI. The Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautical Systems Engineering Technology prepares graduates to enter careers in the design, installation, manufacturing, testing, evaluation, technical sales and maintenance of aeronautical/aerospace systems.

Students gain technical expertise in engineering materials, statics, strength of materials, applied aerodynamics, applied propulsion and electronics. Graduates will have strengths in the analysis, applied design, development, implementation and oversight of more advanced aeronautical/aerospace systems and processes.

The mission of the Aeronautical Systems Engineering Technology program is to prepare students for entry-level positions or graduate-level education in aeronautical systems, systems engineering, engineering technology, or other closely-related fields upon graduation.

Study Objective

The objective of the Aeronautical Systems Engineering Technology program is to prepare students for entry-level professional careers in aviation systems engineering and technology fields. The program education objectives are:

  1. Students shall demonstrate a thorough understanding of fundamental aeronautical concepts and practices
  2. Students shall understand attributes of a modern aviation professional
  3. Students shall apply engineering principles and practices to real-world design problems

Program Educational Goals:  Consistent with the mission of Kent State University, which states, “We transform lives and communicates through the power of discovery, learning and creative expression in an inclusive environment, “the education goals of the Aeronautical Systems Engineering Technology program are as follows:

  1. Educational Goal #1: As measured by the class of 2024, at least 80% of students in each program participate in experiential learning opportunities outside the classroom and/or one’s own major
    1. Participation is defined as at least one full semester of active participation
    2. Opportunities include full-semester courses, internships, co-ops, student groups (i.e. high-powered rocket club, precision flight team) or addition of a minor
  2. Educational Goal #2: As measured by the class of 2024 at least 10% of students in each program participate in undergraduate research opportunities.
  3. Educational Goal #3: Increase the four-year graduation rate by 10%.
  4. Educational Goal #4: Increase the six-year graduation rate to match or exceed the University, Kent-campus preponderant rate of 52%.
    1. If a program already exceeds this rate, match or exceed KSU’s Peer High (OU) rate of 63%.
    2. If a program already exceeds this rate, increase by 5% over previous years or maintain rate consistently for three years.

View Overview (including Admission Requirements), Program Requirements, and Roadmap for the BS degree in Aeronautical Systems Engineering Technology

Click Here To View Program Assessment Measures Employed

What Is the Difference Between Engineering and Engineering Technology?

The line between the two is becoming more blurred since responsibilities overlap more now than ever. In general, an engineer has a theoretical understanding of how something is happening. The curriculum for engineers includes high-level math, theory, and conceptual design. Whereas, the curriculum for engineering technology programs focus on the implementation of engineering principles to solve problems. Engineering Technology tends to be more hands-on and application oriented teaching students to operate, maintain, trouble-shoot, inspect, and test systems. Graduates from these programs can speak intelligently about the technology to communicate with those on the plant floor, upper management and customers and users for sales purposes. It is possible that both engineers and engineer technologists may design a product to solve a problem, but the engineer would be more likely to discover a new technology, practice, or principle. An engineering technologist would use the new technology created by the engineer and apply it to the product they are designing. The engineer develops the big picture and the engineering technologist works out the details. For more information, download for free: "Is There An Engineer Inside You?" by Celeste Baine.

Engineering v. Engineering Technology

Student Achievement Data

Enrollment as of Fall 2020

Freshman

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Total

20

16

21

9

66

 

Graduation Rates

Term

Cohort

Retention

SO-JR

JR-SR

4 Year

5 Year

6 Year

2010F

18

94.4%

61.1%

55.6%

16.7%

33.3%

33.3%

2011F

16

87.5%

75.0%

81.3%

31.3%

62.5%

75.0%

2012F

15

66.7%

33.3%

40.0%

0.0%

13.3%

26.7%

2013F

11

90.9%

81.8%

72.7%

9.1%

45.5%

81.8%

2014F

17

88.2%

70.6%

76.5%

17.6%

29.4%

47.1%

2015F

12

58.3%

58.3%

58.3%

0.0%

41.7%

 

2016F

18

88.9%

77.8%

66.7%

38.9%

   

2017F

15

66.7%

66.7%

66.7%

     

2018F

27

85.2%

66.7%

       

2019F

18

77.8%

         

2020F

13

           

Graduates of this program have found employment with the following types of companies:

  • NASA
  • Lockheed Martin
  • The Boeing Company