Honors Students Plan Busy Year on Salem Campus

Students Challenged, Excel in Honors Program at Salem

Honors Program students include (from left) Advisor Andy Pfrenger, Julie Pavlich, Molly Davidson, Julia Pitcock, Tyler Stratton, Kayla Bigelow, Heath Lude, Mackenzie Godwin, Heather Lude, Joshua Tungate, Katie Cannon, Leanne Strawn, Lindsey Rice, Stephanie Giles, Conni Cross, Brianna Parfaite, Amber Biser and Heather Sutherin.   Kent State University’s Honors Program provides students on all campuses opportunities to participate in learning experiences that are challenging and that provide enriching experiences in the students’ areas of interest. On the Salem Campus this year, 12 new students were admitted into the program and they wasted no time creating a “to-do” list of community and campus service projects, as well as academic pursuits.

The students formed the Honors Club to help organize planning and the implementation of their many projects. Officers include Brianna Parfaite as president; Heather Sutherin as vice president; Conni Cross as secretary; and Lindsey Rice as treasurer.

Honors students train for upcoming Justice Talking presentations.This semester, the students are hosting a Halloween party for children at the Fleming House; volunteering at the Banquet of Lisbon; providing tutoring for English as a second language at St. Paul’s; volunteering at the Salem Historical Society; working for the Undergraduate Research Conference; and organizing a Christmas concert at a local nursing home.

The honors students recently completed training with the Ohio Humanities for Justice Talking, a service-oriented outreach program that brings people together to read and discuss texts that prompt thoughtful conversations about service, justice and civic engagement.

“Students will go out into the community with the Columbiana County Youth Leadership Summit  to put the leadership and facilitator skills from the training to use,” explained Dr. Andrew Pfrenger, English faculty and advisor of the Honors Program at Salem. “The hope is to encourage reflection that might result in a deeper understanding of the values inherent in public service activities.”

First and second semester students with minimum 3.3 GPAs and ACT scores of 25 are encouraged to contact Pfrenger to become active with the program (apfrenge@kent.edu).

“This is an active group and they’re excited to raise awareness of the program,” he said.

For more information about the Honors Program on the Columbiana County campuses, visit http://www.kent.edu/columbiana/honors-program.

# # # 

Photo:
Honors Program students include (from left) Advisor Dr. Andrew Pfrenger, Julie Pavlich, Molly Davidson, Julia Pitcock, Tyler Stratton, Kayla Bigelow, Heath Lude, Mackenzie Godwin, Heather Lude, Joshua Tungate, Katie Cannon, Leanne Strawn, Lindsey Rice, Stephanie Giles, Conni Cross, Brianna Parfaite, Amber Biser and Heather Sutherin.   

Friday, February 03, 2023

Gus Holman knows a thing or two about mushrooms.

First, he knows that morel mushrooms are prized finds by those who hunt and gather them. Secondly, he knows that these mushrooms are expensive for others to purchase. And, he knows that morels are not easy to grow outside of their natural environment.

Knowing these three basic facts helped lead him to the Kent State Salem Campus and, ultimately, an extensive research project involving morel mushrooms.

“My interest in studying mushrooms started with a conversation with my father,” Holman shared. “While building my parents a greenhouse, my dad was lamenting over the fact that he hasn’t found a single morel mushroom in the past several years. I had recently seen a story where a lucky person was able to grow morels in their backyard after many trials and errors. … I promised my father that on my next visit we could follow the same steps.”

It was then that his research truly began; the “spores” were planted.

Gus Holman in the HORT Lab at Kent State University at Salem

“After my visit (with my father), I couldn’t stop thinking about trying to grow these mushrooms, so I decided to try to grow morels in my own backyard,” Holman said. “After further research into growing morels, I learned that these mushrooms are very difficult to grow and only a few commercial producers exist around the world. This led me to my own investigation of cultivating morel mushrooms under climate-controlled conditions.”

Originally from Skandia, Michigan, Holman graduated in 2016 from Northern Michigan University with an associate degree in industrial maintenance technology. He moved to the Cleveland area and began working for a pest control company, working his way through the ranks to become a branch manager for the company.

“Shortly after this, the COVID pandemic and a tough medical diagnosis led me to realize that I need to build a career that I truly enjoyed working in,” he said. “That’s what ultimately brought me to the Salem Campus.”

Holman is a junior horticulture technology major on the Salem Campus, where he also works as a student employee doing general groundskeeping tasks such as plant installation, fertilization, pruning, weeding and landscape maintenance. He recently assembled the new hydroponic and aeroponic plant growing systems in the greenhouse and is now tasked with removing invasive plant species from the campus grounds.

He is not afraid of getting dirty, which helps when studying morel mushrooms!

For those unfamiliar with these mushrooms, morels grow wild and elusively throughout North America and Europe, typically in heavily wooded areas. They begin popping up in the spring and the morel hunting season usually extends from mid-April to mid-June.    Morel enthusiasts are known to keep their favorite hunting spots a secret and they find great joy in foraging for them.

Harvesting morel mushrooms is a physical and time-consuming process; they are seasonal, somewhat fragile and perishable, which makes them quite pricey.

“Morel mushrooms are often very difficult to find in the wild because they need an ideal chain of environmental conditions to grow the actual mushroom caps,” Holman explained. “It’s also believed that a changing climate is reducing the number of morels produced each year. So, with both of those factors in mind, I hope to achieve a way to produce these mushrooms sustainably for commercial consumption.”

Gus Holman is hands-on with his research project.

For his research, Holman is studying the yellow morel (Morchella americana) and the black morel (Morchella angusticeps) species, trying to grow them in a controlled lab environment.

So far, he has found the ideal temperature and humidity conditions that produce abundant growth of morel mycelium. “Mycelium can be thought of as the roots of the mushroom,” he explained. “I have also found a promising growing mixture to base the next steps of my research on.

Holman further explained that one of his biggest challenges he faced through this process was dealing with mold. “When trying to cultivate fungi, like in my research, you create a perfect environment in which all types of fungi like mold and mildew grow. These often-harmful fungi can easily outcompete or disease the mushrooms I’m researching.”

Last summer, Holman received a SURE fellowship which helped him focus on his research. The Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) provides opportunities for undergraduate students to work with faculty mentors to gain firsthand research experience. Those receiving the fellowships are funded over an eight-week course to conduct their research.

After eight weeks, the student researchers presented their findings through a three-minute thesis presentation at a conference on the Kent Campus. Holman placed second at that event.

This past fall, he placed first in the poster presentation category during the Salem Campus Undergraduate Research Conference.

Holman gives credit to the faculty on the Salem Campus for supporting his research and encouraging him throughout this journey, especially Dr. Sarah Eichler of the horticulture program. “Without her guidance and knowledge, my time here at Kent would not be the same,” he said.

“Of course, Dr. Sheren Farag (director of the horticulture program) has been encouraging and wants to see me go on into a graduate program. Also, without Dr. Louise Steele’s (assistant professor of biology) autoclave knowledge and experience, my research would not have been as successful.”

After graduation, Holman said he would like to start his own business, incorporating his research into that venture. “I plan to continue my research after graduation and, potentially, seek a career in mushroom cultivation,” he said. “I also want to continue my education and find a graduate program in mycology, the study of fungi.”

While quite serious about his research and his academic studies, Holman is a cheerful young man with a great sense of humor. When folks “joke” that he must be a “fun guy” because of his research with mushrooms and fungi, he has a ready-made response: “No, I’m just Fun-Gus!”

Evidence of Gus Holman’s groundskeeping work on the Salem Campus grounds: a welcome to KSU.

Cutline A: Gus Holman

Cutline B: A growing mixture that could help produce morel mushrooms on a commercial basis. For now, it’s being used in a lab on the Salem Campus.

Cutline C: Gus Holman is hands-on with his research project.

Cutline D: Evidence of Gus Holman’s groundskeeping work on the Salem Campus grounds: a welcome to KSU.

 

Tuesday, January 31, 2023
Chris Carlson

Chris Carlson was a beloved professor of horticulture on the Salem Campus who helped create the program that is unique to this campus. Unfortunately, Carlson lost his battle with ALS and passed away last fall.

Aside from his obvious love of his family, friends and teaching on the Salem Campus, Carlson also had a passion for music. He loved playing, singing, listening to and sharing music of all genres.

Performing on campus: Acoustic Flashback with The Professor

Last December, the Salem VFW Post 892 held an all-day fundraiser that paid tribute to Carlson’s life and the things that mattered most to him. Organized by Post Commander Doug Bannon, the event featured a dinner, raffles and 11 local musical acts by artists who often shared a stage with Carlson in the past.  

The event raised $2,000 which was donated to the horticulture program on the Kent State Salem Campus.

“Chris was a friend to many, and we all know how much he loved this campus and sharing his knowledge with the students,” Bannon said. “A day of music and friendship was a perfect way to honor his memory. We are proud to help support the horticulture program at Kent State because we know that is what Chris would want most.”


Cutline A: Pictured to acknowledge the $2,000 donation to the horticulture program at Kent State Salem are (from left) Dr. Sheren Farag, director of the horticulture program; Billy Syppko, chief of staff at the Salem VFW Post #892; Doug Bannon, post commander for the Salem VFW Post #892; and Dr. Brad Bielski, interim dean of the Salem Campus.

Cutline B: Chris Carlson

Cutline C: Performing on campus: Acoustic Flashback with The Professor

Thursday, January 26, 2023

 

Zacharie Dancy-Burgess is pinned by Krista Hawkins, lecturer

Kent State at Salem held its inaugural White Coat Ceremony for students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program, signifying a rite of passage as they transition into the nursing field.

The 20 sophomore BSN students each received a white coat that will help establish their “professional identity” and coincides with the beginning of their clinical training. 

The White Coat Ceremony was established in 1993 at Columbia University by the Gold Foundation as a way to highlight the importance of humanism in the caring of patients and is intended for those training to become healthcare professionals. For nearly 30 years, these types of ceremonies have occurred at medical schools and began with nursing schools in 2014.

Kasey Stabinski (left) receiving her coat from senior BSN students Baylee McCandless and Jessica Kisner

In her welcome to those gathered for the ceremony, BSN Lecturer Tara Murphy congratulated the students for reaching this milestone and reminded them of the commitment each must make to becoming a nurse.

“This is the day your life begins to change,” she said. “This is the day you commit to growing into the professional nurse you aspire to be for the rest of your career. There are many rights and privileges associated with being a member of the nursing profession, but there is also great responsibility.”

Senior BSN student Baylee McCandless presenting the white coat to Chloe Chappell

Led by Lorene Martin, program coordinator and faculty member, the students recited a pledge to accept and uphold the tenets of the nursing profession that include integrity, excellence, compassion, collaboration, altruism, respect, resilience, empathy and service.

Aside from the white coat, each student also received a lapel pin from the faculty on behalf of the Gold Foundation.

“That pin is a visual reminder of the pledge you made today,” Martin noted. “If you have a challenging experience at a clinical site or find yourself questioning why chose this path, look at this pin and remember what you pledged: to care for your patients with compassion, dignity, respect and empathy.”

Murphy read a blessing of the hands to signify how the students’ hands will perform life-saving tasks; bring comfort and peace to patients and their families; and provide care to the sick and scared,

“These hands will deliver compassion and respect for the people and families in your care,” she stated. “You may never understand all the ways your hands can heal, but your patients will. Being a nurse is a privilege and a gift to humanity.”

Kent State University at Salem BSN class of 2025 with their white coats

The BSN students honored in the White Coat Ceremony included Veronica Ballew, Chloe Chappell, Zacharie Dancy-Burgess, Joshua Darsie, Annie Davidson, Katie Dunn, Cally Mason, Morgan McGaffick, Rachael McGinnis, Olivia McCoy, Baylee Mohr, Jordyn Palicka, Nakkiya-Rose Plummer, Allysa Rance, Madison Rhome, Sundra Sacconi, Kasey Stabinski, Madalyn Thrasher, Hannah Yannucci and Bria Zban.


Cutline A: Blessing of the hands.

Cutline B: Zacharie Dancy-Burgess is pinned by Krista Hawkins, lecturer 

Cutline C:  Kasey Stabinski (left) receiving her coat from senior BSN students Baylee McCandless and Jessica Kisner

Cutline D: Senior BSN student Baylee McCandless presenting the white coat to Chloe Chappell

Cutline E: The BSN class of 2025 with their white coats include (back, from left): Joshua Darsie, Olivia McCoy, Allysa Rance, Katie Dunn, Cally Mason, Baylee Mohr, Bria Zban, Chloe Chappell, Annie Davidson; (middle, from left) Morgan McGaffick, Nakkiya Plummer, Hannah Yannucci, Zacharie Dancy-Burgess, Sundra Sacconi, Madison Rhome; and (front, from left) Rachael (Abby) McGinnis, Jordyn Palicka, Kasey Stabinski, Veronica Ballew, Madalyn Thrasher. 

Tuesday, January 24, 2023
BSN Students and faculty who traveled to South Dakota fall semester 2022.

In the southwest corner of South Dakota, on the Nebraska border and at the southern end of the Badlands, sits the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. It is home to the Ogalala Lakota Nation.

This fall, faculty and students from the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at Kent State Salem traveled to the reservation in what has become an almost annual excursion. The COVID-19 pandemic put a halt to the trips over the last three years, which made this return visit quite significant for members of the group.

Leading the way was Lorene Martin, program coordinator for the BSN program on the Salem Campus. She was joined by Melissa Duvall, BSN faculty member, and 11 nursing students.

The students are all enrolled in the semester-long transcultural nursing course and must complete the health and human services modules on culture before embarking on the trip. The course begins with cultural pre-immersion meetings in which the students learn about the reservation and the Lakota people and then requires them to each make a class presentation.

“The course and the trip are meant to allow students to begin the journey toward cultural humility and understanding,” Martin explained. “I find the Lakota people so kind, welcoming and warm. Every time I go, I leave with sadness when thinking about the plight of this beautiful culture and the abhorrent conditions in which they continue to exist. I also am so fulfilled to watch students begin this journey of understanding and compassion.

“These are future nurses and they must see other cultures through a lens of humility and acceptance. This the just a beginning, but watching their transition is amazing!”

About Pine Ridge

Pine Ridge is the eighth largest reservation in the U.S. and is the poorest of all. It covers 2 million square acres and has a population of about 20,000 people.  Most families live in small homes without electricity, telephone, running water or sewage systems. The annual median household income is $26,000.

The unemployment rate is 89% and the average life expectancy is the lowest in the western hemisphere (52-66 years for women; 47-58 for men).

The reservation makes up the Oglala Lakota County which ranked 59 out of 69 counties in South Dakota for overall health outcomes (2017). One in four children born on Pine Ridge is diagnosed with either fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

Approximately 85% of Lakota families are affected by alcoholism and there is a methamphetamine drug crisis, leading to alarming rates of teen suicide (150% higher than the U.S. average), infant mortality (300% higher), tuberculosis, diabetes and death.

Travel log

A Halloween at the Pine Ridge Dormitory.

This year’s trip started in Rapid City, South Dakota, with stops at the local Walmart and Dollar General. Using nearly $2,000 in gift cards (purchased with donations from Salem Campus faculty and students, as well as community members), the group purchased socks, boots, hats, gloves, clothing and personal hygiene items to be given to children at the Pine Ridge Dormitory.

The next morning, the students visited Crazy Horse Mountain to learn more about the Lakota culture and the historical significance of this region.

From there, the group drove to a hotel in Gordon, Nebraska, which is about 20 minutes from the reservation.

Kent State students at Bennett County Hospital

“There are no other available, suitable hotels on the reservation for this trip,” Martin explained. “Interestingly, the cultural immersion begins at the hotel. Students were disappointed that there were not more amenities --no pool and no nearby restaurants. The hotel is older and small, but very clean and the owners were very accommodating. Thus begins the understanding of the immersion into this extremely rural, isolated area. No Starbucks!”

The next three days were spent at Bennett County Hospital in Martin, South Dakota. The facility serves Lakota natives with its small hospital, emergency department, rural health clinic and an extended care facility.

The students rotated through each of the units and some were invited on home health visits with public health nurses.

The hospital administrator met with the students and led an in-depth discussion about the disparities and lack of access to healthcare in that part of the country, as well as challenges related to cultural traditions.

One afternoon, the group delivered the collection of donations to the Pine Ridge Dormitory, a facility housing 110 children in kindergarten through 12th grade. Because homes are spread so far across the Pine Ridge area, making daily travel to school almost impossible for most families, the children arrive at the dormitory each Sunday evening and stay until school is dismissed on Friday afternoon.

“Most of the children arrive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs, so the donations of personal items were greatly needed and appreciated,” Martin said. “We were invited to eat in the cafeteria with the children and we spent a great deal of time on the playground and talking with them. We even had a small Halloween party with pinatas, glow sticks and other games.”

Cultural immersion

During a visit to the Oglala Lakota College Historical Center, the nursing students learned more about the history of the Oglala Lakota people, including the colonization of the tribes to the reservation, the stripping of their cultural and spiritual beliefs, the killing of the buffalo and the atrocities of the Wounded Knee Massacre that occurred on Dec. 29, 1890.

Learning Lakota history

The group visited the Wounded Knee Cemetery and the site of the massacre and mass burial. While there, the students engaged in conversations with several Pine Ridge residents who were selling handmade dreamcatchers and jewelry – an important source of income for them.

“As always, I find that we are warmly received wherever we go,” Martin said. “I find that the Lakota are anxious to tell their story and be heard.”

She noted that this part of the trip is always enlightening for students, but the real lessons in social and economic disparities happen during the “windshield survey” that follows.

“We drove into the heart of Pine Ridge and the students did a survey of the homes, available resources, lack of resources and such,” she said. “Then, we went to the only grocery store and they had to compare prices to where we live.”

Through her many trips to Pine Ridge, Martin has become friends with several residents and considers many of her contacts colleagues. One such woman, Patricia Hammond, is Lakota and active in a community garden initiative on the reservation. She met with the students to share her story of living and growing up on the reservation while addressing health concerns and food insecurities of her people.

Hammond led a tour through the “high-tower” gardens on her property and shared her knowledge of traditional herbs and foraged foods while also discussing her work to help build handicapped accessible gardens within the community.

Lessons learned

Martin explained that during the trip, each student must complete a self-reflecting journal entry each day and participate in a daily debriefing. Once back on campus, the students must each submit two journals and attend a focus-group debriefing session.

“The journals and debriefing sessions are aimed at increasing awareness of what they had experienced each day,” she said. “My goal is for them to begin a reflective evaluation of their cultural biases, begin to find humility in the ethnocentricity that they may not have noticed before and to be intrigued enough to further their cultural experiences and education. One thing that I try to make them understand is that cultural competence is a journey, not a destination!”


Cutline A: Students and faculty who traveled to South Dakota this year included (front, from left) Natalie Ammon, Aubrianna Mellott, Karsyn Faulk; (middle, from left) Makenzie Ashe, Ilania Schmidt, Baylee McCandless, Brielle Waugaman, Lorene Martin; and (back, from left) Alexis Rhodes, Chloe Chappell, Melissa Duvall, Paige Adkins, Katie Goodwyn.

Cutline B: Halloween at the Pine Ridge Dormitory

Cutline C: Kent State students at Bennett County Hospital

Cutline D: Learning Lakota history

Tuesday, January 24, 2023
BSN Students and faculty who traveled to South Dakota fall semester 2022.

In the southwest corner of South Dakota, on the Nebraska border and at the southern end of the Badlands, sits the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. It is home to the Ogalala Lakota Nation.

This fall, faculty and students from the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at Kent State Salem traveled to the reservation in what has become an almost annual excursion. The COVID-19 pandemic put a halt to the trips over the last three years, which made this return visit quite significant for members of the group.

Leading the way was Lorene Martin, program coordinator for the BSN program on the Salem Campus. She was joined by Melissa Duvall, BSN faculty member, and 11 nursing students.

The students are all enrolled in the semester-long transcultural nursing course and must complete the health and human services modules on culture before embarking on the trip. The course begins with cultural pre-immersion meetings in which the students learn about the reservation and the Lakota people and then requires them to each make a class presentation.

“The course and the trip are meant to allow students to begin the journey toward cultural humility and understanding,” Martin explained. “I find the Lakota people so kind, welcoming and warm. Every time I go, I leave with sadness when thinking about the plight of this beautiful culture and the abhorrent conditions in which they continue to exist. I also am so fulfilled to watch students begin this journey of understanding and compassion.

“These are future nurses and they must see other cultures through a lens of humility and acceptance. This the just a beginning, but watching their transition is amazing!”

About Pine Ridge

Pine Ridge is the eighth largest reservation in the U.S. and is the poorest of all. It covers 2 million square acres and has a population of about 20,000 people.  Most families live in small homes without electricity, telephone, running water or sewage systems. The annual median household income is $26,000.

The unemployment rate is 89% and the average life expectancy is the lowest in the western hemisphere (52-66 years for women; 47-58 for men).

The reservation makes up the Oglala Lakota County which ranked 59 out of 69 counties in South Dakota for overall health outcomes (2017). One in four children born on Pine Ridge is diagnosed with either fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

Approximately 85% of Lakota families are affected by alcoholism and there is a methamphetamine drug crisis, leading to alarming rates of teen suicide (150% higher than the U.S. average), infant mortality (300% higher), tuberculosis, diabetes and death.

Travel log

A Halloween at the Pine Ridge Dormitory.

This year’s trip started in Rapid City, South Dakota, with stops at the local Walmart and Dollar General. Using nearly $2,000 in gift cards (purchased with donations from Salem Campus faculty and students, as well as community members), the group purchased socks, boots, hats, gloves, clothing and personal hygiene items to be given to children at the Pine Ridge Dormitory.

The next morning, the students visited Crazy Horse Mountain to learn more about the Lakota culture and the historical significance of this region.

From there, the group drove to a hotel in Gordon, Nebraska, which is about 20 minutes from the reservation.

Kent State students at Bennett County Hospital

“There are no other available, suitable hotels on the reservation for this trip,” Martin explained. “Interestingly, the cultural immersion begins at the hotel. Students were disappointed that there were not more amenities --no pool and no nearby restaurants. The hotel is older and small, but very clean and the owners were very accommodating. Thus begins the understanding of the immersion into this extremely rural, isolated area. No Starbucks!”

The next three days were spent at Bennett County Hospital in Martin, South Dakota. The facility serves Lakota natives with its small hospital, emergency department, rural health clinic and an extended care facility.

The students rotated through each of the units and some were invited on home health visits with public health nurses.

The hospital administrator met with the students and led an in-depth discussion about the disparities and lack of access to healthcare in that part of the country, as well as challenges related to cultural traditions.

One afternoon, the group delivered the collection of donations to the Pine Ridge Dormitory, a facility housing 110 children in kindergarten through 12th grade. Because homes are spread so far across the Pine Ridge area, making daily travel to school almost impossible for most families, the children arrive at the dormitory each Sunday evening and stay until school is dismissed on Friday afternoon.

“Most of the children arrive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs, so the donations of personal items were greatly needed and appreciated,” Martin said. “We were invited to eat in the cafeteria with the children and we spent a great deal of time on the playground and talking with them. We even had a small Halloween party with pinatas, glow sticks and other games.”

Cultural immersion

During a visit to the Oglala Lakota College Historical Center, the nursing students learned more about the history of the Oglala Lakota people, including the colonization of the tribes to the reservation, the stripping of their cultural and spiritual beliefs, the killing of the buffalo and the atrocities of the Wounded Knee Massacre that occurred on Dec. 29, 1890.

Learning Lakota history

The group visited the Wounded Knee Cemetery and the site of the massacre and mass burial. While there, the students engaged in conversations with several Pine Ridge residents who were selling handmade dreamcatchers and jewelry – an important source of income for them.

“As always, I find that we are warmly received wherever we go,” Martin said. “I find that the Lakota are anxious to tell their story and be heard.”

She noted that this part of the trip is always enlightening for students, but the real lessons in social and economic disparities happen during the “windshield survey” that follows.

“We drove into the heart of Pine Ridge and the students did a survey of the homes, available resources, lack of resources and such,” she said. “Then, we went to the only grocery store and they had to compare prices to where we live.”

Through her many trips to Pine Ridge, Martin has become friends with several residents and considers many of her contacts colleagues. One such woman, Patricia Hammond, is Lakota and active in a community garden initiative on the reservation. She met with the students to share her story of living and growing up on the reservation while addressing health concerns and food insecurities of her people.

Hammond led a tour through the “high-tower” gardens on her property and shared her knowledge of traditional herbs and foraged foods while also discussing her work to help build handicapped accessible gardens within the community.

Lessons learned

Martin explained that during the trip, each student must complete a self-reflecting journal entry each day and participate in a daily debriefing. Once back on campus, the students must each submit two journals and attend a focus-group debriefing session.

“The journals and debriefing sessions are aimed at increasing awareness of what they had experienced each day,” she said. “My goal is for them to begin a reflective evaluation of their cultural biases, begin to find humility in the ethnocentricity that they may not have noticed before and to be intrigued enough to further their cultural experiences and education. One thing that I try to make them understand is that cultural competence is a journey, not a destination!”


Cutline A: Students and faculty who traveled to South Dakota this year included (front, from left) Natalie Ammon, Aubrianna Mellott, Karsyn Faulk; (middle, from left) Makenzie Ashe, Ilania Schmidt, Baylee McCandless, Brielle Waugaman, Lorene Martin; and (back, from left) Alexis Rhodes, Chloe Chappell, Melissa Duvall, Paige Adkins, Katie Goodwyn.

Cutline B: Halloween at the Pine Ridge Dormitory

Cutline C: Kent State students at Bennett County Hospital

Cutline D: Learning Lakota history

Tuesday, January 24, 2023
BSN Students and faculty who traveled to South Dakota fall semester 2022.

In the southwest corner of South Dakota, on the Nebraska border and at the southern end of the Badlands, sits the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. It is home to the Ogalala Lakota Nation.

This fall, faculty and students from the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at Kent State Salem traveled to the reservation in what has become an almost annual excursion. The COVID-19 pandemic put a halt to the trips over the last three years, which made this return visit quite significant for members of the group.

Leading the way was Lorene Martin, program coordinator for the BSN program on the Salem Campus. She was joined by Melissa Duvall, BSN faculty member, and 11 nursing students.

The students are all enrolled in the semester-long transcultural nursing course and must complete the health and human services modules on culture before embarking on the trip. The course begins with cultural pre-immersion meetings in which the students learn about the reservation and the Lakota people and then requires them to each make a class presentation.

“The course and the trip are meant to allow students to begin the journey toward cultural humility and understanding,” Martin explained. “I find the Lakota people so kind, welcoming and warm. Every time I go, I leave with sadness when thinking about the plight of this beautiful culture and the abhorrent conditions in which they continue to exist. I also am so fulfilled to watch students begin this journey of understanding and compassion.

“These are future nurses and they must see other cultures through a lens of humility and acceptance. This the just a beginning, but watching their transition is amazing!”

About Pine Ridge

Pine Ridge is the eighth largest reservation in the U.S. and is the poorest of all. It covers 2 million square acres and has a population of about 20,000 people.  Most families live in small homes without electricity, telephone, running water or sewage systems. The annual median household income is $26,000.

The unemployment rate is 89% and the average life expectancy is the lowest in the western hemisphere (52-66 years for women; 47-58 for men).

The reservation makes up the Oglala Lakota County which ranked 59 out of 69 counties in South Dakota for overall health outcomes (2017). One in four children born on Pine Ridge is diagnosed with either fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

Approximately 85% of Lakota families are affected by alcoholism and there is a methamphetamine drug crisis, leading to alarming rates of teen suicide (150% higher than the U.S. average), infant mortality (300% higher), tuberculosis, diabetes and death.

Travel log

A Halloween at the Pine Ridge Dormitory.

This year’s trip started in Rapid City, South Dakota, with stops at the local Walmart and Dollar General. Using nearly $2,000 in gift cards (purchased with donations from Salem Campus faculty and students, as well as community members), the group purchased socks, boots, hats, gloves, clothing and personal hygiene items to be given to children at the Pine Ridge Dormitory.

The next morning, the students visited Crazy Horse Mountain to learn more about the Lakota culture and the historical significance of this region.

From there, the group drove to a hotel in Gordon, Nebraska, which is about 20 minutes from the reservation.

Kent State students at Bennett County Hospital

“There are no other available, suitable hotels on the reservation for this trip,” Martin explained. “Interestingly, the cultural immersion begins at the hotel. Students were disappointed that there were not more amenities --no pool and no nearby restaurants. The hotel is older and small, but very clean and the owners were very accommodating. Thus begins the understanding of the immersion into this extremely rural, isolated area. No Starbucks!”

The next three days were spent at Bennett County Hospital in Martin, South Dakota. The facility serves Lakota natives with its small hospital, emergency department, rural health clinic and an extended care facility.

The students rotated through each of the units and some were invited on home health visits with public health nurses.

The hospital administrator met with the students and led an in-depth discussion about the disparities and lack of access to healthcare in that part of the country, as well as challenges related to cultural traditions.

One afternoon, the group delivered the collection of donations to the Pine Ridge Dormitory, a facility housing 110 children in kindergarten through 12th grade. Because homes are spread so far across the Pine Ridge area, making daily travel to school almost impossible for most families, the children arrive at the dormitory each Sunday evening and stay until school is dismissed on Friday afternoon.

“Most of the children arrive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs, so the donations of personal items were greatly needed and appreciated,” Martin said. “We were invited to eat in the cafeteria with the children and we spent a great deal of time on the playground and talking with them. We even had a small Halloween party with pinatas, glow sticks and other games.”

Cultural immersion

During a visit to the Oglala Lakota College Historical Center, the nursing students learned more about the history of the Oglala Lakota people, including the colonization of the tribes to the reservation, the stripping of their cultural and spiritual beliefs, the killing of the buffalo and the atrocities of the Wounded Knee Massacre that occurred on Dec. 29, 1890.

Learning Lakota history

The group visited the Wounded Knee Cemetery and the site of the massacre and mass burial. While there, the students engaged in conversations with several Pine Ridge residents who were selling handmade dreamcatchers and jewelry – an important source of income for them.

“As always, I find that we are warmly received wherever we go,” Martin said. “I find that the Lakota are anxious to tell their story and be heard.”

She noted that this part of the trip is always enlightening for students, but the real lessons in social and economic disparities happen during the “windshield survey” that follows.

“We drove into the heart of Pine Ridge and the students did a survey of the homes, available resources, lack of resources and such,” she said. “Then, we went to the only grocery store and they had to compare prices to where we live.”

Through her many trips to Pine Ridge, Martin has become friends with several residents and considers many of her contacts colleagues. One such woman, Patricia Hammond, is Lakota and active in a community garden initiative on the reservation. She met with the students to share her story of living and growing up on the reservation while addressing health concerns and food insecurities of her people.

Hammond led a tour through the “high-tower” gardens on her property and shared her knowledge of traditional herbs and foraged foods while also discussing her work to help build handicapped accessible gardens within the community.

Lessons learned

Martin explained that during the trip, each student must complete a self-reflecting journal entry each day and participate in a daily debriefing. Once back on campus, the students must each submit two journals and attend a focus-group debriefing session.

“The journals and debriefing sessions are aimed at increasing awareness of what they had experienced each day,” she said. “My goal is for them to begin a reflective evaluation of their cultural biases, begin to find humility in the ethnocentricity that they may not have noticed before and to be intrigued enough to further their cultural experiences and education. One thing that I try to make them understand is that cultural competence is a journey, not a destination!”


Cutline A: Students and faculty who traveled to South Dakota this year included (front, from left) Natalie Ammon, Aubrianna Mellott, Karsyn Faulk; (middle, from left) Makenzie Ashe, Ilania Schmidt, Baylee McCandless, Brielle Waugaman, Lorene Martin; and (back, from left) Alexis Rhodes, Chloe Chappell, Melissa Duvall, Paige Adkins, Katie Goodwyn.

Cutline B: Halloween at the Pine Ridge Dormitory

Cutline C: Kent State students at Bennett County Hospital

Cutline D: Learning Lakota history

Tuesday, January 24, 2023
BSN Students and faculty who traveled to South Dakota fall semester 2022.

In the southwest corner of South Dakota, on the Nebraska border and at the southern end of the Badlands, sits the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. It is home to the Ogalala Lakota Nation.

This fall, faculty and students from the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at Kent State Salem traveled to the reservation in what has become an almost annual excursion. The COVID-19 pandemic put a halt to the trips over the last three years, which made this return visit quite significant for members of the group.

Leading the way was Lorene Martin, program coordinator for the BSN program on the Salem Campus. She was joined by Melissa Duvall, BSN faculty member, and 11 nursing students.

The students are all enrolled in the semester-long transcultural nursing course and must complete the health and human services modules on culture before embarking on the trip. The course begins with cultural pre-immersion meetings in which the students learn about the reservation and the Lakota people and then requires them to each make a class presentation.

“The course and the trip are meant to allow students to begin the journey toward cultural humility and understanding,” Martin explained. “I find the Lakota people so kind, welcoming and warm. Every time I go, I leave with sadness when thinking about the plight of this beautiful culture and the abhorrent conditions in which they continue to exist. I also am so fulfilled to watch students begin this journey of understanding and compassion.

“These are future nurses and they must see other cultures through a lens of humility and acceptance. This the just a beginning, but watching their transition is amazing!”

About Pine Ridge

Pine Ridge is the eighth largest reservation in the U.S. and is the poorest of all. It covers 2 million square acres and has a population of about 20,000 people.  Most families live in small homes without electricity, telephone, running water or sewage systems. The annual median household income is $26,000.

The unemployment rate is 89% and the average life expectancy is the lowest in the western hemisphere (52-66 years for women; 47-58 for men).

The reservation makes up the Oglala Lakota County which ranked 59 out of 69 counties in South Dakota for overall health outcomes (2017). One in four children born on Pine Ridge is diagnosed with either fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

Approximately 85% of Lakota families are affected by alcoholism and there is a methamphetamine drug crisis, leading to alarming rates of teen suicide (150% higher than the U.S. average), infant mortality (300% higher), tuberculosis, diabetes and death.

Travel log

A Halloween at the Pine Ridge Dormitory.

This year’s trip started in Rapid City, South Dakota, with stops at the local Walmart and Dollar General. Using nearly $2,000 in gift cards (purchased with donations from Salem Campus faculty and students, as well as community members), the group purchased socks, boots, hats, gloves, clothing and personal hygiene items to be given to children at the Pine Ridge Dormitory.

The next morning, the students visited Crazy Horse Mountain to learn more about the Lakota culture and the historical significance of this region.

From there, the group drove to a hotel in Gordon, Nebraska, which is about 20 minutes from the reservation.

Kent State students at Bennett County Hospital

“There are no other available, suitable hotels on the reservation for this trip,” Martin explained. “Interestingly, the cultural immersion begins at the hotel. Students were disappointed that there were not more amenities --no pool and no nearby restaurants. The hotel is older and small, but very clean and the owners were very accommodating. Thus begins the understanding of the immersion into this extremely rural, isolated area. No Starbucks!”

The next three days were spent at Bennett County Hospital in Martin, South Dakota. The facility serves Lakota natives with its small hospital, emergency department, rural health clinic and an extended care facility.

The students rotated through each of the units and some were invited on home health visits with public health nurses.

The hospital administrator met with the students and led an in-depth discussion about the disparities and lack of access to healthcare in that part of the country, as well as challenges related to cultural traditions.

One afternoon, the group delivered the collection of donations to the Pine Ridge Dormitory, a facility housing 110 children in kindergarten through 12th grade. Because homes are spread so far across the Pine Ridge area, making daily travel to school almost impossible for most families, the children arrive at the dormitory each Sunday evening and stay until school is dismissed on Friday afternoon.

“Most of the children arrive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs, so the donations of personal items were greatly needed and appreciated,” Martin said. “We were invited to eat in the cafeteria with the children and we spent a great deal of time on the playground and talking with them. We even had a small Halloween party with pinatas, glow sticks and other games.”

Cultural immersion

During a visit to the Oglala Lakota College Historical Center, the nursing students learned more about the history of the Oglala Lakota people, including the colonization of the tribes to the reservation, the stripping of their cultural and spiritual beliefs, the killing of the buffalo and the atrocities of the Wounded Knee Massacre that occurred on Dec. 29, 1890.

Learning Lakota history

The group visited the Wounded Knee Cemetery and the site of the massacre and mass burial. While there, the students engaged in conversations with several Pine Ridge residents who were selling handmade dreamcatchers and jewelry – an important source of income for them.

“As always, I find that we are warmly received wherever we go,” Martin said. “I find that the Lakota are anxious to tell their story and be heard.”

She noted that this part of the trip is always enlightening for students, but the real lessons in social and economic disparities happen during the “windshield survey” that follows.

“We drove into the heart of Pine Ridge and the students did a survey of the homes, available resources, lack of resources and such,” she said. “Then, we went to the only grocery store and they had to compare prices to where we live.”

Through her many trips to Pine Ridge, Martin has become friends with several residents and considers many of her contacts colleagues. One such woman, Patricia Hammond, is Lakota and active in a community garden initiative on the reservation. She met with the students to share her story of living and growing up on the reservation while addressing health concerns and food insecurities of her people.

Hammond led a tour through the “high-tower” gardens on her property and shared her knowledge of traditional herbs and foraged foods while also discussing her work to help build handicapped accessible gardens within the community.

Lessons learned

Martin explained that during the trip, each student must complete a self-reflecting journal entry each day and participate in a daily debriefing. Once back on campus, the students must each submit two journals and attend a focus-group debriefing session.

“The journals and debriefing sessions are aimed at increasing awareness of what they had experienced each day,” she said. “My goal is for them to begin a reflective evaluation of their cultural biases, begin to find humility in the ethnocentricity that they may not have noticed before and to be intrigued enough to further their cultural experiences and education. One thing that I try to make them understand is that cultural competence is a journey, not a destination!”


Cutline A: Students and faculty who traveled to South Dakota this year included (front, from left) Natalie Ammon, Aubrianna Mellott, Karsyn Faulk; (middle, from left) Makenzie Ashe, Ilania Schmidt, Baylee McCandless, Brielle Waugaman, Lorene Martin; and (back, from left) Alexis Rhodes, Chloe Chappell, Melissa Duvall, Paige Adkins, Katie Goodwyn.

Cutline B: Halloween at the Pine Ridge Dormitory

Cutline C: Kent State students at Bennett County Hospital

Cutline D: Learning Lakota history

Thursday, January 19, 2023
Cheers for the Potters!
Cheers for the Quakers!

Until the final seconds of the contest, the winner of the seventh annual Kent State Columbiana County Classic basketball game between East Liverpool and Salem high schools was anyone’s guess. The two teams matched score for score for four quarters but, ultimately, the Potters claimed the win with a 72-69 score over the Quakers.

With the victory, ELHS leads the County Classic series 4-3.

Representatives from the Kent State Salem and East Liverpool campuses were in the stands cheering on the respective community high schools. Cheerleaders tossed t-shirts into the stands throughout the game and all players, coaches and cheerleaders also received shirts.

Always a favorite, Flash cheered and interacted with fans of all ages. 

The Kent State County Classic represents the strong foundation of learning in East Liverpool and Salem, as each community is home to one of the university’s two Columbiana County campuses. 


Flash with the bust of Lou Holtz: ELHS graduate; Kent State graduate; legendary coach; and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Cutline A:  Flash presented the County Classic traveling plaque to the East Liverpool Potters, who won this year’s contest over the Salem Quakers.

Cutline B: Cheers for the Potters!

Cutline C: Cheers for the Quakers!

Cutline D: Flash with the bust of Lou Holtz: ELHS graduate; Kent State graduate; legendary coach; and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

More photos are available on our Facebook page


 

Wednesday, January 18, 2023

Dr. Bielski, interim dean of Kent State University at East Liverpool, announced those students named to the Fall 2022 dean’s list. To qualify for the dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the East Liverpool Campus. 

The students and their hometowns are:

Kent State University at East Liverpool

Dean’s List

Akron:

  • Connor Boccia

Canton:

  • Arissa Billingsley

Clinton:

  • Grant Palmer

Chardon:

  • Maddy O’Reilly

Dover:

  • Beau Wolf

East Liverpool:

  • Kayley Black
  • Owen Klein
  • Tori Lemasters
  • Chelsey Oiler
  • Treasure Reynolds
  • Anthony Steff

East Palestine:

  • Kassandra Rogers

Geneva:

  • Paige Maunus

Jefferson:

  • Sofia Glink

Lisbon:

  • Kristen Gatrell
  • Tyler Palmer
  • Heavyn Wolski

McDonald:  

  • Zach Stevenson

Middlefield:

  • Daisy Britton

Mogadore:

  • Cassandra Wilde

New Philadelphia:

  • Jessica Sweitzer

Rogers:

  • Jacob Reed

Salem:

  • Brandon Good

Steubenville:

  • Thomas Redman

Stow:

  • Kelsey Kramer

Wellsville:

  • Alana Amato

Odessa, MO:

  • Jimmi Bruner
Tuesday, January 17, 2023

Dr. Brad Bielski, interim dean of Kent State University at Salem, announced those students named to the Fall 2022 President’s and Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the Salem Campus. 

The students and their hometowns are:


President’s List

Alliance:

  • Zaviona Fountain

Boardman:

  • Jessica Johnson
  • Jenna McCollum

Bristolville:  

  • Augustin Holman

Cleveland:

  • Joshua Leonard

Dalton:

  • Marissa Weaver

Deerfield:

  • Brittany Arnold
  • Tabitha Hornof

East Liverpool:

  • Briana Hanlon
  • Emily Miller
  • Olivia Rice

East Palestine:

  • Emily Anderson

East Rochester:

  • Cody Mitchell

East Sparta:

  • Alicia Costello 

Fairlawn:

  • Kelsey Bronson 

Lisbon:

  • Alexia Miller

Perrysburg:

  • Nick Etter

Republic:

  • Colleen Knight

Salem:

  • Peyton Bell
  • Jenna Drayer
  • Rachel Gentile
  • Zac Hawkins
  • Illania Schmidt

Dean’s List

Akron:

  • Lauren Chalmers

Alliance:

  • Leah Decker
  • Lauren Dougherty-Laubacher
  • Alexis Faudree
  • Laci Keppel
  • Madison Rhome
  • Abrielle Walker
  • Ella Wright

Ashtabula:

  • Michael Rocco

Austintown:

  • Madisyn Carter
  • Jordan Kyser

Beloit:

  • Felicia Bonar
  • Ariah Hagan
  • Madison Showalter
  • Gabrielle Smith
  • Mara Woost

Berlin Center:

  • Morgan Donithan
  • Connor Francis

Boardman:

  • Alyssa Alberti
  • Desiree Girardi
  • Tyler Jones

Canfield:

  • Kirsten Adams
  • Matthew Brooks
  • Kailey Charnesky
  • Mackenzie Rusu
  • Marissa Yourstowsky

Canton:

  • Owen Conway
  • William Walker

Cleveland:

  • Laura Willen

Columbiana:

  • Zachary Chaffee
  • McKalie Stickney
  • Clohe Young

Cortland:

  • Alexandria Caldwell
  • Paige Mancini
  • Madison Oriti

Cuyahoga Falls:

  • Andrew Subak

Deerfield:

  • Kristen Hoy

Dover:

  • Hannah Harmon

East Liverpool:

  • Natalie Ammon
  • Heidi Bock
  • Jacqueline Francis
  • Abigail Jackson
  • Destini Mott
  • Kobi Ream
  • Ruth Rickerd
  • Jacob Stewart
  • Jayma Sullivan

East Palestine:

  • Julianne Jones
  • Caitlyn McTrusty

East Rochester:

  • Gabrielle Leek 

Garrettsville:

  • Emma Evitts
  • Emma Trent

Hanoverton:

  • Joel Ellks
  • Emily McKarns

Hebron:

  • Grant Foster

Homeworth:

  • Gracin Adams
  • Bailey Campbell
  • Asa DeSanzo, 

Leavittsburg:

  • Mackenzie Chitwood
  • Ashlyn Riggs

Leetonia:

  • Emily Aukerman
  • Olivia Coontz
  • Mary Guappone
  • Jordan Lewis
  • Allysa Rance

Lisbon:

  • Allison Brown
  • Alyssa Chestnut
  • Jaidynn Entrikin
  • Braylee Jones
  • Heather May
  • Olivia McCoy
  • Kennedy Seaman
  • Alison Sprouse

Loudonville:

  • Benjamin Manchester

Lowellville:

  • Mary Novak

Mantua:

  • Paige Rezabek
  • Alison Yakopovich

McDonald:

  • Jenna Golden

Middleburg Heights:

  • Serena Ramsammy

Millersburg:

  • Jaylie Klusty

Minerva:

  • Caleb Garlock
  • Lauren Swast

New Middleton:

  • Kendra DeWitt

New Springfield:

  • Lydia Wilson

New Waterford:

  • Harlie Coleman
  • Blaine McCurdy
  • Carly Mustake

Niles:

  • Mikayla Busse

North Lima:

  • Baylee McCandless
  • Cassandra Pennicuff
  • Julia Spalding

North Benton:

  • Kaylee Burcaw
  • Alexis Pierce

Novelty:

  • Ashlee Edmonds

Petersburg:

  • Cady McLaughlin

Poland:

  • Zaina Mustafa
  • Keelee Torma

Powell:

  • Jenna Onweller

Ravenna:

  • Ashlee Cool
  • Brandy D’Achille
  • Kyleigh Hayes

Richmond Heights:

  • Ashika Patel

Rogers:

  • Caitlin Marshall
  • Trey Marshall

Rootstown:

  • Joy Carpenter
  • Kayla Schweikert

Salem:

  • Ashlie Algaier
  • Sarah Bobby
  • Chloe Chappell
  • Annie Davidson
  • Alivia Davidson-Chuck
  • Brooke Dustman
  • Ellysa Exline
  • Erica Gudat
  • Allison Gurlea
  • Jessica Kisner
  • Isabella Laut
  • Kaitlyn Libb
  • Sophia Lindner
  • Autumn Little
  • Cassie Madison
  • Molly McGaffick
  • Morgan McGaffick
  • Alexis McKenzie
  • Jerika Milhoan
  • Amanda Morrissey-Custer
  • Catherine Ossman
  • Nakkiya Plummer
  • Corey Riesen
  • John Rupert
  • Laurel Stewart
  • Laura Waters
  • Faith Wittenauer
  • Hannah Yannucci

Salineville:

  • Elizabeth Mostella
  • Elizabeth Willis

Sebring:

  • Aebigayle D’Ostroph
  • Morgan Kincaid
  • Zach Ruzek
  • Skye Somerville

Southington:

  • Samantha Meyers

Streetsboro:

  • Chris DePaul

Struthers:

  • Regan Bayus
  • Renee Leonard

Uhrichsville:

  • Sarah Vogt

Warren:

  • Erica Merkel
  • Kelly Simpson

Wellsville:

  • Iliyah Barnes
  • Camryn Jackson

Willoughby:

  • Isha Verma 

Youngstown:

  • Seth Barrett
  • Victoria Berquist
  • Rachel Derenzis
  • Olivia Donchess
  • Haley Mlynarski
  • Megan Osborne
  • Nina Wilps

Greenville, Penn.:

  • Chris Weeden

Moon Township, Penn.:

  • Jennifer Friello

New Cumberland, W.Va.:

  • Rachael McGinnis
  • Cheryl Wiley
Wednesday, January 04, 2023

Happy New Year!

Winter break is over and a new year begins, but activity on our campuses indicate that we are only halfway through our academic year. Our staff is busy with recruitment, enrollment, advising and scheduling. Faculty members are prepping for the new semester and employees are already making plans for the events that will take place on our campuses in the upcoming months. There are many things happening on the Kent State Columbiana County Campuses!

I just wrapped up my first semester as the interim dean of the Salem and East Liverpool campuses and I continue to be impressed by the level of commitment I see from staff, faculty and community members to help our students succeed. There is a distinct culture of caring for and supporting one another on each of these campuses.

Thank you for your continued support of our mission and for helping us sustain the high quality of our academic programs. As I look ahead to 2023, I am confident that we are prepared to face challenges and opportunities, as well as celebrate successes and milestones.

Again, Happy New Year!

Bradley Bielksi, Interim Dean and CAO

Sincerely,

Bradley Bielski, Interim Dean and CAO

Wednesday, December 14, 2022
Dr. Rachel Blasiman, conference chair, with keynote speaker Dr. Lee Gilman URC 2022

Kent State University at Salem held its fall Undergraduate Research Conference, an event that recognizes students for their research and allows them to share what they learned through discussions with the academic staff.

Dr. Gilman’s advice to students.

The conference is open to all undergraduates in any discipline and in any for-credit course on any Kent State campus. Faculty judges evaluate the presentations based on originality; significance; evidence of learning about the research and information gathering process; and overall quality.

The keynote speaker was Dr. Lee Gilman, an assistant professor of behavioral neuroscience in Kent State’s Department of Psychological Sciences, who leads research on how interactions between diet, stress and genes affect brain and body health.

The URC committee includes Dr. Rachael Blasiman, chair; Dr. Kristenne Robison, Dr. Omid Bagheri, Cyndi Peterson, Dr. Tsunghui Tu, Steve Toepfer and Krista Hawkins. 

The winners of the 2022 Kent State Salem Undergraduate Research Conference are:

Poster Presentation:

  • First place: Gus Holman for “Climate Controlled Production of Morel Mushrooms;”
  • Honorable mention to Abigail Jackson and Kobi Ream for “Prioritization and Delegation in Nursing.”
Second year rad tech students who participated in the conference were (from left) John Rupert, Elly Exline and Carly Mustake.

First Place Oral Presentations:

  • Olivia Coontz for “An Investigation into a Prosthetic’s Effect on Mental Health;”
  • Elly Exline for “The Accuracy of Artificial Intelligence Using MRI Imaging in the Field of Neuroradiology;”
  • Julia Chappelear for “Accessibility in Writing;”

Second Place Oral Presentations:

  • Blaine McCurdy for “An Examination of Trends Between Tabletop Role-Playing and Mental Wellness;”
  • Hannah Heath for “The Struggles with Invitro Fertilization;”
  • Seth Barrett for “The ‘T’ in Healthcare: Discrimination Against Transgender People by Healthcare Systems and Governments;”

Third Place Oral Presentations:

  • Caleb Garlock for “Optimizing Optic Flow;”
  • Maria Poppenhouse for “The Effects Hospitalized Children Have on the Parent-Child Relationship;”
  • Donna Finch for “How We Can Help Slow Plastic Pollution in Our Oceans.”

Honorable Mention Presentation:

  • Samantha Wehr for “The Calm Life: Analysis of Coping with Stress and Majors.”

Photo A: Winners from the 2022 Undergraduate Research Conference at Kent State Salem include (front, from left) Donna Finch, Hannah Heath, Maria Poppenhouse, Olivia Coontz, Caleb Garlock, Gus Holman; and (back, from left) Samantha Wehr, Seth Barrett, Kobi Ream, Abigail Jackson, Julia Chappelear, Blaine McCurdy. Not pictured is Elly Exline.

Photo B: Dr. Rachel Blasiman, conference chair, with keynote speaker Dr. Lee Gilman.

Photo C: Dr. Gilman’s advice to students.

Photo D: Second year rad tech students who participated in the conference were (from left) John Rupert, Elly Exline and Carly Mustake.


See more pictures on our Facebook page

 

Tuesday, December 13, 2022
Representing the Kent State East Liverpool Campus at the downtown holiday parade.

In what has become a tradition, the Kent State East Liverpool Campus handed out nearly 1,000 children’s books during the city’s Christmas parade. Students, staff and family members gave the books to little ones along the parade route through a project now known as “Season’s Readings.”

The books were purchased and/or donated by employees and students throughout the year. Employees from an area service agency also donated books.

The campus service project is meant to encourage reading and learning among future Kent State students.


Cutline: Representing the Kent State East Liverpool Campus at the downtown holiday parade.

Monday, December 12, 2022
Student Nurses Association gather gifts to deliver to the Salvation Army.

The Student Nurses Association at Kent State East Liverpool spearheaded a project to help provide gifts for 100 local children through the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree project. Students, faculty and staff across campus participated in the outreach effort, collecting baby dolls, trucks, games, Legos, other toys, coats, clothing and four bikes.

Angela Douglass, senior lecturer in the ADN program on the East Liverpool Campus, helped the students organize the outreach project and noted that this partnership has continued for 20 years. “The spirit of giving is evident each year,” she said.


Cutline: Gathering the gifts to deliver to the Salvation Army are members of the Student Nurses Association (from left) Lauren Plunkett, president; Angela Douglass, faculty advisor; Brittany Soltis, secretary; Carsyn Hoppel, treasurer; and Mason Morris, vice president.

 

Monday, December 12, 2022
Headshot of Tabitha Lockhart.

Her journey into the world of healthcare began on the Kent State Salem Campus and now Tabitha Lockhart is using that foundation to care for patients as a certified physician assistant (PA-C) at the Yale New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Connecticut.

Tabitha Lockhart likes to make her patients smile sometimes.

After graduating from the Salem Campus radiologic technology program in 2007, Lockhart worked full time as a mobile X-ray technologist, traveling throughout Ohio. At the same time, she took classes through Kent State and earned her bachelor’s degree in public health in 2012.

“Throughout my X-ray tech career, I knew I wanted to have more responsibility with patient care and outcomes,” she explained. “The (public health) program prepared me for the challenges of the healthcare environment and the rewards of delivering exceptional patient care, compassion and professionalism. This inspired me to explore further career opportunities in radiology. Once I found the physician assistant profession, I knew it was the path for me!”

Lockhart graduated with her PA degree from the University of Mount Union in 2017 and worked as an interventional radiology PA-C in Canton for almost three years before moving to Connecticut in 2020. Now living in New Haven with her wife, Brooke, she works full time as an interventional radiology PA-C at Yale New Haven Hospital.

“I enjoy working in an academic environment and the level of critical thinking required in my specialty. I am able to approach and evaluate every patient case as both a provider and radiologic technologist,” Lockhart said. “This is useful since all of our patient cases/procedures utilize imaging. My radiology knowledge and training has proved valuable throughout my career path. I am very thankful and proud to have started my healthcare journey as a radiologic technologist.”


Cutline A: Tabitha Lockhart’s career has taken her from Kent State's Salem Campus to Yale New Haven Hospital.
Cutline B: Tabitha Lockhart
Cutline C: Tabitha Lockhart likes to make her patients smile sometimes.

 

Shellie Warino
Monday, November 14, 2022

Shellie Warino of the Salem Campus was named to the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) for a three-year term beginning in 2023.

Shellie Warino
Warino is the program director of the radiation therapy program, as well as a faculty lecturer, on the Kent State Salem Campus. Prior to this role, she served as the program’s clinical coordinator for 15 years.

The JRCERT is the only organization recognized by the United States Committee on Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation for the accreditation of educational programs in radiography, radiation therapy, magnetic resonance and medical dosimetry.

Warino will represent the JRCERT at the annual radiation therapist meeting sponsored by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists. She was selected to this board following an application and interview process.

Warino served as a site visitor for the JRCERT for the past 15 years and as a team chair for five years. She conducted site visits throughout the United States for radiology, radiation therapy and dosimetry education programs seeking initial and/or continuing programmatic accreditation.

Aside from certificates in radiology and radiation therapy, Warino also earned a bachelor’s degree in allied health from Youngstown State University; a master’s degree in health education; and a post-master’s certificate in higher education-community college leadership. She completed more than 30 hours toward a doctorate degree in health education, as well.

Prior to joining Kent State in 2006, Warino worked as a radiation therapy clinical coordinator at the Community College of Allegheny County in Pittsburgh and, earlier, as a radiologic technologist and radiation therapist at Mercy Health in Youngstown.


Cutline: Shellie Warino

 

PTA and OTA students recently gathered with an oversized check to represent their donation to the Banquet of Lisbon.
Thursday, October 27, 2022

PTA and OTA students recently gathered with an oversized check to represent their donation to the Banquet of Lisbon.

Students from the Kent State East Liverpool physical therapist assistant (PTA) and the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) programs joined efforts to help support the Banquet of Lisbon.

The students used fundraisers to make a combined donation of $600 to help the Columbiana County campuses host the banquet on Oct. 24.

Each year, PTA and OTA students from the Kent East Liverpool campus find unique ways to increase awareness about their fields, while raising funds for a cause chosen by the classes.

The Banquet of Lisbon is held each month at the New Lisbon Presbyterian Church in Lisbon, providing free meals to community members. The meals are planned and sponsored by volunteers from service groups, businesses, families and area churches.

For the past several years, the Kent State Salem and East Liverpool campuses have hosted sit-down meals for the Banquet of Lisbon. Faculty, staff and students volunteer to prepare and serve meals to hundreds of area community members.


Cutline: PTA and OTA students recently gathered with an oversized check to represent their donation to the Banquet of Lisbon. Pictured are (front, from left) Nicole Strock, Michala Johnson, Lucia Haddad, Tori Thompson, Jacob Potts, Bryanna Hanna, Kiara Perry, Interim Dean Brad Bielski, Brenna Hagerdon, Aidan Woods, Lizzie McNutt, Matthew Hans, Seth Shivers, Sydney Detchon, Anna Shivers, Jenna Fabian, Ian Beiber, Lauren McCarty; (from top of stairs) Alexis Kaleda, Danella Payne, Sydney Durbin, Gabriella Hyrb, Kylie Surface, Marissa Baker, Scott Porter, Madison White. Not pictured: Haven Barricella

Tuesday, October 11, 2022

Greetings!

Since early August, I’ve been filling the role as interim dean and chief administrative officer for the Kent State Columbiana County Campuses and learning to navigate between the two campuses, as well as with my home campus in Tuscarawas County. I’ve been welcomed in supportive and reassuring ways, confirming that the East Liverpool and Salem campuses are willing to maneuver through changes and embracing the future with a spirit of determination.  

Dr. Bradley Bielski, Dean and CAO of Kent State Columbiana County Campuses

Technology certainly makes it easier for me to manage multiple locations, but I assure you that the faculty, staff, administration and community members associated with these campuses are the keys to making it easier to be an effective leader.

As I spend more time in Columbiana County and as I meet more individuals, I gain a deeper appreciation for the work being done here and for the role each campus plays in its respective community. I am greatly impressed by the commitment to our students and the sincere efforts to provide meaningful experiences for each one.

We are well into the fall semester and learning to navigate through the post-COVID changes we encounter. It is refreshing to see students filling the halls, classrooms and study areas again. It is also refreshing to see faculty and staff engaging with the students in person, and to be able to host activities on our campus.

Within this newsletter, you will find more information about me and my experience in higher education, specifically at Kent State University. I admit that I was a busy man before accepting the job as interim dean of the Columbiana County campuses, but I pledge that I am committed to continuing the traditions rooted here and to helping provide a gateway through which students can pursue their ambitions.

Thank you for your continued support of the East Liverpool and Salem campuses. Many lives have been transformed because of Kent State’s presence in Columbiana County and our mission is to continue making a difference. Here, anywhere is possible!

With sincere appreciation,

Dr. Bradley Bielski
Interim Dean and CAO
Kent State Columbiana County Campuses

Showing their school spirit.
Monday, September 19, 2022

The East Liverpool Potters won the 2022 Volleyball Classic.

The hosting East Liverpool High School Potters claimed the victor’s plaque for the third time following their match up with the Salem High School Quakers in the annual Kent State Volleyball Classic on Saturday, Sept. 17.

The day featured freshman, JV and varsity games between the cross-county rivals, with East Liverpool winning the varsity match-up 25-19, 18-25, 25-10, 25-9.

East Liverpool also won the freshman and JV contests.

As hosts for the day, Kent State Columbiana County provided t-shirts for the players and coaches while Flash – a definite fan favorite – was on hand to cheer, as well.

The Kent State County Classic represents the strong foundation of learning in East Liverpool and Salem, as each community is home to one of the university’s two Columbiana County campuses.


Cutline A: The East Liverpool Potters won the 2022 Volleyball Classic.

Cutline B: Showing their school spirit.

See more photos on our Facebook page.

Participating in the outreach effort were (from left) Jennifer Moody, Lauren Plunkett, Lecturer Julia Schnurrenberger, Sierra Zarnosky, Alexandria Harman, Hannah Shaffer and Senior Lecturer Angela Douglass.
Tuesday, September 13, 2022

Faculty and students from the associate degree in nursing program at Kent State East Liverpool volunteered during the recent Canfield Fair by conducting free blood pressure screenings at a booth sponsored by the Ohio Nurses Association, District Three, in the fair’s Medical Building.

The volunteer effort was initiated and organized by Angela Douglass, senior lecturer of nursing on the East Liverpool campus.  She has spearheaded this outreach project for ADN students at Kent East Liverpool since 2008. Joining Douglass was Julia Schnurrenberger, lecturer for the East Liverpool ADN program.

“My goal in organizing this event is to teach our nursing students the importance of engaging in community involvement, gaining experience in interacting with a wide variety of patients and practicing skills taught in the classroom,” Douglass explained. “It builds professionalism, develops communication skills and nurtures a desire to give back to the community. Our nursing program focuses on the importance of recognizing and accommodating the needs of every patient.”


Cutline: Participating in the outreach effort were (from left) Jennifer Moody, Lauren Plunkett, Lecturer Julia Schnurrenberger, Sierra Zarnosky, Alexandria Harman, Hannah Shaffer and Senior Lecturer Angela Douglass.

 

BSN Nursing graduates received their nursing pins at the Kent State Salem Campus pinning ceremony.
Tuesday, August 30, 2022

 

Kent State at Salem held its summer nursing convocation and pinning ceremony during which students received their nursing pins and recited the nursing pledge. All are receiving degrees this year through the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program on the Salem Campus.

Sherilyn Horst received the award for academic excellence and Alexandra Yurko-Mihelic received the award for clinical excellence.

The Kent State Salem BSN summer 2022 graduates include:

BSN Nursing graduates received their nursing pins at the Kent State Salem Campus pinning ceremony.

  • Keesha Bailey
  • Lauren Blakeman
  • Kristen Bruderly
  • Darrian Chiovitti
  • Trevor Coffy
  • Nicole Dyke
  • Molly Ellyson
  • Eric Grantonic
  • Sherilyn Horst
  • Alexis Moore
  • Amber Straney
  • Lauren Vest
  • Alexandra Yurko-Mihelic.

CUTLINE A: Receiving their nursing pins at the Kent State Salem Campus pinning ceremony were (front, from left) Molly Ellyson, Alexis Moore, Sherilyn Horst, Amber Straney; and (back, from left) Kristen Bruderly, Keesha Bailey, Eric Grantonic, Trevor Coffy, Alexandra Yurko-Mihelic, Lauren Vest. Not pictured: Lauren Blakeman, Darrian Chiovitti and Nicole Dyke.

 

Dr. Bradley Bielski, Dean and CAO of Kent State Columbiana County Campuses
Monday, August 08, 2022

Bradley Bielski, Ph.D., was named interim dean and chief administrative officer for the Kent State University’s Columbiana County campuses in Salem and East Liverpool, effective Aug. 6. He continues serving as the dean and CAO of the Kent State Tuscarawas Campus, located in New Philadelphia, and now leads the academic, academic support, enrollment, fund-raising and business aspects of the three campuses.

Bielski follows Dr. David Dees who served as dean and CAO of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses since 2016. Dees is returning to the Kent Campus as an associate professor in the Kent State University School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration within the College of Education, Health and Human Services.

Dr. Bradley Bielski, Dean and CAO of Kent State Columbiana County Campuses
“I, first, want to acknowledge the outstanding work of Dr. David Dees and wish him well in all future endeavors. He has been extremely helpful during this transition,” Bielski noted. “Furthermore, in a very brief amount of time, I have learned just how important both the Salem and East Liverpool campuses are in their respective communities. Each campus is fortunate to have outstanding faculty, dedicated staff and community leaders that are dedicated to serving the needs of students.”

With more than 18 years of experience in higher education administration, Bielski has served the past eight years as administrative staff to the Tuscarawas County University Branch District-Board of Trustees and the Tuscarawas County University Foundation-Board of Directors.

He previously served for 10 years as vice president for academic affairs at Thomas More University, located in Crestview Hills, Ky. In that position, he led all academic and academically related functions and supervised the student affairs division, adult education, enrollment management and information.

For several years, Bielski taught physical chemistry, specializing in statistical mechanics, quantum chemistry and analytical spectroscopy. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati in 1991 and is a graduate of the Harvard Institute for Educational Management.

Bielski was named the Tuscarawas County Citizen of the Year in 2021 by the area’s Chamber of Commerce, recognizing his work in economic development and his involvement in the community. He recently chaired the local annual United Way campaign, during which the organization broke an all-time fundraising record.

He serves on the board of directors for the Tuscarawas County Economic Development Corporation for which he is chairman; the Cleveland Clinic Union Hospital board of directors; the Community Improvement Corporation of Tuscarawas County board of directors; United Way Tuscarawas, chair and campaign chair; board of directors for the Tuscarawas Chamber of Commerce; board of directors for Workforce Investment of Stark and Tuscarawas counties; board of directors for Leadership Tuscarawas; vice chair of the board of directors Tuscarawas University Foundation, Ex Officio Board of Directors; past chair of the Brighton Center board of directors; past chair of the Northern Kentucky Education Council; past chair for the board of trustees at Thomas More University; board of directors at Notre Dame Academy; and was appointed by the Kentucky governor to the Education Professional Standards Board.


Cutline: Dr. Bradley Bielski, Dean and CAO of Kent State Columbiana County Campuses

ADN students at the 2022 pinning ceremony
Monday, July 25, 2022

ADN students at the 2022 pinning ceremony.

Kent State University at East Liverpool held its annual nursing pinning ceremony May 15, during which 36 students were recognized for receiving degrees through the associate degree in nursing (ADN) program.

Dr. Carol Hrusovsky, academic program director of the ADN program, presented student awards, including the Ohio Nurses Association District 3 Lori Grenich Student Nurse Award to McKenzie Dotson. This award recognizes excellence in clinical nursing and professional awareness.

Inducted into the Alpha Delta Nu Nursing Honor Society were (from left) Stacey Lindsey; Erika Smith; Marvine` Brown, faculty advisor; Hoi Ming Winski; and Lindsey Loboy.

Hoi Ming Winski received the ADN Honors Award for highest GPA; Kimberly Ewing received the ADN Service Award and Lindsey Loboy received the Outstanding ADN Student Award.

Four students were inducted into the Alpha Delta Nu Nursing Honor Society by Marvine’ Brown, associate lecturer and faculty advisor. The students include Loboy, Winski, Erika Smith and Stacey Lindsay.

The Student Nurses Association officers included April Cox, Kimberly Ewing, Schianne Goddard and Reed McGeehan.

The Kent State East Liverpool ADN class of 2022 includes Maria Abdalla, Jenelyn Adams, Allyson Betteridge, Jennifer Cohen, Katie Coriston, April Cox, Erica Davis, Jennifer Davis, McKenzie Dotson, Jessica Drexler, Kimberly Ewing, Donnabel Ferrell,  Kelley Friend, Schianne Goddard, Sydni Hamilton, Casey Kegelmyer, Stacey Lindsay, Dennis Livingston, Lindsey Loboy, Sierra Lonkert, Tessa Love, Erika McCoy, Reed McGeehan, Ashley Milhoan, Ashley Morgan, Danielle Rigsby, Bailey Riley, Kara Ritter, Ryan Roberts, Alyssa Santoro, Erika Smith, Alexis Stillwagon, Amy Voithofer, Quinton Walters, Hoi Ming Winski.


Cutline A:  ADN students at the 2022 pinning ceremony.

Cutline B: Inducted into the Alpha Delta Nu Nursing Honor Society were (from left) Stacey Lindsey; Erika Smith; Marvine` Brown, faculty advisor; Hoi Ming Winski; and Lindsey Loboy.

Kent State University at East Liverpool - Purinton Hall
Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Dr. David Dees, dean of Kent State University at East Liverpool, announced those students named to the Spring 2022 President’s or Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 or more credit hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the East Liverpool Campus.

Kent State University at East Liverpool - Purinton Hall

The students and their hometowns are:

President’s List

East Liverpool:

  • Katerina Wright

Wellsville:

  • Bradon Fredrit

Dean’s List

Alliance:

  • Olive Busson

Atwater:

  • Jules Elling

Aurora:

  • Karanjot Grewal
  • Hunter Metzger
  • Brandon Witmer

Byesville:

  • Dylan Johnson

Calcutta:

  • Brock Ford
  • Isabella Mrozek

Canfield:

  • Kameron DuPonty
  • Christine Fortine

Canton:

  • Alisha Arnold
  • Stephanie Keegan

Carrollton:

  • Benjamin Pallett

Chardon:

  • Hunter Wolf

Conneaut:

  • Mikayla Thompson

Diamond:

  • Jaden Smallfield

East Liverpool:

  • Kitty Chen
  • Anthony DeMarco
  • Emma Dieringer
  • Grace Hill
  • Luke Jackman
  • Veronica Keenan
  • Derek Klein
  • Elizabeth Kolkowski
  • Michael McKenzie
  • Brady Smith
  • Anthony Steff
  • Catherine Ulbright
  • Lukas Wain,
  • Annessa Weyand

East Palestine:

  • Shelby Ogg

Ellsworth:

  • Caroline Channell

Geneva:

  • Tiffany Wingert

Hammondsville:

  • Raelynn Corbin

Kent:

  • Sydney Munger
  • Lyndsey Robinson
  • Rebecca Weiner
  • Carrie White

Leavittsburg:

  • Elyse Fincham
  • Christian Woodyard

Leetonia:

  • Bryce Blower
  • Shayne Scragg

Lisbon:

  • Dalton Curran
  • Lauren McCarty

Mantua:

  • Danny Masiello

Massillon:

  • Benito Shoup

Mogadore:

  • Zachary Rogers

Negley:

  • Lauren Mackall

New Franklin:

  • Robert Sherman

New Philadelphia:

  • Jessica Beal
  • Tashia Hitchock Schuler
  • Julio Sica Perez
  • Abigail Wenger

Newton Falls:

  • Matthew Lubonovic

New Waterford:

  • Nicole Layfield
  • Riley Lockwood

North Canton:

  • Scott Porter

Northfield:

  • Nautica Heddlesten

North Lima:

  • Briana Spalding

Peninsula:

  • Andrew Sunderland

Petersburg:

  • Nicole Worsencroft

Poland:

  • Gabriella Hryb

Ravenna:

  • Meleah Sawastuk
  • Termaine Snyder

Richmond:

  • Racquel Dennis

Rogers:

  • Casey Coie
  • Jacob Reed
  • Michael Miller
  • Kassandra Rogers

Salem:

  • Seth Shivers

Salineville:

  • Hoi Ming Winski

Seville:

  • Dylan Burley

Streetsboro:

  • Jackie Cruz
  • TJ Kaur

Stow:

  • Maddie Keller
  • Kathryn Mathis
  • Jack Young

Tallmadge:

  • Mayce Ryan

Uhrichsville:

  • Frank Rossi

Wellsville:

  • Alana Amato
  • Karah Champ
  • Gavin Kountz
  • Emily McNicol
  • Danelle Payne
  • Kolby Ramsey
  • AnnaBelle Sluder
  • Elaina Weekley

West Lafayette:

  • Brandon Ward

Youngstown:

  • Amber Nakley

Aliquippa, Pa.:

  • Madison Conn

Beaver, Pa.:

  • Danae Stanley

Chester, W.Va.:

  • Andy Gonzalez

Follansbee, W.Va.:

  • Breanna Pawlowski

Newell, W.Va.:

  • Brittney Giorgini

Weirton, W.Va.:

  • Marissa Macaluso
Kent State University at Salem - Student Entrance
Monday, June 13, 2022

Dr. David Dees, dean of Kent State University at Salem, announced those students named to the Spring 2022 President’s and Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the Salem Campus. 

The students and their hometowns are:

Kent State University at Salem - Student Entrance

President’s List

Alliance:

  • Zaviona Fountain

Amherst:

  • Christina Rusinko

Berlin Center:

  • Olivia Haid

Canfield:

  • Matthew Brooks 

Dalton:

  • Brooke Denning 

East Rochester:

  • Cody Mitchell

East Sparta:

  • Alicia Costello 

Leavittsburg:

  • Mackenzie Chitwood

Lisbon:

  • Alyssa Chestnut

New Middletown:

  • Kendra DeWitt

Salem:

  • Sarah Bobby
  • Lauren Dougherty-Laubacher
  • Rachel Gentile,

Salineville:

  • Elizabeth Willis 

Southington:

  • Samantha Meyers

Dean’s List

Akron:

  • Lauren Chalmers
  • Kayla Dickey
  • Andrew Schultz

Alliance:

  • Shyanne Bennett
  • Kelsey Elliott
  • Madison Rhome
  • Leah Springer
  • Arundhati Thornberry

Ashtabula:

  • Amanda Garot

Atwater:

  • John Drago

Austintown:

  • Madisyn Carter
  • Skyler Oliver
  • Julia Oravecz
  • Alexis Paolone
  • Mandy Wegendt

Beloit:

  • Felicia Bonar
  • Lauren Randall
  • Madison Showalter

Bergholz:

  • Trevor Coffy

Berlin Center:

  • Thereasa Clark
  • Morgan Donithan
  • Lokelani Kalima
  • Emily Martin
  • Alexis Moore
  • Gabriel Platt

Boardman:

  • Jessica Johnson
  • Victoria Wellington

Bristolville:

  • Augustin Holman 

Brunswick:

  • Ashleigh Pearson

Canfield:

  • Kirsten Adams
  • David Altiere
  • Logan Burns
  • Brianna Carney
  • Marisa Head
  • Marisa Maillis
  • Kiley McConnell
  • Maran Perry
  • Mackenzie Rusu
  • Julia Schuler
  • Lindsay Wills
  • Leigha Wine
  • Marissa Yourstowsky

Canton:

  • Owen Conway

Carrollton:

  • Rachel Bright
  • Mica Rector

Chagrin Falls: 


Chardon:

  • Katlyn Lancaster

Cleveland:

  • Maggie Gamble

Columbiana:

  • Krista Borton
  • Chanie Danks
  • Ava Delsignore
  • Sherilyn Horst
  • McKenna Schultz
  • Darian Strouse
  • Dominic Yerkey
  • Jack Yerkey
  • Camille Zentner

Cortland:

  • Olivia Kuzma
  • Madison Oriti
  • Marikate Roscoe
  • Haley Tucker

Deerfield:

  • Brittany Arnold
  • Kristen Hoy

Dennison:

  • McKynnsi McKain

Diamond:

  • Gabrielle Arquilla
  • Zeke Robertson

Dover:

  • Brooke Foust
  • Hannah Harmon
  • Thomas Lesh

East Liverpool:

  • Heidi Bock
  • Sidney Bowyer
  • Jetta Fitch
  • Nicole Fitch
  • Abigail Jackson
  • Mary Pipes

East Palestine:

  • Wyatt Gingher
  • Julianne Jones
  • Carrie Manley
  • Libby McElroy
  • Aidan McTrustry
  • Evan Smith

Elyria:

  • Alexandra Smith

Fairlawn:

  • Kelsey Bronson

Garrettsville:

  • Emma Evitts
  • Emma Lawrence

Hanoverton:

  • Abigail Hruby

Homeworth:

  • Bailey Campbell
  • Asa DeSanzo
  • Draven Stanley
  • Madalyn Thrasher
  • Katty Wilson

Jefferson:

  • Abby Kendzerski

Kent:

  • Jennifer Biggs
  • Robert Gallavan
  • Luke Jenkins

Lagrange:

  • Stephanie Dodrill

Leetonia:

  • Kristen Bruderly
  • Danielle Gabriel
  • Allysa Rance
  • Alyssa Withers
  • Caleb Witmer

Lisbon:

  • Jamie Brown
  • Karsyn Faulk
  • Emilee Graham
  • Heather May
  • Olivia McCoy
  • McGwire Groubert
  • Julia Leko
  • Hayle Parrish

Lodi:

  • Mercedes Andrews

Lowellville:

  • Mary Novak

Madison:

  • Brianna Farnsworth

Mantua:

  • Allyson Buchert

Medina:

  • Ryan Sanford

Minerva:

  • Caleb Garlock
  • Lauren Swast

New Middletown:

  • Eric Grantonic

New Philadelphia:

  • Jessica Sweitzer

New Springfield:

  • Amanda Crum

New Waterford:

  • Julia Chappelear
  • Blaine McCurdy

Newton Falls:

  • Rebecca DeSanto
  • Jessica Eckenrode

Niles:

  • Thomas Scarnecchia

North Benton:

  • Kaylee Burcaw

North Jackson:

  • Lana Snyder

North Lima:

  • Darrian Chiovitti
  • Baylee Mohr
  • Maya Regule
  • Sydney Rhodehamel
  • Tori Rhodehamel
  • Julia Spalding

Norton:

  • Abbey Murawski

Perrysburg:

  • Nick Etter

Petersburg:

  • Mackenzie Groner

Poland:

  • Zaina Mustafa
  • Cheyanna Porter

Powell:

  • Lauren Warner

Ravenna:

  • Amelia Ferguson
  • Victoria Wagner

Republic:

  • Colleen Knight

Rogers:

  • Caitlin Marshall
  • Trey Marshall

Rootstown:

  • Emma Campbell
  • Victoria Taylor

Salem:

  • Peyton Bell
  • Brettany Daniels
  • Annie Davidson
  • Casey Dickey
  • Dylan Dominguez
  • Lauren Duke
  • Ellysa Exline
  • Aiden Graham
  • Erica Gudat
  • Zac Hawkins
  • Kasey Jamison
  • Emma Jarvis
  • Jessica Kisner
  • Isabella Less
  • Kaitlyn Libb
  • Autumn Little
  • Brianna Luttmers
  • Cassie Madison
  • Megan Malysa
  • Molly McGaffick
  • Morgan McGaffick
  • Erin Murphy
  • Catherine Ossman
  • Nakkiya Plummer
  • Paige Reardon
  • Daniel Shepard
  • Rhys Ward
  • Samantha Wehr
  • Hannah Yannucci

Salineville:

  • Marshall Somerville

Sebring:

  • Aebigayle D’Ostroph
  • Emma Moser

South Point:

  • Luca Pennington

Strasburg:

  • Makayla Reiger

Stow:

  • Taylor Pellerite

Struthers:

  • Renee Leonard

Sullivan:

  • Hannah Heath

Twinsburg:

  • Morgan Minch
  • Tamera Procop
  • Gunita Sran

Uhrichsville:

  • Tanya Gram
  • Sarah Vogt

Uniontown:

  • Hannah Swiger

Warren:

  • Alexa Crawford
  • Lindsey Elliott
  • Summer Fassnacht
  • Erica Merkel
  • Kimberly Redmond
  • Nathan Royal
  • Kelly Simpson
  • Russell Thornton

Washingtonville:

  • Elisabeth Lorch

Wellsville:

  • Grace Huddlestun
  • Camryn Jackson
  • Hannah Kelly
  • Jacob Stewart

Youngstown:

  • Victoria Berquist
  • Aileen Egolf
  • Nicole Enright
  • Lily Fairbanks
  • Dakota Knightley
  • Jessica Lunger
  • Abbey McCabe
  • Abigale Peterson
  • Elizabeth Protain
  • Maria Pupino

Broomfield, Co.:

  • Christopher Wolf

Moultrie, Ga.:

  • Carolyn Marquis

Boyers, Pa.:

  • Alexandra Yurko-Mihelic

Pittsburgh, Pa.:

  • Brynn Shanahan

Pottstown, Pa.:

  • Isaiah Glover

New Cumberland, W.Va.:

  • Rachael McGinnis
  • Cheryl Wiley
Wednesday, June 08, 2022

At the May 17 commencement ceremonies for the Kent State Columbiana County campuses, there were the usual traditions: caps and gowns; Pomp and Circumstance; presentation of diplomas; turning tassels; and proud families.

And, of course, there was the traditional commencement speech.

This year, the address to graduates was delivered by Dr. David Dees, dean and chief administrative officer of the Salem and East Liverpool campuses.

Dees presided over his final commencement ceremonies as leader of the two campuses and agreed to offer a few parting words of wisdom and advice to the graduates. He is returning to the classroom as an associate professor of cultural foundations on the Kent Campus beginning in early August.

This is his message to the Class of 2022 from the Kent State Salem and East Liverpool campuses.


…It is quite an honor to be here today. As I said, I’ve been a part of these incredible ceremonies for over 30 plus years and I am reinvigorated and reminded each time of the importance of what we do at this university and the importance of education in general. John Adams and Thomas Jefferson didn’t get along and, quite frankly, didn’t agree on many things.

“Joseph Ellis (2002) in his text Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation, describes these two as “the odd couple of the American Revolution.” As a matter of fact, during the presidential campaign of 1800, Jefferson’s supporters accused Adams of having a “hideous hermaphroditical character,” while Adams’ camp called Jefferson “a mean-spirited, low-lived fellow.” Despite their differences, there was one area that they completely aligned which was the importance of a public education in this new democratic experiment they were attempting.

If you think about it, this democratic experiment was extremely risky. Could you really trust the public to decide for themselves what was best? Could you really trust these “crazies” to make informed decisions? To ease their concern, both argued for the importance of some form of public education. The debate about what that would look like has continued over these 250 plus years, but at our personal core as Americans, we have a fundamental belief in the power and importance of public education. Simply stated, public education and our democratic core values have long been linked and connected together.

Continental Congress Ordinance 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, Morrill Act of 1862, the GI Bill of 1944, and all of the public policies and laws regarding student access and personal rights of the 1960's and 1970's  are testaments to this continue linkage.  But why? What is this deep-rooted value for education.

Andrew Delbanco (2012) outlines in his text College:  What it was, is and should be, that we have had three primary reasons for public education and specifically higher education.  

The first one, with two different subsets, is about the economy – both personal and public.  From the public perspective, the economic health of our nation depends on educated people, like you graduates, who are experts in their fields, can add to new ideas and support the industries and professions that we rely on as a technological society. From the personal perspective it is about the economic stability of the individual. As many of you graduates know, the degree you are earning today will open all types of doors and possibilities for your own personal and financial well-being. These two reasons are the most common that we hear over and over again: we need more jobs and job development; and of course the thing we have said for years,  that your earning potential is over 1 million dollars more with a degree than compared to your peers. Education for the economy has been the most common discussion in all our lifetimes.

Delbanco’s second reason for the link between democracy and public education relates back to the passions of Jefferson and Adams and that is to have an educated citizenry that was informed and could make smart decisions for this new republic we were forming. As Robert Reich (2019) writes in his text, the Common Good, “Democracy depends on citizens who are able to recognize truth, analyze and weigh alternatives, and civilly debate their future, just as it depends on citizens who have an equal voice and equal state in it.  Without an educated populace a common good cannot even be discerned.”

Reich, echoing the founders' original concerns, notes that we have to have citizens that can recognize the truth and analyze options. In other words, we need people who are crap detectors!  Yes, people who are smart enough to recognize good ideas from bad and can see through the BS.

Graduates, one of my hopes for you tonight is that you leave this university with a very strong crap detector!  You won’t fall for gimmicks; you are smart enough to recognize charlatans that out for their own good; and that you are committed to analyzing and finding alternatives that stand the test of science, logic and rational thinking. Now, more than ever in our democracy, is this needed.

Granted, this is where the tension lies in our society. What some consider crap, others consider the ultimate truth. With the proliferation of access to unfettered information presented as truth, more and more of our peers are falling into these traps of ideology and moving away from the common good outlined by scholars like Riech and others.

But, it is Delbanco’s third reason, not as much discussed, that may actually be the most important for our conversation here today. A real education should teach you how to live a good and interesting life. Delbanco captures this best when he describes a conversation he overheard where it was said “You want the inside of your head to be an interesting place to spend the rest of your life”.    

To me, this is how we learn to “live” democracy. It is this commitment to living a good life that should send you to learn and hear the stories of others; striving to never be the smartest in the room; surrounding yourself with other people that know more about things you want to learn. Commit to never being stagnant. Find new challenges, even if it may go against the status quo.

Two of my favorite authors come to mind when I think of keeping my head an interesting place to live. The first is John Dewey, one of the most famous American educational philosophers.  My favorite quote from all of Dewey’s work is quite simple, but very telling. Dewey (1916) writes: “A democracy is more than a form of government; it is primarily a mode of associated living, of conjoint communicated experience.” This educational institution we have created is not just about teaching you about voting, laws and rules. It is about how you live your life with the others around you. Think about this: this is beyond being a republican or democrat. This is truly about being an American – living your life in a way that not only makes your journey interesting, but it is about the others around you as well.

Parker Palmer (2014) expands this idea in his text Healing the Heart of Democracy.  As Parker outlines, we must all develop habits of the heart or ways of living and loving one another that support our democratic dream. He notes that there are five habits of the heart that are critical to rekindling our democracy:

The first habit is to recognize that “We are all in this together.” “We are an interconnected species and we must embrace the simple fact that we are dependent upon and accountable to one another, and that includes the stranger, the ‘alien other.’”

The second habit is that we “Must have an appreciation of otherness.” As he states, it doesn’t have to be “us versus them.” Instead, it can remind us of the “ancient tradition of hospitality to the stranger and give us a chance to translate it into twenty-first century terms.”

The third habit of the heart is the “Capacity to hold tension creatively.” “Our lives are filled with contradictions – from the gap between our aspirations and our behavior, to observations and insights we cannot abide because they run counter to our convictions.”  All of us are complicated individuals and, as he continues, that if “… we allow their tensions to expand our hearts, they can open us to new understandings of ourselves and our world, enhancing our lives and allowing us to enhance the lives of others.”  If we acknowledge to ourselves that we are not perfect, this will allow for more personal growth and grace for those around us.

“The fourth habit is developing a “Sense of voice and agency.”  “We grow up in…institutions that treat us as members of an audience instead of actors in a drama.” We are all asked to watch a lot of things around rather than doing. As he continues, we need to “find our voices and learn how to speak them” so that we can add to change in our world.

The last habit of the heart is the “Capacity to create community.” For Palmer, creating a community does not have to be a big change. He states: “The steady companionship of two or three kindred spirits can help us find the courage we need to speak and act as citizens.”  

Graduates, find that group, even if it is small, that helps you speak your voice and create a space for positive change.   

As I think about Parker Palmer’s challenge to us, I am also reminded that much of what he argues for can be found without much access to traditional education. My grandmother, Grammy Dees, was raised in the hills of eastern Kentucky in a very poor and struggling environment. With no more than a sixth-grade education, she lived a difficult life of poverty and struggle. She was a very strong woman who conquered incredible obstacles: losing her husband to a tragic workplace accident at a young age with three kids; having to work multiple jobs to make ends meet; and even learning how to drive at the age of 60. This woman was amazing.  

Yet, every time I read the words of Parker Palmer, I can’t help but think of Grammy Dees.  To her, life was pretty simple: leave things better than you found it and love one another. All of the habits of the heart that Parker Palmer mentions: creating community, knowing we are in this together, speaking up and listening to one another, inviting those in that are different, and reflecting on your own journey could be summarized in these two principles outlined quite simply by this “uneducated” woman.

Graduates, what you have learned in your time at Kent State is very important. It will help our economy as a nation; it will help your own personal economy. Also, hopefully, you will be living crap detectors that can identify truth from falsehood and will not fall into the trap of just really bad ideas. But the most important thing I want you to take from all of this is how do you now go live a life worth living.

Don’t be afraid to stand up for those who can’t. Recently I was in the hospital with a very serious health issue. It was clear to me, and the nurse who was treating me, the plan wasn’t working. Like many of you in the health professions, she had learned to be an advocate for her patient. She knew it wasn’t working and went to the doctor with a new strategy. The doctor, again living the habits of the heart, listened. He didn’t devalue her insights because she was below him; he listened and they strategized together to create a plan that worked. It was this small community of experts that worked together to directly impact my recovery.  

My point is that this isn’t just philosophical talk we have been expressing today. As an educated person, you now have great responsibility to live your life in a different way. You haven’t just learned these ideas in college to get a better job and make more money. you have learned these ideas to help your community become a better place. And remember: this doesn’t depend on your degree as well.

Think about this: if you are a business major, do you want to become an investor that makes a lot of money yet destroys our economy? When I think about the economic collapse of 2008 that all of us in this room are still living the impact from, it was perpetrated by well educated people who knew how to make the money, but never asked if we should be doing it this way.

Many people have asked me why I am stepping down as dean of these campuses and returning to the classroom. The reason is quite simple. I am following the habits of the heart.  

Your value is not about the money you make in life or the prestige in your job. True, money makes many things in life much easier. I’m not going to deny that. But, when you are asked the question “is your head an interesting place to live?”, hopefully, you can say “yes.”  

We live in an incredible time in our history. There are tremendous options for all of you out there. The data shows that each of you will change your career at least two to three more times before you are done and, in some cases, that job you will hold doesn’t exist now. Don’t be afraid to change. Keep your mind an interesting place to live and stick to the habits of the heart and you will be fine.

So, graduates, congratulations! You have made it. You should be quite proud of this accomplishment because I know that all of us in this room are quite proud of you. However, this is just the beginning and I hope as you live your life you take these ideas with you:

  1. Keep that crap detector strong: commit to lifelong learning so that you can always know when your being sold bad ideas.
  2. Never be afraid to try new things: life is not a linear journey. Challenge yourself and keep pursuing that passion that drives your sou. It will make you a better citizen and you owe it to all of us to live that best life.
  3. Listen and never assume you are the smartest in the room: it is the voice of others that can guide your thinking and expand what you know.
  4. Remember to live these habits of the heart, or as Grammy Dees taught me: always leave whatever you touch better than you found it and love one another.

Congratulations to all of you and thank you again for letting me be your dean and participate in this wonderful journey with you. Thank you.

Wednesday, June 08, 2022


Over my professional career, I’ve had a lot of different jobs: radio disc jockey, football coach, mentor, golf coach, referee, radio sports commentator, performer, professor, administrator and dean. Each role was challenging at times, enlightening at others and always rewarding.

With each new role I assumed, I welcomed the challenges and embraced the duties before me. I am in those shoes again.

By the time you read this message, my days as dean and chief administrative officer for the Kent State Columbiana County campuses will be nearly over. As of August 6, I will no longer serve in that capacity.

Instead, I will be an associate professor in the Kent State University School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration within the College of Education, Health and Human Services, teaching on the Kent Campus.

The move is my choice and I am excited about the new opportunities that await me. My passion is teaching and I especially love teaching teachers. I love seeing a student “get it” and sensing that “ah, ha moment” when the lesson is understood.

While my return to the classroom ends my role as dean and CAO of the Salem and East Liverpool campuses, I will always be emotionally attached to them. I will cheer from the sidelines and support every effort to sustain their success. I will miss them.

I began my Kent State career on the East Liverpool Campus, teaching education courses. I moved to the Salem Campus to teach and launch the Rising Scholars program. I fulfilled a role on the Kent Campus in the Center for Teaching and Learning. For a few years, I not only served as dean of our campuses, but as an interim vice president on the Kent Campus, with a focus on the regional campuses.

My years as dean of the Columbiana County campuses, however, have been some of the most fulfilling and amazing of my professional career. I loved working with individuals and organizations from our communities to find ways to support our mission of serving our students and providing gateways to great futures. There are amazing people who do incredible things to support these two campuses. I am truly grateful to have worked beside them and with them to make significant improvements to our campuses.

The employees and faculty on the Salem and East Liverpool campuses are just incredible. As their leader, I was proud of their loyalty, dedication and commitment to our students during some of the most challenging times ever faced by educators during the COVID pandemic. Their responses to that situation were nothing short of astounding – no one gave up on our students and all accepted the responsibility to keep moving forward.

I’ve been asked numerous times why I decided to step down as dean and each time, my answer is the same: it is time.

Age has a funny way of making us view life a bit differently and as I get older, I am noticing the “little things” that I no longer want to take for granted: time with my wife and daughters; good health; spending time with friends on the golf course; or reading a good book.

I also miss interacting with students. I really do.

As a dean, I always noticed the students in the lounges, classrooms and halls. I tried to engage with them, but I found it difficult to build those strong connections that come from spending weeks together in a classroom. I am looking forward to those experiences again. 

I could write volumes about my experiences as dean and I could fill pages with significant accomplishments that we achieved in recent years. There were so many good things that happened and great people who made them happen! I loved serving in this role.

Naturally, there were challenges and even some sad days. Each tested my emotional fortitude and often pulled at my heart, but the team around me always lifted me up and helped me rise above the hurdles.

I assure you that the Salem and East Liverpool campuses will continue to serve their respective communities and will continue to support the students who choose to begin their college journeys with us. The staff and faculty care too deeply to do otherwise.

Dr. Brad Bielski will begin serving as the interim dean and CAO of the Columbiana County campuses on Aug. 6. He is the current dean and CAO of the Tuscarawas Campus with years of leadership experience and he understands how to navigate through the Kent State system. I truly feel this will be a smooth transition and that he will serve our campuses well.

Dr. David Dees
I offer my sincere thanks to each of you who supported me and these two campuses over the last six years.

Together, we made a huge impact on so many lives and helped change our corners of the world.

It’s said that when something ends, we only miss it when it was good.

I will miss being dean and CAO of the Kent State Columbiana County Campuses.

Take care,
David Dees
    

 

Tree-Planting Honors Life, Legacy of Horticulture Professor
Tuesday, June 07, 2022

Dean David Dees spoke about the legacy of Chris Carlson and his role in creating the horticulture program on the Salem Campus.

Step one foot onto the Kent State Salem Campus and evidence of Chris Carlson is everywhere.

The retired tenured professor of horticulture dedicated his life and harnessed his passion to create beautiful outdoor spaces on the Salem Campus over a career that spanned nearly 30 years. Carlson retired from teaching in 2021, but his love for the campus and the horticulture program never stopped.

Colleagues gathered.

Unfortunately, since retiring, Carlson has battled amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease and is living in Wisconsin with family members. He joined the gathering by phone and expressed his appreciation for the tree and for the relationships he made while working at Kent State Salem.

In his honor, faculty and staff members held an informal ceremony during which a tree was planted near one of the gardens he designed and created with his classes. Carlson selected a Dawn redwood as the species of tree to be planted.

Soon, a plaque will be placed near the tree that reads:

This tree is planted in honor of
Chris Carlson

Professor of Horticulture
Who planted seeds of knowledge,
Whose life was rooted on this campus and
Whose legacy will continue to grow for years.
June 2, 2022

Employee John Stainer and horticulture student Gus Holman plant the tree in honor of Chris Carlson.

Dr. Louise Steele, assistant professor of biology on the Salem Campus, created a video that captures the sentiments of the ceremony and the beauty of the campus that Carlson helped grow.

https://video.kent.edu/media/Carlson+Tree+Planting+DRAFT/1_yyipr7cq


Cutline A: Dean David Dees spoke about the legacy of Chris Carlson and his role in creating the horticulture program on the Salem Campus.

Cutline B: Colleagues gathered.

Cutline C: Employee John Stainer and horticulture student Gus Holman plant the tree in honor of Chris Carlson.

Monday, June 06, 2022

Participating in the outreach effort were (front, from left) Jamie Brown, Emma Jarvis, Alyssa Chestnut, Gabby Smith, Iliania Schmidt, Julia Spaulding and (back, from left) Alex Yurko-Mihelic and Lindsay Wills.

Students from the bachelor’s degree in nursing program at Kent State Salem volunteered during a recent health fair sponsored by Salem City Health Department. The volunteer effort was led by Dr. Cheryl Brady, professor of nursing on the Salem Campus, whose students shared information about the dangers of vaping and obesity.


Cutline: Participating in the outreach effort were (front, from left) Jamie Brown, Emma Jarvis, Alyssa Chestnut, Gabby Smith, Iliania Schmidt, Julia Spaulding and (back, from left) Alex Yurko-Mihelic and Lindsay Wills.

 

Dr. Eichler in her element on the Salem Campus
Thursday, May 26, 2022

 

Dr. Eichler in her element on the Salem Campus
Just as most of us are looking forward to being outside following a long winter, the Spring-Summer 2022 issue of Kent State Magazine helps readers better appreciate our green spaces and outdoor wonders. The focus of this issue is on global warming and the climate change crisis.

 Dr. Sarah Eichler, assistant professor of horticulture on the Salem Campus
Dr. Sarah Eichler, assistant professor of biological sciences and horticulture on the Salem Campus, is featured in the article “Climate-Positive Agriculture” which details how she develops policy recommendations for sustainability efforts in agricultural/horticulture, food systems and climate mitigation, as well as her work with local farmers.

Eichler is one of several Kent State faculty members sharing their expertise in a series of articles called the Global Challenge: “Climate change is a complex problem with no easy answers – and everything at stake. As global temperatures continue to rise, Kent State faculty reflect on our potential to mitigate and adapt to a changing planet.”

Read the article in which Eichler shares her expertise: https://www.kent.edu/magazine/climate-positive-agriculture

To learn more about Eichler: https://www.kent.edu/sustainability/spotlight-sarah-eichler.

To read the magazine: https: //www.kent.edu/magazine/springsummer-2022


Cutline A: Dr. Sarah Eichler, assistant professor of horticulture on the Salem Campus

Cutline B: Dr. Eichler in her element on the Salem Campus

Dr. David Dees, dean of the Kent State Columbiana County Campuses, and Mark Seigal, owner and of the Salem Giant Eagle.
Tuesday, May 24, 2022

Kent State University at Salem recently presented the Friend of the Campus Award to Mark Seigal, owner of the Salem Giant Eagle, the highest honor presented annually to non-students. It recognizes community members who work to better the campus through their time and talents over the years, and who embody the quote by Helen Keller: “The welfare of each is bound up in the welfare of all.”

Dr. David Dees, dean of the Kent State Columbiana County Campuses, and Mark Seigal, owner and of the Salem Giant Eagle.
Seigal has been with the Salem Giant Eagle for 26 years but began working in grocery stores owned by his father when he was a child. His parents, Arnie and Sally Seigal, owned and operated several grocery stores in Hancock County, W. Va., before opening the Salem grocery store in 1982, which originally was a Thorofare Market in the plaza across the street from the current Giant Eagle. In 1991, Arnie built the Salem Giant Eagle at its current location.

After graduating from Weir High School in Weirton, W.Va., Seigal earned a degree from Case Western University in Cleveland before graduating from George Washington University with a law degree.

He practiced law for five years in the Washington, D.C., area before moving with his wife, also an attorney, to the Pittsburgh area. Seigal now commutes daily to the Salem store and has become a leader within the community.

Seigal is a generous supporter of the Rising Scholars program on the Columbiana County campuses, donating numerous meals for the students during workshops and events over the last 10 years.

“It just makes sense to support education because it is the key to everything and education makes a difference in every life,” he said. “Starting this support for students at any early age is critical, but it’s just as important to be a constant supporter for those kids as they continuer their journey through school. My dad showed me that we get back ten-fold what we give out. This award really recognizes his legacy and what he instilled in me.”


Cutline:  Dr. David Dees, dean of the Kent State Columbiana County Campuses, and Mark Seigal, owner and of the Salem Giant Eagle.

Receiving nursing pins at the Kent State Salem Campus pinning ceremony 2022
Tuesday, May 24, 2022


Kent State at Salem held its annual nursing convocation and pinning ceremony during which students received their nursing pins and recited the nursing pledge. All are receiving degrees this year through the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program on the Salem Campus.

Eunice Knight received the award for academic excellence and Nicole Fitch received the award for clinical excellence.

The Kent State Salem BSN class of 2021-2022 includes:

Renee Bishop, Sidney Bowyer, Logan Cardinal, Vivian Conrad, Nicole Dyke, Nicole Fitch, Samantha Jeffers, Allison Jones, Lokelani Kalima, Eunice Knight, Brianna Luttmers, Amanda Parrish, Kimberly Redmond, Kara Rothbauer, Trusha Shah, Lauren Vest.


CUTLINE A: Receiving their nursing pins at the Kent State Salem Campus pinning ceremony were (from left) Kimberly Redmond, Vivian Conrad, Lokelani Kalima, Kara Rothbauer, Trusha Shah, Logan Cardinal, Renee Bishop, Nicole Fitch, Brianna Luttmers, Amanda Parrish, Sidney Bowyer, Eunice Knight and Samantha Jeffers.

 

Kent State University mace
Thursday, May 19, 2022

Dean David Dees prepares for his final commencement as dean of the Columbiana County Campuses.

Commencement ceremonies were held May 17 for the Kent State Columbiana County campuses for Summer 2021, Fall 2021 and Spring 2022 graduates earning associate and baccalaureate degrees.

Dr. David Dees, dean and chief administrative officer of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses, presided over the event, along with Dr. Susan Rossi, assistant dean of the Columbiana County campuses.

Baccalaureate Honors:

Summa Cum Laude (Highest Honors):

  • Marina Brockway
  • Alaina Conte
  • Andrew Hopkins
  • Mattisyn Infanti
  • Eunice Knight
  • Thomas Kornbau
  • Deanna Kruger
  • Maureen Mackar
  • Mitchell McDowell,
  • Brenna Rito
  • Gabrielle Shyne
  • Nahed Wahib

Thinking of the future.

Magna Cum Laude (High Honors):

  • Halee Allen
  • Nicholas Berger
  • Robert Buck
  • Logan Cardinal
  • Rachael Channell
  • Amy Dervin
  • Cody Dole
  • Kirsten Garvey
  • Olivia Haid
  • Brandi Hunt
  • Joseph Mapel
  • Bobbie Paulat
  • Kimberly Redmond
  • Trey Sommers

Cum Laude (Honors):

  • Hunter Gillingham
  • Sarah Glista
  • Carly Lacey
  • Brianna Luttmers
  • Zachary McKenzie
  • Alexandra Pugh
  • Skyllar Shasteen
  • Lauren Vest

Summer 2021 Graduates – Associate Degrees

(* Indicates “With Distinction” honors for a grade point average of 3.50 or greater)

  • Jessica Benedetto
  • Anita Cusick*
  • Marco DiVincenzo
  • Krystina Graham
  • Eric Grantonic
  • Brandy Krannich*
  • Sarra Krosen
  • Jessica McGeorge
  • Endy Monjaraz
  • Jennifer O’Brien
  • Jenna Ronshak
  • Giuseppe Sabatino*
  • Alexa Schwerha
  • Eric Swansiger
  • Melody Troyer
  • Mallory Ullom*
  • Marilou Vassar
  • Madelyn Wells
  • TShawn Williams

Summer 2021 Graduates – Baccalaureate Degrees

  • Halee Allen
  • Robert Buck
  • Brittany Christmas
  • Amy Dervin
  • Austin Fossesca
  • Sarah Glista
  • Kimberlyn Kascsak
  • Erica Machan
  • Joseph Mapel
  • Makayla Mast
  • Adela Pearcy
  • Sarah Roberts
  • Trey Sommers
  • Allison Sunderman

 

Fall 2021 Graduates – Associate Degrees

OTA students ready to walk across the stage.
(* Indicates “With Distinction” honors for a grade point average of 3.50 or greater)

  • Natalie Ammon
  • Natalie Barber
  • Thomas Barrett
  • Patricia Beltran
  • Chase Blakeman
  • Teghan Boggs
  • Rachel Bowen*
  • Emily Brereton
  • Brandon Buratti*
  • Karah Champ
  • Chloe Chappell
  • Harlie Coleman
  • Janell Dima*
  • Ava DiMuzio
  • Lucas Duncan
  • Mia Filaccio
  • Whitney Fox
  • Alexander Gonzalez
  • Brittany Gulling
  • Megan Haught
  • Kyleigh Hayes*
  • Kasey Jamison
  • Justin Keir*
  • Colleen Knight
  • Adam Kollay
  • Katelynn McCullough
  • Skyler Oliver
  • Mary Pipes
  • Carly Price
  • Ashlee Ratliff
  • Lindsey Richards
  • Ana Rocha
  • Alexis Santiago
  • Skyllar Shasteen
  • Maureen Shields
  • Karah Skinner
  • Dominic Spiker
  • Andrea Trotter
  • Lana Ulrich
  • Cheyenne Utt
  • Michala Viano
  • Rhianna Wolfson

Fall 2021 Graduates – Baccalaureate Degrees

  • Jason Bosley
  • Jillian Boston
  • Ivy Bulloch
  • Rachael Channell
  • Alaina Conte
  • Sydney Dawson
  • Marco DiVincenzo
  • Cody Dole
  • Kirsten Garvey
  • Andrew Hopkins
  • Brandi Hunt
  • Andrew Jackson
  • Allison Jones
  • Christian Keiper
  • Deanna Kruger
  • Ryan Lutsch
  • Emily Martel
  • Bobbie Paulet
  • Julianne Poynter
  • Alexandra Pugh
  • Brenna Rito
  • Alexis Santiago
  • Hannah Shull
  • Gabrielle Shyne
  • Hope Swiger
  • Nahed Wahib
  • Cody Westling
  • Kate Yeagley

One last group shot for rad tech students.
Spring 2022 Graduates – Associate Degrees

(* Indicates “With Distinction” honors for a grade point average of 3.50 or greater)

  • Maria Abdalla
  • Jenelyn Adams
  • Michael Adams
  • Yara Al-Imeishat
  • Kaley Anderson
  • Nicholas Angle
  • Alissa Baer
  • Samantha Bailey
  • Robert Baker
  • Allyson Betteridge
  • Jennifer Biggs*
  • Kyle Blevins
  • Olive Busson
  • Joshua Call
  • Phillip Campbell
  • Zachary Chaffee*
  • Julia Chappelear*
  • Elliot Citino
  • Trevor Coffy
  • Jennifer Cohen
  • Katie Coriston
  • April Cox*
  • Lisa Cummings
  • Sara Dalrymple
  • Brettany Daniels
  • Erica Davis
  • Jennifer Davis
  • Casey Dickey*
  • Mckenzie Dotson
  • Jessica Drexler
  • Mitti Dillard
  • Angelina D’Itri
  • Jenna Drayer
  • Kameron DuPonty*
  • Gabriel Edwards*
  • Aileen Egolf*
  • Lindsey Elliott*
  • Julia Ellks
  • Tarick Erritouni
  • Kimberly Ewing
  • Karsyn Faulk
  • Donnabel Ferrell
  • Elyse Fincham
  • Allison Forbes
  • Kelley Friend
  • Caleb Garlock
  • Arleigha Gaudio
  • Schianne Goddard*
  • Abrianna Greathouse
  • Barbara Gross
  • Derrick Grossen
  • McGwire Groubert
  • Sydni Hamilton*
  • Briana Hanlon*
  • Emily Hasson
  • Heidi Herman*
  • Sydney Hill*
  • Tabitha Hornof*
  • Allyssa Ippolito
  • Torree Jackson
  • Bryna Jenkins
  • Darrel Jones
  • Matisyn Joseph
  • Veronica Keenan*
  • Casey Kegelmyer
  • Madison Ketchum
  • Owen Kirkland
  • Dakota Knightley*
  • Olivia Kuzma*
  • Taylor Leffler
  • Aurora Leguard
  • Dennis Livingston
  • Lindsey Loboy*
  • Sierra Lonkert
  • Tessa Love
  • Shawn Luben*
  • Matthew Lubonovic*
  • Marissa Macaluso*
  • Cassie Madison*
  • Trey Marshall
  • Erika McCoy
  • Reed McGeehan
  • Emily McNicol*
  • Josephine Mellott
  • Ashley Milhoan
  • Emily Miller*
  • Karlee Miller
  • Baylee Mohr
  • Kimberly Moore
  • Ashley Morgan
  • Jaidyn Morgan
  • Kacey Morris
  • Brianna Morrow
  • Emma Moser
  • Destini Mott*
  • Isabella Mrozek
  • Erin Murphy*
  • Julia Myers
  • Julia Oravecz*
  • Breanna Pawlowski*
  • Abigail Pearson
  • Abigale Peterson*
  • Kelly Rektor*
  • Katlynn Remillard
  • Ruth Rickerd
  • Tyler Ridgway
  • Ashlyn Riggs*
  • Danielle Rigsby
  • Bailey Riley
  • Kara Ritter
  • Gabriel Roach
  • Ryan Roberts
  • Courtney Roof
  • Marikate Roscoe*
  • Kyleigh Ross
  • Alyssa Santoro
  • Brynn Shanahan
  • Daniel Shepard
  • Rachel Simballa
  • Alexandria Smith*
  • Erika Smith
  • Corey Snow*
  • Kristina Snyder
  • Briana Spalding
  • Laurel Stewart*
  • McKalie Stickney
  • Alexis Stillwagon
  • Mackenzie Sturgeon*
  • Jayma Sullivan*
  • Lauren Swast*
  • Adam Tatgenhorst
  • Nikia Taylor
  • Sarrah Tennefoss*
  • Nicholas Todd
  • Emma Trent
  • Haley Tucker*
  • Amy Voithofer
  • Justyce Vrable*
  • Quinton Walters
  • Lauren Warner*
  • Hoi Ming Winski*
  • Samantha Wehr
  • Marissa Yourstowsky*

Rising Scholars mentors, now graduates.
Spring 2022 – Baccalaureate Degrees

  • China Barrino-Goins
  • Samantha Basile
  • Nicholas Berger
  • Sidney Bowyer
  • Marina Brockway
  • Joshua Call
  • Alyssa Card
  • Logan Cardinal
  • Vivian Conrad
  • Cheyenne Cook
  • Kayla Cronin
  • Shelby Dennis
  • Nocole Dyke
  • Nicole Fitch
  • Hunter Gillingham
  • Olivia Haid
  • Mattisyn Infanti
  • Samantha Jeffers
  • Allison Jones
  • Darrel Jones
  • Lokelani Kalima
  • Eunice Knight
  • Thomas Kornbau
  • Carly Lacey
  • Brianna Luttmers
  • Mitchell McDowell
  • Zachary McKenzie
  • Sarah Monteleone
  • Amanda Parrish
  • Christine Pizzo
  • Kimberly Redmond
  • Tori Rishel
  • Samantha Robinson
  • Kara Rothbauer
  • Trusha Shah
  • Skyllar Shasteen
  • Haley Sowers
  • Sydney Spahr
  • Nikia Taylor
  • Lauren Vest
  • Morgan Woolf

 
Photo 1: Dean David Dees prepares for his final commencement as dean of the Columbiana County Campuses.

Photo 2: Thinking of the future.

Photo 3: OTA students ready to walk across the stage.

Photo 4: One last group shot for rad tech students.

Photo 5: Rising Scholars mentors, now graduates.


More photos on our Facebook page

 

The Rising Scholars Class of 2022 includes (from left) Anthony Steff, Katelyn Cross, Ashley Diem, Ayden Korda, Danny Felton, Maddie Cole and Carys Douglas.
Monday, May 16, 2022

The Kent State Columbiana County campuses held a graduation celebration to recognize members of the Rising Scholars program who are each graduating from their respective high schools this spring.

The graduating scholars include:

  • The Rising Scholars Class of 2022 includes (from left) Anthony Steff, Katelyn Cross, Ashley Diem, Ayden Korda, Danny Felton, Maddie Cole and Carys Douglas.
    Jenna Bagley of Salem High School
  • Destiny Beaver of East Liverpool High School
  • Allison Borchardt of Salem High School
  • Maddie Cole of Leetonia High School
  • Katelyn Cross of Leetonia High School
  • Alexia Dennison of United Local High School
  • Ashley Diem of Salem High School
  • Carys Douglas of Wellsville High School
  • Danny Felton of David Anderson (Lisbon) High School
  • Timmy Finch of Leetonia High School
  • Logan Haueter of Salem High School
  • Trinity Hoskinson of United Local High School
  • Ayden Korda of David Anderson (Lisbon) High School
  • Francis Lewis of Salem High School
  • Devin McGuire of United Local High School
  • Jordan Powell of Southern Local High School
  • Giovanna Pucci of Wellsville High School
  • Kyra Rawson of East Liverpool High School
  • Jasmine Rhodes of East Liverpool High School
  • Anthony Steff of Wellsville High School

Mentors and campus administrators who worked with the scholars
The scholars were recognized by Dr. Jessica Paull, program coordinator, along with Dr. David Dees, dean and chief administrative officer of the Columbiana campuses.

The Rising Scholars Program is designed to offer local first-generation college-bound students and their families the knowledge and social support needed to succeed at a university. The goal is for each student in the program to complete a post-secondary education with credentials necessary to succeed in his or her career. Students are chosen by their schools based on their academic and leadership potential.

Kent State Salem and East Liverpool students serve as mentors to the younger scholars. Each mentor is a first-generation college student from Columbiana County with a strong record of academic success and a desire to serve the community.


Photo A: The Rising Scholars Class of 2022 includes (from left) Anthony Steff, Katelyn Cross, Ashley Diem, Ayden Korda, Danny Felton, Maddie Cole and Carys Douglas.

Photo B: Mentors and campus administrators who worked with the scholars included (front, from left) Loke Kalima, Brienna Scott, Ally Harman and (back, from left) Dr. David Dees, Nick Berger, Tommy Kornbau, Blaine McCurdy and Dr. Jessica Paull

More pictures on our Facebook page

 

The 2022 PTA Class from Kent State East Liverpool gathered on the last day of classes on the steps of the Carnegie Library.
Friday, May 13, 2022

The 2022 PTA Class from Kent State East Liverpool gathered on the last day of classes on the steps of the Carnegie Library.

Kent State University at East Liverpool held a pinning ceremony for the students who met the requirements for the associate of applied science degree in physical therapist assistant technology for 2022.

Reciting the PTA Graduate Oath
The students were recognized for their dedication and determination as they worked to earn their degrees through the difficult days of the COVID pandemic.

Kameron DuPonty was recognized with the PTA academic achievement award.


Cutline A: The 2022 PTA Class from Kent State East Liverpool gathered on the last day of classes on the steps of the Carnegie Library. They include: (from left) Matthew Lubonovic, Michael Adams, Marissa Macaluso, Allison Forbes, Briana Spalding, Elyse Fincham, Olive Busson and Kameron DuPonty.

Cutline B: Reciting the PTA Graduate Oath

 

 

 

Students recognized during the awards banquet
Tuesday, May 03, 2022

Students recognized during the awards banquet were (front, from left) Katerina Wright, Lindsey Loboy, Kim Ewing, Hoi Ming Winski, Breanna Pawlowski, Mackenzie Sturgeon: and (back from left) Kameron DuPonty and Wyatt Crabtree

Kent State University at East Liverpool recognized the academic achievements of several students during its Campus Awards Ceremony, while also honoring the service of faculty, staff and community leaders.

The awards and recipients are:

Student Awards:

Outstanding Business Management Student:

  • Gabriel Edwards

Outstanding Computer Technology Student:

  • Wyatt Crabtree

Associate Degree Nursing Academic Award:

  • Hoi Ming Winski

Associate Degree Nursing Service Award:

  • Kim Ewing

Associate Degree Nursing Outstanding Student Award:

  • Lindsey Loboy

Occupational Therapy Assistant Academic Award:

  • Mackenzie Sturgeon

Occupational Therapy Assistant Service Award:

  • Arleigha Gaudio

Occupational Therapy Assistant Outstanding Student:

  • Breanna Pawlowski

Physical Therapist Assistant Academic Award:

  • Kameron DuPonty

Environmental Club Service Award:

  • Margaret Villarreal

President’s List:

  • Daniel Culler
  • Gabriel Edwards
  • Keith Francis
  • Bradon Fredritz
  • Marissa Price
  • Katerina Wright

Community Partners Bob and Robin Bosco of Bob & Robin’s Flowers

Community Awards

Community Partner Award:

  • Bob and Robin Bosco of Bob & Robin’s Flowers

Lifetime Achievement Award:

  • Marilyn Parkes

Campus Faculty and Staff Awards

Full-Time Faculty Member of the Year:

  • Lynn Leija - physical therapist assistant program

Adjunct Faculty Member of the Year:

  • Betsy Babb - art and art history

Staff Member of the Year:

  • Tina Smith - public relations coordinator

Cutline A: Students recognized during the awards banquet were (front, from left) Katerina Wright, Lindsey Loboy, Kim Ewing, Hoi Ming Winski, Breanna Pawlowski, Mackenzie Sturgeon: and (back from left) Kameron DuPonty and Wyatt Crabtree

Cutline B: Community Partners Bob and Robin Bosco of Bob & Robin’s Flowers

Skyllar Shasteen was recognized with three separate awards.
Friday, April 29, 2022

President’s List awardees

Kent State University at Salem recognized the academic achievements of several students for the 2021-2022 academic year at its annual awards banquet.

The awards and recipients are:

Academic Awards

Outstanding American Sign Language Student:

  • McGwire Groubert

Outstanding American Sign Language Best Non-Manuals:

  • Abigail Hruby

Outstanding Students in French:

  • Arundhati Thornberry
  • Omobolanle Ajibola

Human Services Intern of Excellence-Professionalism Award:

  • Taylor Leffler

Human Services Intern of Excellence–Dedication Award:

  • Thomas Scarnecchia

Human Services Intern of Excellence–Advocacy Award:

  • Jessica Gaines

Outstanding Students in Horticulture:

  • Militca Denee
  • Augustin Holman
  • Alicia Lynne Costello

Honors Program Thesis Award:

  • Skyllar Shasteen

Skyllar Shasteen
Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology Academic Excellence:

  • Casey Dickey

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology Clinical Excellence:

  • Olivia Kuzma

Outstanding English Majors:

  • Regan Crosser
  • Sophia Lindner

Outstanding English Minors:

  • Connor Francis
  • Skyllar Shasteen

Excellence in Tutoring Writing:

  • Julia Chappelear

Rising Scholars Outstanding Mentor:

  • Ally Harman

Rising Scholars Outstanding New Mentor:

  • Blaine McCurdy

Outstanding Students in Psychological Research:

  • Skyllar Shasteen
  • Kasey Jamison

Outstanding Students in Psychology:

  • Draven Stanley
  • Tommy Kornbau

Outstanding Business Student:

  • Emily Fitch

Outstanding Information Technology Student:

  • Lucas Duncan

Outstanding Insurance Studies Student:

  • Alyssa Card

Outstanding Criminology and Justice Studies Student:

  • Katerina Wright

Early Childhood Education Exemplary Student:

  • Angelina D’Itri

Early Childhood Education Outstanding Student Teacher-Senior:

  • Marina Brockway

Early Childhood Education Outstanding Student Teacher in Field Work-Junior:

  • Matthew Brooks

Early Childhood Education Outstanding Role Model of the Profession-Upperclassman:

  • Zachary McKenzie

Early Childhood Education Technology Reflective Student Teachers:

  • Jayma Sullivan
  • Tabitha Hornof

Early Childhood Education Technology Academic Excellence:

  • Briana Hanlon

Academic Excellence in Nursing-Sophomore:

  • Madison Showalter

Clinical Excellence in Nursing-Sophomore:

  • MacKenzie Kiko

Academic Excellence in Nursing-Junior:

  • Sherilyn Horst

Clinical Excellence in Nursing-Junior:

  • Jessica Kisner

Academic Excellence in Nursing-Senior:

  • Eunice Knight

Clinical Excellence in Nursing-Senior:

  • Nicole Fitch

Kent State Salem Undergraduate Research Conference Outstanding Presentations:

First Place, Session One:

  • Jessica Johnson

Second Place, Session One:

  • Michael Schlegel

Third Place, Session One:

  • Abigail Jackson

First Place, Session Two:

  • Olivia Coontz

Third Place, Session Two:

  • Kasey Jamison

Fall 2021/Spring 2022 President’s List (* represents students who achieved this distinction for both semesters):

  • Samantha Basile
  • Rachel Bright
  • Marina Brockway
  • Macy Buehner
  • Alyssa Card
  • Olivia Coontz
  • Alicia Costello
  • Ava Delsignore
  • Shelby Dennis
  • Kendra DeWitt
  • Angelina D’Itri
  • Jenna Drayer
  • Zaviona Fountain
  • Hunter Gillingham*
  • Briana Hanlon, Hannah Harmon
  • Sherilyn Horst
  • Mattisyn Infanti
  • Jessica Johnson
  • Kaitlin Ketchum
  • Mariah Lanzer
  • McKenzie Martin
  • Olivia McCoy
  • Mitchell McDowell
  • Zachary McKenzie*
  • Emily Miller
  • Marikate Roscoe
  • Erin Smith
  • Ashley Stellato
  • Jayma Sullivan
  • Emily Yereb

See more photos!


Cutline A: President’s List awardees

Cutline B: Skyllar Shasteen was recognized with three separate awards.

 

Planting the dogwood on the Salem Campus
Monday, April 25, 2022

Planting the dogwood on the Salem Campus

Kent State University at Salem again received the Tree Campus Higher Education recognition by the Arbor Day Foundation, that honors colleges and universities and their leaders for promoting healthy trees and engaging students and staff in the spirit of conservation.

The campus celebrated this recognition during its Arbor Day observances by planting a red flowering dogwood tree on the campus grounds. Students and faculty of the horticulture program coordinated the tree planting including Owen Conway, Alicia Costello, Augustin Holman, Brennan McGuire, Dr. Sarah Eichler, assistant professor of biological sciences and horticulture; and John Majernik, lecturer for the horticulture program.

Observing Arbor Day on the Salem Campus were (from left) John Majernik, Augustin Holman, Alicia Costello, Brennan McGuire, Owen Conway and Sarah Eichler.

To receive Tree Campus distinction, Kent State Salem had to meet the Tree Campus USA’s five standards, providing detailed documentation for each standard. These include maintaining a tree advisory committee; having a campus tree-care plan; dedicating annual expenditures for its campus tree program; holding an Arbor Day observance; and leading a student service-learning project.

The Salem campus is home to Kent State University’s horticulture program, where students can earn an associate degree in horticulture technology or a bachelor’s degree in applied horticulture.

“Your entire community should be proud of this sustained commitment to environmental stewardship,” stated Lauren Weyers, program manager for the Arbor Day Foundation. “If ever there was a time for trees, now is that time. Your diligence in improving the environment and quality of life at your school contributes to a healthier, more sustainable world for us all.”
 


Cutline A:  Planting the dogwood on the Salem Campus.

Cutline B: Observing Arbor Day on the Salem Campus were (from left) John Majernik, Augustin Holman, Alicia Costello, Brennan McGuire, Owen Conway and Sarah Eichler.

 

 

Diane Hill with her research poster.
Tuesday, April 19, 2022

Diane Hill with her research poster.

Diane Hill, senior lecturer in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at Kent State Salem, recently shared her research findings at the Midwest Nursing Research Society Symposium in Schaumburg, Ill. (near Chicago).

Hill is an advanced practice nurse/clinical nurse specialist whose area of expertise is pediatrics and she has been teaching on the Salem Campus for 15 years. Her research title was “Challenges for custodial grandparents caring for grandchildren with chronic illness: an integrated literature review.”

This literature review was the initial steps toward Hill’s doctorate dissertation.

“As a pediatric nurse, I see an increasing number of children cared for exclusively by grandparents for various reasons,” Hill explained. “My future study will examine the custodial grandparents’ challenges as they care for grandchildren with asthma.”


Cutline: Diane Hill with her research poster.

 

Scholarships Awarded to ELHS Students from Volleyball Contest
Monday, April 18, 2022

East Liverpool High School seniors Kaylee Nelson and Jasmine Rhodes.

Last fall, the annual Kent State Columbiana County Volleyball Classic was held between the East Liverpool and Salem high school teams. As part of this event, the local Kent State campuses award $500 scholarships to two students from each of the high schools.

Receiving the scholarships from East Liverpool High School were (from left) Kaylee Nelson and Jasmine Rhodes.

Nelson intends to study nursing on the East Liverpool Campus and Rhodes will attend the Kent State Salem Campus while determining her major.

Two recipients from Salem High School will be recognized at their senior awards ceremony in May.


Cutline: (from left) East Liverpool High School seniors Kaylee Nelson and Jasmine Rhodes.

This group of scholars learned how to become a nurse during a workshop on the East Liverpool Campus.
Tuesday, March 22, 2022

This group of scholars learned how to become a nurse during a workshop on the East Liverpool Campus.


For any Rising Scholar from Columbiana County thinking about a future in nursing, a recent workshop on the East Liverpool Campus may have helped with the planning process.

Listening for a heartbeat.
Faculty and students from the associate degree in nursing (ADN) program at East Liverpool welcomed a group of scholars for a day of demonstrations and hands-on activities in the nursing labs.

Inserting an IV.

Scholars interacted with a variety of “patients” (mannequins) using stethoscopes to detect heartbeats and pulses; IV needles; and other medical devices.

“The scholars worked alongside nursing faculty and students who demonstrated how they train on state-of-the-art mannequins, including ‘Annie,’” explained Dr. Jessica Paull, Rising Scholars program coordinator. “Annie has a heartbeat, pulse and can be programmed to ‘crash,’ so students had to find the source of her medical issues for her vitals to return to normal.”

Taking a pulse and checking vitals.
Throughout the day, scholars learned about various career paths in nursing and the educational process to become nurses.

The participating scholars included Kaitlyn Boston, Chariti Boyd, Jazzmen Echols, Haylee Kellogg and Kiah Sloan from Southern Local; Ryan Ehler and Giovanna Pucci from Wellsville; Kayleigh Ansell, Miles Reynolds and Melody Wright from East Liverpool; Lillian Starcher from Salem; Teagan Arter and Taylor Chapman from Leetonia; and Kaitlyn Black and Selena Zuti from Crestview.

The mentors included Blaine McCardy and Loki Kalima.


Photo A: This group of scholars learned how to become a nurse during a workshop on the East Liverpool Campus.

Photo B: Listening for a heartbeat.

Photo C: Inserting an IV.

Photo D: Taking a pulse and checking vitals.

 

The BSN students who collected items for pediatric patients
Monday, March 14, 2022

The BSN students who collected items for pediatric patients include (front, from left) Katelyn Bailey, Alyssa Chestnut, Emma Jarvis, Lindsay Wills and (back, from left) Kobi Ream, Abigail Jackson, Jamie Brown and Jessica Kisner.

 

A group of nursing students from the Salem Campus decided to give a little more of themselves to the patients at Akron Children’s Hospital.

The students are part of Diane Hill’s pediatric nursing class who completed clinical studies at the hospital. On their own, the students purchased and donated items such as sleepers, socks, underwear and other clothing items.

“My pediatric students are just so caring,” Hill shared. “What a great give-back from these students.”


Baskets of donations


Cutline A: The BSN students who collected items for pediatric patients include (front, from left) Katelyn Bailey, Alyssa Chestnut, Emma Jarvis, Lindsay Wills and (back, from left) Kobi Ream, Abigail Jackson, Jamie Brown and Jessica Kisner.

Cutline B: Baskets of donations

Thursday, March 03, 2022

Greetings!
Looking at the calendar, I realize that a change of seasons is upon us. After another long, cold, snowy winter, we can feel spring peeking around the corner and we welcome the change!

As an educator, I love fall and the excitement of returning to the classroom after summer break because there is always an energy that surrounds our campus as we learn, create, discover and explore together. But, I also love spring on our campuses.

Spring is generally viewed as a time of new beginnings, fresh starts and a time of awakening; however, in the world of higher education, each spring marks the end of an academic year and/or the culmination of long journeys for some. Ironically, the “endings” that occur each spring on our campuses also mark beginnings worth celebrating.

We celebrate the graduates receiving their diplomas after years of hard work and who are about to embark on careers that will help change our world. We celebrate the students being recognized for their academic success with awards and scholarships and who are inspired to continue setting lofty goals. We celebrate faculty and staff retiring after years of dedicated service to our students and campus and who are ready to begin a new phase of their lives.

With each change of season, lives change. The changes often bring new opportunities, new beginnings, new situations and even new challenges. As dean of the Kent State Salem and East Liverpool campuses, I always strive to prepare and empower others to make the most of changes and new beginnings.

We have dedicated faculty, staff and administrative employees who are committed to student success – all year long. They make me proud of their dedication and loyalty.

Over the next several months, voices from our campuses will be heard throughout the Kent State system as the university works to develop a comprehensive strategic plan for the future. Our faculty and campus employees fully understand the value and importance of the regional campuses – especially of the Salem and East Liverpool campuses – to the overall success of Kent State University, and they are ready to share their ideas, thoughts and perspectives.

Colleges and universities are experiencing challenges like never before: a pandemic; shrinking population; economic woes; social strife; and changing job markets. I am confident; however, that the combined commitment of the Salem and East Liverpool campus personnel will define how we face these challenges and how we continue to impact the lives of our students.

I am also proud of the seemingly unending support we receive from our communities, alumni and friends of the campuses. Such support is absolutely critical to our success and is often the bridge needed to help students achieve their goals. I appreciate each of you and your vested interest in the Kent State Columbiana County campuses.

Dr. David Dees

Although the seasons may change, our commitment to student success remains constant. Enjoy your spring!

With thanks,

David M. Dees
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Salem and East Liverpool

Kent State University at Salem James and Coralie Centofanti Hall
Thursday, January 20, 2022

Dr. David Dees, dean of Kent State University at Salem, announced those students named to the Fall 2021 President’s and Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the Salem Campus.

The students and their hometowns are:

President’s List

Alliance:

  • Zaviona Fountain

Atwater:

  • Alyssa Card

Aurora:

  • Macy Buehner

Bloomingdale:

  • Erin Smith

Carrollton:

  • Rachel Bright

Columbiana:

  • Ava Delsignore
  • Sherilyn Horst

East Liverpool:

  • Angelina D’Itri
  • Jayma Sullivan

East Sparta:

  • Alicia Costello

Homeworth:

  • Hunter Gillingham

Leetonia:

  • Olivia Coontz

Lisbon:

  • Olivia McCoy

New Middleton:

  • Kendra DeWitt

Ravenna:

  • Zachary McKenzie

Salem:

  • Annie Davidson
  • Erica Gudat
  • Morgan McGaffick

Uhrichsville:

  • Ellee Shepherd

Wellsville:

  • Mattisyn Infanti

Dean’s List

Akron:

  • Juliette Azipoh
  • Alyssa Casey
  • Lauren Chalmers
  • Joy Colvin
  • Kayla Dickey

Alliance:

  • Tristan Confalone
  • Shelby Dennis
  • Kelsey Elliott
  • Madison Rhome
  • Morgan Woolf

Amherst:

  • Christina Rusinko

Ashtabula:

  • Danielle Melnik

Austintown:

  • Julia Oravecz
  • Kelly Rektor

Beloit:

  • Braxton Barker
  • Madison Showalter

Berlin Center:

  • Morgan Donithan
  • Connor Francis
  • Lokelani Kalima

Boardman:

  • Jessica Johnson
  • Abigale Peterson

Canfield:

  • Kirsten Adams
  • Matthew Brooks
  • Brianna Carney
  • Robert Coonce
  • Marisa Head
  • Alison Locketti
  • Danielle Rollison
  • Kara Rothbauer
  • Mackenzie Rusu
  • Trusha Shah
  • Ashley Stellato

Canton:

  • Owen Conway
  • Janell Dima
  • Bobbie Foutty
  • Nicole Sanderson
  • Jennifer Traylor

Chardon:

  • Katlyn Lancaster

Columbiana:

  • Zachary Chaffee

Cortland:

  • Madison Oriti
  • LaChic Parker
  • Marikate Roscoe

Dalton:

  • Brooke Denning

Deerfield:

  • Brittany Arnold
  • Tabitha Hornof
  • Kristen Hoy

Diamond:

  • Gabrielle Arquilla
  • Dover:Brooke Foust
  • Hannah Harmon

East Liverpool:

  • Paige Adkins
  • Natalie Ammon
  • Sidney Bowyer
  • Nicole Fitch
  • Briana Hanlon
  • Alexandra Hill
  • Sydney Hill
  • Carly Lacey
  • Aubrianna Mellott
  • Emily Miller
  • Andrea Trotter
  • Hannah White

East Palestine:

  • Shawni Firmstone
  • Kenzee Johnston
  • Sarah Monteleone

East Rochester:

  • Cody Mitchell

Fremont:

  • Aimee Martinez

Hartville:

  • Kirsten Garvey

Homeworth:

  • Katty Wilson

Jefferson:

  • Tessa Hinson

Kensington:

  • Sydney Spahr

Kent:

  • Jennifer Biggs

Kirtland:

  • Brooke Celeste

Leavittsburg:

  • Mackenzie Chitwood

Leetonia:

  • Danielle Gabriel
  • Victoria Kosek
  • Allysa Rance
  • Cameron Sloan
  • Caleb Witmer

Lisbon:

  • Alyssa Chestnut
  • Heather May
  • Alexia Miller
  • Alison Sprouse
  • Justyce Vrable
  • Madelyn Wells

Lowellville:

  • Mary Novak
  • Raymond Stabinski

Mantua:

  • Allyson Buchert

McDonald:

  • Michael Ferradino

Medina:

  • Ryan Sanford

Millersburg:

  • Jaylie Klusty

Mineral Ridge:

  • Rachael Channell

Minerva:

  • Reed Lucas
  • Lauren Swast

New Philadelphia:

  • Sarah Hill

New Springfield:

  • Amanda Crum

Newton Falls:

  • Lynae Downing
  • Jessica Eckenrode
  • Heidi Hauck
  • Alexandria Smith

New Waterford:

  • Nicole Dyke
  • Carly Mustake

Niles:

  • Thomas Scarnecchia
  • Skyllar Shasteen

North Lima:

  • Baylee Mohr
  • Cassandra Pennicuff

Norton:

  • Abbey Murawski

Paris:

  • Logan Cardinal

Poland:

  • Cheyanna Porter

Powell:

  • Lauren Warner

Ravenna:

  • Paige Doremus
  • Maria Miller
  • Bronwyn Sanders

Rogers:

  • Kiley Cook
  • Wyatt Crabtree
  • Caitlin Marshall

Rootstown:

  • Mackenzie Wood

Salem:

  • Kade Blake
  • Sarah Bobby
  • Chloe Chappell
  • Mitchell Craig
  • Lauren Dougherty-Laubacher
  • Jenna Drayer
  • Lauren Duke
  • Samantha Elrod
  • Rachel Gentile
  • Molly Hopple
  • Kasey Jamison
  • Eunice Knight
  • Thomas Kornbau
  • Kaitlyn Libb
  • Sophia Lindner
  • Autumn Little
  • Brianna Luttmers
  • McKenzie Martin
  • Cally Mason
  • Shannan Morris
  • Nina Moruzzi
  • Erin Murphy
  • Whitney Parkinson
  • Nakkiya-Rose Plummer
  • Samantha Robinson
  • Illania Schmidt
  • Theodore Smith
  • Laurel Stewar
  • Melody Troyer
  • Andrew Wilson
  • Danielle Whitman
  • Faith Wittenauer
  • Hannah Yannucci
  • Ian Ziegler
  • Lucas Ziegler

Salineville:

  • Jayson Bott
  • Marshall Somerville
  • Elizabeth Willis

Sebring:

  • Teghan Boggs
  • Aebigayle D’Ostroph
  • Emma Moser

Seville:

  • Leah Weinmann

Solon:

  • Janae Awuah

Southington:

  • Taylor Leffler
  • Samantha Meyers

Stone Creek:

  • Jilliann Borter

Struthers:

  • Renee Leonard

Sullivan:

  • Hannah Heath

Thompson:

  • Angel Lewis

Tuscarawas:

  • Mackenzie Sentz

Warren:

  • Samantha Basile
  • Marina Brockway
  • Alexa DiMauro
  • Kimberly Redmond
  • Kelly Simpson

Wellington:

  • Stephanie Dodrill

Wellsville:

  • Megan Haught
  • Mitchell McDowell
  • Amanda Parrish

Youngstown:

  • Rachael DiFrancesco
  • Lily Fairbanks
  • Whitney Fox
  • David Lynn

Indianapolis, Ind.:

  • Lauren Vest

Kokomo, Ind.:

  • Taylor Russell

New Cumberland, W.Va.:

  • Rachael McGinnis
  • Cheryl Wiley

Weirton, W.Va.:

  • Shane Doggett
Kent State University at East Liverpool John J. Purinton Hall
Thursday, January 20, 2022

 

Dr. David Dees, dean of Kent State University at East Liverpool, announced those students named to the Fall 2021 President’s or Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 or more credit hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the East Liverpool Campus.

The students and their hometowns are:

President’s List

Wellsville:

  • Bradon Fredritz

Dean’s List

Ashtabula:

  • David Brown

Calcutta:

  • Brock Ford

Canfield:

  • Alexis Kaleda

Canton:

  • Lexy Smith

Carrollton:

  • Elizabeth McNutt

Cuyahoga Falls:

  • Caitlyn Gerdes

East Liverpool:

  • Alex Burgess
  • Anthony DeMarco
  • Derek Klein
  • Caleb Shroades
  • Abby Smith
  • Annessa Weyand
  • Aaron White

East Palestine:

  • Sara Cozza

Hubbard:

  • Jakob Darlington

Lisbon:

  • Matisyn Joseph
  • Hannah Moore

Lowellville:

  • Kasey Stabinski

Newton Falls:

  • Heidi Herman

North Lima:

  • Arleigha Gaudio

Richmond:

  • Racquel Dennis

Salem:

  • Nicholas Colbert
  • Aurora Leguard

Toronto:

  • Ashlee Danko

Wellsville:

  • Gabriel Edwards
  • Kylie Surace

Aliquippa, Pa.:

  • Madison Conn

 

Dean David Dees (far left) presented the County Classic traveling plaque to the East Liverpool Potters, who won this year’s contest over the Salem Quakers.
Thursday, January 06, 2022

Cheers for the Potters!

East Liverpool took home the traveling plaque by winning the sixth annual Kent State Columbiana County Classic with a 66-50 score over Salem High School on the Quakers home court. With the win, the Potters tied the series at 3-3.

Cheers for the Quakers!
Representatives from the Salem and East Liverpool campuses greeted fans by handing out mini magnetic flashlights at the door and provided t-shirts that the cheerleaders tossed into the stands throughout the game. All players, coaches and cheerleaders also received shirts.

Always a favorite, Flash cheered and danced with fans of all ages.

At halftime, four students each received a $500 Opportunity Scholarship to be used at the Salem or East Liverpool Campus. Dean David Dees presented the scholarships to seniors Casey Miller and Corey Riesen of Salem High School and to Jamar Allen and Paxton Grimes of East Liverpool High School.

The Kent State County Classic represents the strong foundation of learning in East Liverpool and Salem, as each community is home to one of the university’s two Columbiana County campuses.

 

Go, teams!



Cutline A:  Dean David Dees (far left) presented the County Classic traveling plaque to the East Liverpool Potters, who won this year’s contest over the Salem Quakers.

Cutline B: Cheers for the Potters!

Cutline C: Cheers for the Quakers!

Cutline D: Go, teams!

 

More photos are available on our Facebook page

 

 

Hand print at Lighthouse Kids
Wednesday, January 05, 2022

Showing off their sensory items are OTA students (first row, from left) Aurora Leguard, Mackenzie Sturgeon, Matisyn Joseph, Veronica Keenan and (second row, from left) Brenna Pawlowski, Sara Dalrymple, Heidi Herman, Bryna Jenkins, Arliegha Gaudio


The second-year students of the occupational therapy assistant program from Kent State East Liverpool took a lot of what they are learning and incorporated it into activities for children at the Lighthouse Kids Learning Center in Wellsville.

The facility provides daycare services for infants, toddlers and preschool-aged youngsters. The children range in age from six weeks to five years old.

Hand print at Lighthouse Kids
OTA students designed and presented hour-long programs for each age group that met the groups’ development levels while interacting with the daycare teachers.

This provided the Kent State students with hands-on learning experiences with a pediatric population and helped them transfer their own classroom learning to a live setting with play-based occupational therapy interventions.

 

OTA students at the Lighthouse Kids Center (seated) included Bryna Jenkins and Matisyn Joseph; and (standing) Heidi Herman, Veronica Keenan, Aurora Leguard, Arleigh Gaudio, and Mackenzie Sturgeon
The daycare children engaged in finger painting for sensory input; movement activities choreographed to children’s music to promote gross motor movements; and art activities that reinforced fine motor skills.

The OTA students created sensory boards with trees decorated with socks and mittens that were given to the daycare children.

Not long after the visit to the Lighthouse Kids Learning Center, the OTA students also visited the Robert Bycroft School and engaged in activities with its students.


Cutline A: Showing off their sensory items are OTA students (first row, from left) Aurora Leguard, Mackenzie Sturgeon, Matisyn Joseph, Veronica Keenan and (second row, from left) Brenna Pawlowski, Sara Dalrymple, Heidi Herman, Bryna Jenkins, Arliegha Gaudio

Cutline B: Hand print at Lighthouse Kids

Cutline C: OTA students at the Lighthouse Kids Center (seated) included Bryna Jenkins and Matisyn Joseph; and (standing) Heidi Herman, Veronica Keenan, Aurora Leguard, Arleigh Gaudio, and Mackenzie Sturgeon

 

    

 

Radiology Program Spearheads Collection for Food Bank
Wednesday, December 15, 2021

The Radiologic Technology Club from the Kent State Salem Campus collected money and 100 boxes of macaroni and cheese that it donated to the Second Harvest Food Bank in Mahoning County.

Students, faculty and campus employees contributed to the collection.

Pictured with part of the collected items are (front, from left) Dakota Knightley, Olivia Kuzma, Jaidyn Morgan, Marikate Roscoe; (middle, from left) Abrianna Greathouse, Emma Moser, Barbara Gross, Haley Tucker, Madison Ketchum; and (back, from left) Jan Gibson, program director; Julia Oravecz, Lauren Warner, Marissa Yourstowsky, Brettany Daniels, Aileen Egolf, Kyle Blevins, Erin Murphy.

Radiology Program Spearheads Collection for Food Bank

Wednesday, December 15, 2021

The Radiologic Technology Club from the Kent State Salem Campus collected money and 100 boxes of macaroni and cheese that it donated to the Second Harvest Food Bank in Mahoning County.

Students, faculty and campus employees contributed to the collection.

Pictured with part of the collected items are (front, from left) Dakota Knightley, Olivia Kuzma, Jaidyn Morgan, Marikate Roscoe; (middle, from left) Abrianna Greathouse, Emma Moser, Barbara Gross, Haley Tucker, Madison Ketchum; and (back, from left) Jan Gibson, program director; Julia Oravecz, Lauren Warner, Marissa Yourstowsky, Brettany Daniels, Aileen Egolf, Kyle Blevins, Erin Murphy.

Radiology Program Spearheads Collection for Food Bank

Abigail Jackson
Wednesday, December 15, 2021

Prize winners from the 2021 Undergraduate Research Conference on the Salem Campus included (left) Kasey Jamison and (right) Abigail Jackson with (center) Dr. Rachael Blasiman and Dean David Dees.

Kent State University at Salem held its fall Undergraduate Research Conference, an event that recognizes students for their research and allows them to share what they learned through discussions with the academic staff. This year’s event was more of a hybrid-format, with students presenting in person and through remote technology.

Dr. Rachael Blasiman introduced keynote speaker Dr. Sarah Kennedy who joined the conference remotely.

 

The conference is open to all undergraduates in any discipline and in any for-credit course on any Kent State campus. Faculty judges evaluate the presentations based on originality; significance; evidence of learning about the research and information gathering process; and overall quality.

Dr. Sarah A. Kennedy was the keynote speaker. She is an associate professor of chemistry at Radford University in Radford, Va., and the program director for REALising Inclusive Science Excellence (REALISE). Her research background is in polymer chemistry and structural biology and she also pursues green chemistry products and conducts research on chemical education.

Dr. Rachael Blasiman, associate professor of psychology, serves as chair of the URC on the Salem Campus.

 

Winners for this year’s URC are:

Madison Ketchum, a rad tech student, with her research poster.
First place winners -

  • Jessica Johnson for “Little One, Big Emotions”
  • Olivia Coontz for “Is Happiness Worth It?”

Second place winners -

  • Michael Schlegel for Tuberculosis in the Homeless Population”
  • Devon Miller for “Cezanne started out with all the tricks: Reading Hemingway’s Big Two-Hearted River as an Impressionist Painting”

Third place winners -

  • Abigail Jackson for “Spravato for Treatment Resistant Depression”
  • Kasey Jamison for “Long-term Effects of Study Skills Workshops within the Rising Scholars Program”

Photo A: Prize winners from the 2021 Undergraduate Research Conference on the Salem Campus included (left) Kasey Jamison and (right) Abigail Jackson with (center) Dr. Rachael Blasiman and Dean David Dees.

Photo B: Dr. Rachael Blasiman introduced keynote speaker Dr. Sarah Kennedy who joined the conference remotely.

Photo C: Madison Ketchum, a rad tech student, with her research poster.

Dr. Sheren Farag
Wednesday, November 24, 2021

Dr. Sheren Farag has spent years researching how crops, plants, trees and vegetation grow. She is also passionate about teaching and designing agricultural and horticultural curriculum for college students. And, she is open to innovation and new technology.

With that combined expertise, Farag is now focused on her new role as program director and assistant professor of the horticulture technology program on the Kent State Salem Campus.

“My main goal is to see the horticulture technology program growing and developing to help our students maximize their educational experiences,” she shared. “I will start by collaborating with the regional partners and potential employers to have a more profound idea of the required knowledge and skills from the program graduates.”

Farag fully understands and appreciates the value of having a network of experts from the local green industry to support the program and her goals.

Dr. Sheren Farag
“I think one of the greatest opportunities is the experienced advisory board members who can give us an accurate and more profound insight into the required knowledge, training and skills of our graduates,” she said. “That would help us tremendously in developing the program curricula. Additionally, our collaborations with some regional industry partners can help us land appropriate training opportunities and paid internships for our students.”

Aside from enhancing the coursework of the horticulture program to align with what employers expect from graduates, Farag intends to lead efforts to update the program facilities, modernize the greenhouse and incorporate new growing systems for urban horticulture.

She also wants to target recruitment efforts for high school students interested in careers in horticulture, as well as adult learners currently in the workforce who want to sharpen their expertise and skills including those working in landscape architecture, urban horticultural and arboriculture and forestry.

Farag received a Bachelor of Science degree in soil and water science from Alexandria University, Egypt, followed by a post-graduate professional degree in integrated planning for rural development and environmental management from Lleida University and Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Zaragoza in Zaragoza, Spain.

In 2011, Farag received a Master of Advanced Studies in environment and natural resources management from Seville University in Seville, Spain, where she continued her studies and earned her doctorate degree in agricultural engineering (agricultural water management) in 2014.

For more than seven years, Farag held several research positions at various research institutions such as the Natural Resources and Agrobiology Institute in Seville, Spain; Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension-Texas A&M University; and Citrus Center-Texas A&M University-Kingsville. Her primary research focused on irrigation and soil management, crop physiology, horticulture production and using drones for precision agriculture.

Farag transitioned into the classroom and began her teaching career in numerous specialized agricultural and horticultural courses including horticulture food crops, crop science, agribusiness, agriculture records management, geographic information systems (GIS) and precision agriculture.

Intrigued by innovative technologies, Farag became certified as a remote drone pilot by the Federal Aviation Administration. Just prior to her appointment at Kent State Salem, she worked at Texas State Technical College’s Department of Workforce Training and Continuing Education as a trainer and remote drone pilot operator and instructor.

As a workforce trainer, she was required to also become a certified craft instructor from the National Center of Construction Education and Research (NCCER).

“Being a certified craft instructor enabled me to train instructors on courses requiring hands-on sessions,” she explained. “I am so delighted to join the horticultural technology program at Kent State University. I think it’s an excellent opportunity to help me apply all my previous experience to see this program grow and move forward.

“…Kent State University is known as a student-centered university. The slogan is ‘Students First.’ This goal perfectly aligns with my passion for teaching and empowering students and preparing them to become future leaders of the green industry.”

The James and Coralie Centofanti Hall on the Kent State Salem Campus.
Wednesday, October 27, 2021

The James and Coralie Centofanti Hall on the Kent State Salem Campus.
Part of the recent homecoming festivities on the Salem Campus included a time to observe the 10th anniversary of the opening of the James and Coralie Centofanti Hall.

Several faculty and staff members, students, alumni, community members gathered to reflect on how the James and Coralie Centofanti Hall has changed lives over the last 10 years.

Special guest Joe Centofanti, son of the late James and Coralie Centofanti, shared how his father came to the United States from Italy and, through hard work and wise planning, built a successful business in the area. The business created jobs, built structures that housed other businesses, provided for his family and made it possible for him to give back to the community.

Dean David Dees (center) with Marsha and Joe Centofanti
“My dad didn’t have a college degree, but he was a master at what he did,” Joe Centofanti shared. “He believed in education and encouraged others to go to school. He would be very proud to know that he helped make this addition to the campus possible.”

Also offering comments about the meaningfulness of Centofanti Hall to the Salem Campus and its students were:

  • Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the Kent State Salem Campus;
  • Lorene Martin, senior lecturer and coordinator of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program;
  • Jennifer White, a 2013 BSN graduate now working as a palliative health nurse practitioner at the Cleveland Clinic;
  • Christi Kugler, a 2011 BSN graduate now serving as the corporate clinical educator with CommuniCare Health Services;
  • Jan Gibson, senior program director for the Radiology Technology programs;
  • Margie Iagulli, senior lecturer for Rad Tech;
  • Brenna Rito, a 2020 Rad Tech graduate working at the Salem Regional Medical Center and currently enrolled in the radiation therapy program.

The multi-million-dollar Health and Sciences Wing opened in September 2011 and features state-of-the-art facilities on the first floor, including dedicated spaces for nursing and radiology instruction, a conference room, bookstore, faculty offices, student lounge and centralized classrooms. 

Nursing faculty (past and present), alum and students
The second floor includes a state-of-the-art biology lab, chemistry lab, research lab, classrooms and restrooms. In total, more than 33,200 square feet of space was renovated.

The initial renovation of the wing began in 2010 with plans to convert an underutilized gymnasium into an additional 16,000 square feet of learning space for the Salem Campus. 

Contributions to help finance the kickoff of these renovations were received from Salem Community Hospital, the Salem Community Foundation, the Pearce Foundation and more than 50 private individuals and families, including the Centofanti’s.

In February of 2013, then Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton accepted a $700,000 commitment from the James and Coralie Centofanti Foundation that was earmarked to complete the second floor of the Health and Sciences Wing on the campus of Kent State University at Salem. 

The Centofanti Foundation’s donation was used to transform the 9,000 –square-foot shell into showcase of laboratories and additional classrooms for biology, chemistry and other science-related studies.

Shortly after work began on the second floor and with approval by the Kent State Board of Trustees, the wing was named the James and Coralie Centofanti Hall.

Rad Tech faculty, alum and students

The second-floor renovations began in September 2014 and were completed in May 2015 at a cost of just over $2 million. Faculty and staff moved into the new spaces over the summer and students are now using the state-of-the-art labs and classrooms.

A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held on September 23, 2014, to mark the completion of the second floor of Centofanti Hall.

At that ceremony it was stated that “Jim and his wife, Coralie, believed in giving back, the power of philanthropy and the importance of learning. This gift will help prepare students to fill important professional roles in our community. Kent State Salem’s students demonstrate the work ethic that Jim believed was essential to success in any field.”

The total cost of converting the gymnasium space into the health and sciences wing was almost $9 million. The monies included equal amounts of local contributions, local campus funds and state funds.


Cutline A: The James and Coralie Centofanti Hall on the Kent State Salem Campus.

Cutline B: Dean David Dees (center) with Marsha and Joe Centofanti

Cutline C: Nursing faculty (past and present), alum and students

Cutline D: Rad Tech faculty, alum and students                                  
 

East Liverpool PTA Students Donate to Banquet of Lisbon
Friday, October 22, 2021

East Liverpool PTA Students Donate to Banquet of Lisbon

Students from the Kent State East Liverpool physical therapist assistant program observed National PTA Month by making donations to the Banquet of Lisbon.

The PTA students raised $500 through fundraisers this semester that was donated to help the Columbiana County campuses host the banquet on Oct. 25. The students also collected non-perishable food items that were donated to the Banquet of Lisbon.

Each year, PTA students from the Kent East Liverpool campus find unique ways to increase awareness about their field, while raising funds for a cause chosen by the class.

The Banquet of Lisbon is held each month at the New Lisbon Presbyterian Church in Lisbon, providing free meals to community members. The meals are planned and sponsored by volunteers from service groups, businesses, families and area churches.

For the past several years, the Kent State Salem and East Liverpool campuses have hosted sit-down meals for the Banquet of Lisbon, but, because of COVID, this year’s meal will be a carryout fried chicken dinner.

Kent State East Liverpool PTA students recently gathered with an oversized check to represent their donation to the Banquet of Lisbon. Pictured are (front, from left) Lauren McCarty, Michala Johnson, Elyse Fincham, Allison Forbes, Olive Busson, Marissa Macaluso; (middle, from left) Madison White, Gabriella Hyrb, Alexis Kaleda, Danelle Payne, Michael Adams, Briana Spalding, Marissa Baker; and (back, from left) Matthew Hans, Seth Shivers, Scott Porter, Kameron DuPonty and Matthew Lubonovic.


 

Ray Trevelline, former owner of the Hot Dog Shoppe in downtown East Liverpool, received the Community Partner Award.
Thursday, October 21, 2021

Kent State University at East Liverpool recognized its 2020 and 2021 Wall of Fame honorees during a program in Purinton Hall on Thursday, Sept. 30.

David Thornberry and Jonathan Ludwig each received the 2020 and 2021 Lifetime Achievement Award, respectively, which recognizes Kent State graduates for their professional accomplishments and community involvement.

The late Dr. Carole A. Barbato, who taught communication studies on the East Liverpool Campus, was honored posthumously with the 2020 Friend of the Campus Award, while William Barker received the same award, posthumously, for 2021. This award recognizes individuals who work tirelessly to improve the community and who support the university’s mission to provide quality education to the tri-state area.

The 2020 Community Partner Award was awarded to the Hot Dog Shoppe/Ray Trevelline and to Milligan’s Hardware and Supply/Art Doak for 2021. This award recognizes the long-standing business relationships with each of the two recipients and their support of academic success for area residents.

David Thornberry
David Thornberry now lives and teaches in Austin, Texas, but grew up in Newell, W.Va. and graduated from Oak Glen High School. He attended the East Liverpool Campus and graduated from Kent State University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1986, followed by a Master of Fine Arts in 1988.

Thornberry is a painter, poet, artist, photographer and teacher. He teaches painting and drawing at Austin Community College in Austin, as well as at the Dougherty Arts Center, the Art School at Laguna Gloria and the Austin Waldorf School. He also taught in Ontario, Canada; Pittsburgh, Jackson, Wyoming; at Kent State University; and at the Austin Museum of Art.  His art has been recognized across the country and his works have appeared in exhibits throughout the United States and in numerous publications.

Thornberry is also a published poet and recently released his 18th volume of poetry.

While a student on the East Liverpool Campus, he volunteered at several events to promote the arts, including the Ohio River Arts Festival. 

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Jonathan Ludwig
Ludwig, is the current superintendent of East Liverpool City Schools, a position he has held since 2019. He graduated from East Liverpool High School in 1994 and earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Kent State in 1999. He completed his graduate studies at both Franciscan University in Steubenville and Salem University in Salem, W.Va.

Ludwig worked as an elementary special education teacher and as an online special education coordinator and instructor. He also taught for two years at Beaver Local and then worked with the life skills class at ELHS. Prior to being named superintendent, Ludwig was the principal at the Columbiana County Career and Technical Center. 

Barbato was a professor of communication studies at Kent State University and the East Liverpool Campus for 40 years, teaching 21 different courses. She passed away unexpectedly in 2014 at the age of 64.

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Dr. Carole Barbato
Born in Youngstown, Barbato graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School in 1967. She furthered her education at Kent State University where she earned a bachelor’s degree in communications in 1971; a master’s degree in organizational communications in 1975; and her doctorate degree in small group communications in 1994.

Barbato was loved and respected as a professor, but she worked tirelessly with colleagues to preserve the history of the events of May 4, 1970, on the Kent State Campus. She co-authored a book, wrote several book chapters and numerous journal articles about the events of that day. 

In 2012, she and three of her colleagues earned the 2010 Ohio Historic Preservation Office’s Preservation Merit Award for documentation of the May 4, 1970, Kent State Shootings Site to the National Register of Historical Places. Their work created the May 4 Walking Tour and the May 4 Visitors Center on the Kent Campus.

William Barker

Barker was the owner of the former Patterson Industries in the East End of East Liverpool, as well as Tru-Vel Industries. He was among the first to serve on the Kent State East Liverpool advisory board and is credited with creating the Friends of the East Liverpool Campus.

Over five decades, the Friends has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for scholarships and programs on the East Liverpool Campus. 

Barker was active in the community, serving on the boards at East Liverpool City Hospital and First National Bank. He was a member of the Wellsville Masonic Lodge #108 for 70 years, becoming a 33rd degree Master Mason, and was a member of the Scottish Rite of Free Masons in Steubenville. Barker died in August 2020 at the age of 97. 

More photos on our Facebook page.


Cutline A: Ray Trevelline, former owner of the Hot Dog Shoppe in downtown East Liverpool, received the Community Partner Award.

Cutline B: David Thornberry

Cutline C: Jonathan Ludwig

Cutline D: The late Dr. Carole Barbato

Cutline E: The late William Barker

Bench dedicated to the late Dr. Carole Barbato at Kent State University at East Liverpool
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Situated between two trees and overlooking the Commons area on the East Liverpool Campus is a beautiful bronze bench with a plaque that reads: “A life that touched others lives on forever.” 

The bench was unveiled and dedicated on Sept. 30 to honor the late Dr. Carole A. Barbato, a beloved professor of communication studies on the East Liverpool Campus who died in the spring of 2014 at the age of 64. 

The first to take a seat on the new bench was Patrick Barbato, along with his daughter Alissa and granddaughter.

On hand for the dedication was her husband, Pat, along with her daughter, Alissa, and granddaughter. Joining them were former students, co-workers, peers and friends, some from the Kent Campus. 

The bench dedication was originally scheduled to occur in the spring of 2020 during planned ceremonies for the East Liverpool Campus to observe the 50th anniversary of the events of May 4, 1970, on the Kent State Campus and to honor Barbato’s tireless efforts to preserve the history of that day.

Because of the COVID pandemic, however, the bench dedication was postponed, as was her recognition on the Wall of Fame as a Friend of the East Liverpool Campus.

Barbato was known as an energetic, engaged and dedicated teacher and was a favorite among students and staff. She was active and involved with student activities, community events and campus programs.

Those who knew her best noted that Barbato’s greatest professional accomplishment came on Oct. 19, 2012, with the opening of the Kent State University May 4 Visitor’s Center. She and her colleagues Laura Davis, Jerry Lewis and Mark Seeman earned the 2010 Ohio Historic Preservation Office’s Preservation Merit Award for documentation of the May 4, 1970, Kent State Shootings Site to the National Register of Historical Places. The group was instrumental in the creation of the May 4 Walking Tour and the May 4 Visitors Center. 

Davis and Seeman attended the bench dedication and Wall of Fame program.

Dr. Carole Babato’s colleagues (from left) Dr. Mark Seeman and Dr. Laura Davis who worked with her to preserve the history of May 4, 1970, on the Kent State University campus.

Throughout her professional life, Carole co-authored a book and wrote several book chapters and numerous journal articles in her field, including an article in the Journal of Loss and Trauma about the events of May 4, 1970. Her book, This We Know: A Chronology of the Shootings at Kent State, May 1970, “… gathers well-established information from recorded accounts - from the time they happened through what has been learned since.” 

At a special celebration on the Kent Campus shortly after her death, it was stated that “Carole fulfilled a deep personal and professional commitment to honor those who were lost on May 4, 1970.”

It was also stated that Carole “served as a dedicated, engaged, tireless Kent State faculty member … who excelled as a teacher, author, university citizen and activist. She led countless students to success through the well-prepared and enthusiastic teaching of 21 different communication studies courses.” Her teaching career spanned 40 years.

Barbato is honored with a tribute wall in Taylor Hall on the Kent Campus. The display is near the main office for the School of Communication Studies on the second floor and just above the May 4 Visitor Center, which is housed in the lower level of the building.

The display shows her smiling face and states that “Carole fulfilled a deep personal and professional commitment to honor those who were lost on May 4, 1970. She helped place the markers where Allison, Jeff, Bill and Sandy, her childhood friend, fell.”

In 2006, she received the Ohio Communication Association Distinguished Teaching Award. She also received the Distinguished Alumni Award (posthumously) from Kent State’s School of Communication Studies.

Barbato was born in Youngstown in 1949 and graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School in 1967. She furthered her education at Kent State University from where she earned a bachelor’s degree in communications in 1971; a master’s degree in organizational communications in 1975; and a Ph.D. in small group communications in 1994.

She is survived by her husband Patrick; daughter Alissa; and three grandchildren.

There are volumes that have been written and spoken about the late Dr. Carole Barbato. She has been praised for her teaching, her passion for life, her loyalty to Kent State and her love of her family. But, perhaps, the greatest statement about her is the quote that is displayed on the wall of Taylor Hall: “Carole made us better people and the world a better place.”


Cutline A: The bench dedicated to the late Dr. Carole A. Barbato.

Cutline B: The first to take a seat on the new bench was Patrick Barbato, along with his daughter Alissa and granddaughter.

Cutline C: Dr. Carole Babato’s colleagues (from left) Mark Seeman and Laura Davis who worked with her to preserve the history of May 4, 1970, on the Kent State University campus.

Gavin Whitman with his smart TV
Thursday, August 26, 2021

 

For incoming freshman Gavin Whitman, participating in the Get Caught Up in a Flash Bootcamp was one of the smartest ways to start his journey at Kent State.

Gavin Whitman with his smart TV

After successfully completing the week-long program, Whitman received a 32-inch Samsung Smart Hub/HDTV. He is a student on the East Liverpool Campus.

The bootcamp provides students with an immersive and intensive learning experience to focus on identified weaknesses in English and/or algebra before beginning their first semester. Students attend a weeklong, on-campus experience where they meet with professors, improve their knowledge and then reassess their skills at the end of the week through testing. 

Participating students can save time and money by testing out of the remedial courses.

Students are identified during campus STAR events and notified of the bootcamp and its benefits during their academic advising appointments. 


Cutline: Gavin Whitman with his smart TV.
 

The East Liverpool Potters won the 2021 Volleyball Classic
Thursday, August 26, 2021

 

The third Kent State Columbiana County Volleyball Classic took place Aug. 24, when the Salem Quakers hosted the East Liverpool Potters for a full night of volleyball action and helping kick off the volleyball season in this area.

Flash at the Columbiana County Classic Volleyball game 2021
The night featured freshman, JV and varsity games between the cross-county rivals, In a hard-fought varsity match, East Liverpool High School defeated Salem High School for the second year in a row. 

Salem High School players during pre-game warmups
It took four games, but the Potters won the varsity match-up 25-23, 18-25, 25-12, 25-21.

East Liverpool also won the freshman and JV contests. 

As hosts for the evening, Kent State Columbiana County provided t-shirts for the players and coaches and fed the teams following the games. Flash was on hand to cheer, as well.

The Kent State County Classic represents the strong foundation of learning in East Liverpool and Salem, as each community is home to one of the university’s two Columbiana County campuses. 


Cutline A: The East Liverpool Potters won the 2021 Volleyball Classic.

Cutline B: Flash was there for both schools.

Cutline C: Salem High School players during pre-game warmups.

More photos on our Facebook
 

Kent State Homecoming 2021 Columbiana County Campuses
Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Homecoming 2021

Plans are underway for Homecoming 2021 on the Salem and East Liverpool campuses. During these two separate celebrations, we will honor special individuals and remember milestone events on each of our campuses. 

what to expect and RSVP

Maia Amato is sworn in as the newest member of the Wellsville Village Council by Mayor Randy Allmon.
Wednesday, August 18, 2021

Meet Maia Amato: the newest member of the Wellsville Village Council.

Maia Amato takes her seat at the Wellsville Village Council table.
She also is a senior at Kent State University, preparing to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in business administration. She earned an associate degree in business from Kent State in December 2020, taking classes on the East Liverpool and Salem campuses.

Following the recent death of Wellsville Mayor Nancy Murray, a shuffling of council positions occurred, creating a vacancy. Amato expressed interest in the position and was unanimously selected by council members to fill the seat formerly held by Randy Allmon, who assumed the mayor’s post.

Amato currently serves as a legal secretary and a paraprofessional for Garfield Elementary School in Wellsville and was selected by Wellsville’s Republican party as its candidate for the council position in the November election.

Just 20 years old, Amato already has her eyes set on a future of community service and a career of helping others. 

Maia Amato takes her seat at the Wellsville Village Council table.
“I wanted to be part of the Wellsville Village Council to help make Wellsville a better place to live,” she said. “I’d like to do things such as bring more jobs into the town and help create more activities for the kids, with hopes of keeping them out of trouble.”

Wellsville is Amato’s hometown, but her sights may be set on more distant horizons.

“I very well see me moving forward in local, state and federal politics,” she noted.  “I am currently between two career paths.  After earning my bachelor’s degree, I would either like to pursue law school and become a lawyer or receive my MBA and go into healthcare administration.”

Amato graduated from Wellsville High School in 2019. While still in high school, she enrolled at Kent State University through the College Credit Plus program and earned enough credits to begin college as a sophomore. 

As the newest member of the Wellsville Village Council, Amato credited Kent State with instilling a “leadership mindset” within her.

“I hope that I bring a new perspective and new ideas to the council and I encourage others as young as me to get out of their comfort zones and be leaders, as well,” she offered.

“The best advice I could give to young men and women about making a difference in their communities is that no goal is out of reach and age doesn’t define your mindset.”


Cutline A: Maia Amato is sworn in as the newest member of the Wellsville Village Council by Mayor Randy Allmon.

Cutline B: Maia Amato takes her seat at the Wellsville Village Council table.  
 

Kent State University Physical Therapist Assistant
Wednesday, August 18, 2021

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Jenifer Kiernan-Story (left) and Katie Sutton
Each spring, graduating students in the Physical Therapist Assistant program at Kent State East Liverpool cast votes to honor a clinical site instructor who impacted them during their learning experiences. The COVID pandemic delayed the presentation of the awards the past two springs, but the 2020 and 2021 honorees recently received their respective recognition for their work with the PTA students.

Debra Arcuragi (right) and Katie Sutton
Jenifer Kiernan-Story, PT, was selected as the 2020 Clinical Instructor of the Year and Debra Arcuragi, PTA, was named the 2021 Clinical Instructor of the Year.  

Kiernan-Story is a physical therapist at Mangiarelli Rehabilitation LLC, a family-owned and operated physical therapy facility in Warren that serves the Youngstown-Warren area. She is a credentialed clinical instructor through the American Physical Therapy Assocation and has been a long-term supporter and instructor for the East Liverpool PTA program.

Arcuragi is a physical therapist assistant at Trinity Health System in Steubenville and a 1990 graduate of the PTA program at Kent State East Liverpool. She, too, has worked with students for several years and is a strong supporter of the Kent State East Liverpool PTA program.


Cutline A: Jenifer Kiernan-Story (left) was named the 2020 Clinical Instructor of the Year by students in the PTA program at Kent State East Liverpool. Presenting her with the award is Katie Sutton, academic coordinator of PTST clinical education at Kent East Liverpool.

Cutline B: Debra Arcuragi (right) was named the 2021 Clinical Instructor of the Year by students in the PTA program at Kent State East Liverpool. Presenting the award is Katie Sutton, academic coordinator of PTST clinical education at Kent East Liverpool.
 

Kent State University at East Liverpool John J. Purinton Hall
Thursday, July 01, 2021

Dr. David Dees, dean of Kent State University at East Liverpool, announced those students named to the Spring 2021 President’s or Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 or more credit hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the East Liverpool Campus. 

The students and their hometowns are:


President’s List

East Liverpool:

  • Katerina Wright

Ravenna:

  • Keith Francis

Warren:

  • Daniel Culler 

Wellsville:

  • Gabriel Edwards

Youngstown:

  • Marissa Price

Dean’s List


Adena:

  • Billie Wells

Akron:

  • Jaden Kiggans
  • Debbie Slabaugh

Alliance:

  • Olive Bussen
  • Vanessia Freeman
  • Melissa Kirksey
  • Arundhati Thornberry

Ashtabula:

  • Christy Carpenter
  • Amiah Diaz

Austintown:

  • Cassie Keller

Berlin Center:

  • Elaine Ramhoff

Beloit:

  • Jordan McGuire
  • Erika Smith

Campbell:

  • Kristin Clark

Canal Fulton:

  • Grace Shafer

Canfield:

  • Kameron DuPonty
  • Delia Howard
  • Alexis Stillwagon

Canton:

  • Laurie Corbin
  • Ian-Isaac Fletcher
  • Nicholas Kakoules
  • Yuri Vovk

Carrollton:

  • Shelby Spencer

Cleveland:

  • Alexandra Eberling

Chagrin Falls:

  • Yvonne Pecka

Chardon:

  • Ryan Fox

Columbiana:

  • Madison Cline
  • Kelley Friend
  • Jonathan Murner
  • McKenna Schultz
  • Maci Shaffer

Concord Township:

  • Timothy Morton

Conneaut:

  • Ashley Leveto-Dean
  • Nicholas Osborne
  • Heather Williams

Copley:

  • Alisyn Davis

Cortland:

  • Alyssa Lang

Cuyahoga Falls:

  • Lisa Chester

Dennison:

  • Kelsey Fogle

Doylestown:

  • Darla Fleming

East Liverpool:

  • Alexa Aldrich
  • Kamryn Beohm
  • Jensen Britt
  • Sydney Cooper
  • Michael DeBord
  • Emma Dieringer
  • Ashli Hall
  • Jessica Headley
  • Joshua Higgins
  • Luke Jackman
  • Orion Kolkowski
  • Jude Mercer
  • Emily Nelms
  • Ayden Payne
  • Brooke Schwerha
  • Andrea Trotter
  • Leah Vinton
  • Annessa Weyand
  • Aaron White
  • Abigail Ziegler

East Palestine:

  • Abigail Andre
  • Lillian Niziolek
  • Morgan Rutledge

East Rochester:

  • Taylor Walter

Hammondsville:

  • Raelynn Corbin

Homeworth:

  • Paige Miller

Kent:

  • Rachel Booher

Kimbolton:

  • Karley Buchanan

Lisbon:

  • Aaron Hinchliffe
  • Mackenzie Sturgeon
  • Justyce Vrable

Louisville:

  • Katie Bice
  • Heather Smith

Macedonia:

  • Riley Monroe

Madison:

  • Anthony Miller

Mantua:

  • John Seifert

Massillon:

  • Christine Herritt

Negley:

  • Emily Glenz
  • Karsyn Moore
  • Kaedyn Sutton

New Middletown:

  • Lindsey Loboy

New Springfield:

  • Brooke Maretich

North Bloomfield:

  • Megan McMasters

Northfield:

  • Claire Kremyar
  • Julia Walsh

North Lima:

  • Arleigha Gaudio
  • Briana Spalding

Painesville:

  • Jacob Sintic

Petersburg:

  • Nicole Worsencroft

Ravenna:

  • Amelia Ferguson
  • James Markijohn

Rayland:

  • Cassidy Concato

Rogers:

  • Makenna Coie
  • Caitlin Marshall
  • Kassandra Rogers 

Salem:

  • Jaclyn Coker
  • Gracie Hiner
  • Zachary Pleska
  • Ana Rocha

Salineville:

  • Hoi Ming Y. Winiski

Steubenville:

  • Schianne Goddard

Stow:

  • Jonathan Brown

Tippecanoe:

  • Seka Cogar

Tuscarawas:

  • Kimberly Striker

Twinsburg:

  • Benjamin Brady
  • Sydney Burger
  • Maxwell Eidam

Uhrichsville:

  • Nicolette Ellis-Corle
  • Rebekah Sullivan

Uniontown:

  • Farah Cook
  • Allison Portman

Warren:

  • Crystal Flynn-Zalovcik
  • John Millen
  • Megan Pirigyi

Wellsville:

  • Greta Cartwright
  • Kristen Gatrell
  • Angela Ice
  • Camryn Jackson
  • Hannah Kelly
  • Emily McNicol
  • Jenna McNicol
  • Kolby Ramsey
  • AnnaBelle Sluder
  • Emma Smith
  • Kylie Surace
  • Elaina Weekley
  • Shamara Williams

West Lafayette:

  • Connor Kunze

Willowick:

  • William Davis
  • Joshua Forristal 

Youngstown:

  • April Cox
  • Donnabel Ferrell


Beaver, Pa.:

  • Bailie Rohr

Follansbee, W.Va.:

  • Katelyn Canei
Kent State University at Salem James and Coralie Centofanti Hall
Thursday, July 01, 2021


Dr. David Dees, dean of Kent State University at Salem, announced those students named to the Spring 2021 President’s and Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the Salem Campus. 

The students and their hometowns are:

President’s List

Alliance:

  • Shelby Dennis
     

Boardman:

  • Jessica Johnson

Cortland:

  • Marikate Roscoe 
     

Dover:

  • Hannah Harmon


East Liverpool:

  • Briana Hanlon
  • Emily Miller 

Homeworth:

  • Hunter Gillingham


North Lima:

  • Ashley Stellato 

Ravenna:

  • Zachary McKenzie 

Salem:

  • Jenna Drayer
  • McKenzie Martin
  • Emily Yereb

Sebring:

  • Mariah Lanzer

Summitville:

  • Kaitlin Ketchum

Warren:

  • Samantha Basile
  • Marina Brockway

Wellsville:

  • Mattisyn Infanti
  • Mitchell McDowell

Dean’s List

Andover:

  • Jennifer Quellhorst

Akron:

  • Shellery Haines
  • Gabrielle Lathrop
  • Adela Pearcy

Alliance:

  • Nathan Decker
  • Kelsey Elliott
  • Zaviona Fountain
  • Brenna Rito
  • Morgan Woolf

Ashtabula:

  • Nicholina Brandstake

Atwater:

  • Cortney Currey
  • Bobbie Paulat

Austintown:

  • Madisyn Carter
  • Julia Oravecz
  • Kelly Rektor
  • Kristan Santos

Beloit:

  • Madeleine Hinkle
  • Caitlin LaBonte
  • Rachel Moore
  • Lauren Randall
  • Madison Showalter
  • Rachel Ward

Berlin Center:

  • Olivia Buehler
  • Kennedy Close
  • Kennedy Eichert
  • Connor Francis
  • Olivia Haid
  • Brock Miller
  • Danielle Vuletich

Boardman:

  • Abigale Peterson
  • Melissa Tyger
  • Victoria Wellington
  • Bria Zban

Brunswick:

  • Alexandrea Krencisz

Cambridge:

  • Madalyne Ludovici

Canfield:

  • Ashley Algarin
  • Olivia Altiere
  • Paige Bayer
  • Matthew Brown
  • Nicholas Cavoulas
  • Jacob Gehring
  •  Marisa Head
  • Robert Kaiser
  • Alison Locketti
  • Sheridan Myers
  • Mackenzie Rusu
  • Reese Snyder
  • Lindsay Will
  • Marissa Yourstowsky

Canton:

  • Jillian Boston
  • Janell Dima
  • Helaina Kort
  • Erica Machan

Carrollton:

  • Mikayla Brannick

Chagrin Falls:

  • Christian Keiper

Columbiana:

  • Halee Allen
  • Owen Bacon
  • Nicholas Berger
  • Zachary Chaffee
  • Ava Delsignore
  • Luke Holm
  • Sherilyn Horst
  • Harley Hostetter
  • Kathryn Stanley
  • Jack Yerkey
  • Camille Zentner

Columbus:

  • Pretina Baah
  • George Simon

Cortland:

  • Olivia Kuzma
  • Haley Tucker

Cuyahoga Falls:

  • Jason Bosley
  • Melissa Kyer
  • Bradley Montgomery

Damascus:

  • Abigail Pearson

Deerfield:

  • Tabitha Hornof
  • Halle Morehead
  • Alexander Silva

Diamond:

  • Gabrielle Arquilla
  • Kyleigh Hayes
  • Kaitlyn Pennington

East Liverpool:

  • Paige Adkins
  • Emily Braslawsce
  • Abigail Jackson
  • Carly Lacey
  • Destini Mott
  • Kobi Ream

East Palestine:

  • Emily Anderson
  • Samantha Jeffers
  • Sarah Monteleone
  • Macy Rosen
  • Kaitlynn Stock

Geneva:

  • Sydney Lockridge

Hanoverton:

  • Tessa Young

Hartville:

  • Ryan Brown
  • Kirsten Garvey
  • Paige Sommers
  • Trey Sommers

Hiram:

  • Cassandra Painley

Hubbard:

  • Sydney Ford

Jefferson:

  • Bella Jordan

Kensington:

  • Mackenzie Kiko
  • Giuseppe Sabatino
  • Sydney Spahr

Kent:

  • Jennifer Biggs
  • Jessica Good

Lakewood:

  • Xristi Williams

Leavittsburg:

  • Ashlyn Riggs

Leetonia:

  • Benjamin Elenz
  • Shelby Hilbert
  • Caleb Witmer

Lisbon:

  • Jamie Brown
  • Anita Cusick
  • Karsyn Faulk
  • Curtis Gearhart
  • Emilee Graham
  • Annie Griggs
  • Brandi Hunt
  • Alexia Miller
  • Lindsey Richards
  • Samanth Shaffer
  • Alison Sprouse

Louisville:

  • Hunter Hurley
  • Allison Jones
  • Jozie Scott
  • Raymond Stabinski

Mantua:

  • Allyson Buchert

Martins Ferry:

  • Sarah Miller

Massillon:

  • D’Shannyn Shinholster

Mentor:

  • Shane Esmonde 

Middlefield:

  • Magdalena Coblentz

Mineral Ridge:

  • Rachael Channell

Minerva:

  • Caleb Garlock
  • Lauren Swast

Mogadore:

  • Elaina Sheeler

Munroe Falls:

  • Zachary Duffy

Navarre:

  • Lexi Flickinger

Negley:

  • Robert Buck
  • Britney Hughe
  • Ashton Roberts

New Middletown:

  • Listy Barnhart
  • Eric Grantonic
  • Molli Peroglio

New Philadelphia:

  • Heather Patrino

New Waterford:

  • Julia Chappelear
  • Blaine McCurdy
  • Carly Mustake
  • Julianne Poynter
  • Bailey Wonner

Newton Falls:

  • Heidi Hauck
  • Alexandria Smith

Niles:

  • Brett Caldwell
  • Skyllar Shasteen

North Canton:

  • Kelley Rohr

North Jackson:

  • Alaina Fitch

North Lima:

  • Hayley Humphries
  • Sydney Rhodehamel

Novelty:

  • Caitlin Rocki

Orrville:

  • Cody Decker

Orwell:

  • Riki Kaiser

Paris:

  • Oneal Cardinal

Port Washington:

  • Alexis Hunt

Powell:

  • Lauren Warner

Ravenna:

  • Sydney Chell
  • Gabrielle Shyne
  • Victoria Wagner

Republic:

  • Colleen Knight

Rogers:

  • Kiley Cook

Rootstown:

  • Victoria Taylor

Salem:

  • Caleb Agee
  • Rachel Bowen
  • Halle Cochran
  • Allee Davidson-Chuck
  • Casey Dickey
  • Lauren Duke
  • Ellysa Exline
  • Kyle Gentile
  • Molly Hopple
  • Kelly Hutton
  • Madeleine Kirkland
  • Eunice Knight
  • Brandy Krannich
  • Rachel Kuttler
  • Cassie Madison
  • Tyressa Manion
  • Endy Monjaraz
  • Erin Murphy
  • Adam Nash
  • Catherine Ossman
  • David Prokay
  • Samantha Robinson
  • Lauren Sawdey
  • Illania Schmidt
  • Madelinn Slanker
  • Hannah Staffeld
  • Laurel Stewart
  • Melody Troyer
  • Laura Waters
  • Jenna Witmer
  • Faith Wittenauer
  • Ian Ziegler
  • Lucas Ziegler

Salineville:

  • Mariah Hart
  • Samantha Michael
  • Marshall Somerville

Sebring:

  • Isabelle Jackson
  • Makayla Randlett

Shreve:

  • Andrew Hopkins

Silver Lake:

  • Jennifer Casto

Southington:

  • Taylor Leffler

Streetsboro:

  • Emily Martel
  • Nickie Shepherd

Stow:

  • Jacob Doctor
  • Cailah Nguyen
  • Hannah Shull

Struthers:

  • Kellie Walker

Sunbury:

  • Linda Osentoski

Twinsburg:

  • Lorelei Gilmore
  • Yun Lu

Urichsville:

  • Malory Roth


Wadsworth:

  • Militca Denee
  • Julia Imber

Warren:

  • Natalie Eckrote
  • Summer Fassnacht
  • Kurtis Hart
  • Marissa Krasinski
  • Kimberly Redmond
  • Nathan Royal

Westlake:

  • Michael Steinetz

Windwor:

  • Jessica Gaines

Wooster:

  • Makayla Mast

Youngstown:

  • Rachel Derenzis
  • Rachael DiFrancesco
  • Katelyn Dunn
  • Aileen Egolf
  • Nicole Enright
  • Lily Fairbanks
  • Elizabeth Protain
  • Sophia Sainato
  • Hope Swiger

Moultrie, Ga.:

  • Carolyn Marquis

Indianapolis, Ind.:

  • Lauren Vest

Dover, N.J.:

  • Alexander Dimick

Belle Vernon, Pa.:

  • Alaina Conte

Boyers, Pa.:

  • Alexandra Yurko-Mihelic

Crafton, Pa.:

  • Shawn Luben
Receiving awards for outstanding service on the Salem Campus are (from right) Krista Hawkins and Deb Hoopes.
Wednesday, June 02, 2021


Kent State University at Salem recently recognized two employees for exemplary teaching and service to the campus for the 2020-2021 academic year.

Receiving awards for outstanding service on the Salem Campus are (from right) Krista Hawkins and Deb Hoopes.

Krista Hawkins was named outstanding faculty member and Deborah Hoopes was recognized as the outstanding staff member. 

Each was selected based on nominations from students, staff and faculty members of the Salem Campus.

Hawkins is a registered nurse and a lecturer in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program on the Salem Campus, where she has taught fulltime for four years. She earned her BSN from Kent State University in 2012 and her MSN-Education in 2017. 

Hawkins teaches sophomore level foundations of physical assessment and communication in nursing, as well as clinicals for sophomore foundations and nursing of adults for junior students. She also serves as the coordinator for the skills/simulation lab on the Salem Campus.

A 1989 graduate of United Local High School, Hawkins first worked as a bookkeeper for Snyder Equipment and as a stay-at-home mom while her children were young. After earning her nursing degree, she worked as a registered nurse at Northside Medical Center in Youngstown and for one year as an adjunct instructor for the Salem Campus BSN program.

Image
Krista Hawkins, MSN-Ed, RN

Hawkins has served the last 10 years as the program director and camp nurse for the Sandy Beaver District Cub Scout Day Camp. She lives in Hanoverton with her husband, Michael, and their three sons, Andrew, Shawn and Joshua. 

“To earn a college education has been a dream and a goal for as long as I can remember, but I never imagined I would be the instructor!” Hawkins said, noting that she enjoys the challenge of working with adult students who also navigate family and life responsibilities outside of school.

“I know what achievement feels like because it was my path, too,” she said. “It’s difficult, but it can be done well with the right support. I’m glad that I am now in the position to help guide others. 

“Working in higher ed also allows ample opportunity for personal growth; the chance to meet new people, to have new experiences and to explore new ideas which, ultimately, come back to enrich my own community.”

Hawkins added that teaching on the Salem Campus is especially meaningful because she can learn from the individual expertise of her colleagues across various disciplines and collaborate on projects.

Deb Hoopes

“Having a close relationship with my students and following up on their success after graduation is also one of the perks of teaching here,” she continued. “I often think, as I drive into the parking lot at Kent State Salem, about all of the interesting ideas, discussions and plans that take place inside this building and how they are all helping to make the world a better place. It feels good to be part of that!”

Hoopes has 13 years of service as a custodian with Kent State University’s maintenance and grounds department. Her first four years were spent on the Kent Campus and the last nine years have been on the Salem Campus.

While a bit reluctant to talk about herself, Hoopes is known on campus for her hard work and dedication to Kent. She always takes the initiative to do what needs done and takes great pride in making the campus shine.

“I am honored to have been chosen for this award,” she said. “I am very blessed to have the opportunity to work at Kent State Salem, where I have the pleasure of meeting new students and working with faculty. I enjoy being able to help people and providing a safe environment for everyone. Thank you Kent State University Salem Campus!”


Cutline A: Receiving awards for outstanding service on the Salem Campus are (from right) Krista Hawkins and Deb Hoopes.

Cutline B: Krista Hawkins, MSN-Ed, RN

Cutline C: Deb Hoopes
 

The stage is set
Wednesday, May 26, 2021

 

Time to smile!
Commencement ceremonies were held May 14 at the county fairgrounds for the Kent State Columbiana County campuses, acknowledging all the hard work of students and faculty, especially after a challenging year of living through a pandemic. 

Dr. David Dees, dean of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses, presided over the event, along with Dr. Susan Rossi, assistant dean. 

Families and graduates in the grandstands

Some commencement traditions were modified because of the COVID pandemic and the resulting safety protocols that had to be followed, yet the event was a true celebration. To manage attendance, two outdoor ceremonies were held that day to accommodate the graduates who participated in commencement. 

Making a statement
The second of the two ceremonies was for graduates of the nursing, physical therapist assistant and radiological technology programs, during which the graduates received the traditional pins representing their respective programs and recited their professional oaths.

There was no processional march to Pomp and Circumstance for graduates. Instead, each was strategically seated in the grandstands with a limited number of family and/or friends, keeping socially distant from other graduates.

Dees acknowledged that the pandemic forced the many changes, but that he was determined to find a way to hold a commencement ceremony in 2021. “The important thing is that we are here today to celebrate each of you and your hard work,” he said. “Finally, we are able to gather together. What a great day!”

 



Photo 1: The stage is set

Photo 2: Time to smile!

Photo 3: Families and graduates in the grandstands

Photo 4: Making a statement

More photos on our Facebook page

Travis Diem, graduating from Crestview High School, received his Rising Scholars stole from his father.
Thursday, May 20, 2021

Travis Diem, graduating from Crestview High School, received his Rising Scholars stole from his father.

 

As seventh graders, 15 local students were directed to the Rising Scholars program (formerly known as the Rural Scholars program) because their teachers detected something special in each of them. Now, six years later, they are each ready to move onto the next phase of their lives: college, trade school, the workplace following completion of the Kent State Columbiana County Rising Scholars program.

A graduation celebration was held on the Salem Campus to recognize members of the Rising Scholars program who are each graduating from their respective high schools this spring. Because of the pandemic, each graduate was recognized in a “private” ceremony with just family, a mentor and a few program administrators. 

 

The graduating scholars include: 

  • Emely Best from Ohio Connections Academy
  • Madison Borchardt from Crestview High School
  • Whitney Carter from East Liverpool High School
  • Travis Diem from Crestview High School
  • Quinton Gfeller from Southern Local High School
  • Jacob Grodhaus from Lisbon High School
  • Jacob Hickman from United High School
  • Kiana Howe from Lisbon High School
  • Camryn Jackson from Wellsville High School
  • Jacob Paulin from Salem High School
  • Nakkiya Rose Plummer from Leetonia High School
  • Tony Seddon from Salem High School
  • Emma Smith from Wellsville High School
  • Stephanie Vassar from East Liverpool High School
  • Dylan Yarwood from United High School

 

Supporting the Rising Scholars

The scholars were recognized by Dr. Jessica Paull, interim program coordinator, along with Dr. David Dees, dean and chief administrative officer of the Columbiana campuses; Dr. Susan Rossi, assistant dean of the Columbiana County campuses; and Stephanie Shaw, representing the Marion G. Resch Foundation.

Stephanie Shaw, of the Marion G .Resch Foundation, presents a certificate and gifts to graduate Stephanie Vassar from East Liverpool High School.

The Rural Scholars Program is designed to offer local first-generation college-bound students and their families the knowledge and social support needed to succeed at a university. The goal is for each student in the program to complete a post-secondary education with credentials necessary to succeed in his or her career. Students are chosen by their schools on the basis of their academic and leadership potential.

Kent State Salem and East Liverpool students serve as mentors to the younger scholars. Each mentor is a first-generation college student from Columbiana County with a strong record of academic success and a desire to serve the community. 

Participating schools include Crestview Local, East Liverpool City Schools, Leetonia Exempted Village, Lisbon Village Exempted, Salem City Schools, Southern Local Schools, United Local Schools and Wellsville Local Schools.


Photo A: Travis Diem, graduating from Crestview High School, received his Rising Scholars stole from his father.

Photo B: Supporting the Rising Scholars are (front, from left) Dr. David Dees, dean of the Columbiana County campuses; Stephanie Shaw from the Marion G. Resch Foundation; and Dr. Jessica Paull, interim program coordinator; and (back, from left) mentors Tommy Kornbau, Hannah Thomas, Loke Kalima, Blaine McCurdy and Sarah Tennefoss

Photo C: Stephanie Shaw, of the Marion G .Resch Foundation, presents a certificate and gifts to graduate Stephanie Vassar from East Liverpool High School.

More pictures on our Facebook page
 

Monday, May 10, 2021

Three students won prizes for their written papers submitted for the 2021 Kent State East Liverpool Earth Day Environmental Justice Virtual Conference. 

The event took place April 24 with the theme “Rethinking Food: Equity, Plant-Based Consumption and Alternatives.” There were 29 papers submitted for judging.

Marissa Price earned first place honors for her paper, “The Price of Policy.” Second place went to Rachel Booher for “The Truth Behind Harmful Waste;” and the third place prize was awarded to Kassidy Fischer for her paper, “Species Suffering Due to Climate Change.”

The conference was held via a remote format, using Zoom.

Black Squirrel Scholars - A Literary Magazine
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

 

There was no way the COVID pandemic was going to keep a group of students and faculty members from doing something they really wanted to accomplish this past academic year: publishing a literary journal to showcase the creative talents on the Salem Campus.

Months of hard work and collaboration resulted in the online publication of Black Squirrel Scholars, a literary journal that features a collection of 52 works of poetry, essays, photography, drawings and graphics.

The faculty advisors for the project were Dr. Barbara George and Dr. Joshua Myers, both English faculty members.

The proposal team for the project were members of George’s professional writing class, including Aaron Holden, Whitney Fox and Mariah Lanzer. 

The design team included Fox, Lanzer and George.

The editorial team were all part of Myer’s editing and publishing class. Members included Nicholas Berger, Regan Crosser, Fox, Holden, Luke Holm, Lanzer, Erica Palocyi, Bailie Rohr, Skyllar Shasteen, Tyler Stratton and Melissa Tyger.

Check out the first edition of Black Squirrel Scholars 


Cutline: The cover of Black Squirrel Scholars.     
 

Kent State University at East Liverpool Mary Patterson Building
Tuesday, May 04, 2021


Kent State University at East Liverpool recognized the academic and service achievements of several students at the conclusion of the Spring 2021 semester

The students recognized included:


Business Management:

  • Joshua Higgins

Computer Technology:

  • Luke Jackman

Associate Degree Nursing Academic Award:

  • Melissa Kirksey

Student Nurses Association Club Service Award:

  • Abigail Ziegler

Occupational Therapy Assistant Academic Award:

  • Billie Wells

Student Occupational Therapy Assistant Club Service Awards:

  • Alyssa Lang
  • Brooke Maretich

Physical Therapist Assistant Academic Award:

  • Emily Glenz

Student Physical Therapist Assistant Club Service Award:

  • Brandon Blystone

Environmental Club Service Awards:

  • Rebekah Davis
  • Margaret Villarreal

Wall of Fame Scholarship:

  • Donnabel Ferrell

President’s List for Spring 2020:

  • Zachary Blevins
  • Nicole Cochra
  • Sierra Donahue
  • Sydney Hill
  • Maggie Howel
  • Hoi Ming Winski
  • Katerina Wright

President’s List for Fall 2020:

  • Gabriel Edwards
  • Katerina Wright
     
Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University at Salem
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Kent State University at Salem recognized the academic achievements of several students for the 2020-2021 academic year.

The awards and recipients are:

Academic Awards

Outstanding Achievement in Public Speaking:

  • Angelina D’Itri
  • Sean Jackson

Outstanding Business Student:

  • Mitchell Craig

Outstanding IT Student:

  • Joseph Mapel

Outstanding Early Childhood Education Technology Student Teachers:

  • Kendra DeWitt
  • Kassandra Taubler

Outstanding Early Childhood Education Student Teacher:

  • Emily Krych

Outstanding Achievement in Early Childhood Education:

  • Erica Fenton

Human Services Awards for Intern of Excellence:

  • Curtis Gearhart
  • Brandy Krannich

Outstanding English Majors:

  • Whitney Fox
  • Melissa Tyger


Outstanding Creative Writer Award:

  • Aaron Holden

Outstanding Writing Tutor Awards:

  • Mariah Lanzer
  • Skyllar Shasteen

Honors Program Thesis Awards:

  • Mariah Lanzer
  • Tyler Stratton


Rising Scholars Outstanding Mentor:

  • Nicholas Berger


Rising Scholars Outstanding New Mentor:

  • Faith Wittenaur

Outstanding Student in Psychological Research:

  • Sarah Miller


Outstanding Students in Psychology:

  • Olivia Haid
  • Skyllar Shasteen

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology Academic Excellence Award:

  • Allyson Buchert

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology Clinical Excellence Award:

  • Heidi Hauck

Academic Excellence in Nursing-Sophomore:

  • Sherilyn Horst


Clinical Excellence in Nursing-Sophomore:

  • Jessica Kisner


Academic Excellence in Nursing-Junior:

  • Eunice Knight


Clinical Excellence in Nursing-Junior:

  • Kenzie Martin


Academic Excellence in Nursing-Senior:

  • Jozie Scott

Clinical Excellence in Nursing-Senior:

  • Ashton Roberts

Kent State Salem Undergraduate Research Conference Outstanding Presentations:

  • Whitney Fox
  • Abbi Gallon
  • Olivia Haid
  • Jesseca Housel
  • Kasey Jamison
  • Matthew Kern
  • Kimberly Redmond
  • Rebekah Sullivan

Spring 2020 President’s List:

  • Mia Albaugh
  • Halee Allen
  • Karlie Blissenbach
  • MaryQuinn Cook
  • Lucas Duncan
  • Erica Fenton
  • Michael Fletcher
  • Zaviona Fountain
  • Sarah Glist
  • Sherilyn Horst
  • Michaela Husto
  • Abigail Jackson
  • Alexis Johnson
  • Hannah Koran
  • Michael Laubacher
  • Roger Leipply
  • Heather Lude
  • Katrina Malcolm
  • Amber Mondak
  • Brenna Rito
  • Tyler Soward
  • Demi Wisnieski

Fall 2020 President’s List:

  • Jason Bosle
  • Alaina Conte
  • Janell Dima
  • Jenna Drayer
  • Lucas Duncan
  • Ellysa Exline
  • Hunter Gillingham
  • Briana Hanlon
  • Marisa Head
  • Sherilyn Horst
  • Jessica Johnson
  • Hannah Koran
  • Deanna Kruger
  • Katrina Malcolm
  • Emily Miller
  • Yvette Rivera-Bernstein
  • Mackenzie Rusu
  • Marshall Somerville
  • Lindsay Will
  • Sarah Yerkey
OTA Students show off their sensory shoe boxes
Wednesday, April 21, 2021

OTA students show off their sensory shoe boxes

 

Using plastic shoe boxes, second-year occupational therapy assistant students created unique teaching tools that were donated to elementary classrooms in the East Liverpool City Schools district.

Sorting and counting
The OTA students were each tasked to design an activity that addresses skills such as sorting, matching, placing and basic assembly and that can be used by children from kindergarten through the fourth grade.

OTA Program Director Kathy Swoboda explained that the shoe box tasks may include a sensory component, each is designed to incorporate the basic of the TEACCH method: Treatment and Education of Autistic and Communication Handicapped Children.

Sharpening fine motor skills

“These foundational skills promote student success in the academic setting by improving fine motor coordination, sequencing, following directions and task completion,” she noted. 

In addition to creating the shoe box activity, each OTA student must provide step-by-step instructions for using the box; a brief activity analysis with grading instructions to meet the student performance levels (making the task easier or more difficult); and a complete summary to educate others on the therapeutic benefits to the student using the box.


Cutline A: Showing off their sensory shoe boxes are OTA students (first row, from left) Heidi Herman, Breanna Pawlowski, Aurora Leguard; (second row, from left) Mackenzie Sturgeon, Chelsea Freshwater, Arleigha Gaudio; (third row, from left) Autumn Moninger, Khaylah Brown; and (fourth row, from left) Veronica Keenan, Matisyn Joseph

Cutline B: Sorting and counting

Cutline C: Sharpening fine motor skills
 

The Discovery Garden at Kent State Salem
Tuesday, April 20, 2021

The 2021 Kent State East Liverpool Earth Day Environmental Justice Virtual Conference will be held this Saturday via a remote format with the theme “Rethinking Food: Equity, Plant-based Consumption and Alternatives.”

The conference will be held via a remote format, using Zoom, from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.  It is open to the public and registration is required. 

Professor Denise Harrison

The keynote speaker is Professor Denise Harrison an expert in several areas including intersectionality; crossroads of race; class and gender; first wave feminist and suffragist; black women writers; food sourcing; food and sustainability; food activism; history of cooking; Africans and African- Americans; Native American traditions; Native American culture; and environmental issues. 

Dr. Jessica Krieger
The guest speaker is Dr. Jessica Krieger, a graduate of Kent State University is working on cultivating meat in a lab without harm to animals. Her work focuses on cutting-edge research to develop ways to grow cells that make up the meat that is consumed as food, which can help address environmental issues associated with raising animals for food. 

To register for the conference, go to https://tinyurl.com/2021-Earth-Day-Conference. Once registered, you will receive a Zoom link that will be activated beginning at 8:30 a.m. the day of the conference.

This event is a collaboration between students in the Environmental Club and the faculty planning committee. Margaret Villarreal, president of the Environmental Club, met with student members via Zoom during the spring semester to address environmental issues and assist in planning the conference. 

The faculty members who serve on the planning committee include Dr. Lydia Rose, Dr. Darryl Hancock, Dr. Haiyan Zhu, Dr. Q. Ding and Dr. Daniel Dankovich along with staff members Paula Butler, and Clayton Gellatly. 

Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the East Liverpool Campus, will give an opening address.

The conference includes a paper competition and student presentations. Winners of the paper competition will be announced at the end of the conference.

Any questions regarding the conference may be sent to Rose at Lrose17@kent.edu


Cutline A: Denise Harrison

Cutline B: Dr. Jessica Krieger
 

Monday, April 12, 2021

From left: Brady Fredritz, Donald Bean and Olivia Baumgarner.

In February, the Kent State Columbiana County campuses hosted the fifth annual County Classic basketball game between the East Liverpool and Salem high school boys’ teams. As part of this event, the local Kent State campuses award $500 scholarships to two students from each of the high schools. 

Donald Bean (center), the assistant director of enrollment management and student services at Kent State East Liverpool, recently presented certificates to scholarship recipients Brady Fredritz (left) and Olivia Baumgarner (right), both seniors at East Liverpool High School. 

Fredritz plans to study education and Baumgarner will study psychology and business at a Columbiana County campus.

Two recipients from Salem High School will be recognized at their senior awards ceremony in May.


Cutline: (From left) Brady Fredritz, Donald Bean and Olivia Baumgarner.

PTA Program Application Deadline Extended to April 15, 2021
Thursday, March 25, 2021

Applications are now being accepted from those wanting to earn an Associate of Applied Science degree in Physical Therapist Assistant Technology at Kent State East Liverpool.

The application deadline is April 15, 2021.

This accredited program provides students with the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary to become licensed or certified as a physical therapist assistant. A PTA works under the direction and supervision of a physical therapist. Licensure or certification in most states requires graduation from an accredited program, background clearances and passing the National Physical Therapy Examination.

The integrated curriculum includes lecture, lecture/lab, seminar and practicum courses. Major course content is cumulative and taught in four sequential semesters in a two-year cycle. The technical study curriculum requires the student to be on campus or in the clinic three to five days per week each term. 

Details about the program     APPLY NOW!

Contact Kathryn Sutton at 330-382-7405 or ksutton1@kent.edu for more information or for questions on eligibility. 

 

Satterfield Hall
Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Two students from the Kent State Salem Campus were recently recognized by Kent State University’s English Department through its Tier I and Tier II composition contests. 

Kimberly Redmond


Kimberly Redmond earned a first-place award in the Tier II competition for her research essay entitled “Suicide Prevention: Are We Doing Enough? She is a junior in the nursing program on the Salem Campus and wrote the essay on assignment from Dr. Barbara George, assistant professor of English at Kent State Salem.

Redmond shared that she hopes to work in psychiatric nursing following graduation and to eventually continue her education to earn master’s degrees so that she can one day work on healthcare reform for better mental health screenings and treatments in clinical settings.

“I worked meticulously to present the best research possible on a topic that I am extremely passionate about, so winning this award means a great deal to me,” she said. “It shows that all my hard work has been acknowledged and appreciated. Winning this award has also solidified that I am on the right track to accomplish my future career goals, making me that much more eager to reach them.”

Lauren Meadows


Lauren Meadows earned a third-place award in the Tier II competition for a narrative essay entitled “Three-Year Old Memories.” She is a student of James Winter, associate professor of English on the Kent State Salem Campus.

Meadows is a College Credit Plus student attending Kent State as a junior through Field High School in Mogadore. She said that, following graduation from high school in 2022, she plans to attend college to study English, business management or a specialized education. 

“I am honored to have placed in this writing contest,” she said. “By still being in high school, it is rewarding to have my work chosen from many submissions by college-aged students. It proves to me that the hard work I put into my writing really does pay off.”

The Kent State Salem students’ works were judged against submissions from students representing all of Kent State’s campuses.


Photo A: Kimberly Redmond
Photo B: Lauren Meadows

2021 County Classic Salem Quakers won this year’s contest over the East Liverpool Potters
Monday, February 22, 2021

 

2021 County Classic Salem Quakers won this year’s contest over the East Liverpool Potters

Bad weather delayed the game a few days. COVID-19 limited the fans and activities. But, the Kent State Columbiana County Classic took place Feb. 18 featuring the boys basketball teams from Salem and East Liverpool high schools.

Cheers for the Potters!

The series was tied at 2-2, but the visiting Salem Quakers came from behind in the final seconds of the game to win 66-64. 

Following the game, the team received the traveling plaque from Donald Bean, assistant director of the Enrollment Management and Student Services Department on the East Liverpool campus.

 



Quakers during pre-game warm-ups.

Because of COVID safety protocols, Kent State was unable to engage the limited number of fans with activities that have become traditional at the County Classic: door prizes, giveaways, a t-shirt toss and interactions with Flash, the Kent State mascot. 

A Potter prepares for the game.

Hopefully, the activities will return when the two teams meet again on Jan. 4, 2022.

The Kent State County Classic represents the strong foundation of learning in East Liverpool and Salem, as each community is home to one of the university’s two Columbiana County campuses. 



Cutline A:  Donald Bean (far right), representing the East Liverpool Campus, presented the County Classic traveling plaque to the Salem Quakers, who won this year’s contest over the East Liverpool Potters.

Cutline B: Cheers for the Potters!

Cutline C: Quakers during pre-game warm-ups.

Cutline D: A Potter prepares for the game.

More photos are available on our Facebook page
 

ADN student Addison Guildoo checks the temperature of an East Liverpool City School employee waiting to receive the COVID vaccine.
Sunday, February 21, 2021

ADN student Addison Guildoo checks the temperature of an East Liverpool City School employee waiting to receive the COVID vaccine.

While the much-anticipated COVID-19 vaccine is finally being administered around the world, folks in Columbiana County are also receiving their immunizations at the local level with the help of nursing students from the Kent State East Liverpool and Salem campuses.

Students in the Bachelor of Science in nursing program on the Salem Campus, as well as those in the associate degree in nursing program on the East Liverpool Campus, became part of history as they participated in vaccine clinics across the county.

Melody Troyer, a BSN student from the Salem Campus, administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a community member.

The BSN students from the Salem Campus participate each Tuesday in weekly vaccine clinics sponsored by the Columbiana County Community Action Agency in Lisbon and East Liverpool. The student nurses administer vaccines and provide patient education following the injections.

Sandy Gruszecki is the nurse manager for the Lisbon, East Liverpool and Salineville CAA and is also a 2010 graduate of the Salem Campus BSN program. She has worked for the CAA for 10 years and helps coordinate the clinical experiences for the student nurses.

Dr. Cheryl Brady, BSN faculty member, explained that she was one of Gruszecki’s instructors and they have stayed in touch over the years as nursing students complete community health clinicals at CAA.

Students from the ADN program at Kent State East Liverpool volunteered at the vaccination clinic held for employees of the East Liverpool City School district.
Brady also noted that the students are gaining valuable first-hand experience with the vaccination process as well as a historical vantage point to the pandemic.

“The participants receiving the vaccines are very grateful and eager for others to get vaccinated,” she said. “Many have commented about wanting to see their grandchildren.”

Representing the Salem Campus BSN program are Madeleine Hinkle, Samantha Jeffers, McKenzie Martin, Sarah Miller, Samantha Prosser, Kristan Santos, Melody Troyer and Kellie Walker.

BSN student Kellie Walker injects a community member with the COVID-19 vaccine.

The ADN students from the East Liverpool Campus assisted at the immunization clinic held for employees of the East Liverpool City Schools. John Dawson, an adjunct clinical instructor for the ADN program and a nurse with the ELCS, coordinated the experience for the students.

Aside from helping with registration, crowd management and documentation, the students conducted post-injection monitoring for those who received the vaccine. The students will return to participate in the second round of immunizations.

Representing the ADN program at Kent State East Liverpool were students Makayla Ammon, Matthew Bigelow, Addison Guildoo, Joelle McCoy, Jeanna Scarabino, Sierra Wells and Abigail Ziegler.

“It was a great historical experience for our students,” noted Dr. Carol Hrusovsky, program director for the East Liverpool ADN program.


Cutline A: ADN student Addison Guildoo checks the temperature of an East Liverpool City School employee waiting to receive the COVID vaccine.

Cutline B: Melody Troyer, a BSN student from the Salem Campus, administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a community member.

Cutline C: Students from the ADN program at Kent State East Liverpool volunteered at the vaccination clinic held for employees of the East Liverpool City School district.

Cutline D: BSN student Kellie Walker injects a community member with the COVID-19 vaccine.

 

ADN student Addison Guildoo checks the temperature of an East Liverpool City School employee waiting to receive the COVID vaccine.
Sunday, February 21, 2021

ADN student Addison Guildoo checks the temperature of an East Liverpool City School employee waiting to receive the COVID vaccine.

While the much-anticipated COVID-19 vaccine is finally being administered around the world, folks in Columbiana County are also receiving their immunizations at the local level with the help of nursing students from the Kent State East Liverpool and Salem campuses.

Students in the Bachelor of Science in nursing program on the Salem Campus, as well as those in the associate degree in nursing program on the East Liverpool Campus, became part of history as they participated in vaccine clinics across the county.

Melody Troyer, a BSN student from the Salem Campus, administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a community member.

The BSN students from the Salem Campus participate each Tuesday in weekly vaccine clinics sponsored by the Columbiana County Community Action Agency in Lisbon and East Liverpool. The student nurses administer vaccines and provide patient education following the injections.

Sandy Gruszecki is the nurse manager for the Lisbon, East Liverpool and Salineville CAA and is also a 2010 graduate of the Salem Campus BSN program. She has worked for the CAA for 10 years and helps coordinate the clinical experiences for the student nurses.

Dr. Cheryl Brady, BSN faculty member, explained that she was one of Gruszecki’s instructors and they have stayed in touch over the years as nursing students complete community health clinicals at CAA.

Students from the ADN program at Kent State East Liverpool volunteered at the vaccination clinic held for employees of the East Liverpool City School district.
Brady also noted that the students are gaining valuable first-hand experience with the vaccination process as well as a historical vantage point to the pandemic.

“The participants receiving the vaccines are very grateful and eager for others to get vaccinated,” she said. “Many have commented about wanting to see their grandchildren.”

Representing the Salem Campus BSN program are Madeleine Hinkle, Samantha Jeffers, McKenzie Martin, Sarah Miller, Samantha Prosser, Kristan Santos, Melody Troyer and Kellie Walker.

BSN student Kellie Walker injects a community member with the COVID-19 vaccine.

The ADN students from the East Liverpool Campus assisted at the immunization clinic held for employees of the East Liverpool City Schools. John Dawson, an adjunct clinical instructor for the ADN program and a nurse with the ELCS, coordinated the experience for the students.

Aside from helping with registration, crowd management and documentation, the students conducted post-injection monitoring for those who received the vaccine. The students will return to participate in the second round of immunizations.

Representing the ADN program at Kent State East Liverpool were students Makayla Ammon, Matthew Bigelow, Addison Guildoo, Joelle McCoy, Jeanna Scarabino, Sierra Wells and Abigail Ziegler.

“It was a great historical experience for our students,” noted Dr. Carol Hrusovsky, program director for the East Liverpool ADN program.


Cutline A: ADN student Addison Guildoo checks the temperature of an East Liverpool City School employee waiting to receive the COVID vaccine.

Cutline B: Melody Troyer, a BSN student from the Salem Campus, administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a community member.

Cutline C: Students from the ADN program at Kent State East Liverpool volunteered at the vaccination clinic held for employees of the East Liverpool City School district.

Cutline D: BSN student Kellie Walker injects a community member with the COVID-19 vaccine.

 

Learn more about earning your university degree at Information Night
Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Dr. David Dees, dean of Kent State University at Salem, announced those students named to the Fall 2020 President’s and Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the Salem Campus. 

The students and their hometowns are:

President’s List

Boardman:

  • Jessica Johnson

Canfield:

  • Marisa Head
  • Mackenzie Rusu
  • Lindsay Wills

Canton:

  • Janell Dima

Columbiana:

  • Lucas Duncan
  • Sherilyn Horst

Cuyahoga Falls:

  • Jason Bosley

East Liverpool:

  • Briana Hanlon
  • Katrina Malcolm
  • Emily Miller

Homeworth:

  • Hunter Gillingham

Kent:

  • Deanna Kruger

Salem:

  • Jenna Drayer
  • Ellysa Exline
  • Hannah Koran
  • Sarah Yerkey

Salineville:

  • Marshall Somerville

Warren:

  • Yvette Rivera-Bernstein

Belle Vernon, Pa.:

  • Alaina Conte

Dean’s List

Akron:

  • Adela Pearcy
  • Andrew Schultz

Alliance:

  • Nathan Decker
  • Shelby Dennis
  • Kelsey Elliott
  • Brenna Rito
  • Brianna Smith
  • Kirstin Smith

Atwater:

  • Jaylie Klusty
  • Bobbie Paulat

Austintown:

  • Madisyn Carter
  • Julia Oravecz
  • Kelly Rektor

Beloit:

  • Curtis Gearhart
  • Heather Hinchliffe
  • Lauren Randall
  • Madison Showalter
  • Brock Smith

Bergholz:

  • Trevor Coffy 

Berlin Center:

  • Olivia Buehler
  • Connor Francis
  • Olivia Haid
  • Alexis Moore
  • Michala Viano

Boardman:

  • Mikeal Korpi
  • Abigale Peterson
  • Jessica Popovich
  • Melissa Tyger
  • Victoria Wellington
  • Bria Zban

Brunswick:

  • Christian Vasquez

Canal Fulton:

  • Hailey Sabol

Canfield:

  • Ashley Baird
  • Valentino Corbisello
  • Adam Kollay
  • Sheridan Myers
  • Marissa Yourstowsky

Canton:

  • Jillian Boston

Carrollton:

  • Rachel Bright

Chagrin Falls:

  • Christian Keiper

Cleveland:

  • Shahd Jaffal

Columbiana:

  • Halee Allen
  • Micah Artman
  • Nicholas Berger
  • Zachary Chaffee
  • Ava Delsignore
  • Russell Ford

Cortland:

  • Marikate Roscoe
  • Addison Schaeffer

Deerfield:

  • Tabitha Hornof

Dellroy:

  • Mikayla Brannick

Diamond:

  • Gabrielle Arquilla
  • Kyleigh Hayes

East Liverpool:

  • Paige Adkins
  • Natalie Ammon
  • Allysha Burnett
  • Angelina D’Itri
  • Abigail Jackson
  • Carly Lacey
  • Aubrianna Mellott
  • Destini Mott
  • Erin Taylor

East Palestine:

  • Emily Anderson
  • Cheyenne Cook
  • Sarah Monteleone
  • Payton Sherry

East Rochester:

  • Taylor Walter

Hanoverton:

  • Celeste Powers
  • Laurel Stewart
  • Dyllon Thompson

Hartville:

  • Kirsten Garvey
  • Trey Sommers

Homeworth:

  • Jeffery Legros

Jefferson:

  • Hayleigh Jordan

Kensington:

  • Giuseppe Sabatino
  • Sydney Spahr

Kent:

  • Jennifer Biggs
  • Kourtny Skiljan

Leetonia:

  • Cassie McLaughlin
  • Natalie Slepski
  • Caleb Witmer

Lisbon:

  • Cassandra Aldish
  • Mary Baker
  • Jamie Brown
  • Danny Davis
  • Emilee Graham
  • Brandi Hunt
  • Alyson Jones
  • Hayle Parrish
  • Kobi Ream
  • Jenna Ronshak
  • Samantha Shaffer

Louisville:

  • MacKenzie Kaster
  • Jozie Scott

Lowellville:

  • Kasey Stabinski

Mantua:

  • Allyson Buchert

Maple Heights:

  • Tariq Spears

Medina:

  • Ryan Sanford

Mineral Ridge:

  • Rachael Channell

Minerva:

  • Caleb Garlock
  • Jennifer O’Brien
  • Lauren Swast

Negley:

  • Robert Buck

New Middletown:

  • Kendra DeWitt
  • Molli Peroglio

Newton Falls:

  • Heidi Hauck

New Waterford:

  • Julia Chappelear
  • Carly Mustake
  • Taylor Oliver
  • Julianne Poynter

North Benton:

  • Sarrah Tennefoss

North Bloomfield:

  • Ashley King

North Jackson:

  • Jillian Giovanni
  • Alaina Welsch

North Lima:

  • Jayden Emerick
  • Sarah Martin
  • Ashley Stellato

Orwell:

  • Mackenzie Chitwood

Paris:

  • Logan Cardinal

Poland:

  • Sarah Glista

Ravenna:

  • Sydney Chell
  • Keith Francis
  • Zachary McKenzie
  • Gabrielle Shyne
  • Victoria Wagner

Republic:

  • Colleen Knight

Rogers:

  • Kiley Cook
  • Taylor Hicks
  • Trey Marshall

Salem:

  • Rachel Bowen
  • Jerald Brain
  • Mitchell Craig
  • Regan Crosser
  • Casey Dickey
  • Erica Fenton
  • Carly Hall
  • Drake Harkleroad
  • Kasey Jamison
  • Emily Johnson
  • Justin Keir
  • Owen Kirkland
  • Eunice Knight
  • Leah Ladd
  • Lisa Liptak
  • Cassie Madison
  • Megan Malysa
  • Catherine Ossman
  • Cameron Pierson
  • Cheyanna Porter
  • Bridgett Riley
  • Samantha Sacconi
  • Lauren Sawdey
  • Melody Troyer
  • Grace Weingart
  • Jenna Witmer

Salineville:

  • Katelyn Bailey
  • Alexis Rhodes
  • Elizabeth Willis

Sebring:

  • Isabelle Jackson
  • Mariah Lanzer
  • Emma Moser
  • Makayla Randlett

Sheffield Lake:

  • Melissa Hall

Shreve:

  • Andrew Hopkins

Steubenville:

  • Katherine Hawthorne

Stow:

  • Breonna Barker

Streetsboro:

  • Emily Martel

Summitville:

  • Kaitlin Ketchum

Sugarcreek:

  • Mark Keene

Uhrichsville:

  • Malory Roth

Wadsworth:

  • Militca Denee

Warren:

  • Samantha Basile
  • Marina Brockway
  • Nathan Royal
  • Tori Wells

Wellsville:

  • Mattisyn Infanti
  • Mitchell McDowell

Youngstown:

  • Brittany Christmas
  • Rachael DiFrancesco
  • Lily Fairbanks
  • Whitney Fox
  • Aaron Holden
  • Jennifer Liptak
  • Dianna Yeager

Beaver, Pa.:

  • Bailie Rohr

Boyers, Pa.:

  • Alexandra Yurko-Mihelic

Little River, S.Ca.:

  • Shelby Menning

Colliers, W.Va.:

  • Candice Meade

 

Kent State University at East Liverpool John J. Purinton Hall
Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Dr. David Dees, dean of Kent State University at East Liverpool, announced those students named to the Fall 2020 President’s or Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 or more credit hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the East Liverpool Campus. 

The students and their hometowns are:

President’s List

East Liverpool:

  • Katerina Wright

Wellsville:

  • Gabriel Edwards

Dean’s List

Ashtabula:

  • Hannah Hudson

Canfield:

  • Nahed Wahib

Canton:

  • Ian-Isaac Fletcher

Columbiana:

  • Stacey Lindsay

East Liverpool:

  • Phillip Campbell
  • Joshua Higgins
  • Sydney Hill
  • Mark Kline
  • Ayden Payne
  • Mary Pipes
  • Traven Renner
  • Marilou Vassar
  • Annessa Weyand

Euclid:

  • Laryssa Lindsey

Fairfield Township:

  • Ben Burchell

Homeworth:

  • Paige Miller

Kensington:

  • Emmelea Powell

Lisbon:

  • Lauren McCarty
  • Mackenzie Sturgeon
  • Heavyn Wolski
  • Sierra Zarnosky

Newton Falls:

  • Heidi Herman
  • Matthew Lubonovic

Rogers:

  • Caitlin Marshall

Salem:

  • Carissa Brink
  • Haley Carrocci

Wellsville:

  • Maia Amato
  • Joshua Call
  • Danelle Sandoval
  • Cheyenne Utt

Ellwood City, Pa.:

  • Michala Johnson

Follansbee, W.Va.:

  • Breanna Pawlowski

Newell, W.Va.:

  • Sierra Lonkert

Weirton, W.Va.:

  • Marissa Macaluso 
With the donated ultrasound equipment are (from left) student Raegan Meals, Cyndi Peterson, Shari Tilton and student Rylee Meals.
Tuesday, January 19, 2021

Giving a quick demonstration of how the ultrasound machine would be used in a lab setting are (from left) Clinical Coordinator Shari Tilton and students Raegan and Rylee Meals.

The diagnostic medical sonography program on the Salem Campus received a donation from Aultman Hospital that is providing enhanced learning opportunities for rad tech students studying this specialty.

During the fall semester, the hospital donated a Siemens Acuson Sequoia ultrasound machine with multiple transducers. It performs abdominal and OB/GYN examinations and can also be used to teach vascular flow characteristics and disease. It is used for lab sessions across the entire sonography curriculum.

With this newly- acquired equipment, there are now four student scanning stations in the Pearce Foundation sonography lab on the Salem Campus. “This additional ultrasound unit will enhance the students’ lab experience by increasing the amount of active engagement during lab scanning sessions,” noted Cyndi Peterson, program director for diagnostic medical sonography.

Shari Tilton, clinical coordinator, recognized Linda Metzger and Jeff McCune from Aultman Hospital for working to make the donation possible. 


Cutline 1: With the donated ultrasound equipment are (from left) student Raegan Meals, Cyndi Peterson, Shari Tilton and student Rylee Meals. The Meals sisters graduated from the program in December 2020.

Cutline 2: Giving a quick demonstration of how the ultrasound machine would be used in a lab setting are (from left) Clinical Coordinator Shari Tilton and students Raegan and Rylee Meals. 

Dr. Tsunghui Tu
Friday, January 08, 2021

Dr. Tsunghui Tu, associate professor and program director for the early childhood education program at Kent State Salem, was recently featured on the Zippia website where she shared her thoughts about trends in her field.

Dr. Tsunghui Tu

Zippia is a site for companies wanting to “recruit top-level staff and job seekers who want to empower their career aspirations.” The company notes that it used a data-based approach to connect job seekers and employers.

In early December, the company posted an article that featured the opinions of experts about the current job market.

In its introduction to the article, Zippia states: 

“Given the change of course that has happened in the world, we wanted to provide expert opinions on what aspiring graduates can do to start off their careersin an uncertain economic climate. We wanted to know what skills will be more important, where the economy is doing relatively well, and if there will be any lasting effects on the job market.

“Companies are looking for candidates that can handle the new responsibilities of the job market. Recent graduates actually have an advantage because they are comfortable using newer technologies and have been communicating virtually their whole lives. They can take what they've learned and apply it immediately.

“We spoke to professors and experts from several universities and companies to get their opinions on where the job market for recent graduates is heading, as well as how young graduates entering the industry can be adequately prepared. Here are their thoughts.”

Tu is prominently featured on the page, sharing her thoughts about the future for early childhood education graduates. https://www.zippia.com/professional-educator-jobs/trends/.


Cutline: Dr. Tsunghui Tu
 

Shown are (from left) PTA volunteers Rachel Dawson and Amy Maltarich with Debbie Riggs, of Kent State at East Liverpool.
Wednesday, January 06, 2021

Showing some of the books donated to Beaver Local elementary students were (from left) Debbie Riggs of Kent State, students Brody Nign and Payton Smith, and Mrs. Brianne Hall

Over the last year, hundreds of children’s books were collected on the Kent State East Liverpool Campus that were intended to be handed out during the city’s annual holiday parade. When the parade was canceled this year because of the COVID pandemic, however, campus employees decided to find another way to distribute the books to local youngsters.

With the books at Beaver Local were (from left) Cayden Vincent, Debbie Riggs of Kent State, Brody Nign, Payton Smith and Mrs. Brianne Hall.

Through a project known as Season’s Readings, Kent State East Liverpool recently donated nearly 1,500 new books combined to East Liverpool’s North Elementary School, Beaver Local elementary students and to the East Liverpool Head Start program. 

The North Elementary PTA included the books in gift bags prepared for each of its students that included pajamas, t-shirts and other items. 

The books from Kent State were donated by employees, students, local businesses and the former Auxiliary from East Liverpool City Hospital or purchased with monetary donations.

Over the last five years, more than 5,000 books have been given to area children through Kent State’s Season’s Readings project.


Cutline A: The North Elementary PTA included a new book in each holiday gift bag prepared for its students. Shown are (from left) PTA volunteers Rachel Dawson and Amy Maltarich with Debbie Riggs, of Kent State at East Liverpool.

Cutline B: Showing some of the books donated to Beaver Local elementary students were (from left) Debbie Riggs of Kent State, students Brody Nign and Payton Smith, and Mrs. Brianne Hall.    

Cutline C: With the books at Beaver Local were (from left) Cayden Vincent, Debbie Riggs of Kent State, Brody Nign, Payton Smith and Mrs. Brianne Hall.
 

Monday, January 04, 2021

Dr. Marc Hoffrichter, (left) and Dr. David Dees, Dean

 

Dr. Marc Hoffrichter, (left) president of the East Liverpool Fawcett Community Foundation, presented a check for $4,500 to Dr. David Dees, dean and chief administrative officer of the Kent State East Liverpool Campus, that is earmarked for scholarships to benefit students enrolled in the occupational therapy assistant program.


The funds came from the estate of the late M. Patricia Burnett who created the endowed scholarship through the Fawcett Community Foundation. Kent State East Liverpool annually awards the M. Patricia Burnett Scholarship to a student from the occupational therapy assistant program.


 

Solar panels Kent State University at East Liverpool
Monday, December 14, 2020


As part of a university-wide initiative, the Kent State University campuses in Salem and East Liverpool are going green through a renewable energy project to provide solar panels at each location, resulting in cost savings and reducing the carbon footprint of Kent State.

Crews begin assembling the solar panels on the rooftop of Kent State’s Purinton Hall in East Liverpool.

A year ago, the Kent State University Board of Trustees approved the solar panel project for six of its regional campuses as part of the university’s Energy Master Plan. The university publicly solicited proposals and TEN NINE Energy LLC was selected to lead the project. The project could produce up to 56 percent of the electricity required by the regional campuses annually while saving nearly $130,000 during the first year and more than $1.5 million for the duration of the 25-year contract.

Locally, work is underway on the Salem Campus to install ground-mounted solar photovoltaic panels on a plot of ground behind the main classroom building. In East Liverpool, work began this week to install rooftop panels on Purinton Hall.

There is no upfront capital expense to Kent State, but all electricity produced will be purchased at a negotiated rate with the developer.

The overall project will also benefit the utility electric grid. During the summer, with high electricity use because of air conditioning, the solar array will produce the most electricity and reduce the stress on the electric grid.

Aside from the Salem and East Liverpool campuses, solar panels are being installed on the Ashtabula, Geauga, Stark and Trumbull campuses.

“I applaud Kent State’s vision and the commitment to our environment demonstrated by this project,” noted Dr. David Dees, dean and chief administrative officer of the Columbiana County campuses. “Solar energy is a clean, renewable energy source and this is a way for us to be good stewards of the local environment.

On the Salem Campus

An array of solar panels being installed on the Salem Campus.
This project involves installing an array of about 1,560 solar panels and connecting to the campus electric system, producing enough clean electricity to serve 73 percent of the electricity for the campus. This is enough electricity to power 95 homes and translates to an expected cost savings of about $280,000 for the Salem Campus over the 25 years of the contract.

Solar panels on the Salem Campus
The project will reduce the carbon footprint by 617 tons of carbon dioxide, the main contributor to global warming. This is equivalent to removing 121 cars from the roads.

Once the solar array is completed, the land around the project will be planted with wildflowers and other native pollinators specifically selected to promote habitats that increase numbers of honeybees, butterflies and other native pollinators. This is intended to help restore balance to the ecosystem and can become an outdoor learning space for studying horticulture, botany, environmental sciences and other subjects.

This project is expected to be completed in the spring of 2021. 

On the East Liverpool Campus

Because of limited open land on the East Liverpool Campus, a rooftop solar array of 232 solar panels will be installed on Purinton Hall and electricity will be extended to the building. The panels will be mounted on a weight ballasted system that does not require roof penetrations and will not compromise the new roofing system recently installed on the building.

The minimum 25-year solar electric cost savings to the East Liverpool Campus is expected to be about $40,000 with a reduced carbon footprint of 89 tons of carbon dioxide. This is the equivalent to removing 18 cars from roadways.


  
Cutline A: Crews begin assembling the solar panels on the rooftop of Kent State’s Purinton Hall in East Liverpool.

Cutline B: An array of solar panels being installed on the Salem Campus.

Cutline C: Solar panels on the Salem Campus.
    

Kent State University at Salem James and Coralie Centofanti Hall
Wednesday, December 09, 2020


Kent State University at Salem recognized the academic achievements of several students with its fall scholarship program.

The scholarship recipients are:

Alumni Insurance Studies Scholarship:

  • Emily Burch
  • Alyssa Card
  • Heather Castillo
  • Colleen Knight
  • Elizabeth Wassel

BSN Nursing Scholarship:

  • Vivian Conrad 

Courtney Family Scholarship:

  • Adam Kollay
  • Baylee McCandless
  • Marissa Yourstowsky

Columbiana County Women’s Leadership Scholarship:

  • Lisa Liptak

Davey Tree Expert Scholarship:

  • Ivy Bulloch
  • Militca Denee

Donna J. Sedzmak Student Survivor and Caregiver Scholarship:

  • Hannah Schultheis

Dr. James F. Cooney Endowed Scholarship:

  • Sherilyn Horst
  • Brandy Krannich

Flor and Elba Navarro Scholarship:

  • Alexis Santiago

Garden Club of Youngstown Scholarship:

  • Ivy Bulloch 

Garden Forum of Greater Youngstown Area:

  • Militca Denee

Haupt-Davey Tree Scholarship:

  • Hannah Harmon
  • Aleah Hartley

Independent Insurance Agents of Trumbull County Scholarship:

  • Jordan Betts
  • Melissa Clark
  • Carolyn Marquis
  • Jacob Santone
  • Nikia Taylor

Jack and Carol Adornetto Insurance Studies Scholarship:

  • Elizabeth Wassel

James and Coralie Centofanti Nursing and Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Scholarship:

  • Brittany Christmas
  • Magdalena Coblentz
  • Casey Dickey
  • Jessica Lunger
  • Rylee Meals
  • Sheridan Myers
  • Kimberly Redmond
  • Jozie Scott

John E. Roncone Scholarship:

  • Joseph Mapel

Joseph P. and Donna J. Sedzmak Accounting and Business Scholarship:

  • Katrina Malcolm

Joyce and Tom Butts Scholarship:

  • Allysha Campbell

Kent State Salem Advisory Board Scholarship:

  • Cassie Madison
  • Michala Viano

Kent State Salem Alumni Scholarship:

  • Alexis Rhodes

Kent State Salem Access:

  • Jamie Brown
  • Braxton Barker
  • Ellysa Exline
  • Andrea Fitch
  • Olivia Haid
  • Jessi Lautzenheiser
  • Lauren Randall
  • Victoria Wellington
  • Jenna Witmer

Kim E. Goll Scholarship:

  • Casey Dickey

Mary Byers Howett Scholarship:

  • Bobbie Paulat

Mitch’s Live Your Dream Scholarship:

  • Militca Denee

Opportunity Scholarship:

  • Mariah Adams
  • Tala Al-imeishat
  • Katelyn Bailey
  • Alyssa Barnhart
  • Jordan Betts
  • Jacqueline Blair
  • Ashlie Campbell
  • Cassidi Cline
  • Alaina Conte
  • Kiley Cook
  • Madelyn Delong
  • Shelby Dennis
  • Angelina Ditri
  • Zaviona Fountain
  • Kaylee Freeman
  • Emilee Graham
  • Andrew Hopkins
  • Tabitha Hornof
  • Madison Ketchum
  • Ashley King
  • Olivia Kuzma
  • Alexis Lawton
  • McKenzie Lemasters
  • MiKayla List
  • Brianna Luttmers
  • Tyressa Manion
  • Aubrianna Mellott
  • Samantha Moschgat
  • Erin Murphy
  • Mary Novak
  • Julia Oravecz
  • Kari Park
  • Sara Rex
  • Marikate Roscoe
  • Machenzie Ruzu
  • Illania Schmidt
  • Madison Showalter
  • Laurel Stewart
  • Andrea Trotter
  • Noah Wandling
  • Hannah White
  • Kylie Whittington
  • Brianne Williams
  • Alexandra Yurko-Mihelic

Professional Promise Scholarship:

  • Sarrah Tennefoss

Roy Bell Memorial Scholarship:

  • Allyson Buchert
  • Rachael DiFrancesco

Rural Scholars Scholarship:

  • Natalie Ammon
  • Nicholas Berger
  • Justyn Briand
  • Morgan Briand
  • Casey Dickey
  • Alexandria Harman
  • Lokelani Kalima
  • Katie Larabee
  • Vicroria Mayer
  • Blaine McCurdy
  • Amber Mondak
  • Hannah Schultheis
  • Kylee Scott
  • Erin Taylor
  • Sarrah Tennefoss
  • Hannah Thomas
  • Faith Wittenauer

Salem Community Foundation:

  • Cassandra Aldish
  • Ashlie Algaier
  • Kayla Amelung
  • Jordan Archer
  • Sarah Bobby
  • Bailey Boosz
  • Rachel Bowen
  • Ashlie Campbell
  • Sarah Castles
  • Melissa Clark
  • April Clark
  • Mitchell Craig
  • Quentin Craik
  • Marissa Cushman
  • Casey Dickey
  • Garrett Dickey
  • Jenna Drayer
  • Lauren Duke
  • Paige Eichler
  • Molly Ellyson
  • Ellysa Exline
  • Andrea Fitch
  • Stephanie Fowler
  • Violet-Rose German
  • Hunter Gillingham
  • Courtney Halter
  • Hailie Hamilton
  • Delaney Higgins
  • Heather Hinchliffe
  • Madeleine Hinkle
  • Sherilyn Horst
  • Morgan Hovorka
  • Morgan Hunter
  • Sean Jackson
  • Logan Jackson
  • Emma Jarvis
  • Emily Johnson
  • Kacey Morris
  • Madeline Kirkland
  • Owen Kirkland
  • Jessica Kisner
  • Hannah Koran
  • Thomas Kornbau
  • Rachel Kuttler
  • Caitlin LaBonte
  • Jessi Lautebheiser
  • Madison Lovell
  • Ryan Lutsch
  • Brianna Luttmers
  • Adam Magnuson
  • Megan Malysa
  • McKenzie Martin
  • Brettany Maurer
  • Baylee McCandless
  • Paula McFarland
  • Alexis McKenzie
  • Raegan Meals
  • Rylee Meals
  • Paige Miller
  • Sarah Miller
  • Brooke Morris
  • Wendy Morris
  • Ayla Mroczkowski
  • Adam Nash
  • Catherine Ossman
  • Whitney Parkinson
  • Joseph Pittman
  • Lauren Randall
  • Kasandra Rea
  • Shyanne Rendziniak
  • Bridgett Riley
  • Camryn Riley
  • Tori Rishel
  • Kyleigh Ross
  • John Rupert
  • Madison Showalter
  • Gabrielle Smith
  • David Smith
  • Logan Stecker
  • Ashley Stellato
  • Laurel Stewart
  • Melody Troyer
  • Rachel Ward
  • Laura Waters
  • Christian Wayt
  • Emily Weikart
  • Caleb Witmer
  • Jenna Witmer
  • Faith Wittenauer
  • Emilee Wren
  • Corina Wright
  • Sarah Yerkey
  • Tessa Young
  • Rylie Zeigler 

Salem Honors Program Scholarship:

  • Lauren Duke
  • Kalie Eastek
  • Ellysa Exline
  • Jillian Giovanni
  • Abigail Jackson
  • Mariah Lanzer
  • Sophia Lindner
  • Emily Miller
  • Jaidyn Morgan
  • Abigail Pearson
  • Abigale Peterson
  • Carly Price
  • Kobi Ream
  • Jozie Scott
  • Skyllar Shasteen
  • Tyler Stratton
  • Lauren Swast

Salem Psychology Scholarship:

  • Thomas Kornbau
  • Darian Strouse

Westfield Insurance Scholarship:

  • Alli Davis
  • Deanna Kruger
  • Shawn Luben
  • Carolyn Marquis
  • Nikia Taylor

Willoway Nursery Scholarship:

  • Militca Denee

 

 

Cutline: Kent State University at Salem Centofanti Hall

Kent State University at East Liverpool John J. Purinton Hall
Wednesday, December 09, 2020

ent State University at East Liverpool recognized the academic achievements of several students by the awarding of scholarships.

The recipients are:

David T. Mason Memorial Endowed Scholarship:

  • Sydney Hill

Dixie F. Leedy Memorial Scholarship:

  • Mattisyn Infanti

Dr. John W. Hayes Nursing Scholarship:

  • Ariel Danver
  • Laila Green
  • Heather Kornas
  • Kassi McCoy
  • Isabel Pedraja

Friends of the East Liverpool Campus Scholarship:

  • Emma Boling
  • Emily Brereton
  • Hadley Bugar
  • Addison Copeland
  • Allison Forbes
  • Briana Hanlon
  • Joshua Higgins
  • Emily Howell
  • Emily Kapp
  • Aidan Lowe
  • Emily Ludwig
  • Nicole Massaro
  • Lauren McCarty
  • Traven Renner
  • Bethany Stauffer
  • Todd Stewart
  • Justin Sweeney
  • Alan Taylor
  • Cheyenne Utt
  • Sierra Wells
  • Tava Wright
  • Teira Wright

Gus Markanton Memorial Scholarship:

  • Gabriel Edwards
  • Derrick Hemming
  • Joshua Higgins
  • Sarah Roberts

Harold T. Bricker East Liverpool City Schools Scholarship:

  • Kamryn Bailey
  • Ariel Danver
  • Sierra Donahue
  • Tessa Love

Larry, Donna and Ashley Kannal Nursing Scholarship:

  • Kamryn Bailey
  • Sierra Donahue
  • Addison Guildoo
  • Elaina Howell
  • Glaiza Pazin
  • Hoi Ming Winski
  • Abigail Ziegler

M. Patricia Burnett Scholarship:

  • Stephanie Matkovich

Norman I. Mayer Nursing Scholarship:

  • Lauren DeSarro
  • McKenzie Dotson
  • Addisen Ginier
  • Tessa Love

Pottertown Foundation Scholarship:

  • McKenzie Dotson
  • Addisen Ginier
  • Addison Guildoo
  • Sydney Hill
  • Elaina Howell

Thomas V.  Rutledge Scholarship:

  • Marissa Macaluso
  • Mallory Ullom

Single Parent Scholarship:

  • Billie Wells 

East Liverpool Campus Access Scholarship:

  • Jeremy Barton
  • Jacqueline Francis
  • Kassandra Rogers

Opportunity Scholarship:

  • Catherine Alfred
  • Natalie Ammon
  • Alexis Ariemiea
  • Alissa Baer
  • Khaylah Brown
  • Katelyn Canei
  • Thomas Cave
  • Jules Clutter
  • Cassidy Concato
  • Peyton Davidson
  • Gabriel Edwards
  • Caitlin Fitzgerald
  • Skylar Fletcher
  • Janine Furrie
  • Arleigha Gaudio
  • Zachary Gill
  • Skyler Hamilton
  • Alisha Hayter
  • Whitney Hillock
  • Tiffany Hysong
  • Shelby Jewell
  • Michala Johnson
  • Shannon Joy
  • Alexis Kaleda
  • Haley Karelin
  • Cassie Keller
  • Kassi McCoy
  • Gabrielle Merriman
  • Autumn Moninger
  • Desire Ofalla
  • Lisa Paskevitch
  • Isabel Pedraja
  • Jacob Potts
  • Darci Powell
  • Bailie Rohr
  • Amber Rom
  • Corey Saluga
  • Kylee Scott
  • Hannah Shaffer
  • Briana Spalding
  • Mackenzie Sturgeon
  • L. Jeremiah Swiger
  • Maci Trombulak
  • Gabriella Venci
  • Eric Walker
  • Mary Whims

 

 

Cutline: John J. Purinton Hall
 

Maegan Richards
Tuesday, December 08, 2020

Congratulations are in order for MAEGAN RICHARDS who received the 2020 President’s Award of Distinction!

Maegan Richards
Richards is the Academic Learning Commons coordinator for the Salem and East Liverpool campuses. She works tirelessly and non-stop to make certain our students on both campuses are equipped with computers, technology, resources and personal contact to help them succeed. She truly puts students first every single day.

She earned a Bachelor of Arts in English in 2009 and a Master of Library and Information Science in 2011, each from Kent State, and has been a full-time employee on the Salem Campus since September 2011.

As a student, she began working as a writing tutor during her sophomore year on the Salem Campus and then worked in the Enrollment Management and Student Services Department. When she began graduate school, Maegan transitioned to working in the Performing Arts Library on the Kent Campus, as well as in the library on the Salem Campus.

Kent State University President Todd Diacon noted that his office received nearly 200 nominations from employees’ supervisors, peers and colleagues throughout the eight campuses. Only a very select number of staff members were chosen to receive this honor.

“This prestigious honor recognizes your exceptional performance and value as a member of our university community,” Diacon wrote to Richards. “As I reviewed the nominations, I was touched to see so many examples of employees like you who demonstrate in your day-to-day efforts the university’s core values and that Flashes take care of Flashes.”

In 2016, Richards received the Staff of the Year Award for the Salem Campus, recognizing exemplary service to the campus. It, too, was based on nominations from students, staff and faculty.

“Maegan has matured from a student and student worker on our campus to one of our most valued employees,” noted Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the Columbiana County campuses. “As we learned to navigate through the COVID pandemic over the last several months, Maegan NEVER stopped. She was very proactive in finding ways to reach out to students and faculty so that we could continue delivering on our promise of providing a quality education for each of them, even in a remote environment. I could list several examples of how she went above and beyond her job duties, but that list is almost endless. Her impact on our students and our campus is astounding and quite worthy of this recognition.”

Dr. Rachael Blasiman, associate professor of psychology and chair of the Faculty Council on the Salem Campus, offered a congratulatory note on behalf of several faculty members who nominated Maegan for this award:

“Maegan Richards wears many hats at the Salem campus - she leads our Academic Learning Commons; she is a valuable member on multiple campus committees; and she assists our academic tutors,” Blasiman stated. “And she wears each of these hats with indefatigable cheerfulness, professionalism and admirable ability. Maegan is there to help every student and faculty member who wanders into her office, often going beyond her job description to help others. She has been instrumental in evolving our library to meet student needs and to promote undergraduate research. Maegan rises to every challenge and we are lucky to have her as a member of our campus community. I am so pleased that she has been recognized for her achievements by Kent State University; it is certainly a well-deserved honor!”


Read more about her recognition


Cutline: Maegan Richards

 

Tuesday, December 08, 2020

 

The Kent State East Liverpool Campus was selected as the Business of the Month by the Wellsville Area Chamber of Commerce. Although the campus was the March Business of the Month, the COVID pandemic delayed the presentation of the award until just recently. Chamber President Sheryl Gibson (left) made the presentation to Dr. Susan Rossi, assistant dean of the East Liverpool Campus.

Chamber President Sheryl Gibson (left) made the presentation to Dr. Susan Rossi, assistant dean of the East Liverpool Campus

Officers of the Student Nurses Association on the East Liverpool Campus held a collection drive to benefit the East Liverpool Salvation Army.
Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Officers of the Student Nurses Association on the East Liverpool Campus held a collection drive to benefit the East Liverpool Salvation Army.
Students in the associate degree in nursing program on the East Liverpool Campus were determined to hold a successful holiday collection to support the local Salvation Army, keeping alive a tradition that goes back several years.

The Student Nurses Association collected toys, clothes, gift wrap and money to donate to the Salvation Army for its upcoming holiday outreach program.  Student nurses also held a book raffle earlier in the semester and donated the proceeds from that fundraiser to this project.

“This is an annual philanthropic endeavor that the SNA takes on each year to give back to our community,” noted Angela Douglas, faculty advisor to the SNA. “Despite a pandemic, these students put together a wonderful effort to assist many in need this holiday season.”

The SNA officers spearheading this project are Abigail Ziegler, president; Isabel Pedraja, vice president; Morgan Germanovich, secretary; and Cheryl Vaughn, treasurer.


Cutline A: Officers of the Student Nurses Association on the East Liverpool Campus held a collection drive to benefit the East Liverpool Salvation Army. Pictured are (from left) Abigail Ziegler and her daughter Hadley; Morgan Germanovich and Cheryl Vaughn. Not pictured is Isabel Pedraja.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zaviona Fountain on a field trip
Monday, November 23, 2020

Majoring in early childhood education, Zaviona Fountain and Jadon Kersey had to fill roles as students and teachers throughout the last few years. That is typical for all who major in education; however, the COVID pandemic added more twists to navigating that journey.

Zaviona Fountain on a field trip

“At the beginning of the semester, I told my students that fall 2020 will look different than any semester we have experienced,” explained Dr. Tsunghui Tu, associate professor and director of the early childhood education technology program. “Even though it seems to be an unpleasant time in our lives, we can use it as a learning opportunity for our personal and professional growth.”

Like most other courses, the early childhood classes moved from face-to-face to remote teaching at Kent State Salem, but the course objectives and expected student outcomes remained the same.

All major courses in the early childhood education technology program include field experience and student teaching requirements where they spend time in actual classroom settings. Because of COVID, these experiences were monitored like never before.

“The students followed the Kent State Flashes Safe Seven, as well as the CDC guidelines and guidelines at their student teaching sites,” Tu explained. “They were informed of the guidelines before student teaching to ensure everyone in our community is safe and healthy.” 

Kersey is in her third year of the program and agreed that the pandemic situation required more out of her as a student at Kent State.

“The traditional college experience has changed for just about all of us,” she said. “I was at Kent State Salem three times a week and now I attend all of my classes online. (But) Kent State has been the biggest support system to me during these uncertain times. Not only do my professors constantly check in with me to make sure I am adjusting, but the staff, in general, at Kent State always keeps in touch to make sure I am staying on track – not just with schooling, but with my mental health, too.

Zaviona Fountain

Fountain is set to graduate in December with an associate degree in early childhood education technology from the Kent State Salem Campus. Each semester as a student, she was named to the Dean’s List or President’s List, indicating her drive toward success. 

Still, the pandemic presented challenges and demands that changed the way she took on her roles as student and student teacher. She related that, as a student, she missed the face-to-face classes and interacting with her peers and instructors, and that adjusting to remote learning was not easy in the beginning.

“I am a very hands-on, in-person learner. That is how I learn and understand material best,” she said. “I have never procrastinated in my life. I truly enjoy learning, getting my homework done on time and working on assignments early. (But), this semester, I have struggled. I began procrastinating when it comes to reading and I really had a hard time trying to make a schedule that I can follow throughout my daily life.”

As a professor and as the program director, Tu approached this semester knowing that she needed to provide extra guidance and support to her students who were headed into schools as student teachers. 

“During these unprecedented times, some people may experience anxiety, stress, sadness or fears,” she noted. “I encouraged my student teachers to stay calm and follow the recommendations of the CDC. I also encourage them to be open-minded; be flexible about changes in their student teaching environment; and maintain regular communication with me, their student teaching environments and their university supervisor to discuss any changes or concerns they may have.

“In addition,” Tu continued, “I told them that we will get through this very trying time together as a team and to be respectful, patient and show gratitude, kindness and forgiveness to each other and the people around us.” 

Fountain is completing her student teaching requirements at a full-day preschool, where she works with 15 students, ages 4 and 5 years. Three of the students are on the autism spectrum. Off campus, she works as a direct care professional.

“As a direct care professional, I work with individuals with disabilities. … I can relate a lot of the things that I learn at my job to the students I work with, as well. These students are very smart, adorable and it is amazing seeing them grow and develop at such a young age. Each one has touched my heart and I am so lucky to have the opportunity to observe them, work with them and watch them learn new things,” she said. 

As with all professions, and most aspects of life, the COVID pandemic changed the student teaching experience in several ways. Initially, the first big change was the need for masks.

“It was challenging wearing a mask with the students. They wear masks and I can’t see their mouths. Sometimes it is hard to tell the emotions they are expressing and it’s often difficult to hear or understand them when they talk,” Fountain explained. “It is also challenging to not be able to comfort students when they are sad because we must try not to touch the students to keep them, and us, safe.”

Jadon Kersey in a classroom

Kersey finished her student teaching experience this semester, working with a preschool program for children ages 3 to 5 years old.

“It was a bittersweet experience completing my student teaching during this time,” she said. “Although these young children have to adjust to social distancing and mask regulations, they are part of history and that will always be something special. The students have adapted amazingly well, and I am blown away by the positive attitudes and open minds these young children have.”

Fountain noted that her young students also adapted to the pandemic restrictions in the classroom “fairly well,” yet there are still trying times.

“When it comes to wearing masks, the students do a remarkable job. I sometimes feel like I have a harder time wearing mine than they do,” she shared. “However, there are many struggles with students wearing masks, especially now when the weather is changing. Students sneeze in their masks, suck on their masks, cough. I constantly tell them to wash their hands, I have to find new masks for the students, and we must sanitize areas.”

Fountain explained that the students also struggle occasionally with the way the classroom setup is designed and the measures taken to prevent close contact between the children. She explained that during free play, for instance, only two students can play in an area at one time and only students from the same table can play in the same space at the same time.

Jadon Kersey

“They get bored quickly with what they’re playing with and they want to rotate to different play areas, but we have to sanitize everything that is played with, before other students touch it, and it difficult,” she said. “They also want to give hugs and comfort one another when they’re sad. It’s challenging as a teacher to explain that they must keep their hands and feet to themselves, no matter what.”

As a student, Fountain said she understands the frustration created because of the pandemic restrictions and can empathize with the youngsters. She, too, has learned to adapt in the role of a student.

“I learned that at any time, your life can change drastically. Never take the opportunities you have available to you for granted,” she said. “I also learned that it is very important to be open minded about learning with technology. I have never been one to enjoy learning using technology. I did not like how math teachers used iPads in high schools because I always felt that math should be taught with paper and pencil. But (technology) is something I am slowly learning to use properly.”

Fountain’s journey as a student will not end with her graduation this December. She will return to earn her bachelor’s degree in early childhood education with her eyes focused on a future as a teacher.

Kersey’s goals are to become a lead teacher in a preschool following graduation. Her student teaching experience – and her experience being a student – taught her more than she expected.

“I learned to not take life for granted,” she said. “These simple day-to-day routines can be taken away from us in a heartbeat. This time also taught me to always choose to be positive and to look on the bright side; to ask, ‘what can I take away from this experience and how can I help someone else have positive mindset?’

“…College is hard and adding a pandemic to the stress of schoolwork is even more challenging. But it is so worth it in the end!”


Cutline A: Zaviona Fountain on a field trip

Cutline B: Zaviona Fountatin

Cutline C: Jadon Kersey in a classroom

Cutline D: Jadon Kersey

October is PT Month
Wednesday, October 28, 2020

 

Students from the Kent State East Liverpool physical therapist assistant program observed National PTA Month by making monetary donations to two causes.

The PTA students raised $500 through fundraisers this semester and chose to present $250 to the East Liverpool City Police Department’s Shop with a Cop program, as well as to VALOR Retreat.

Each year, PTA students from the Kent East Liverpool campus find unique ways to increase awareness about their field, while raising funds for a cause chosen by the class.

The Shop with a Cop program pairs local law enforcement officers with area youth to help shop for Christmas gifts. The program not only provides families with help for the holidays, but also builds goodwill between the officers and community members.

The VALOR Retreat is a recreational facility being built in the Hocking Hills area for combat veterans and their families, as well as Gold Star families. The name represents Veterans Are Loved, Owed, Respected.

The retreat sits on a 197-acre private reserve and will include four handicap-accessible cabins and a lodge, providing a tranquil environment for veterans to recover from the ravages of conflict and reconnect with nature, their families and each other. 

Students from the Kent State East Liverpool physical therapist assistant program gathered to present a check to East Liverpool Police Officers Jim Krawiec and Justin Watkins for the Shop with a Cop program, while also noting their donation to the VALOR Retreat. 

The PTA students included Alexis Ariemiea, Olive Busson, Samantha Croskey, Kameron DuPonty, Sydney Durbin, Elyse Fincham, Allison Forbes, Matt Lubonovic, Marissa Macaluso, Corey Saluga, Briana Spalding, Adria Stelluto, Jade Strohl, Justin Sweeney, Logan Tonkovich, Nick Adkins, Jeremy Barton, Brandon Blystone, Sydni Bowker, Cassidy Concato, Skylar Fletcher, Emily Glenz, Shelby Jewell, Jayla Martin, John Seifert and Mallory Ullom.

Monday, October 26, 2020

NOTE: Article content has been updated.

Following a survey visit with the Ohio Board of Nursing this past October, the Kent State University’s College of Applied and Technical Studies Associate Degree of Nursing program (in accordance with Rule 4723-5-06 of the Ohio Administrative Code) met and maintained all requirements of Chapter 4723-5. 

The Ohio Board of Nursing will consider the survey visit report and the program’s re-approval status at its January 13-14, 2021, meeting.  

“I tip my hat to Dr. Carol Hrusovsky for heading up this project,” noted Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the Columbiana County Campuses and interim vice president of System Integration. “Not only is she the program director for the East Liverpool ADN program, she also serves as the interim senior academic program director and program administrator for the KSU-ADN programs. This includes overseeing the programs on the East Liverpool, Tuscarawas and Ashtabula campuses, as well as the Twinsburg Academic Center.

“Preparing for a reaccreditation survey always requires a lot of work by a lot of people. Given the unusual circumstances created by the COVID pandemic, however, this survey was particularly challenging. I am so proud of the effort put forth by everyone involved to make this happen. I know it was exhausting at times, but the end result reflects the caliber of people who are leading these programs throughout our system.”

Hrusovsky also thanked the faculty, staff and Kent State University administration for 
the support given to the associate degree of nursing program, especially during the survey period.  
 

East Liverpool High School Volleyball Coach Kelly Kiger
Thursday, October 08, 2020

East Liverpool Coach Kelly Kiger holds the winner’s plaque after her team defeated Salem High School in the 2020 Kent State Columbiana County Volleyball Classic

The second Kent State Columbiana County Volleyball Classic took place Oct. 3, when the East Liverpool Potters hosted the Salem Quakers for a full day of volleyball action.

The day featured freshman, JV and varsity games between the cross-county rivals, In a hard-fought varsity match, East Liverpool High School defeated Salem High School, earning the right to keep the traveling winner’s plaque until next year’s battle. 

It took five games to determine the winner, but the Potters came out on top 25-22, 10-25, 25-23, 22-25, 19-17.

The Kent State County Classic represents the strong foundation of learning in East Liverpool and Salem, as each community is home to one of the university’s two Columbiana County campuses. 

Salem High School players at the Columbiana County Classic 2020


Cutline A: East Liverpool Coach Kelly Kiger holds the winner’s plaque after her team defeated Salem High School in the 2020 Kent State Columbiana County Volleyball Classic.

Cutline B: Salem High School during pre-game warmups.

See more photos on our Facebook page
 

East Liverpool custodians
East Liverpool custodians
Tuesday, October 06, 2020


Oct. 2 is National Custodian Day, but the staffs on the East Liverpool and Salem campuses deserve more than one day to recognize their efforts in recent months. 

The custodial and maintenance employees from the Kent State Salem Campus

“These folks have been critical to our success and I can’t thank them enough,” noted Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO. “They, along with our maintenance crews, worked throughout the pandemic to keep operations going and to make significant changes to our internal spaces. They continue to be diligent about keeping our buildings clean and safe for students, staff, faculty and visitors.”

The crews on both campuses spent many hours preparing for a return to campus, rearranging classrooms, as well as study and lounge areas, to assure that social distancing standards were being met. They also put out signage and created sanitizing stations throughout the buildings.

The custodial and maintenance employees from the Kent State East Liverpool Campus

Additionally, the custodial and maintenance crews worked to install plastic barriers in reception areas and offices.

Now that employees and students are back on campus – even at limited numbers – the custodial employees never stop. Restrooms and common areas must be cleaned and disinfected numerous times throughout each day, with a heightened importance to the effectiveness of their work.

“Our custodians do an amazing job, but over recent months, they have really stepped up and proved their worth,” Dees added. “I hope they know how much we all appreciate what they do.”


Cutline A: The custodial and maintenance employees from the Kent State Salem Campus include (from left) Charles Brant, Mario Denno, John Stainer, Debbie Hoopes and Philip “Buck” Snyder. They social distanced themselves for the photo and took off their masks just long enough for the picture to be taken (notice the masks in each of their hands!). 

Cutline B: The custodial and maintenance employees from the Kent State East Liverpool Campus include (from left) Nate Adkins, Bob Allgood and Kenny Butler.
 

Tuesday, September 29, 2020


Because of limitations related to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2020 Culture Fair on the East Liverpool Campus will be quite different: no student research on display; no ethnic foods; no ethnic artifacts; no guest speakers. But, there will still be a great opportunity to learn about another culture.

This year’s event will incorporate Islamic Day in Ohio and its online presentations on Oct. 10, beginning at 11:30 a.m. and ending at 1 p.m. 

“Each fall semester, the faculty at East Liverpool typically coordinates the Culture Fair: An Undergraduate Research Conference to bring cultural awareness to our campus and enhance knowledge and understanding of different cultural groups. Due to the current pandemic, we will not have a traditional culture fair on site at our campus,” explained Dr. Lydia Rose, associate professor of sociology at Kent State East Liverpool. “However, the Culture Fair planning committee discovered an online opportunity for the campus community to expand its knowledge of different cultural groups outside of the classroom.”
Students, faculty and staff are invited to participate in the 33rd annual “Islamic Day in Ohio”  by going online to https://isak.org/ido

 Each October, the Islamic Council of Ohio promotes and celebrates Islamic Day in Ohio. The Islamic Society of Akron and Kent (ISAK) and the Akron Masjid are hosting IDO this year’s event as a free online webinar. The theme is “Racial Justice: A Moral Obligation.” 

Speakers include Azhar Azeez , the past president of the Islamic Society of North America  which is one of the largest and oldest Islamic Societies in the USA and Canada; Councilman Basheer Jones, the first Muslim council representative of Cleveland; Toqa Hassan, a young Muslim woman from Akron and a Ph.D. student in communication at Kent State University; and Dr. Khalid Madhi, current chair of Faith Islamic Academy’s Board of Education and a member of ISAK’s Intra-Faith Group Addressing Racism.  

In 1987, then-Ohio Gov. Richard Celeste declared an official Islamic Day in Ohio as part of the council’s efforts to promote Islam to elected public officials. The tradition continued and, each year since then, an Islamic Center from within the state is selected by ICO to host the event.

The IDO’s goal is to promote and educate others about Islam, including its ideals, teachings and practices throughout Ohio, while providing an opportunity for open, interactive and interfaith dialogues between the host Muslim community and the non-Muslim communities in the vicinity.

For more information about this event visit https://www.ic-ohio.org/idoday.html.

Rose chairs the Culture Fair planning committee and its members include Robin Mermer, nursing faculty; Dr. Brian Wright, associate professor of math; and Brenda McIntosh, counseling specialist.
 

Dr. Jessica Paull
Wednesday, September 23, 2020

  
Just like everything else around us, the Rural Scholars program is going through some changes this fall – some because of the COVID-19 pandemic; others because of new leadership.

Nonetheless, the program continues to provide opportunities for students of all ages to learn more about themselves, opportunities available to them and how to pursue their goals.

Dr. Jessica Paull is the newly appointed coordinator for the Rural Scholars program on the Columbiana County campuses and she has wasted no time making big plans for the scholars and mentors participating in the program. 

“This is a very unique time to lead the Rural Scholars program and I’m excited to take advantage of the new opportunities it is offering us,” she said. “I really enjoy how this program not only provides mentoring, but also a variety of opportunities for scholars that they may not have otherwise had.”

A large part of the Rural Scholar program’s success has been based on relationships; relationships between mentors and scholars, as well as relationships between mentors and the university. 

College students from the Salem and East Liverpool campuses apply, and are selected, to be mentors for middle and high school scholars. These mentor/mentee relationships are vital for personal and program successes. The pandemic and social distancing practices, however, have created new dynamics with these relationships, especially since the program will be offered in a remote fashion this year.

“We have wonderful mentors who are so dedicated to our scholars. They are the heart of the program. There would not be a Rural Scholars program without them. We have to ensure that we support our mentors so they can continue their excellent work,” Paull shared. 

“Mentoring requires a close connection and, in the past, we’ve relied on face-to-face interactions in the schools and through our programming to create and maintain those kinds of connections. This isn’t an option at this point, so now we have to think outside the box,” she continued.

“Fortunately, these scholars have been raised in a digital era, where it’s the norm to interact with the different aspects of life in this way. So, digital mentoring just joins online shopping, remote classes, dating apps and every other part of our culture that has adapted to technology.”

Paull noted that having a remote program offers unique opportunities for virtual workshops and the restraints created through geography and transportation costs are gone. 

“In the past, a speaker may have turned down an opportunity to lead a workshop because the campus was too far away or their schedule couldn’t allow them to leave for an entire afternoon,” she explained. “Now they can simply log in from their office. Because we don’t need to have the physical space or transportation for everyone, we don’t have to limit the number of students attending each workshop. All of our scholars can attend all of our workshops if they like.”

Having a remote or virtual program also provides opportunities for the Columbiana County participants to collaborate with the Rising Scholars programs from the other Kent State regional campuses. This allows Paull to expand programming without increasing costs.

Currently, there are eight area school districts that participate in the Rural Scholars program, with 111 student scholars. More will be added as the seventh-grade applications are processed.

This fall, the scholars will each receive workshop kits so that they can interact with the virtual sessions.  The workshops vary in topics and include:

  • A geologist will demonstrate the properties (ex. hardness, color, shine, breaking) of different minerals by showing the scholars how to perform a scratch test. Each scholar will be supplied with a rock and mineral kit.
  • For a Halloween-themed workshop, scholars will receive a kit to construct a Play-Dough brain and learn how to dissect the various parts of gray matter.
  • Chef Don from Yo Fresh will offer a live cooking demonstration. Scholars will be provided the needed ingredients so they can learn how to prepare a healthy meal from an experienced chef.
  • In celebration of Veteran’s Day, Lt. Colonel Natalie Paull will lead a discussion about different military career trajectories.
  • Columbiana County native and international artist Kevin Llewellyn will host a workshop, sharing his talents as an artist of life-sized oil paintings.

Paull welcomes faculty and staff from the Salem and East Liverpool campuses to become involved with the program. “What does your profession or discipline do? Could you offer an hour workshop or create an interactive online activity for seventh through twelfth graders? We would love to have our scholars work with you!”

She assumes the responsibility for the program as an extension of her position as an assistant professor of sociology on the Salem Campus.

Paull earned three degrees in sociology from Kent State University. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 2003; a Master of Arts degree in 2004; and her doctorate degree in 2013.

Paull has been an instructor for Kent State University for nearly 18 years, teaching a variety of sociology courses. In 2018, she was selected as the Outstanding Adjunct Faculty Member for the Kent State Salem Campus.
Earlier in her career, she served as a research assistant in the Kent State sociology department; as a supervisor in the Survey Research Lab at Kent State; and as the principle investigator on an interpersonal research project at Kent State.
In 2018, Paull served as the co-coordinator of research and development for the Mahoning Valley Family Center, studying family benefits of affordable and accessible family centers. 

Most recently, Paull served as an assistant editor for Ink Media and Design in Mahoning County, where she created an interactive online curriculum for grades 3-8.

About Rural Scholars:

The Kent State Rural Scholars Program is designed to offer local first-generation college-bound students and their families the knowledge and social support needed to succeed at a university. The ultimate goal is for each student in the program to complete a post-secondary education with credentials necessary to succeed in his or her career. 

Middle school and high school students are selected by their respective schools to participate based their academic and leadership potential. Participating schools include Crestview Local, East Liverpool City Schools, Leetonia Exempted Village, Lisbon Village Exempted, Salem City Schools, Southern Local Schools, United Local Schools and Wellsville Local Schools.

The scholars participate in year-round activities that help them better understand the resources and opportunities that are available in nearby communities. Hands-on workshops and programming help them learn about careers in business, industry, manufacturing, healthcare, agriculture and technology, while other sessions provide intensive lessons in environmental sciences, health and physical science, leadership, communication and study skills.

The program also includes Kent State students who serve as mentors to the rural scholars. Each is also a first-generation college student from Columbiana County with a strong record of academic success and a desire to serve the community. 

Cars line up for the Salem DKS drive-thru
Tuesday, September 01, 2020

 

The Kent State East Liverp

Flash fist-bumps a CCP student
ool and Salem campuses had to rethink orientation for new students this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Typically, each campus holds a one-day event known as Destination Kent State – or DKS – that helps new students navigate through the buildings and to learn more about being a Golden Flash.  

Driving through the drive-thru at Kent State East Liverpool

Because of safety measures related to the pandemic, however, an on-campus event could not be held for the large number of students expected. Instead, the students participated in a remote DKS webinar during which they learned about the various procedures and services provided on each campus.

Following the webinar, the East Liverpool and Salem campuses held drive-thru events during which each student received a packet of resource material, a Kent State t-shirt and a Flashes Take Care of Flashes welcome kit from the safety of their vehicle. 

Showing off their t-shirts in Salem
The welcome kit contained two Kent State masks, hand sanitizer, a packet of sanitizing wipes, a Feverscan (to check temperatures) and a key chain that helps with hands-free contact with keypad buttons, elevator buttons, etc.

Showing off their t-shirts in East Liverpool

Campus staff – along with Flash – was on hand to greet the students and welcome them to campus, all while practicing social distancing guidelines.

DKS is always an energized day on campus and, hopefully, next year’s events will return to a format that allows students to be on campus and participate in activities in person. 

 


     
Cutline A: Cars line up for the Salem DKS drive-thru

Cutline B: Flash fist-bumps a CCP student

Cutline C: Driving through the drive-thru at Kent State East Liverpool

Cutline D: Showing off their t-shirts in Salem

Cutline E: Showing off their t-shirts in East Liverpool
 

Monday, August 31, 2020


On Sept. 22 and 23, the Ohio Board of Nursing will conduct a virtual three-year survey visit at Kent State University’s East Liverpool Campus for consideration of reapproval of the Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) education program.

The Ohio Board of Nursing wishes to provide students, faculty and teaching assistants at all campuses offering the ADN program the opportunity to provide feedback to the board surveyors.

Therefore, you are being provided with information about how to contact the Ohio Board of Nursing Education Regulatory Surveyor with your comments.

Contact:

        Ms. Kristie Oles, Ed.D., MSN, BA, RN, FRE
        Education Regulatory Surveyor
        koles@nursing.ohio.gov
        With subject line: KSU ADN Survey Visit
        Please identify your campus.

The virtual survey visit will be at the Kent State University East Liverpool Campus. Students, faculty and teaching assistants will have an opportunity to interact with the Ohio Board of Nursing Education regulatory surveyor via Zoom.

To access the rules by which the program will be evaluated by the board survey visitor, go to the website for the Ohio Board of Nursing at www.nursing.ohio.gov and click on “Laws and Rules” or go directly to http://codes.ohio.gov/oac/4723-5

To be most useful, the board requests your comments on or before Tuesday, Sept. 15. You can, however, make comments at any time.
    

Thank you for your assistance,

Dr. Carol J. Hrusovsky, program administrator

Dr. David Dees
Friday, August 28, 2020

Greetings!

Yes, summer is over, and we are witnessing back-to-school activities all around us. From shopping for new clothes and school supplies, to gearing up for athletic competitions, there is always a sense of excited anticipation with the beginning of a new school year. 

Dr. David Dees
This year, however, the back-to-school activities on the Kent State University Columbiana County campuses have been anything but typical. We are excited to be back, but, just like every other school – from pre-schools to high schools and colleges – we had to make significant changes to our physical spaces and how we deliver instruction to our students. 

When we went remote in March, we did not stop what we do as a university…and that is to focus on our students. Quite the contrary. Our faculty and staff jumped in and, within two days, began teaching students remotely. Our support staff continued to serve students and the public by being available through technology. Sure, there were bumps in the road; but we pushed onward and fulfilled our promise to provide our students with a quality education. 

Now, as the 2020-2021 academic year is beginning to unfold, we continue our commitment to the students. That commitment is not just about their academic success; we are also committed to their health, safety and well-being like never before.

Unfortunately, not all things on campus will be routine or “normal.” Instead, we will embrace this new perspective and work within the boundaries of the COVID-19 pandemic. When you visit either the East Liverpool Campus or Salem Campus, you will notice measures taken to keep everyone safe: see-through barriers at reception desks and in classrooms, signage about physical distancing, restrictions limiting the size of gatherings, hand sanitizing stations, face coverings, etc. These are the same things we have all grown accustomed to in most public settings. 

The staff and faculty members spent countless hours over recent months preparing for the return to campus. Our instructors completed robust training that will help them use new technology to reach all students through face-to-face, remote or a blended instruction format.

The IT staff members worked hard to find and install the technology that makes this all possible. Our maintenance crews worked hard to make the necessary changes within our buildings. And staff members never missed a beat with advising students, helping with financial aid, getting them enrolled, counseling and keeping lines of communication open.

We are as ready as we can be to welcome everyone back to campus, but we are playing it safe! We are limiting the number of employees in our buildings to minimize the risk of contamination and, with technology, we are able to deliver instruction to our students without the need for them – or the faculty members – to be on campus.

I am proud of the work Kent State University is doing to address the unending issues that continue to pop up related to the COVID-19 pandemic. We are being hailed as a model for other institutions, schools and businesses to follow regarding our emergency preparedness and practices. 

After almost six months of uncertainty and confusion in the world around us, we are ready to get back to the business of providing our students with a quality educational experience and to help prepare them for their futures. 

As Kent State President Todd Diacon stated: “We have our roadmap for a successful opening of the academic year. We have our roadmap for learning and the creation of knowledge during the pandemic. … We have our roadmap for taking care of each other so that each of us is made safer. We have our roadmap and our collective commitment to our core values because we are Kent State.”

Stay safe and remember: Flashes Take Care of Flashes!

Sincerely,

David M. Dees, Ph.D.
Dean and CAO for Kent State University-Columbiana County
Interim Vice President of System Integration at Kent State

Katelyn McKinney trying out a therapeutic swing
Thursday, August 27, 2020

In January, as the new spring semester began, Katelyn McKinney was like thousands of other college and high school students: counting down the months until a May graduation ceremony and excited about all the activities leading up to that special day.

Katelyn McKinney trying out a therapeutic swing at the American Occupational Therapy Association’s national conference in New Orleans
Less than two months from graduation, however, everything came to a halt as the COVID-19 pandemic hit. McKinney was in the middle of her last clinical rotation as a student in the Kent State East Liverpool’s occupational therapy assistant program – her final requirement for graduation – when the stay-home order was issued in Ohio.

During one of her fieldwork experiences, Katelyn McKinney helped decorate the gym at the Lawrence County C.A.R.E.S. Center for a carnival she and fellow students hosted.
McKinney was completing her fieldwork at the Robert Bycroft School in Lisbon when it closed in March under the governor’s orders. For her to graduate in May, she needed to complete her fieldwork by late April. As the stay-home order was extended, the hope of meeting that deadline dimmed. 

Likewise, her classmates also were completing their fieldwork requirements and found themselves unable to continue when their sites closed, and Kent State no longer permitted them to continue their fieldwork because of COVID-19 concerns.

McKinney and her classmates missed the May graduation, but. because Robert Bycroft is contracted for occupational therapy services with East Liverpool City Hospital, McKinney was able to return to her fieldwork at the hospital on June 15. As a result, she met the requirements for the August graduation and received her associate of applied science degree in the OTA program.

OTA’s work under the supervision of an occupational therapist and help evaluate and treat individuals with injuries, illnesses, cognitive impairments, physical disabilities and other disorders of conditions. It’s a hands-on discipline and the precautions that resulted from COVID-19 often made it difficult to perform all the necessary duties.    

OTA students Ryan Bost and Katelyn McKinney presented their community-based project at the Ohio Occupational Therapy Association’s state conference

“In fieldwork, there were many increased safety procedures to keep everyone safe,” McKinney shared. “Not only did it cost time and resources, but it was very difficult to communicate with staff and especially patients through a mask and face shield. I had to work much harder to make those vital connections with my patients because they were unable to see my facial expressions and, at times, unable to hear my instructions.”

McKinney said that while the hospital was treating COVID patients, she felt safe and did not risk her health treating them. 

“To limit the number of people exposed to COVID patients, only the occupational therapist treated them. It still affected the mood of the staff to know that patients were suffering behind closed doors,” she said. 

“Little did the COVID patients know that they had a support system rooting for them throughout the entire hospital. It was also challenging to see patients suffer from the effects of being unable to see their friends and families. Visitors were prohibited for the majority of my fieldwork experience and the connections made with patients became even more important than they were before.”

McKinney feels well prepared to begin her career as an OTA because of the challenges she faced to earn her degree and because of the high standards set by Kent State’s OTA program.

“I have learned to adapt in ways I never thought possible and will be a better practitioner for it,” she said. “I was exposed to a wide variety of topics and options that our field has to offer. I was also able to expand my communication skills and make tough decisions, and I made connections with people who helped me grow and succeed.

“The world has changed so much this year and I know many are struggling. Long term, I hope to find a job that not only helps support my family, but one that I love. I have always had a passion for the geriatric population and would be so happy to work with them.”

Graduation is not the only milestone event that was delayed for McKinney in 2020. She also postponed getting married.

Katelyn McKinney and her cat, Griff.
“I am engaged to my fiancé Scott (Rohrdanz),” she related. “We were to be married this year but chose to postpone because of this crazy year. … I am incredibly thankful for all of the opportunities I have received in my life. I am excited for the future and cannot wait to see what it holds. Life takes you to unexpected places for really good reasons. Every part of my life brought me a new blessing. Here, at Kent State East Liverpool, I was even able to make one of the closest friends I have ever known.”

For future OTA students, McKinney offered this advice: “Always be prepared and ready to ask questions. Take advantage of the resources and opportunities provided to you. Even when it is challenging, you will make it through it. Keep studying and pushing yourself in new ways. Be confident and ready to get hands-on. Finally, don’t hesitate to ask for help when you need it.”

McKinney is a Boardman native and graduated from Boardman High School. She is the daughter of Robert and Darlene McKinney. Her brother, Matthew, is a teacher in Cincinnati.


Cutline A: Katelyn McKinney trying out a therapeutic swing at the American Occupational Therapy Association’s national conference in New Orleans.

Cutline B: During one of her fieldwork experiences, Katelyn McKinney helped decorate the gym at the Lawrence County C.A.R.E.S. Center for a carnival she and fellow students hosted.

Cutline C: OTA students Ryan Bost and Katelyn McKinney presented their community-based project at the Ohio Occupational Therapy Association’s state conference.

Cutline D: Katelyn McKinney and her cat, Griff.
 

(from left) Dean and CAO David Dees; Ventra’s Anthony Cugini and Matt Zines and John Stainer of the Kent State Salem maintenance staff
Monday, August 03, 2020

Ventra Salem just helped add another layer of protection against COVID for students across the Kent State University system. The company, based in Salem, recently donated 1,000 plastic face shields that will be distributed to students and faculty on Kent campuses.

Matt Zines, program engineer at Ventra Salem and a KSU alum, hands over a carton of face shields to Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the Columbiana County campuses.

The face shields are particularly helpful for the allied health programs because students and faculty must navigate situations that include hands-on instruction and movement in clinical-like settings. 

 Ventra Salem donated 90 shields earlier to the Salem Campus, making its contribution nearly 1,100 shields to Kent State.

“It’s wonderful that a local company is willing to do something so meaningful for our students and I am proud of the Kent State connection with Ventra,” noted Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the Columbiana County campuses. 

 Matt Zines, a Kent State graduate who attended the Salem Campus, is a program engineer at Ventra and helped with this specific project. He and Anthony Cugini, safety coordinator, recently delivered the face shields to the Salem Campus.

Ventra Salem is a division of Flex-N-Gate. It manufactures a wide range of engineered mechanical assemblies, precision molded, painted and plated plastic components and lamp systems. 


Cutline A: On hand for the delivery of 1,000 plastic face shields from Ventra Salem were (from left) Dean and CAO David Dees; Ventra’s Anthony Cugini and Matt Zines and John Stainer of the Kent State Salem maintenance staff, wearing one of the shields – all following social distancing rules.

Cutline B: Matt Zines, program engineer at Ventra Salem and a KSU alum, hands over a carton of face shields to Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the Columbiana County campuses.

Kent State University at East Liverpool Purinton Hall
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of Kent State University at East Liverpool, announced those students named to the Spring 2020 President’s or Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 or more credit hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the East Liverpool Campus. 
    

The students and their hometowns are:


President’s List

Broadview Heights:

  • Maggie Howell


Columbiana:

  • Nicole Cochran

East Liverpool:

  • Sierra Donahue
  • Sydney Hill
  • Katerina Wright

Salineville:

  • Hoi Ming Winski

Vienna:

  • Zachary Blevins

Dean’s List

Adena:

  • Logan Tonkovich

Akron:

  • Dean Greathouse
  • Melissa Kirksey
  • Alexus Snyder

Alliance:

  • Veronica Stahler
  • Samantha Young

Austintown:

  • Gretchen Crawford

Beloit:

  • Elvira Ward 

Bergholz:

  • Miranda Wiley

Bloomingdale:

  • Caitlynne Devore

Boardman:

  • Natalie Pecchia

Brewster:

  • Amberlin Howell

Campbell:

  • Karla Burris

Canal Fulton:

  • Lauren May

Canfield:

  • Delia Howard
  • Mckenzie Posten

Canton:

  • Shelby Crow
  • Lacey Jackson

Cleveland:

  • Megan Best
  • John Greifenstein
  • Elizabeth Ziemski

Columbiana:

  • Laila Green
  • Rachel Klem

Cortland:

  • Alyssa Lang

Cuyahoga Falls:

  • Andrew Sunderland

East Liverpool:

  • Matthew Bigelow
  • Brooke Briggs
  • Riley Britt
  • Ashley Chisom
  • Sydney Cooper
  • Melinda Dailey
  • Eric Glendenning
  •  Addison Guildoo
  • Jessica Headley
  • Jamie Hilton
  • Elaina Howell
  • Luke Jackman
  • Veronica Keenan
  • Olivia Prince
  • Traven Renne
  • David Spencer
  • Jayma Sullivan
  • Erica Tenney
  • Sydney Voorhees
  • Chelsea Ware
  • Aidan Watkins
  • Hannah White
  • Marissa Williams
  • Joanie Wood
  • Aaron Yourex
  • Abigail Ziegler

East Palestine:

  • Caitlyn McTrustry
  • Trinity Miller

Hammondsville:

  • Raelynn Corbin

Hanoverton:

  • Britni Boston
  • Emily Phillips

Huber Heights:

  • Andrew Arnst

Irondale:

  • Margaret Villarreal

Jackson:

  • Josh Exline

Leetonia:

  • Caitlin Fitzgerald

Lisbon:

  • Autumn Armstrong
  • Morgan Burcham
  • Mandy Donaldson
  • Annie Griggs
  • Aurora Leguard
  • Madelyn Liberati
  • Kayla Malone
  • Ray Mills
  • Sadie Potts
  • Jenna Ronshak
  • Madeline Smith
  • Justin Sweeney
  • Justyce Vrable 

Louisville:

  • Cassandra Lipari
  • Alesha Robish
  • Danae Stanle
  • Ashley White

Macedonia:

  • Karen Zlocki

Mantua:

  • John Seifert

Massillon:

  • Regina Chu
  • Emily Gross

Mesopotamia:

  • Isabella Schaden

Millersburg:

  • Jevon Miller

Minerva:

  • Briana Baker

Negley:

  • Emily Glenz

Newcomerstown:

  • Levi Kilpatrick

New Philadelphia:

  • Aric Anderson
  • Hope McGinnis

New Springfield:

  • Haley Karelin

North Canton:

  • Emily Orsich
  • Melissa Queen
  • Danielle Rearick
  • Brooke Thorne

North Lima:

  • Arleigha Gaudio

Peninsula:

  • Amanda Perko

Ravenna:

  • Lauren Housley

Rogers:

  • Kassandra Rogers 

Rootstown:

  • Zachary King

Salem:

  • Jaymie Andrews
  • Denise Brainard
  • Tyler Buckius
  • Taylor Headley
  • Brittany Hoops
  • Bethany Kholos
  • Lydia Larson
  • Kelly Ma
  • Shanna Mille
  • Tiffany Shepard

Salineville:

  • Allison Forbes
  • Madison Howdershelt

Silver Lake:

  • Jennifer Casto

Solon:

  • Joelle Fisher

Steubenville:

  • Joelle McCoy
  • Elyse Price

Stow:

  • Julia Csernyik
  • Anna Echols

Tallmadge:

  • Kenna Loveless

Toronto:

  • Dustin Henry
  • Madeline Swickard
  • Angelica Ternasky

Twinsburg:

  • Roshawn Bryson
  • Jordan Eaton

Wadsworth:

  • Denise Swanson

Warren:

  • Taylor Channell
  • Shakeila Matlock

Waynesburg:

  • Logan Frederick

Wellsville:

  • Jayla Corbin
  • Rachael McGinnis
  • Emily McNicol
  • McKenna Rawson
  • Jonathan Walker

Willoughby:

  • Jacklyn Brown

Wooster:

  • Cassidy Wint

Youngstown:

  • Shannon Balog
  • Courtney Best
  • Taylor Clawson
  • April Emanuel
  • Jordyn Faustino
  • Desire Ofalla
  • Amy Pangio
  • Drew Rober
  • Tawania Triplett


Beaver, Pa.:

  • Bailie Rohr

Enon Valley, Pa.:

  • Destini Carothers

Imperial, Pa.:

  • Dawn Cunningham

Pittsburgh, Pa.:

  • Lauren Wilson


Newell, W.Va.:

  • Thomas Cave

Weirton, W.Va.:

  • Courtney Antigo
Kent State University at Salem
Tuesday, July 14, 2020


Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of Kent State University at Salem, announced those students named to the Spring 2020 President’s and Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the Salem Campus. 

The students and their hometowns are:


President’s List

Alliance:

  • Zaviona Fountain
  • Michaela Huston
  • Brenna Rito

Columbiana:

  • Halee Allen
  • Lucas Duncan
  • Sherilyn Horst
  • Amber Mondak

East Liverpool:

  • Abigail Jackson
  • Katrina Malcolm

Lisbon:

  • Karlie Blissenbach
  • MaryQuinn Cook
  • Tyler Sowards

McDonald:

  • Michael Fletcher

Minerva:

  • Michael Laubacher

New Philadelphia:

  • Demi Wisnieski

Petersburg:

  • Roger Leipply

Poland:

  • Mia Albaugh
  • Sarah Glista

Salem:

  • Erica Fenton
  • Hannah Koran
  • Heather Lude

Youngstown:

  • Alexis Johnson

Dean’s List

Akron:

  • Kari Park

Alliance:

  • Zoie Davis
  • Nathan Decker
  • Shelby Dennis
  • Alexis Faudree
  • Alicia Lamp
  • Sarah Teutsch 

Apple Creek:

  • Teresa Miskimen 

Atwater:

  • Rachael Angel
  • Bobbie Paulat

Austintown:

  • Abbie Ketchum
  • Kelly Rektor
  • Bethany Skeens

Beloit:

  • Calista Bias
  • Curtis Gearhart
  • Heather Hinchliffe
  • Caitlin LaBonte
  • Rachel Moore
  • Samantha Morris
  • Gabrielle Smith

Berlin Center:

  • Jarrett Bishop
  • Olivia Haid
  • Joshua Miller
  • Alexis Moore
  • Michala Viano

Boardman:

  • Brady Harter
  • Harley Novak
  • Jessica Popovich
  • Sara Tkac

Bowling Green:

  • Cari Jones

Bristolville:

  • Kayla Adams  

Canal Fulton:

  • Danielle Hearn
  • Kimberly Larson

Canfield:

  • Valentino Corbisello
  • Danielle Gabriel
  • Greta Graffius
  • Amanda Humphreys
  • Robert Kaiser
  • Nataley Kemmer
  • Laurence Kilbert
  • Adam Kollay
  • Leah Ladd
  • Ashley Pitorak
  • Alexandra Pugh
  • Kara Rothbauer
  • Tyler Stratton
  • Allison Sunderman
  • Katelyn Yohman

Canton:

  • Janell Dima
  • Sarah Hon
  • Rebekah Owen
  • Eric Sarbaugh

Carrollton:

  • Kaitlynn Wells

Cleveland:

  • Erika Bradley
  • Ivy Bulloch
  • Keelin McAndrew

Chagrin Falls:

  • Christian Keiper

Columbiana:

  • Nicholas Berger
  • Lauren Blakeman
  • Zachary Chaffee
  • Gage DeWitt
  • Russell Ford
  • Luke Holm
  • Harley Hostetter
  • Elizabeth McGarry
  • Dylan Reeves
  • Jillian Strecansky
  • Darian Strouse
  • Gabriella Vivo
  • Hunter Zentner

Columbus:

  • Kylla May Lado

Conneaut:

  • Ricky Teed

Cortland:

  • LaChic Parker

Cuyahoga Falls:

  • Lauren Rayman
  • Timothy Trimmer

Dellroy:

  • Mikayla Brannick

Diamond:

  • Gabrielle Arquilla
  • Kyleigh Hayes
  • McKenzie Lemasters 

East Liverpool:

  • Natalie Ammon
  • Emily Brereton
  • Allysha Campbell
  • Tyrone Coles
  • Meredith Dawson
  • Nicole Fitch
  • Hannah Hughes
  • Reed McGeehan
  • Aubrianna Mellott
  • Terri Stuchell
  • Mary Whims

East Palestine:

  • Morgan Cheurco
  • Cheyenne Cook
  • Jade McBride
  • Gillian Stilson

East Rochester:

  • Lacy Marshall

Girard:

  • Krystina Graham
  • Katelin Knapp

Hanoverton:

  • Erin Boyle
  • Raider Morgan
  • Samantha Moschgat
  • Laurel Stewart
  • Dyllon Thompson

Hartville:

  • Kirsten Garvey
  • Paige Sommers
  • Trey Sommers

Homeworth:

  • Paige Miller

Hudson:

  • Chen Davis

Kensington:

  • Molly Ellyso
  • Giuseppe Sabatino
  • Skyllar Shasteen

Kent:

  • Deanna Kruger
  • Kourtny Skiljan

Leetonia:

  • Mitchell Baker
  • Laura Bokanovich
  • Allycia Flowers
  • Natalie Slepski
  • Courtney Smith
  • Caleb Witmer

Lisbon:

  • Nicholas Angle
  • Jamie Brown
  • Anita Cusick
  • Danny Davis
  • Natalie Esterly
  • Karsyn Faulk
  • Koby Felton
  • Katelyn Haifley
  • Brandi Hunt
  • Alyson Jones
  • Edith Kelly
  • Alivia Leyman
  • Ethan McCloskey
  • Kobi Ream
  • Samantha Shaffer
  • Alison Sprouse
  • Craig Walker

Louisville:

  • Jozie Scott

Macedonia:

  • Daniel Goga

Mantua:

  • Allyson Buchert
  • Bryanna Herbold

Massillon:

  • Amy Dervin

Mayfield Heights:

  • Calin Flanik

Medina:

  • Heather Castillo

Mentor on The Lake:

  • Sara Vay

Middlefield:

  • Magdalena Coblentz
  • Jacqueline LeQuyea

Mineral Ridge:

  • Rachael Channell
  • Abrianna Greathouse
  • Robert Jensen

Minerva:

  • Maria Allen
  • Erin Kennedy
  • Jaidyn Morgan
  • Danielle Osterfeld
  • Quade Zeedrich

Negley:

  • Britney Hughes
  • Andrew Shultz

New Middletown:

  • Kendra DeWitt
  • Olivia DiLallo

New Philadelphia:

  • Abigail Wenger

New Springfield:

  • Vivian Conrad

New Waterford:

  • Julia Chappelear
  • Harlie Coleman
  • Morgan Cox
  • Carly Mustake
  • Seth Oliver
  • Taylor Oliver
  • Adeline Whaley

Newton Falls:

  • Heidi Hauck

North Benton:

  • Jeremiah Curtis
  • Ashley Simmons
  • Jared Simmons
  • Sarrah Tennefoss

North Bloomfield:

  • Ashley King

North Canton:

  • Jordan Childs
  • Madison Smith

Northfield:

  • Aidan Wells

North Jackson:

  • Jillian Giovanni
  • Melissa Namy

North Lima:

  • Kali Dudich
  • Jayden Emerick
  • Baylee McCandless
  • Olivia Rhodehamel

Orwell:

  • Mackenzie Chitwood

Painesville:

  • Johnny Alvarez
  • Allison Batt

Paris:

  • Marta Eelen

Parma Heights:

  • Ryan Lutz

Petersburg:

  • Elizabeth Thompson

Poland:

  • Kaitlin Masucc
  • Anna Primavera
  • Abigail Sheronovich

Ravenna:

  • Emily Krych
  • Autumn Scheall
  • Gabrielle Shyne

Rogers:

  • Taylor Hicks

Rootstown:

  • Kassandra Taubler

Salem:

  • Reyna Albino
  • Lauren Alek
  • Jordan Archer
  • Paige Bailey
  • Lea Bock
  • Michael Boosz
  • Rachel Bowe
  • Jerald Brain
  • Robert Brownlee
  • Joshua Cannon
  • Halle Cochran
  • Jessica Cvelbar
  • Casey Dickey
  • Ava DiMuzio
  • Elena Economou
  • Ellysa Exline
  • Noah Ferrier
  • Mia Filaccio
  • Abigail George
  • Elizabeth Gillis
  • Emma Griffith
  • Barbara Gross
  • Carly Hall
  • Courtney Halter
  • Hannah Henderson
  • Emma Jarvis
  • Emily Johnson
  • Jessica Kisner
  • Eunice Knight
  • Tommy Kornbau
  • Brandy Krannich
  • Rachel Kuttler
  • Cassie Madison
  • Megan Malysa
  • Emily Manski
  • Amaya Martin
  • McKenzie Marti
  • Paula McFarland
  • Raegan Meal
  • Rylee Meal
  • Josephine Mellott
  • Ayla Mroczkowsk
  • Lincoln Murray
  • Makala Nye
  • Catherine Ossman
  • Whitney Parkinson
  • Ruchi Patel
  • Shaylyn Pittman
  • Hannah Raymond
  • Shyanne Rendziniak
  • Tori Rishel
  • Savanah Ross
  • John Rupert
  • Brooke Sauerwein
  • Lauren Sawdey
  • Hannah Schulthei
  • Elizabeth Seama
  • Elijah Shelhart
  • Seth Shivers
  • Austin Smith
  • Chelsea Toot
  • Melody Troyer
  • Kate Yeagley

Salineville:

  • Katelyn Bailey
  • Heidi Dunn
  • Samantha Michael
  • Abby Smalley
  • Marshall Somerville
  • Kristofor Stewart
  • Elizabeth Willis

Sebring:

  • Mariah Lanzer

Solon:

  • Askalemariam Hadgu

Southington:

  • Samantha Meyers
  • Hunter Romigh

Stow:

  • Ariana Buda
  • Zachary Fry
  • Jessica Worthing

Tallmadge:

  • Joshua Terry

Toronto:

  • Antoinette Basinger 

Wadsworth:

  • Militca Denee

Warren:

  • Rachel Beach
  • Tara Creque
  • Kelly Dillon
  • Lindsey Elliott
  • Ava Lavelle
  • MiKayla List

Washingtonville:

  • Marina Prior

Wellsville:

  • Harmony Black
  • Melissa Brinker
  • Krista Deitch
  • Mitchell McDowell
  • Danielle Rigsby
  • Jacob Stewart
  • Melinda Winters

Winona:

  • Catherine Cannon

Wintersville:

  • Wendy Vargo

Wooster:

  • Makayla Mast

Youngstown:

  • Devon Asher
  • Antonio Chito
  • Brittany Christmas
  • Rachel Derenzis
  • Rachael DiFrancesco
  • Nicole Enright
  • Whitney Fox
  • Aaron Holden
  • Dakota Knightley
  • Brandon Krall
  • Tyrone Lockett
  • Mackenzie Pringle
  • Julianne Sandora
  • Jeffrey Sebaugh
  • Carly Sicilian

Boyers, Pa.:

  • Alexandra Yurko-Mihelic

Crafton, Pa.:

  • Shawn Luben

Hookstown, Pa.:

  • Leona Hower

Evanston, Ill.:

  • Monica Patrick

Chester, W.Va.:

  • Mikayla Fisher
Dr. David Dees
Wednesday, July 08, 2020

Summer is flying by and I know many of you are wondering about our return to the Kent State Salem and East Liverpool campuses this fall. We are making plans to welcome you back to a fall semester that is going to be exciting for all of us. We miss you all and cannot wait to engage with all of our students again.

Our campuses will look different. There are several safety measures we have put in place and, as the semester gets closer, you will receive information about the things we are asking you to do – and the things we are doing – to make sure it is a safe educational environment.

All of our faculty members, based on their expertise in teaching within their fields, are choosing the best format and method to teach the course material. This may include chat rooms, email, open forum and discussion boards, audio and video conferencing applications, web conferencing or other synchronous and asynchronous collaboration tools.

Dr. David Dees

Some courses may be completely face-to-face. It truly depends on the course and how the faculty member designed the learning environment. You will learn more about each course as the semester approaches, but please know the faculty have designed all of our courses in ways that will be very engaging, yet safe for everyone involved.

The Kent State Reopening Committee for Classroom Technology is busy working to provide the technology needed to deliver courses in a functional and flexible manner.

Each traditional/lecture-oriented instructional space will be equipped with a high-definition camera and an omnidirectional microphone that will pick up sounds from all across the space. 

For those courses that are in person, faculty members will be able to broadcast their classes in real-time to students who are not physically present, as well as record their classes for later viewing by those unable to view it in real-time. 

More than 300 faculty members participated this summer in training on how to make an exciting remote environment for our students. These same faculty are sharing tips and ideas with each other and creating a culture of faculty members who are really dedicated to your learning and really dedicated to making sure, that no matter how we are teaching, you are going to have a great experience on our campuses.

If you are worried about technology – no need to worry! We made our campuses WiFi hot spots and we are able to provide you with internet access if needed, as well as some technology tools that you may need.

We are here to help you keep your professional goals moving forward through your education.

Also, we know that many of you may have experienced financial hardship during this COVID-19 pandemic. We are still dedicated and committed to making college affordable for you and your family.

We have partnered with some of our most generous donors, as well as some local foundations, for additional funding in scholarships for you. So, please, do not let money be the thing that holds you back.

Contact our counselors. Contact our financial aid advisors.

We will get you financial aid help so that you can meet your dream and your vision and follow the career path you want to take.

We are all available for you, NOW. All of us are here, working and doing our best to help our students.

For your return to campus, we are asking you to become familiar with the Flashes Safe Seven. This is a list of seven basic principles that we are going to follow and guidelines we are using to make sure our campuses are safe.

Please, pay attention to these and we ask that we do this together. Remember: Flashes take care of Flashes! 

We are so excited to get you back to campus!

We miss you all and, perhaps more than ever before, we are committed to helping you accomplish your personal and professional goals.

If you need anything or have questions, please do not hesitate to email us at infocolumbiana@kent.edu.

You can also visit our website at www.kent.edu/columbiana where you can find information about financial aid, advising, counseling and other services, as well as the Flashes Safe Seven. We now have a live chat box on our web page so that you can interact with someone on a personal level.

WE ARE HERE FOR YOU!

And we are going to make this a great semester at Kent State Salem and Kent State East Liverpool.

Remember to stay safe, take care of yourself and – Go Flashes!


David Dees, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State Columbiana County
Interim Vice President of System Integration at Kent State University 

On the Move
Monday, July 06, 2020

The Kent State East Liverpool Campus is taking an active role in a pilot study that will, in part, measure physical activity of local residents and could lead to more extensive research related to physical activity in the city. 

Heading up the research project are Dr. Lydia Rose, associate professor of sociology at Kent East Liverpool, and Dr. Kele Ding, associate professor of health education and promotion at Kent State University.

Rose and Ding received a grant from the Grace Lutheran Endowment Fund to conduct the study. Assisting them are senior students Rebekah Davis and Jamiae Sunderland who each are associated with the Kent State East Liverpool Social Science Research Lab.

The researchers are now recruiting adult volunteers from East Liverpool to participate in the study. Each participant must be 18 years old and complete a screening survey.

The volunteers will each receive a physical activity monitoring watch to wear as they walk, jog or cycle at least three times each week. The watch is connected to a social networking app that will map out locations people find enjoyable and safe for physical activities. The app will also give participants opportunities to share their experiences and to support each other to remain physically active. 

The online tools can be used with smart phones, tablets or computers.

Additionally, participants in the study will provide feedback to the researchers through online focus groups to be conducted through a Zoom video conference session. The researchers will use the date to test the feasibility of data collection as well as data analysis.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, participants will be asked to maintain social distances and to wear masks when around others. Rose and Ding adjusted the study to include measures to keep participants safe and to help prevent anyone from contracting or spreading the virus.

Those interested in participating in the study can email Rose at Lrose17@kent.edu, and use “Pilot Study” in the subject line. 

This pilot study will provide preliminary data for a much larger research project proposal to be submitted to the National Institute of Health (NIH). 

The Kent State researchers are partnering with Carol Cowan and the East Liverpool Health District for the NIH grant to develop an intervention to increase physical activity. The larger NIH grant involves using multiple levels of a socio-economic model: the personal level, the social level, the economic level and the structural level. 

For the personal level, individuals will use monitoring devices to track their own physical activities. The social level will involve participating in an online social network to provide motivation and inspiration to meet healthy levels of physical activity. 

The researchers will focus on cycling and community involvement to develop cycling activities and routes through downtown, which is conducive to cycling because it is one of the more level areas for new cyclists. 

On a structural level, the research team will work with city officials to make sure the environment is safe for cycling and community level activities and will seek funding for city bikes. 

All community level activities will meet the safety standards for both cycling and mitigating the spread of COVID-19. If the NIH study is funded, the researchers will reach out to local businesses to develop ways to participate in the study.

Rose is a tenured associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Kent State University. She earned a doctorate degree in sociology from Purdue University where she developed expertise in understanding and addressing social inequality. 

Ding is a tenured associate professor in the School of Health Sciences at Kent State University with expertise in behavior theory, measurement and evaluation, survey research and data analysis. In the last six years, he has been involved in developing and testing a community intervention trial for mental and psychological recovery among the homeless population by applying creative arts therapy, earth medicine and therapeutic community model in practice.

Rebekah Davis
Jamiae Sunderland

 

Davis is a senior at Kent State, studying psychology/sociology. She volunteers as an activities director and camp counselor for Camp E.A.R.T.H., was president of the Environmental Club at Kent East Liverpool and, since 2018, has served as a student research leader in the Social Science Research Lab. 


Sunderland is a senior student and recently joined the Social Science Research Lab. 

 


Lydia Rose PhD
 
Dr. Lydia Rose, PhD
Associate Professor of Sociology
Director, Social Science Research Lab
Interdisciplinary Research Leader, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Fellow
Kent State University East Liverpool

 


Kele Ding, PhD, MD
                    

Dr. Kele Ding, PhD, MD
Associate Professor, Health Education and Promotion
Kent State University
E-mail: kding@kent.edu


 

Friday, June 12, 2020


The Kent State East Liverpool Campus received a significant boost to its scholarship fund by the Friends of the East Liverpool Campus that will help local students begin or complete their degrees.

The Friends made a financial contribution to provide funding for up to 30 new scholarships totaling more than $40,000. 

The funds are earmarked for scholarships beginning with the upcoming fall semester for new and returning students. Each scholarship recipient must attend the East Liverpool campus for six or more hours per semester and be a graduate of the Beaver Local, East Liverpool, Edison Local, Lisbon, Oak Glen, Southern Local, Toronto or Wellsville school districts. 

“The COVID-19 crisis magnified the importance of scholarships since many students experienced severe disruptions in their lives over recent months,” noted John Mercer, chairman of the Friends of the East Liverpool Campus. “These scholarships are fully intended to help relieve the financial burdens of some Kent State East Liverpool students and help them continue to pursue their education. It is critical during these unprecedented times that Kent State East Liverpool ensures that each student who enrolls has an opportunity to graduate. We aim to help support that mission.”

The Friends of the East Liverpool Campus will continue to provide its traditional scholarships, as well.

Any current student, or someone considering enrolling at Kent State East Liverpool, is encouraged to contact the campus to learn about this scholarship, as well as other financial aid possibilities.

Dean and Chief Administrative Officer David Dees added that “the campus and community are doing everything possible to ensure tuition costs are not a barrier to individuals interested in earning college degrees.

For financial aid information, call 1-877-KENT-EDU or send an email message to infocolumbiana@kent.edu asking to speak to a financial aid advisor.

The Friends of the East Liverpool Campus has generously provided scholarship support and helped enhance the learning environment for Kent State East Liverpool students for more than 50 years. The group’s mission is to promote higher education access to residents of the Upper Ohio River Valley.

Individuals interested in supporting the Friends’ scholarship initiatives can make a tax-deductible contribution payable to The Friends of the East Liverpool Campus-KSU and mail it to 400 E. Fourth St., East Liverpool, Ohio, 43920. 

For information on additional ways to support Kent State East Liverpool’s current and future students, please call 300-382-7416.


Cutline: The Friends of the East Liverpool Campus is helping provide more scholarships for area students.

Thursday, June 04, 2020

Kent State University at Salem is offering scholarships that provide free tuition for a qualified student’s first year while seeking an associate of applied science degree in horticulture technology. The scholarships are made possible through the Eugene W. and Betty Haupt-The Davey Tree Expert Company endowment.

To qualify, a student must be a new freshman; with a 2.0 grade point average; a completed FAFSA form; and declare horticulture technology as his/her major.  

Eugene W. Haupt

The scholarships are funded through an endowment established by the late Eugene Haupt, an executive with The Davey Tree Expert Company, who retired in 1990 after a career of 52 years. He last served as president of the Davey Tree Surgery Company in Livermore, Calif., and served on the Davey Tree board of directors for many years. Haupt started at Davey in 1939 and held several positions in the field before working his way up to his most meaningful role at Davey in 1969 when he was named general manager of the Davey Tree Surgery Company. He was later named executive vice president and general manager and eventually promoted to president of the Surgery Company in 1985.

Haupt established trust funds designated to benefit Kent State Salem “students who have an interest in horticulture to further their education and interest in the field.” The endowment was named in memory of him and his first wife, the late Bertha “Betty” Davidson Haupt. 

“This is a great opportunity for area students interested in careers in the green industry, thanks to the incredible generosity of Mr. Haupt,” noted Dr. David Dees, dean and chief administrative officer of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses. “His gift and financial support will strengthen and help transform our horticulture program, which will ultimately benefit our students, area communities and the companies that hire our graduates. We are sincerely grateful for Mr. Haupt’s vision.”

Haupt was a native of Beaver County, Pa., and served in the U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division in World War II. He participated in the invasion of Normandy and the Battle of the Bulge, earning two bronze stars. Following his military service, Haupt continued a career with Davey that spanned five decades.

“Davey is proud to be affiliated with these scholarships, which will be awarded in Gene and Betty’s honor. Gene was a stalwart leader at Davey who helped shape a generation of managers and executives, but beyond that, he was a committed and influential figure within the arboriculture industry, an iconic personality and an American hero,” said Pat Covey, Davey chairman, president and CEO. “This gift ensures his legacy of supporting the green industry endures for many years.”

The AAS degree in horticulture technology includes three concentrations for students to consider, including landscape design, turfgrass management and urban forestry. This degree is a natural pathway to the Bachelor of Applied Horticulture degree and extends a student’s education to include the development of managerial expertise in the green industry.

For information about the Eugene W. and Betty Haupt-Davey Tree Expert Company scholarship or the horticulture program at Kent State Salem, please send an email to infocolumbiana@kent.edu


Cutline: Eugene W. Haupt


 

Wednesday, June 03, 2020

Kent State University at East Liverpool recognized the academic achievements of several students at the conclusion of the Spring 2020 semester.

The students recognized included:

Academic Awards

Business Management:

  • Andrew Jackson

Associate Degree Nursing Academic Award:

  • Regina Chu

Student Nurses Association Club Service Award:

  • Ray Mills

Occupational Therapy Assistant Academic Award:

  • Lauren Wilson

Student Occupational Therapy Assistant Club Service Award:

  • Brittany Hoops

Physical Therapist Assistant Academic Award:

  • Kelly May

Student Physical Therapist Assistant Club Service Award:

  • Alissa Opsitnik

Undergraduate Student Government:

  • Linda Adkins

Environmental Club Service Award:

  • Margaret Villarreal

President’s List for Spring and Fall 2019:

  • Alyssa Card
  • Isaac Reese
  • Hunter Ulbright
  • Katerina Wright
     
Tuesday, June 02, 2020

Kent State University at Salem recognized the academic achievements of several students for the 2019-2020 academic year.

The awards and recipients are:

Academic Awards

Human Services Award for Intern of Excellence:

  • Hannah Koran

Outstanding Early Childhood Education Student/Teacher Award:

  • Rebecca Muldowney

Outstanding Classroom Achievement in Early Childhood Education:

  • Connie Coss

Outstanding Student Teachers in Early Childhood Education:

  • Shelby Dennis
  • Zachary McKenzie

Outstanding Business Students:

  • Roger Leipply
  • Tyler Sowards

Outstanding English Tutor:

  • Katie Larabee

Outstanding English Major:

  • Tyler Stratton

Outstanding English Minor:

  • Nick Berger

Outstanding Creative Writing Minor:

  • Mariah Lanzer

Honors Thesis Awards:

  • Stephanie Giles
  • Heather Lude

Outstanding Public Speaking Awards:

  • Alexander Gonzalez
  • Axel Espinoza Quevedo

Outstanding Academic Honors in Criminology and Justice Studies:

  • Alexis Johnson

Excellence in Landscape and Turfgrass Management/Horticulture:

  • Tyler Hoaglin
  • Eric Swansiger

Excellence in Landscape Design/Horticulture:

  • Ivy Bulloch
  • Militca Denee

Excellence in Urban Forestry/Horticulture:

  • Sara Rex
  • Marshall Sommerville

Outstanding Student in Psychological Research:

  • Nick Berger

Outstanding Students in Psychology:

  • Melissa Nam
  • Darian Strouse

Radiologic Technology Academic Excellence Award:

  • Michael Laubacher

Radiologic Technology Clinical Excellence Award:

  • Brenna Rito

Academic Excellence in Nursing-Sophomore:

  • Kimberly Redmond

Clinical Excellence in Nursing-Sophomore:

  • Eunice Knight

Academic Excellence in Nursing-Junior:

  • Russell Ford

Clinical Excellence in Nursing-Junior:

  • Leah Ladd

Academic Excellence in Nursing-Senior:

  • Lea Bock

Clinical Excellence in Nursing-Senior:

  • Taylor Oliver

Spring and Fall 2019 President’s List:

  • Katelyn Bailey
  • Adam Bell
  • Nicholas Berger
  • Melissa Brinker
  • Arielle Claybrook
  • Connilyn Cross
  • Shelby Dennis
  • Casey Dickey
  • Bobbi Fairbourn
  • Zaviona Fountain
  • Kirsten Garve
  • Jillian Giovann
  • Michaela Huston
  • Mattisyn Infant
  • Abigail Jackson
  • Alexis Johnson
  • Hannah Koran
  • Tommy Kornbau
  • Mariah Lanze
  • Roger Leippl
  • Kimberly Redmond
  • Abby Smalle
  • Lydia Strawn
  • Timothy Trimmer
  • Melody Troyer
     
Friday, May 29, 2020

Message from the Dean

To Current and Prospective Students of Kent State University Columbiana County Campuses:

Dr. David Dees

As your Dean, I am writing to update each of you on our plans for the fall semester. First, you must understand that there are, literally, more than 100 people considering every problem and situation you can think of to make sure we have procedures in place so that we can welcome you back to campus in the safest way possible. One way we will do this is by following the Flash Safe 7.  If you are unfamiliar with those guidelines, be sure to check them out.

Second, over 250 faculty, university-wide, are spending the summer researching and learning ways to make their instruction, regardless of the environment, more interactive and engaging so that you can have the best educational experience possible. Their dedication to your learning is unprecedented and I am so proud of their efforts to help you achieve your personal and professional goals.

Third, the Kent State East Liverpool and Salem family is partnering with local groups and individuals to increase financial assistance to all students. We know that everyone is concerned and worried about finances right now; therefore, I have asked some of our most dedicated donors to reach into their pockets to provide even more opportunities for you to keep moving forward, in an affordable way, with your education. We are already one of the most affordable options for a four-year degree in our area, but now, during this time of crisis, we are finding ways to provide you even more financial support. For more information on financial support please visit https://www.kent.edu/columbiana/financial-aid.

We recognize that many of you or your families have suffered direct economic hardships during the pandemic. During difficult times such as these, furthering your education will provide you with the knowledge and skills for current and future jobs. With a Columbiana County unemployment rate of nearly 20 percent, now is the time to retool and/or get a start on your future career. This great economy of ours will recover. And, when it does, you need to make sure you have the educational tools to keep moving forward. Whether you are looking to retool or maybe questioning going away at this difficult time, we are a great local educational choice. To learn about our degree options, be sure to visit https://www.kent.edu/columbiana/majors-and-degrees.

Over the next several weeks, we will continue providing information on how our fall semester will look. I can tell you two things:  1) we will look different this fall than last year, but, 2) our dedication to your educational success is unwavering and this will not change, no matter what we are facing in our communities. Some classes will be face-to-face; others will use engaging interactive technologies to connect you with your professors and peers; and some classes will be online. Our goal is to have a mixture of courses that will allow you to safely continue moving towards your educational goals.

The East Liverpool and Salem Campuses of Kent State University are so proud to continue to serve our communities. For over 50 years, we have provided our citizens access to one of the top universities in the country. No matter what we face as a community and nation, we have always been here to provide the best education possible. This has not changed and will not waiver as we get through this pandemic. Please, reach out to your advisor or call the campus directly to discuss your options for the fall semester. You can also ask questions or seek information via email at infocolumbiana@kent.edu

Stay safe and take care of yourselves. I look forward to seeing many of you in the fall.
Sincerely,


David M. Dees, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer for Kent State Columbiana County
Interim Vice President of System Integration at Kent State University

Monday, May 18, 2020

Faculty lined up waiting to congratulate the graduates.

Students graduating this spring from the Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program at Kent State East Liverpool did not have the traditional pinning ceremony and end-of-year celebrations, but the faculty found a way to recognize them in a COVID-kind-of-way, nonetheless.

Dr. H welcomes graduates to their drive-through send-off.

Gathered in a campus parking lot, faculty members lined up their personal vehicles and offered graduates a drive-through send-off, maintaining social distancing standards. The students entered the lot and were directed to follow a path that allowed them to turn in badges and receive their nursing pins, honor cords, certificates and cards signed by faculty members. 

A happy grad waves from her car
Because the pinning ceremony and banquet was canceled, money raised by the Student Nurses Association club helped provide a gift card for each graduate, as well.

The grads also received Buszta information, which will help each of them prepare for the NCLEX review and testing.

A message for the graduates

Dr. Carol Hrusovsky, ADN program director, noted that all faculty members took part in this event. “We honked horns, had signs and really made the students feel special,” she said. “They were all surprised and touched by what we did.”

Hrusovsky also pointed out that nine of the 2020 graduates from the East Liverpool ADN program were inducted into the Alpha Delta Nu Nursing Honor Society-Gamma Sigma Chapter. She said that this is a first for the program.

Inducted were:

  • Jaymie Andrews
  • Victoria Angel
  • Britni Boston
  • Denise Brainard
  • Morgan Burcham
  • Regina Chu
  • Kayla Malone
  • Ray Mills
  • Danae Stanley 

The Organization for the Associate Degree of Nursing (OADN)’s honor society recognizes the academic excellence of nursing students. Eligibility is based on academic success and demonstrated conduct that reflects integrity and professionalism.


Cutline A: Faculty lined up waiting to congratulate the graduates.

Cutline B: Dr. H welcomes graduates to their drive-through send-off.

Cutline C: A happy grad waves from her car.

Cutline D: A message for the graduates.


 

Monday, May 18, 2020

When storms approach, most people heed the warnings by seeking the safety of shelter and waiting for the winds and rain to pass. There are many, however, whose jobs require them to respond and run into the storm’s path to help others.

That’s exactly what happened as the COVID-19 pandemic stormed into our lives and caused havoc in almost every aspect of life as we knew it. Many sheltered in place and many others were called to respond to the storm raging around us.

Nurses Brittany Bryte and Tony Koch, both graduates of the Kent State Salem nursing program, worked on COVID floors in a New York City hospital during the pandemic.

Two of those who responded, and found themselves in the eye of the storm, were Tony Koch and Brittany Bryte, both graduates of the Kent State Salem nursing program. 

Koch, a 2017 graduate of Kent State Salem (and a 2010 graduate of Austintown Fitch High School), explained that he works as a traveling nurse, working over the last two years at facilities in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington, D.C. On Feb. 17, he began an assignment at a facility outside of Washington, D.C., before COVID-19 was a household term.

“The facility where I worked then was very wary of COVID before it hit the news,” Koch related. “We had a conference briefing every morning (but) things slowly changed. I got texts from my family outlining how proactive Ohio was about COVID-19, from shutting down non-essential businesses to shutting down schools. Where I was, we were a bit behind their moves.”

Bryte, a 2018 graduate of Kent State Salem (and a 2013 West Branch graduate), is friends with Koch and was ready to begin her first assignment as a traveling nurse at the same facility on March 17. 

“She was all packed up, ready to drive to D.C. and then the governor of Virginia (where the facility was located) announced that non-essential surgeries were to be postponed,” Koch said. “So, we were both out of a job. I was offered to stay on board to work in the ER, but we chose to take a ‘crisis assignment’ in New York. We were each offered a six-week contract at the Stony Brook University facility outside of New York City with an ‘ASAP start’ and we jumped on it.”

Bryte explained that she was excited to begin her first assignment as a traveling nurse at the Washington D.C. area hospital and was quite disappointed when that contract was canceled. Prior to this, she worked on a progressive care unit, working three 12-hour shifts.

“I have just over a year’s experience and was ready to dive into traveling because that was my goal since graduation,” Bryte said. “When Tony asked me if I wanted to go to New York for a six-week assignment, I didn’t hesitate to say ‘yes.’ The hardest part was telling my family that I was leaving and that my destination was New York. Next thing I knew, we were signing our contracts and getting on a plane.”

Headed to the front lines

The day after signing their contracts, Koch and Bryte attended orientation at Stony Brook University Hospital-Southampton on Long Island, and the next day, they were on the floor as working nurses.

Tony Koch preparing to enter a COVID patient room at Stony Brook University Hospital in New York City.

Koch said that they arrived in New York City, needing to “hit the ground running” with up to 30 other traveling nurses from states such as Ohio, Texas, Florida, Oklahoma and Arizona.

Their assignments found them floating between three floors. Two of the floors were COVID-only floors, with patients under investigation to rule out COVID. The other “floor” was a converted hallway for offices in the respiratory and wound care departments but was transformed, under mandates by the state of emergency in New York, so that the hospital could increase its bed count.

“I’ve never been so familiar with the morgue before this,” Koch said. “I remember on the first day I worked, I was required, three to four times throughout the night, to move bodies around the already-filled morgue like a cramped puzzle.”

For the first few weeks of his assignment, Koch worked only on the COVID units. He then requested his final weeks to be on a unit of “clean” patients so he could quarantine himself quickly when he returned home, anticipating the birth of his niece, and wanting to be there when she arrived. (He made it!)

While in New York, Koch and Bryte worked four days a week for up to 52 hours per week.

“I’m usually a day-shift worker and working nights is no walk in the park,” Bryte said. “My sleep schedule was completely out of whack and I tried to get as much sleep as I could between shifts. The struggle was keeping myself healthy while being so sleep-deprived.”

Koch said that working on the COVID units was unlike any other nursing assignment he has had in his career. “It was certainly different,” he said. “Many full-time regular staff were out due to getting COVID and some were hospitalized. It seemed as if every native there knows someone close to them who has passed because of COVID. The patients have been predominantly male. I remember having a young, 50-something-year-old police officer who contracted COVID and he was upset it spread to his wife and children, as well.”

When working on COVID floors, Koch noted that exposure to patients must be limited. He said that most of the rooms are equipped with baby monitors so the staff can observe the patients without entering the rooms as frequently as normal. 

Once in a patient room, Koch said that it was quite important to accomplish all of his tasks at once to avoid exposing himself longer than necessary and to conserve personal protective equipment, which was in limited supply for a while.

“Gowning up included an N95 mask that I used all shift – it had to be signed out and cleaned between shifts – a hair cap, face shield, full gown, double gloves and shoe covers. The backs of my ears hurt from the mask use.”

Actions louder than words

Tony Koch, a 2017 graduate of the Kent State Salem BSN program.

Koch said that he preferred walking to work each day, wearing his scrubs, a mask and a jacket. His attire, apparently, sent a message. “People crossed the street to avoid me daily and I’d be lying if I said it didn’t affect me emotionally,” he shared. “I don’t remember a person walking by me normally, not acting like I had the plague.”

Still, there were others who recognized the hard work of the healthcare workers and helped encourage them to keep going.

“On Fridays, people parked their cars on the street in front of the hospital, held signs with their kids hanging out the sunroofs, honked their horns, thanking us as we began and ended our shifts. Every Friday,” Koch said. “Just because I didn’t ask for a ‘thank you’ doesn’t mean it doesn’t mean the world to me when I get it. Vehicles with sirens drove by at 7 p.m. every Friday, with the sirens on, in support of us. Everyone in the hospital loves to hear it.”

Lessons learned

Koch noted that his education at Kent State Salem helped prepare him for this experience in surprising ways. While the classroom, lab and clinical instruction was vital to developing the skills and knowledge to be a great nurse, it was a transcultural nursing class that made an important impact on his approach to patient care.

“I had the opportunity to go on a trip to a Native American reservation in South Dakota (Pine Ridge Reservation) and I was exposed to feeling like a foreigner in an acute setting before I ever had a nursing license,” he shared. “Patients will expose you right away if they know you are not from where they are from, and that is something you have to overcome as a caregiver. I learned to hit the ground running and care of a wide variety of people.”

Bryte agrees. “If not for the professors in the Kent State Salem program and my superiors at my first job, I would not be the nurse I am today,” she said. “I dove right in without a second thought and it’s because of those people that I was able to do so.”

Koch offered words of wisdom for future nursing (and non-nursing) students at the Kent State Salem Campus:

“Make friends. And, like my dad always tells me, the name of the game is ‘get along.’ Your instructors will stress the need to know your skills and subject matter. My advice is to make friends.

“Years later, the memories of learning my skills and subject matter are nothing but an artisan’s clustered bookshelf in my mind,” he continued. “The friends I made and the times we had along the way is what mattered to me. … The work will get done if you focus and have fun landmarks along the way. Don’t let nursing school bog you down. It isn’t something to get through; it is a process to enjoy.

“These memories might not be as useful as a nursing manual, but I like to look back at them with the same enthusiasm I did as a toddler with my first pop-up book.”

Koch’s experience as a nurse in the eye of the COVID storm also affected the way he cares for patients. 

“More than ever, I take the soak-it-all-in approach,” he said. “I like to know patients’ stories and learn where they come from, how they feel. Being required to always wear a mask means you must learn to show more emotions through your eyes and through your words with people and patients. A smile is no longer the universal sign of comfort when you have to hide it behind a mask.”

Inspired to accept challenges

Brittany Bryte and Tony Koch finding time for well-earned respite on a Long Island beach

Koch related that, while preparing to graduate from nursing school, Hurricane Harvey had just hit the Houston area and he watched as nurses responded by traveling there to help in that crisis. That sparked a desire to become a traveling nurse, but he knew he needed at least a year’s experience as a working nurse to make that dream come true.

“And here I am with today’s scenario,” he said. “I hope I can look back and see that I tried to make a difference for the right reasons. We like to play scenarios in our minds – like the generic would-I-jump-into-a burning-building-to-save-someone-type scenario – and I like to think this is me proving to myself that I have it in me to do it.

“In the middle of March and early April, we had no idea the extent of the damage this pandemic would cause. Was I afraid I would get COVID? Not really. But I did know it was a possibility and being scared wasn’t useful.”

His final words of caution for those anxious to get back to “normal?”

“If you shouldn’t take financial advice from your broke uncle, why would you take health advice during a pandemic from anyone other than an expert in the field? The new normal doesn’t have to be worse just because it isn’t what you’re used to. Adjust. Adapt. Care more.”


Cutline A: Nurses Brittany Bryte and Tony Koch, both graduates of the Kent State Salem nursing program, worked on COVID floors in a New York City hospital during the pandemic.

Cutline B: Tony Koch preparing to enter a COVID patient room at Stony Brook University Hospital in New York City.

Cutline C: Tony Koch, a 2017 graduate of the Kent State Salem BSN program.

Cutline D: Brittany Bryte and Tony Koch finding time for well-earned respite on a Long Island beach.


    
 

Thursday, May 07, 2020

When Christopher Thompson prepared for a horticulture internship in Ghana, he knew it would be an experience of a lifetime. What he never expected, however, was how that experience would be turned upside-down by a world-wide pandemic.

Thompson is a recent graduate of the horticulture program on the Kent State Salem Campus, earning a Bachelor of Applied Horticulture degree this spring. He also holds an Associate of Applied Science degree in horticulture, with an urban forestry concentration, from the Salem Campus.

Christopher Thompson holding a cocoa seedling
While completing his degree requirements, Thompson understood that he needed to complete an internship and it was a discussion with his aunt that led him to Ghana.

“My aunt is one of the founders of Celmar Travel and Tours, based in the U.S. and Ghana,” he explained. “When I talked to her about my internship ideas, she and the rest of the Celmar Ghana team designed a custom internship for me, based on my interests and course requirements. I asked at the right time since their internship placement program had just launched.”

Thompson completed his internship at three locations in Ghana, including Gold Coast Fruits Ltd. In Amasaman; various cocoa and palm farms in Assin Fosu; and Sugar Land Ltd. In Dorfor.

His internship was originally scheduled from early February through early April but ended in late March because of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“The COVID-19 pandemic ended my internship in a very surprising way,” he noted. “By the time I got back to Accra from my internship at Sugar Land, Ghana had closed its borders to all travel coming into and out of the country. I boarded the second to last repatriation flight back to the U.S. after signing a $2,000 loan with the U.S. government as a requirement to board the flight.

As an intern, Christopher Thompson spent time on a cocoa farm. Here, he is holding cocoa pods

“Before I left Ghana, there were people who had contracted the illness, so, as a precaution, restaurants were closed; markets were cleaned with disinfectants; people were wearing face masks; and, before entering a shop, you were required to wash your hands at a hand-washing station set up at the door. Ghana was very proactive.”

Naturally disappointed that the internship was cut short, Thompson still appreciates the experience and being able to study horticulture and culture in another country.

“I greatly enjoyed my time in Ghana. The people were friendly and accommodating; the food is delicious; and the weather is superb,” he said. “I was able to learn so much about the different food crops and plants in the area, as well as make many new friends.

“The vegetation in Ghana is prolific. Even in crowded cities, trees and bushes abound in the smallest corners of space and still produce large fruits,” Thompson shared. “Seeing houseplants that we can only enjoy indoors in Ohio growing as focal points in front yards is very interesting. Walking through forests of cocoa trees and seeing the cocoa pods growing on the trunks and branches of the trees is a strange and exciting experience. Seeing bamboo forests tower over the rest of the landscape truly is a sight to behold.”

Christopher Thompson holding a pineapple plant during his internship in Ghana

Thompson said that he spent a great deal of time taking notes and trying to understand how the workers’ roles and responsibilities benefit the crops and the companies for which they work. He said he tried to learn as much as he could while being an active and participating member of the work crews at the various companies he visited.

“I believe that this internship helped me become a more well-rounded person and expanded my knowledge about the different types of jobs and roles that people can play in the horticultural and agricultural industry”

While Thompson traveled back and forth to a farm near the capital city of Accra, he stayed with family friends at their guest house and, when he left the big city to work at the more remote farms, he stayed in hotels closer to those locations.

The cultural differences were many, but Thompson noted two that were quite unexpected. 

“One of the biggest differences that I faced was the constant music and noise that is heard throughout the various cities and town,” he related. “It is not uncommon to wake up to the sound of an outside loudspeaker playing music or the local news as early as 5 a.m. It took some getting used to, but I eventually adjusted.

“Another cultural difference was time management,” Thompson continued.” People are often not on time for scheduled events, so it can be frustrating when you’re waiting on someone to show up and they’re late.”

Another surprise for Thompson were the “tro-tros,” or communal cabs that can seat up to 15 people, depending on the size of the car. 

While in Ghana, Christopher Thompson made sure to let others know he was a Kent State student

“The mate (announcer) yells out the stops from the side of the car while it is in motion. It is up to you to discern where the tro-tro is going and then signal for him to stop so you can get on,” he explained. “It was a confusing process at first, since the mate will abbreviate the different destinations, but, after the first few experiences, it got easier. I liked them because, if you missed one that was going to your destination, another would be passing by shortly.”

Thompson obviously intends to pursue a career in the forestry, horticulture of agricultural industry, while also continuing to learn, hone his skills and earn relevant professional licenses and certifications.

“I want to put my education and experiences to work in a field I’m passionate about,” he said. “I look forward to working in an environment with like-minded people and expanding my knowledge and competencies as we work toward common goals. … My goal is to become a valuable asset to the company or organization I am employed with, as well as my community.”

While the COVID-19 pandemic cut short Thompson’s first visit to Ghana, he said he has plans to return.

“I do plan on going back to Ghana. The environment and the feeling of the country is so different and unique compared to what I am used to,” he said. “I loved my time spent with people I met, and I could see myself staying for an extended period.”


Cutline A: Christopher Thompson holding a cocoa seedling.

Cutline B: As an intern, Christopher Thompson spent time on a cocoa farm. Here, he is holding cocoa pods.

Cutline C: Christopher Thompson holding a pineapple plant during his internship in Ghana.

Cutline D: While in Ghana, Christopher Thompson made sure to let others know he was a Kent State student.

Monday, May 04, 2020

Remembering May 4, 1970, on the Kent State East Liverpool Campus.

To help the university mark the 50th anniversary of the events of May 4, 1970, the Salem and East Liverpool campuses each had scheduled a series of events throughout the spring semester that, unfortunately, were canceled because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The events included guest speakers, memorial dedications, displays and panel discussions for the campuses and their respective communities.

Remembering May 4, 1970, on the Kent State Salem Campus.

Despite not being able to hold these events, the Salem and East Liverpool campuses join Kent State University in remembering the lives that were lost and the lives that were forever changed on May 4, 1970.

Lit candles and gold roses were placed on the Salem and East Liverpool campuses in remembrance of the four students who died that day: Alison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder.

Please visit the Kent State website for details about how this day is being remembered https://www.kent.edu/may4kentstate50


Cutline A: Remembering May 4, 1970, on the Kent State East Liverpool Campus.

Cutline B: Remembering May 4, 1970, on the Kent State Salem Campus.
 

Thursday, April 30, 2020

(from left) Dr. Cheryl Brady and Lorene Martin delivering pepperoni rolls to health care facilities.

Nurses are known for their compassion, concern and desire to care for others. The nursing faculty at the Kent State Salem Campus recently demonstrated that compassion and care by delivering food to frontline workers at local healthcare facilities.

Dr. Mary Lou Ferranto, professor and coordinator of the BSN nursing program at Kent State Salem, noted that the staff organized an “adopt a hospital” effort and then picked up and delivered a total of 890 pepperoni rolls to various facilities that support the Salem Campus nursing program. 

Faculty members delivered 500 pepperoni rolls to Salem Regional Medical Center; 50 to Caprice Health Care Center; 110 to Akron Children’s Hospital in Boardman; 120 to Mercy Hospital’s OB unit; and 110 to various units at Mercy Health Care.

(from left) Salem nursing faculty member Diane Hill with Jamie Demain, director of the volunteer office of the Mahoning Valley Akron Children’s Hospital in Boardman, delivering pepperoni rolls to hospital employees.

Danielle Baker-Rose, a disability specialist with the Student Accessibility Services office for Kent State Columbiana County, baked and donated 250 frosted sugar cookies to SRMC, while nursing instructor Sarah Pierce-Brown donated meals to the ICUs at Mercy Hospital in Youngstown.

The extension of caring also came from students through fundraising by the Students for Professional Nursing club, which helped offset the cost of the donations. Other funds were raised through a GoFundMe account that generated monetary donations from Salem Campus employees.

Ferranto expressed great appreciation to Bellaria Pizza in Boardman for being part of this project and offering the pepperoni rolls at an affordable price.


Cutline A: Nursing faculty member Lorene Martin (left) delivered pepperoni rolls to employees at the Salem Regional Medical Center and Danielle Baker-Rose delivered her homemade frosted sugar cookies. 

Cutline B: (from left) Dr. Cheryl Brady and Lorene Martin delivering pepperoni rolls to health care facilities.

Cutline C: (from left) Salem nursing faculty member Diane Hill with Jamie Demain, director of the volunteer office of the Mahoning Valley Akron Children’s Hospital in Boardman, delivering pepperoni rolls to hospital employees.

Thursday, April 23, 2020

Greetings from my remote office within the Dees home.

Like most of you, I’m now working remotely and learning to stay put. That’s a big change for me, because I’m used to being on the move! In my roles as dean of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses, as well as Interim Vice President, I spend a lot of time in my car traveling across northeast Ohio.

Dr. David Dees

But, now, I’m home with my family and trying to make it all work from here.

I know that none of us ever imagined a time such as this.

When the COVID-19 situation began to unfold around us, Kent State was quick to respond. Like all Kent Campuses, we closed our doors on the afternoon of March 16 and pushed full steam ahead to keep our ships afloat. I am so incredibly proud of how the staff and faculty responded, wasting no time to put our classes and services online so that the students wouldn’t be left behind.

Everybody stepped up with a “we-have-to-do-this” attitude and all were willing to try new things and adapt. Our faculty and IT/technology staff worked closely in those early days to try new technology and adapt teaching styles. And, even now, they continue to try new things and to help each other in remarkable ways.

Teaching continues. Learning continues. Advising, tutoring, counseling, admissions and support continues – just in a different way.

I am not surprised, however, by how our local campuses responded to this situation. We have incredible people who want to see our students succeed. This is what makes me so proud of what we do in Columbiana County.

From the beginning of this crisis, everyone was focused on doing what is best for our students. We are doing everything we can to encourage our students to keep trying and to not quit.

We understand that this is just one aspect of our students’ lives that is changing. On top of worrying about keeping up with their studies, they now worry about their jobs, their partners’ or parents’ jobs, buying groceries, teaching their kids who are at home, staying healthy. We understand. Our students are surrounded by faculty and staff who will do whatever they can to help them get through this.

While deeply caring about our own, our campuses extended its support to our local communities, as well.

From day one, our allied health departments recognized the shortage of PPE for local healthcare workers and began pulling our stock of masks, gloves and gowns to donate to the Salem and East Liverpool hospitals. We also loaned hospital beds, a ventilator, bedside tables, sterilizing equipment and monitors to the facilities.

Several students received substantial packages from the Flash Food Pantry on the East Liverpool Campus at the onset of this stay-at-home situation. Since then, the shelves of the pantry were emptied and all food items (which filled a pickup and an SUV) donated to an agency in East Liverpool that helps area residents in need.

I can give no timetable for when things will begin returning to “normal” on our campuses. We will wait for guidance from Gov. DeWine, the Board of Trustees, President Todd Diacon and the scientists and then react accordingly.

This point in the academic year is typically a time of celebration on our campuses, a time when we recognize students with awards and scholarships, hold pinning ceremonies and host other yearend events, namely, commencement.

As the dean, my favorite day of the year is when I shake the hand of each graduate who walks across the stage to receive that hard-earned diploma. I beam with pride and love to hear the cheers from family members seated in the audience, knowing that, for many, this is a first for their family.

I regret that, as of now, I cannot plan to shake those hands or hear those cheers. But, our staffs are doing their best to put together Plan B to recognize our graduates in some way, some day. We really want to celebrate this milestone.

To that end, I recently traveled to the Kent Campus to personally record my message to the graduates that will be available to all on May 9. Those students who met all of the graduation requirements will graduate and receive their diplomas and all of you can virtually celebrate with President Diacon, Interim Provost Tankersley and myself during this recorded event.

While this is far from what any of us expected for the Class of 2020, I know from watching our people – watching them be creative, watching them be focused on helping our students succeed, watching them put differences aside and watching them put forth the extra effort – that we will figure this out.

Thank you for your continued interest in our campus and for your support of our “Students First” mission. Never have we been so challenged to fulfill that mission, but never have we demonstrated our commitment so strongly.


Sincerely,
David Dees, Ph.D.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Kent State Emergency Grant Fund

Applications are now being accepted for emergency aid through the Kent State Emergency Grant Fund.

DEAR KENT STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS,

We know that many of you are hurting as a result of the pressures and stress brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Many of you have lost jobs and income, and some are dealing with family members who are sick with COVID-19.

Kent State is committed to helping students who are struggling financially due to the pandemic. Applications are now being accepted for emergency aid through the Kent State Emergency Grant Fund.

The Emergency Grant Fund is in addition to the Pay It Flash Forward Emergency Fund, but you only need to fill out one application for both funds. If you have previously applied for the Pay It Flash Forward Emergency Fund, your application will automatically be considered for all emergency grant funding.

Emergency grant money will be distributed with the intent of helping as many students as possible with financial challenges. The financial awards will be based on a student’s individual need and circumstance.

TO BE CONSIDERED FOR EMERGENCY GRANT FUNDING:

You must apply using the existing emergency grant application found on FlashLine.
You must be enrolled for Spring Semester 2020.
You must be pursuing a degree.
Once an application has been reviewed, you will be contacted by email with additional information.

Guided by our principle of Students First, Kent State has developed a holistic review process for Kent State Emergency Grant Fund applications that will focus on all aspects of a student’s well-being. If you or your family has experienced a loss of job or reduction of pay that could impact your 2020-2021 Financial Aid Offer, click here for more information or contact the One Stop for Student Services at 330-672-6000.

In addition to financial support, you may have a need for food, mental health counseling or other urgent assistance. More information on these resources can be found on the Office of the Dean of Students' COVID-19 Emergency Resources page.

We live by our motto, Flashes Take Care of Flashes, and we will do all in our power to ensure that you are given full advantage of all the support Kent State has to offer.

Sincerely,

Lamar R. Hylton, Ph.D.
Interim Vice President for Student Affairs

Mary Parker, Ed.D.
Vice President for Enrollment Management

Monday, April 20, 2020

Dr. Darryl Hancock at the 2020 Earth Day Environmental Justice Conference

Kent State East Liverpool’s Environmental Justice Conference was held April 18, but in a remote format that was unlike any previous conference held over the last 15 years.

Through the wonders of technology, this year’s conference was held in a webinar format, allowing presenters and guests to attend from their own personal off-campus locations.

This year’s theme was “The Birds and The Bees,” focusing on the importance of these species to the balance of our environments and the world’s ecosystems.

After months of planning, the conference almost came to a halt once the COVID-19 pandemic hit. The committee members quickly switched gears and refused to cancel the annual event. Instead, they spent hours and hours researching available technology; finding online TED talks to replace scheduled speakers; and encouraging students to participate.

In the end, the remote conference was a huge success and well-attended.

TED talks were used as guest speakers for the conference

Attendees participating in a remote format

The conference included student presentations; three TED talks about birds and bees; a yoga session that had participants humming like bees (which was great for attendees who were sitting for hours); an open discussion among participants; and the announcement of award winners.

Even though the conference was held in a webinar format, there were 50 attendees; 28 student presentations; 32 poster submissions; 25 paper submissions; and several faculty and staff volunteers.

Student award winners included:

Posters:

Nicole Fazio, first place for “Bees, Our Food System and Human Manipulation;” and Carlye Neaffer, second place for “Climate Change and the Future: ‘The Talk’ No One Wants to Have.”

There were four honorable mention winners in the poster competition: Derek Firth for “Killer Bees…When Eco-Activism Turns to Eco-Terrorism;” Ashley Krieger for “Poultry: An Environmental Punishment?;” Phillip Martin for “Clipped Wing, Odd Duck, Lucky Fin: A Sociological Analysis of Ableism and the Disability Community Using Animal Metaphors;” and Brooke Thorne for “To Bee of Not to Bee…Afraid.”

English/Cultural Studies Papers:

Victoria Watson, first place for “Blue Jays and Human Ways;” Autumn Leeper, second place for “Bird Feeders and the Culture Around Them: A Common but Lesser-Known Community;” Sydney Pearce, honorable mention for “The Waggle Dance: Communication, Language and the Difference Between the Two.”

Physical Science/Sociology Papers:

Aaliyah Ruppel, first place for “Sociology of Bird Graffiti;” and Carlye Neaffer for “Climate Change and the Future: ‘The Talk’ No One Wants to Have.”


Cutline A: Dr. Darryl Hancock, conference committee chair, served as moderator for the Environmental Justice Conference

Cutline B: Attendees participating in a remote format.

Cutline C: TED talks were used as guest speakers for the conference.

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Thursday, April 16, 2020

 

When the COVID-19 pandemic forced its way into our lives, everything changed. At Kent State, faculty members began delivering lessons remotely and students began learning in online classrooms. All student services became remote/online.

Learning to deliver higher education with this format was challenging enough for most. For Sarah Pierce-Brown, that was only one part of her life that was about to turn upside down.

RN Sarah Pierce-Brown, a member of the nursing faculty at Kent State Salem, at work at St. Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown.

Pierce-Brown is a member of the nursing faculty on the Salem Campus, but she also works as a nurse in the surgical/trauma intensive care unit at St. Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown. She also floats when there is a need in other intensive care units, such as the medical intensive care unit, the cardiothoracic unit and the recovery room.

Now, more than ever, she feels that her skills and knowledge are helping her navigate the twists and turns of patient care during this critical time and, at the same time, she is embracing the challenges so that she can help prepare her students for similar situations.

“COVID-19 has really impacted both of my jobs, as a nursing educator and bedside nurse,” Pierce-Brown noted. “…Every week I meet with my current students and I tell them they are doing the right thing by staying home and practicing social distancing. It’s helping us on the frontlines by reducing the number of transmissions. I hope my students will see the difference nurses are making in our community and in the world. I also hope that my students will be able to see that nurses cannot do this alone. Every health care discipline has a crucial part. We are all working together as a team, helping to save lives.”

A Lisbon resident, Pierce-Brown graduated with a Bachelor’s in Science Nursing from Kent State Salem in 2012 and earned a master’s in nursing education from Kent State in 2017. She began teaching as an adjunct on the Salem Campus in 2014 and became a fulltime faculty member in 2017.

She teaches nursing of the critically ill and is the clinical instructor for the course, while also teaching clinicals for the sophomore and junior level courses. “An exciting aspect of my position at the Salem Campus is that I also serve as the lab coordinator for our skills and simulation labs. In addition, I function as the clinical liaison between Kent Salem and Mercy Hospital.”

On top of that, she also teaches staff, students and other faculty Stop the Bleed, part of a national campaign to educate community members to learn life-saving techniques in cases of massive bleeding.

“As an educator, I typically meet with students for skills testing, help with content and I love taking students to the Medical Intensive Care unit for clinical. Unfortunately, I am not able to do meet with my students physically, so I meet my students virtually. Also, since we are not able to attend clinical, I have to get creative and find experiences through virtual learning that meet my course objectives,” she explained. “I’ve been able to share my own experiences in caring for patients in the ICU. These stories really help the students make connections to disease processes and treatments and gives them insight to a nurse’s role in the ICU setting.”

Image
Sarah Pierce-Brown with BSN students from the Salem Campus during a clinical rotation at St. Elizabeth Hospital.

Pierce-Brown has worked at St. Elizabeth for seven years. As a PRN (part-time) nurse now, she can “float” to other departments and ICU’s, giving her a broad perspective of the seriousness of this current situation.

“From a bedside nurse’s perspective, this has really opened my eyes to the things I took for granted in my job. I am fortunate that when I go to work, I have personal protective equipment, but I know there is a large shortage within our nation,” she said. “As nurses working together, we must have more understanding and patience with each other. I love working where I do, and I continue to work there because we have always worked as a cohesive team to care for our patients. The pandemic has really made our network of nurses bond and support each other more than ever. We have also developed a deeper appreciation for each person in our facility and every department within our hospital system. … I feel very fortunate to work as a critical care nurse for the last seven years.”

Pierce-Brown credits her education at Kent State Salem for helping her become the nurse she is today, noting that the high standards for success on campus definitely helped her rise above the challenges of the profession.

“My experiences in nursing school taught me to work hard and helped me decide what kind of nurse I wanted to be. As a faculty member, I have found a sense of community within my campus and the students that attend our campus.

“I am proud that I can serve my community in two different capacities. As an educator, I am a part of a team that helps prepare our students to become successful and go on to serve the community members where they practice,” she continued. “As a nurse working the bedside, I can provide expertise knowledge and support/comfort for my patients and families through their illness and recovery. I am grateful to Kent State University for the experiences and opportunities that have led me to a career and profession that I love being a part of.”

Pierce-Brown appreciates being strongly connected to the communities around her, on and off campus. The network of providers makes a big difference and lessons are learned every day.

“Public health and education are so important and not enough value is placed on it,” she said. “It’s important, as a community, for us to prepare for disasters and outbreaks. I am proud of my community and feel that we are doing our best to flatten the curve and reduce the spread of COVID-19. Even with the pandemic going on, there are patients who still need medical attention for emergencies. I can’t imagine how it feels to be a patient in the hospital at this time. It is so important for us to show compassion and make that connection with our patients.”

COVID-19 not only impacts Pierce-Brown’s professional life, but is taking an emotional toll on her, personally, as well.

“This really has impacted my life,” she shared. “My husband has survived cancer and his mother is currently going through cancer treatment for the second time in her life. Being quarantined is something that he would have never thought he would have to do again in his life. As a provider at the bedside, there is the fear that I would become sick or, even worse, get my husband sick. I know that I could be a potential carrier for COVID-19 so I am following the CDC guidelines and not visiting with family and friends, especially for those who are immunocompromised.

“Even though I am sure everyone is getting a little 'stir crazy,’ I encourage everyone to continue practicing the CDC guidelines for social distancing and stay home. I am proud of all our graduates making a difference during this difficult time. Our students continue to show resilience and dedication. We are all in this together.”


Cutline A: RN Sarah Pierce-Brown, a member of the nursing faculty at Kent State Salem, at work at St. Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown.

Cutline B: Sarah Pierce-Brown (center) with BSN students from the Salem Campus during a clinical rotation at St. Elizabeth Hospital. The students include (from left) Sam Telshaw, Nicole Stevens, Haley McIlvain, Pavin Heath and Mohamed Abouamra.

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

When the Kent State campuses were closed in mid-March because of the COVID-19 quarantine, everything about teaching and learning had to change. On the Salem and East Liverpool campuses, the immediate concern was the students: how could we continue to deliver the academic content to them that they need to succeed?

Below are the thoughts of two well-respected faculty members from our Salem and East Liverpool campuses.

Dr. Rachael Blasiman

Dr. Dan Dankovich


Dr. Rachael Blasiman is an associate professor of psychological sciences on the Salem Campus. Last fall, she received the Distinguished Teaching Award, the university’s most distinguished teaching award. She began teaching on the Salem Campus in 2010.

Dr. Dan Dankovich is a biology lecturer on the East Liverpool Campus, where he teaches human biology and anatomy/physiology. Last fall, he received the Outstanding Teaching Award, the highest honor for nontenure track faculty at the university. He has taught at Kent State since 2010 and has been a fulltime faculty member on the East Liverpool Campus since 2018.

 

Remote Teaching/Learning

Dr. Blasiman: “Teaching remotely is certainly a balancing act right now! As instructors, we want to provide our students with important information from the course, but also be flexible in responding to students' individual situations. We want to make sure they are getting a quality education and also consider that many of our students are struggling right now.”

Dr. Dankovich: “I am impressed by the way faculty and staff have taken on the challenge to take traditional face-to-face classes and make them work in this new setting. The dedication and commitment that I have witnessed from all faculty and the entire IT department that I have personally interacted with is an amazing example of ‘team.’ Everyone is trying their best and putting the needs of the students first. It is awesome to witness this from the inside.”

Students’ Response

Dr. Blasiman: “I see a wide variety of responses to moving classes online. Some of my students see it positively because it cuts down on driving time. They also like that they can view a recorded lecture multiple times to help with note-taking and studying. Other students are struggling with balancing school with family and work responsibilities, along with the general stress of being under quarantine and other health concerns.”

Dr. Dankovich: “My students seem fairly well prepared for this situation. I have communicated daily via email since the first day of this closing and now I email my students a minimum of three times per week. Continual communication and keeping them in the ‘loop’ has proven to be a great teaching strategy that makes them feel included and up-to-date with information. Maybe I have over-communicated, but I treat them like adults and told them every step along the way what was going on - good and bad! Several of them have commented that they appreciate this approach to include them in these always-changing times. I have had no withdrawals from either class and remote attendance is holding steady at over 95 percent!”

The Challenges

Dr. Dankovich interacting with students in his lab.

Dr. Blasiman: “My biggest challenge has been finding the time to set up classes online the way I want them to be! I have an ideal version of what I think an online class should look like and it's a challenge to match that to reality. I want my students' online experience to be positive, helpful, organized, easy to navigate, clear and adaptable to changing circumstances.”

Dr. Dankovich: “The biggest challenge that I have faced in adapting to this teaching style is the lack of hands-on learning and active learning in small groups in class and lab. I miss the hands-on dissections in lab and have sought additional ways to teach that. It has made me rethink and reevaluate my in-class time.”

 

The Positives

Dr. Rachael Blasiman in a traditional classroom setting.

Dr. Blasiman: “I find that I'm more intentional in keeping up with my students as individuals. In class, these conversations arise organically, but moving online has made me more aware of how important it is to connect with people and find out about their lives and how their experiences intersect with their schoolwork.”

Dr. Dankovich: “I am now implementing new strategies that will make class and lab more interactive. These new strategies will continue once we return to face-to-face teaching to make class time even more interactive. Remote teaching has forced me to look honestly at my teaching style, how I deliver content and make changes that ultimately will help to further engage the student in, and with, the material.”

What do you miss most about the traditional classroom setting?

Dr. Blasiman: “The traditional classroom setting is dynamic and familiar; online teaching feels like uncharted territory. It requires new and creative ways of adapting course delivery, activities and assessments. It will take some time to adjust to a new routine, but I know we can do it!”

Dr. Dankovich: “No question - I miss the students. I believe that you form significant instructor-student relationships in the face-to-face setting. These are kids I have the opportunity to teach for two semesters and you cannot replace those daily interactions with the computer or a Zoom meeting. I am too attached to seeing them progress with the material and to the active learning that takes place in the live classroom. I especially love when the class goes off the rails and you take it in that ‘new’ direction. Learning is not a simple or a step-by-step clean process. I like when it gets messy. When there are questions. When the unexpected happens. I miss the spontaneity of face-to-face classes.”


Cutline A: Dr. Rachael Blasiman

Cutline B: Dr. Dan Dankovich

Cutline C: Dr. Dankovich interacting with students in his lab.

Cutline D: Dr. Rachael Blasiman in a traditional classroom setting.

Monday, April 13, 2020

Kent State East Liverpool is holding the 2020 Earth Day Environmental Justice Conference in a virtual format, using Zoom technology, an internet conferencing tool. The conference is Sat., April 18, from 9 a.m. to noon, and is open to the public.

The theme of this year’s conference is “The Birds and The Bees,” highlighting student research about the importance of these creatures to the environment.

The Cardinal is the State Bird of Ohio

Those wanting to join the conference remotely, must register in advance using an email address to https://tinyurl.com/2020EarthDayKSU. After registering, a confirmation email will be sent with instructions to join the meeting. The conference can be viewed on computers and phones with internet access.

This is the 15th annual Earth Day Environmental Justice Conference. When the campus closed in mid-March because of the COVID-19 situation, it looked like the conference was going be canceled. The planning committee, however, was encouraged by Dr. David Dees, campus dean, to look for other options and, therefore, decided to host a virtual conference using online technology.

The initial planned speakers opted out of the virtual conference, but the committee members did not give up. They developed an enlightening program to address the major concerns and importance of bees and birds in our environment.

Student research on a variety of environmental justice issues will also be highlighted and virtual breakout rooms will allow students to share their research with a broader audience.

The Earth Day Conference planning committee is chaired by Dr. Darryl Hancock and members include Dr. Lydia Rose, Dr. Q. Ding, Megan Rodgers, Dr. Haiyan Zhu and Matt Stewart. While it was challenging, the committee is excited to offer the conference since this is the 50th anniversary of Earth Day and the 50th anniversary of the Environmental Protection Agency.

For more information about the conference, visit www.kent.edu/columbiana.

Thursday, April 09, 2020

The 2020 Earth Day Environmental Justice Conference will be held, but with a twist: this year’s event will be a “virtual conference.”

The conference is April 18, beginning at 9 a.m. and will be presented using a Zoom webinar format.

A tradition on the East Liverpool Campus, the annual research conference leads students to study issues that impact the environment and prompt them to be stewards of the Earth.

The theme for this year’s conference is “The Birds and the Bees.” Committee members hope students’ research will show how important these creatures are in maintaining an ecological balance in our world.

The conference will feature essays, posters, slide presentations and videos submitted by students, as well as three TED talk presentations.

The Agenda

8:50 – 9 a.m. Attendees log onto the conference via Zoom

Honey bee

9 - 9:15 a.m. Conference Committee Chair’s address – Dr. Darryl Hancock

9:10- 9:15 a.m. Environmental Club’s address- President, Sydney Hill

9:15- 9:30 a.m. Dean’s address - Columbiana Campuses Dean Dr. David Dees

9:30- 9:45 a.m. TED talk: “For the Love of Birds” TED Global 2017 - Washington Wachira

9:45- 10 a.m. “Citizen Science” conceptual discussion - Dr. Lydia Rose

10:00- 10:45 a.m. “Break out” sessions for Student Research presentations

10:45- 11 a.m. Yoga for your anti-Viral Bunker- Amy McCormack

11-1 1:10 a.m. Break

11:10- 11:25 a.m. TED Talk: “Why bees are disappearing” TED Global 2013 – Marla Spivak

11:26- 11:45 a.m. TED Talk: “Stunning photos of the endangered Everglades” TEDx UF - Mac Stone

11:45- 11:55 a.m. Conference Committee members Discussion and Q & A

11:55 a.m.- noon Winners announced for Poster and Paper competitions

To Participate

  • The deadline to submit research materials is April 10
    • Full essays should be eight to 10 pages (include cover page with name, tile and identifying information);
    • One-page statements or presentations must be a minimum of 150 to 400 words (include a cover sheet with name, title and identifying information;
    • PowerPoint presentations should be five to 10 slides;
    • Videos should be five to 10 minutes;
    • Posters should be virtual PDF submissions.

Upload all presentations onto the Conference online link by April 10.

All who register on time and present their work at the conference will each receive a certificate.

Questions should be directed to Dr. Darryl Hancock at dhancoc@kent.edu or to Dr. Lydia Rose at lrose17@kent.edu.


THANK YOU!

The 2020 Earth Day/Environmental Justice Conference Committee would like to thank you for attending our virtual conference in this most difficult of times.

A big “thank you” to Kent State University Columbiana Campuses Dean, Dr. David Dees for encouraging us to bring this conference to the virtual platform when social distancing orders were enforced.

Thanks to all who participated to make this conference possible:
Maegan Richards, Coordinator Academic learning Commons, Salem
Wendy Atkins, Coordinator Academic Learning Commons, EL
Clayton Gellatly, Manager IT, Columbiana campuses
Moneeka Pelley, IT User Support Associate EL campus
Jordan Steele, IT User Support Analysis, EL campus
Rachael Esterly, Instructional Designer, Columbiana campuses
Amy McCormack, adjunct Yoga Instructor, EL
Ali Erritouni, Associate Professor of English, Columbiana campuses
Tina Smith, Public Relations Coordinator, Columbiana campuses
Sydney Hill, President of the East Liverpool campus Environmental Club,
All active student members of the Environmental Club
All participating presenters of their undergraduate research

And a special thanks goes out to all our Conference Planning Committee members:

Dr. Lydia Rose, Associate Professor of Sociology, Director Social Science Research Lab
Interdisciplinary Research Leader, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Fellow, EL

Dr. Qunxing Ding, Associate Professor, Biological Sciences, EL

Megan Rogers, Laboratory Assistant, Staff Advisor Environmental Club, EL

Dr. Haiyan Zhu, Associate Professor, Biological Sciences, EL

Mathew Stewart, Associate Lecturer, English, EL

*Dr. Darryl Hancock, Associate Professor, PTA Tech EL

* Indicates Chair of the committee


 

Flash Food Pantry Donation
Flash Food Pantry Donation
Friday, April 03, 2020

 

The Kent State Columbiana County campuses wasted no time reaching out to the Salem and East Liverpool communities to share resources during this COVID-19 crisis.

These PPE items were donated to East Liverpool City Hospital from the East Liverpool Campus.


Within days of shutting the doors on each campus, staff began suggesting ways to donate items to local healthcare providers and other agencies rather than have the items locked away.

The nursing, PTA and OTA programs from the East Liverpool Campus boxed up and donated masks, gowns and gloves that were taken to East Liverpool City Hospital. Patient beds are also marked to be loaned out if needed.

Nursing faculty (from left) Krista Hawkins and Sarah Pierce-Brown helped prepare items that were loaned to the Salem Regional Medical Center.

 

At the beginning of the stay-at-home orders, organizers of the Flash Food Pantry on the East Liverpool Campus gave food items to several students. Since then, the shelves of the pantry were emptied of their stock and all items were donated to The Way Station in East Liverpool. The donation of food filled a pickup and an SUV.

The Salem Campus extended its help to the Salem Regional Medical Center with donations of PPE items from the nursing and rad tech programs, as well as loaning several pieces of medical equipment.

The loaned items included six beds, a stretcher, a ventilator, bedside tables, vital-sign monitors, oximeters, blood pressure cuffs, an EKG machine and a defibrillator. The biology department loaned a UV light AirClean station for sterilization.


Photo 1: These PPE items were donated to East Liverpool City Hospital from the East Liverpool Campus.

Photo 2: Nursing faculty (from left) Sarah Pierce-Brown and Krista Hawkins helped prepare items that were loaned to the Salem Regional Medical Center.

Friday, March 20, 2020

Important Contact Information Columbiana County Campuses

 

The Kent State Columbiana County campuses are working hard to keep information flowing and to create resources that will help find answers to many of your questions.

To simplify how you get answers to your questions specific to the East Liverpool and Salem campuses, please use infocolumbiana@kent.edu. This email mailbox will be monitored by staff from our two campuses who will then seek out answers to your specific questions. Some answers may take longer to get than others, but we will try our best to answer all questions.

The Enrollment Management and Student Services Department also created a list of contacts for each campus that can help direct you to key personnel for specific information related to the Columbiana County campuses.

East Liverpool   Salem

Monday, March 16, 2020


Dear Kent State East Liverpool and Salem Students,

This week will begin a new chapter for all of us. However, what I know about all of you and the faculty and staff at our campuses, we will handle this, and we will all work to take care of each other through this difficult time. I wanted to let each of you know what we are doing and provide some guidance for you as we adapt to this situation.

First, the faculty and staff have been working hard the last several days to prepare for this week. It has involved learning new technologies, discovering different options, as well as creative thinking to get things in place. I am asking you as students to reach out to your professor, your advisor, or someone at the campus if something is not working or you are confused. We have people ready to help guide you through this process.

Second, be patient. This is new for all of us and we will, in some cases, be learning and adjusting with you. Again, communication with your professor and/or the campus will help all of us identify issues and work towards solutions. Remember, practicing social distance does not mean that we cannot connect in other ways.

Third, utilize some of the university resources we have prepared for you. There are some critical resources already in place. If you have questions about learning remotely, please refer to http://www.kent.edu/keeponlearning for helpful tools and resources. For updates on COVID-19, including the latest communications and general FAQ’s, visit: https://www.kent.edu/coronavirus. Also, keep up with your email and Flash ALERTS. Things are changing every hour so staying connected to this information will help you through this process.

Fourth, know that we will succeed. As President Diacon noted, we will succeed because our faculty and staff are committed to your learning. We will succeed because each of you are dedicated and passionate students that are here to create more opportunities for yourself and your families. We will succeed because “Flashes take care of Flashes”.

On a final note, when you get frustrated or anxious, remember why we are doing this. Practicing social distance is what will help to slow the spread of this virus. We are doing this to help our community. We are doing this to safeguard first responders and health care workers that are critical to all of us. We are doing this to protect those loved ones that have underlying conditions that put them at risk. We are doing this because as a nation, despite some of our differences, we truly care about each other.

Hang in there, don’t be afraid to ask for help, and most importantly, take care of yourselves.

Sincerely,

ddees

David M. Dees, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer

Monday, March 16, 2020

Dear Members of the Kent State University Community,

Yesterday, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine banned all indoor and outdoor events with more than 100 attendees and provided the estimate that the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Ohio will likely peak between late April and mid-May. As such, we will extend remote instruction of face-to-face courses for the remainder of this semester.

Kent Campus students are strongly encouraged to return to their homes for the remainder of the semester. For those students who vacate their room by March 30, there will be an appropriate refund of room and meal plan. Details will be provided soon. The university will work with students who are not able to return home during this time period on an individual basis. A limited number of residence halls and dining options will remain available for those students.

Decisions regarding spring commencement and May 4 50th Commemoration activities will be made at a later date.

During the remainder of the semester, overall operations of the university will continue, and the University Library will be accessible.

  • Staffing of each unit will continue as currently in place; however, if reasonable employee needs so dictate, on-site staffing may be reduced.
  • Faculty may continue to use their offices and labs while practicing social distancing.
  • Large gatherings, meetings and events remain suspended in keeping with the governor’s executive orders
  • Intercollegiate athletic events and all practices are canceled for the remainder of the semester.
  • University-sponsored travel – domestic and international – remains suspended until further notice.
  • No future university-sponsored travel may be booked unless approved by a dean or vice president until further notice.

Information on remote instruction for students, including access instructions and technology resources, is at www.kent.edu/keeponlearning. Remote instruction resources for faculty may be found at www.kent.edu/keeponteaching.

For technology issues, contact TechHelp by either submitting a support ticket or via Live Chat with support staff. You can also call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 330-672-HELP.

Students, faculty and staff will find additional guidance by:

We recommend anyone who believes they have been in close contact (within approximately 6 feet for a prolonged period of time) with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 to self-isolate and call your local health department or healthcare provider for further guidance. If you have had close contact with a person with COVID-19 and develop symptoms such as fever (temperature greater than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit), cough or shortness of breath, seek medical advice by calling your local health department. If you cannot reach your local health department, call ahead before going to the emergency room or doctor’s office to notify them of recent contact with individuals who have tested positive for the virus.

Continue to Take Preventative Measures

It is imperative that we take steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19:

  • Avoid large gatherings and follow social distancing recommendations of 3-6 feet.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your mouth, nose and eyes.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with your arm or a tissue.
  • Avoid exposure to others who are sick.
  • Stay home while you are ill (except to visit a healthcare professional) and avoid close contact with others.
  • Get adequate sleep and eat well-balanced meals to ensure a healthy immune system.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

Additional information can be found here:

Many thanks to our outstanding faculty and staff, for it is through their great cooperation and forbearance we will keep students on track for graduation. I know students will have a quality educational experience through this disruptive and challenging time. As Flashes take care of Flashes, remember to show kindness and respect in all we do.

Sincerely,

Todd Diacon
President

Thursday, March 12, 2020

Updated Monday, March 16, 2020:

Coronavirus/COVID-19 Questions


Kent State's Modified Spring Schedule

Kent State applauds Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine’s proactive approach to keeping our state safe during the ongoing spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). On March 12, Gov. DeWine banned all indoor and outdoor events with more than 100 attendees and provided the estimate that the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Ohio will likely peak between late April and mid-May. As such, we will extend remote instruction of face-to-face courses for the remainder of this semester.

To slow transmission of the virus and consistent with recommendations from state health authorities to limit large gatherings and practice social distancing, Kent State is taking the following preventative and proactive actions:

  • March 10-15: Face-to-face classes canceled.
  • March 16-20: Classes will be held via remote instruction.
  • March 23-29: Spring break will occur as scheduled.
  • March 30-End of Spring Semester: Classes will be held via remote instruction.

BACHELOR of NURSING CLINICAL ROTATIONS
Effective March 13, 2020, all College of Nursing (BSN, MSN, DNP, PhD) clinicals are suspended until April 13, 2020 at which time we will re-evaluate. This includes the BSN at regionals (Stark, Trumbull, Geauga and Salem). For those of you who anticipate a May graduation, we are working to ensure that your graduation will be on time. College of Nursing Students please contact Dr. Tracey Motter (BSN Kent Campus) at 330-672-8784 or Dr. Wendy Umberger (MSN/DNP/PhD Kent Campus) at 330-672-8813.


UNIVERSITY OPERATIONS

  • COLUMBIANA CAMPUSES:At 5 p.m. on March 16, 2020, Kent State East Liverpool and Salem are closed. Essential services will be performed remotely.
  • KENT CAMPUS: As of March 16, at 5 p.m., the Kent Campus has reduced nearly all campus operations until further notice. Only a limited number of employees will be asked to report to their campus. Areas requiring at least a minimal physical presence on campus include health services, public safety, information technology, residence services, dining services, mail services, facilities and a few research laboratories. Units designated for on-campus service will operate with limited staff in rotation. OnMarch 17, most buildings will be locked.
  • Residence halls at the Kent Campus will close on March 20, at 5 p.m. Access check out requirements and special arrangements.
  • March 15 information aboutan employee at Kent State who has been in close proximity to a person who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19). This employee is in isolation for 14 days and is being tested for COVID-19.These measures are in effect. Read the full email.

ACADEMIC RESOURCES


CAMPUS EVENTS

  • Events scheduled for all campus locations are canceled to avoid creating large gatherings. No additional spring semester events will be scheduled. 
  • Decisions regarding spring commencement and the Kent Campus May 4 50th Commemoration activities will be made at a later date.

CONTINUE TO TAKE PREVENTATIVE MEASURES

It is imperative that we take steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19:

  • Avoid large gatherings and follow social distancing recommendations of 3-6 feet.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your mouth, nose and eyes.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with your arm or a tissue.
  • Avoid exposure to others who are sick.
  • Stay home while you are ill (except to visit a healthcare professional) and avoid close contact with others.
  • Get adequate sleep and eat well-balanced meals to ensure a healthy immune system.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • General coronavirus FAQS, as addressed by Kent State University in response to university community

Additional information can be found here:

We take all of these steps to ensure the health and safety of our campus community and to be proactive in an effort to prevent illness while continuing the academic mission of the university.

We will continue to monitor the outbreak and will align our recommendations with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the World Health Organization and other city, state and federal agencies.

VIEW KENT STATE CORONAVIRUS/COVID-19 UPDATES & FAQS

SUBSCRIBE TO FLASHALERTS

 

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Especially in the world of healthcare, practitioners trained in other countries often find that they need additional training before they are permitted to practice in the United States. For foreign-trained physical therapists and physical therapist assistants, Kent State University has a way to bridge that gap.

Tiffany Kiphart, director of the Kent State PTA program, recognized a need for such a bridge and started the program on the Ashtabula Campus two years ago and, for the past two semesters, the East Liverpool Campus has offered the program. This is the only such program for physical therapists in the U.S.

The five-week program is offered online; however, participants are required to attend a day-long competencies day on campus.

Dr. Darryl Hancock, associate professor of PTA at East Liverpool, is the course instructor. “This course is the education they are required to have beyond their own foreign-trained PT or PTA programs and what they must complete to sit for their respective state licensure exams,” he explained. “Without it, they may not be able to work as physical therapists or PTAs in this country.” 

Recently, Hancock welcomed a class of seven students to the East Liverpool Campus, where they spent a day of hands-on training to test their competencies and skills. “All of the individuals live in the United States and are seeking to gain licensure in either PT or PTA,” he noted. “This was a great group of professionals who are already highly-skilled and all anxious to put their skills to use helping patients in this country.”

Dr. Darryl Hancock demonstrates techniques used in traction treatments


Cutline A: Darryl Hancock stands behind foreign-trained PTs and PTAs who were on the East Liverpool Campus to receive additional skills training so they can practice in this country. The students were (from left) Sailesh Balanagu, Anshoo Jayendra Shah, Kamalpreet Kaur, Ishaniben Shah, Devangi Patel, Namrata Mehta and Sebastian Jose.

Cutline B: Darryl Hancock demonstrates techniques used in traction treatments.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

 

The fourth Kent State County Classic basketball game took place Jan. 28, when the Salem High School Quakers hosted the East Liverpool High School Potters in a cross-county match-up.

The traveling trophy was awarded to the Potters after they defeated the Quakers, 85-53, which evened up the four-game series. Salem won the trophy the first two years, while East Liverpool has taken it home the last two years.

Cheerleaders tossed out t-shirts to fans, while Flash helped both sides of the gym cheer for their teams. The night also featured a trivia contest and a door prize drawing.

During halftime activities, four high school students were each awarded a $500 Opportunity Scholarship, to be used at either Columbiana County campus next academic year.

At halftime, four students were each awarded $500 scholarships to a Kent State Columbiana County campus for the 2020-2021 academic year. The scholarships were awarded to Tyressa Manion and Tyson Swiger, of Salem High School, and Madelyn DeLong and Sierra Arter of East Liverpool High School.

The Kent State County Classic represents the strong foundation of learning in East Liverpool and Salem, as each community is home to one of the university’s two Columbiana County campuses.

Fan favorite – Flash!


Cutline A: Dr. David Dees (far left), dean of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses, along with Flash, presented the County Classic traveling plaque to the East Liverpool Potters, who won this year’s contest over the Salem Quakers.

Cutline B: During halftime activities, four high school students were each awarded a $500 Opportunity Scholarship, to be used at either Columbiana County campus next academic year. Pictured are (from left) Madelyn DeLong and Sierra Arter of East Liverpool High School; Dr. David Dees, dean of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses; and Tyressa Manion and Tyson Swiger of Salem High School.

Cutline C: Fan favorite – Flash!

More photos are available on our Facebook page

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Throughout the Spring 2020 semester, the East Liverpool Campus will join with the university to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the events of May 4, 1970, on the Kent State Campus. 

A series of events and activities is planned to focus attention on this historical time in American history. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to participate and/or attend these events. 

The current list of activities is listed below. Please note that additional events may be added throughout the semester or there may be slight changes to these events (times, locations) that may coincide with other campus activities.


Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4th and Student Protest in America
Wednesday, Feb. 19
5:30 p.m.
Quiet Study Lounge, Purinton Hall
Open to public
This is a documentary film about a generation of young people who stood up against social injustice during some of our nation’s most turbulent and transformative years, the 1960s through the 1970s. This is an award-winning documentary that was written and produced by Daniel Miller, who was a student on campus that year. 


Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4th and Student Protest in America (CANCELED)
Tuesday, April 7
11:30 a.m.
Library, Purinton Hall 


Community and Consensus: Preserving the History of May 4, 1970 (CANCELED)
Presentation by Dr. Laura Davis and Dr. Mark Seeman
Tuesday, April 7
3:30 p.m.
Library, Purinton Hall
Dr. Davis and Dr. Seeman worked tirelessly with the late Dr. Carol Barbato, communications professor at Kent State East Liverpool, to preserve the story and the site of the Kent State shootings. Hear how these three individuals completed four large and complex projects to secure this history and protect the space where the events occurred. This included creating the May 4 Walking Tour and the May 4 Visitors Center museum on the Kent Campus, as well as its ultimate recognition on the National Register of Historic Places and as a National Historic Landmark.

Memorial Dedication to Dr. Carole Barbato (CANCELED)
Tuesday, April 7
Following the presentation by Dr. Davis and Dr. Seeman
Purinton Hall Commons Area
The East Liverpool Campus will dedicate a space on the Commons Area in memory of Dr. Carole Barbato.


May 4, 1970: A Retrospective and Prospective (CANCELED)
Thursday, April 9
10:30 a.m.
Library, Purinton Hall
A panel discussion with Dr. Bob Walker, Francis Graham and Matt Stewart as they share their thoughts, experiences and perspectives about the events of May 4, 1970.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020


Throughout the Spring 2020 semester, the Salem Campus will join with the university to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the events of May 4, 1970, on the Kent State Campus. 

A series of events and activities is planned to focus attention on this historical time in American history. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to participate and/or attend these events, as well as to invite friends and family.

The current list of activities is listed below. Please note that additional events may be added throughout the semester or there may be slight changes to these events (times, locations) that may coincide with other campus activities.


The Age of Aquarius
January through May
Salem Campus Classroom Building
To create an atmosphere of the 1960s and 1970s, the campus will host a display of period clothes throughout the buildings Some of the items were worn by students attending Kent State in 1970, while others are on loan from the Kent State School of Fashion and/or from the Theatre Department (costumes worn in the stage production of Hair). The campus will also display books about this event, Kent State memorabilia (a 1970 Kent State yearbook, sorority pin, cover of Life Magazine, etc.) and images portraying pop culture from this time, including a poster of a draft lottery board). 

Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4th and Student Protest in America
Wednesday, Feb. 12     noon-1:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 12    5:30-7 p.m. (CANCELED)
Room 134 – Lecture Hall
Open to public
This is a documentary film about a generation of young people who stood up against social injustice during some of our nation’s most turbulent and transformative years, the 1960s through the 1970s. This is an award-winning documentary that was written and produced by Daniel Miller, who was a student on campus that year. 

Student Trip to May 4 Center (CANCELED)
Friday, April 3
10 a.m. to Noon
Many students are unaware of the important and leading role Kent State University played in the civil rights movements of the 1960s and 1970s, as well as the tragic events of May 4, 1970. This trip to the May 4 Center will enhance historical insight into these events and how history was made on the local, regional and national levels. For details about participating in this trip, contact Dr. Sue Wamsley, history professor, at ewamsley@kent.edu.

Salem Remembers May 4, 1970 
Thursday, April 16
Reception at 5:30 p.m.
Program at 6:30 p.m.
Academic Learning Commons
Open to public
Local residents will share their stories and remembrances of what happened at Kent State on May 4, 1970, during a panel discussion. These will be personal accounts from a variety of perspectives, some from Kent State students at that time. The panel will be co-moderated by Dr. David Dees, interim vice president for System Integration and dean of the Columbiana County campuses, and Professor Karen Cunningham from the School of Peace and Conflict Studies.

May 4 Voices
Thursday, April 30
5:30-7 p.m.
Room 134 – Lecture Hall
May 4 Voices is a play that brings together first-person narratives about the May 4, 1970, events at Kent State University. This video production of the play, written by David Hassler and directed by Katherine Burke, is based on the Kent State Shooting Oral History Project. It includes more than 115 interviews with National Guardsmen, students, townspeople and politicians. The interviews capture the sense of trauma, confusion and fear felt by the people who witnessed or who were involved with the May 4 events. 

Learn more about earning your university degree at Information Night
Monday, January 13, 2020


Dr. David Dees, dean of Kent State University at Salem, announced those students named to the Fall 2019 President’s and Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the Salem Campus. 

The students and their hometowns are:

PRESIDENT'S LIST

Alliance:

  • Shelby Dennis
  • Zaviona Fountain
  • Michaela Huston

Canfield:

  • Axel Espinosa Quevedo

Columbiana:

  • Nicholas Berger
  • Sherilyn Horst
  • Lucas Duncan

Cuyahoga Falls:

  • Timothy Trimmer

East Liverpool:

  • Abigail Jackson

Hartville:

  • Kirsten Garvey

Lakeview:

  • Myranda Joseph

Lisbon:

  • Jamie Brown

North Jackson:

  • Jillian Giovanni

Petersburg:

  • Roger Leipply

Rogers:

  • Kimberly Redmond

Salem:

  • Casey Dickey
  • Hannah Koran

Salineville:

  • Katelyn Bailey

Wellsville:

  • Melissa Brinker
  • Mattisyn Infanti

DEAN'S LIST

Akron:

  • Ryan Keller
  • Adela Pearcy

Alliance:

  • Nathan Decker
  • Morgan Kirby
  • Brenna Rito
  • Brianna Smith
  • Sarah Teutsch
  • Morgan Woolf

Apple Creek:

  • Teresa Miskimen

Atwater:

  • Bobbie Paulat

Austintown:

  • Julia Oravecz
  • Kelly Rektor
  • Bethany Skeens
  • Daniel Skeens

Beloit:

  • Brandon Bowen
  • Curtis Gearhart
  • Caitlin LaBonte
  • Samantha Morris
  • Gabrielle Smith

Bergholz:

  • Trevor Coffy

Berlin Center:

  • Erin Helmick
  • Autumn Reed

Bloomingdale:

  • Madison Moore

Boardman:

  • Ashley Simione-Villanueva
  • Victoria Wellington

Bowling Green:

  • Cari Jones

Bristolville:

  • Kayla Adams
  • MiKayla List

Campbell:

  • Alexis Santiago

Canfield:

  • Lauren Blakeman
  • Matthew Brooks
  • Zachary Chaffee
  • Valentino Corbisello
  • Danielle Gabriel
  • Amanda Humphreys
  • Adam Kollay
  • Samantha Morris
  • Mckenzie Posten
  • Alexandra Pugh
  • Maria Pupino
  • Kara Rothbauer
  • Tyler Stratton
  • Allison Sunderman
  • Katelyn Yohman
  • Marissa Yourstowsky

Canton:

  • Sarah Hon
  • Christina Hutson

Cleveland:

  • Ivy Bulloch

Columbiana:

  • Halee Allen
  • Cheyenne Elwonger
  • Luke Holm
  • Amber Mondak
  • Darian Strouse

Cortland:

  • LaChic Parker

Deerfield:

  • Cameron Drotos
  • Scott Nance

Dellroy:

  • Mikayla Brannick

Diamond:

  • Gabrielle Arquilla
  • McKenzie Lemasters
  • Kaitlyn Pennington

East Liverpool:

  • Mariah Adams
  • Allyson Betteridge
  • Sidney Bowyer
  • Allysha Campbell
  • Bradley Elliott
  • Hannah Hughes
  • Katrina Malcolm
  • Karlee Miller
  • Terri Stuchell 

East Palestine:

  • Cheyenne Cook
  • Andrew Ellis
  • Gillian Stilson

Hanoverton:

  • Joseph Mapel
  • Samantha Moschgat
  • Madison Smith
  • Laurel Stewart
  • Dyllon Thompson

Hartville:

  • Paige Sommers
  • Trey Sommers 

Homeworth:

  • Brogan Fisher
  • Tarabekah Fogarascher
  • Hunter Gillingham
  • Michaela Hahn
  • Lindsey Rice

Kensington:

  • Derek Bryan
  • Audrey Keister
  • Giuseppe Sabatino
  • Skyllar Shasteen

Kent:

  • Deanna Kruger

Leetonia:

  • Mitchell Baker
  • Laura Bokanovich
  • Kristen Bruderly
  • Ryan Dowling
  • Caleb Witmer

Lisbon:

  • Cassandra Aldish
  • Nicholas Angle
  • Karlie Blissenbach
  • Alyssa Chestnut
  • MaryQuinn Cook
  • Anita Cusick
  • Danny Davis
  • Natalie Esterly 
  • Alexander Gonzalez
  • Megan Graham
  • Katelyn Haifley
  • Kevin Hall
  • Brandi Hunt
  • Alivia Leyman
  • Tess Neville
  • Lauren Plunkett
  • Kobi Ream
  • Jenna Ronshak
  • Samantha Shaffer
  • Tyler Sowards
  • Alison Sprouse
  • Lauren Vest
  • Craig Walker
  • Madelyn Wells
  • Judy Wilcox

McDonald:

  • Megan Smith

Mentor on The Lake:

  • Sara Vay 

Mineral Ridge:

  • Robert Jensen

Minerva:

  • Maria Allen
  • Michael Laubacher
  • Jaidyn Morgan
  • Danielle Osterfeld
  • Quade Zeedrich

Montville:

  • Nathan Coufal

Negley:

  • Robert Buck
  • Sawyer Meek

New Middletown:

  • Kendra DeWitt
  • Olivia DiLallo
  • Eric Grantonic

New Philadelphia:

  • Malory Roth
  • Demi Wisnieski 

New Springfield:

  • Vivian Conrad

New Waterford:

  • Julia Chappelear
  • Harlie Coleman
  • Morgan Cox
  • Carly Mustake
  • Lisa Paskevitch
  • Brittany Spalding

North Benton:

  • Abigail Hammonds
  • Sarrah Tennefoss

North Bloomfield:

  • Ashley King 

North Jackson:

  • Melissa Namy

North Lima:

  • Sarah Martin
  • Ashley Stellato

Painesville:

  • Allison Batt
  • Sarah Butler

Paris:

  • Logan Cardinal

Petersburg:

  • Elizabeth Thompson

Poland:

  • Brittany Gulling

Ravenna:

  • Emily Krych
  • Zachary McKenzie
  • Gabrielle Shyne

Rogers:

  • Trey Marshall

Salem:

  • Reyna Albino
  • Lea Bock
  • Rachel Bowen
  • Jerrica Carl
  • Ricky Coffey
  • Jessica Cvelbar
  • Ellie Davidson
  • Allee Davidson-Chuck
  • Erica Fenton
  • Mason Filaccio
  • Stephanie Fowler
  • Samantha Geary
  • Caitlin Giles
  • Elizabeth Gillis
  • Courtney Halter
  • Emma Jarvis
  • Emily Johnson
  • Destiny Kay
  • Cole Kern
  • William Knepper
  • Eunice Knight
  • Tommy Kornbau
  • Brandy Krannich
  • Rachel Kuttler
  • Katie Larabee
  • McKala Lehman
  • Kaitlyn Libb
  • Heather Lude
  • Brianna Luttmers
  • McKenzie Martin
  • Paula McFarland
  • Raegan Meals
  • Rylee Meals
  • Kayla Mills
  • Bryanna Morris
  • Erin Murphy
  • Shanna Oettinger
  • Whitney Parkinson
  • Ruchi Patel
  • Shaylyn Pittman
  • Cheyanna Porter
  • Hannah Schultheis
  • Anne Sedjo
  • Austin Smith
  • Rebecca Soliday
  • Ailyn Stewart
  • Chelsea Toot
  • Melody Troyer
  • Kate Yeagley

Salineville:

  • Mariah Hart
  • Samantha Michael
  • Abby Smalley
  • Marshall Somerville
  • Kristofor Stewart
  • Elizabeth Willis

Sebring:

  • Isabelle Jackson
  • Mariah Lanzer

Southington:

  • Samantha Meyers
  • Hunter Romigh

Steubenville:

  • Amber DeSmith

Tallmadge:

  • Joshua Terry

Toronto:

  • Maria Dunlope
  • Tierra Taylor

Twinsburg:

  • Jessica Burdette

Wadsworth:

  • Militca Denee

Warren:

  • Tyler Bragg
  • Tara Creque
  • Samantha Hunter
  • Danielle Wilson

Wellsville:

  • Samantha Caldwell
  • Melinda Winters

Wintersville:

  • Michelle Santini
  • Amanda Souther

Wooster:

  • Makayla Mast

Youngstown:

  • Devon Asher
  • Antonio Chito
  • Brittany Christmas
  • Rachel Derenzis
  • Rachael DiFrancesco
  • Nicole Enright
  • Whitney Fox
  • Sarah Glista
  • Madeline Hubert
  • Alexis Johnson
  • Jennifer Liptak
  • Tyrone Lockett
  • Sydney McGrath
  • Toniann Minardi
  • Jeffrey Sebaugh
  • Amber Venorsky
  • Dianna Yeager

Catonsville, Md.:

  • Benjamin Laufer

Hookstown, Pa.:

  • Leona Hower

Tyler, Texas:

  • Nikia Taylor
Monday, January 13, 2020


Dr. David Dees, dean of Kent State University at East Liverpool, announced those students named to the Fall 2019 President’s or Dean’s lists. To qualify for the President’s List, students must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 or more credit hours during the semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.40 or greater grade point average and must have completed 12 or more credit hours for the semester, the majority at the East Liverpool Campus. 

The students and their hometowns are:


PRESIDENT'S LIST

Atwater:

  • Alyssa Card

East Liverpool:

  • Katerina Wright

Pittsburgh, Pa.:

  • Isaac Reese

DEAN'S LIST


Adena:

  • Logan Tonkovich

Akron:

  • Katelyn Paolucci

Calcutta:

  • Johnathan Conaway

Canton:

  • Derrick Hemming

Dover:

  • Abby Lax

East Liverpool:

  • Matthew Diddle
  • Eric Glendenning
  • Addison Guildoo
  • Nathaniel Hager
  • Sydney Hill
  • Jamie Hilton
  • Elaina Howell
  • Traven Renner
  • Leeanne Ridgley
  • Kiley Rosenlieb
  • Corey Snow
  • Chelsea Ware
  • Aiden Watkins
  • Hannah White
  • Aaron Yourex

Hanoverton:

  • Maggie Willison 

Irondale:

  • Margaret Villarreal

Lisbon:

  • Tori Bowersock
  • Madelyn Liberati
  • Justin Sweeney

McDonald:

  • Jessica Cornelius

Middlefield:

  • Bryanna Drabek

New Philadelphia:

  • Baily Gortney

Newton Falls:

  • Heidi Herman 

Petersburg:

  • Emily Yereb

Rogers:

  • Kassandra Rogers

Salineville:

  • Jayson Bott
  • Hoi Ming Winski

Steubenville:

  • Megan Hyde

Toronto:

  • Mallory Ullom

Wellsville:

  • Jeremy Barton
  • Ryan Dalrymple
  • Hunter Weekley

Youngstown:

  • Donnabel Ferrell
  • Katelyn McKinney


Aliquippa, Pa.:

  • Allison Domitrovich

Beaver, Pa.:

  • Bailie Rohr
Applications now open for Physical Therapist Assistant Program
Friday, January 10, 2020

 

Applications are now being accepted from those wanting to earn an Associate of Applied Science degree in Physical Therapist Assistant Technology at Kent State East Liverpool.

The application deadline is April 1, 2020.

This accredited program provides students with the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary to become licensed or certified as a physical therapist assistant. A PTA works under the direction and supervision of a physical therapist. Licensure or certification in most states requires graduation from an accredited program, background clearances and passing the National Physical Therapy Examination.

The integrated curriculum includes lecture, lecture/lab, seminar and practicum courses. Major course content is cumulative and taught in four sequential semesters in a two-year cycle. The technical study curriculum requires the student to be on campus or in the clinic three to five days per week each term. 

Details about the program

APPLY NOW!

Contact Kathryn Sutton at 330-382-7405 or ksutton1@kent.edu for more information or for questions on eligibility. 

 

Monday, January 06, 2020

The Kent State Salem Communiversity Choir will share the stage with the Kent State Nova Jazz Singers at a free concert on Sunday, Jan. 19, at 3 p.m. in the Kent State Salem City Center auditorium. 

The Communiversity Choir will present a series of musical selections under the direction of Melissa Fucci, associate professor of music at Kent State Salem. The choir is made up of community members, as well as students and faculty from the Salem Campus.

The Nova Jazz Singers was founded in 2012 by Dr. Christopher Venesile, associate professor of choral music education at Kent State, and, through their performances, “fuse the choral tradition with the power and innovation of jazz.”

The ensemble performs annually at premier jazz clubs in Northeast Ohio, New York City jazz clubs, the Elmhurst Jazz Festival in Chicago and, in 2020, will be featured at the Ohio Music Education Association State Professional Conference.


 

Monday, January 06, 2020

 

Kent State at Salem held a nursing convocation and pinning ceremony for students graduating from the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program on the Salem Campus at the end of the Fall 2019 semester.

Dr. Mary Lou Ferranto, coordinator of the BSN program at Salem, presented the 2019 class of graduates, while nursing faculty members presented various awards and the students’ pins. 

Michelle Santini received the Award for Academic Performance, while Amanda Souther received the Award for Clinical Excellence. Student Murphy Flowers offered remarks to those gathered and Jerrica Carl led the reciting of the class pledge

Ready to step up as nurses

The Kent State Salem BSN class of 2019’s December graduates includes:

  • Mohamed Abouamra
  • Jerrica Carl
  • Ryan Dowling
  • Murphy Flowers
  • Kevin Hall
  • Karsen Heldreth
  • Amber Langdon
  • Hope LeBourgeois
  • Genna Peace
  • Michelle Santini
  • Sarah Simballa
  • Nicole Smith
  • Rebecca Soliday
  • Amanda Souther

Cutline A: Receiving nursing pins during ceremonies for the Kent State Salem Campus were (from left): Michelle Santini, Genna Peace, Kevin Hall, Hope LeBourgeois, Ryan Dowling, Nicole Smith, Karsen Heldreth, Amber Langdon, Rebecca Soliday, Murphy Flowers, Jerrica Carl, Amanda Southern, Sarah Simballa

Cutline B: Ready to step up as nurses are the Fall 2019 graduates of the BSN program from the Salem Campus.

Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Throughout the past Fall semester, six students taking the Business Consulting and Practicum course worked on a project that could help increase participation in the Senior Olympics program through the Direction Home of Eastern Ohio.

The presentation of the Business Consulting and Practicum course project

The students partnered with Direction Home to help determine why participation in the Senior Olympic games dropped in recent year, while also developing plans to help increase the participation level. 

The instructor for the class, Tim McFadden, explained that the students worked with Joe Rossi, CEO of the Direction Home of Eastern Ohio, and other staff members, throughout the project. The work culminated in a formal presentation to the organization that outlined suggested strategies for marketing and outreach.

The research included a comprehensive survey of past participants; benchmarking of other Senior Olympics program from across the country; and a review of the agency’s current web site and online presence.

“The students did a really nice job,” Rossi said. “The presentation and video were really informative. We have hired people and paid a lot of money and really never gotten as good of information.” 

The students included Andrew Birk, Katie Larabee, Gloria Meiring, Sydney Rice, Austin Smith and Katelyn Yohman. 


Cutline A:  The students who worked with Direction Home were (from left) Katie Larabee, Sydney Rice, Gloria Meiring, Katelyn Yohman, Andrew Birk and Austin Smith

Cutline B: There for the presentation were (front, from left) students Andrew Birk, Sydney Rice and Katelyn Yohman; and (back, from left) students Gloria Meiring and Katie Larabee; Direction Home’s Mallory Wiand, Tony Cario, Doug Doyle and Joe Rossi; student Austin Smith; and instructor Tim McFadden.

Thursday, December 12, 2019

Generosity on display

 

The Student Nurses Association at Kent State University East Liverpool spearheaded, for the sixth year, a project to help provide gifts for 49 local children through the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree program. Gifts were donated by nursing students, as well as faculty and staff from the entire campus. The donation also include a collection of new hats, scarves, mittens and gloves. 


Cutline A: Shown with the gifts collected this year are (from left) Ashley Deer, SNA secretary; Erin Reese, SNA vice president; Marcie Van Fosson, nursing department secretary; Salvation Army St. Lydia Behr; student Thomas Siembida; Ray Mills, SNA president; and Angela Douglass, faculty advisor.

Cutline B: Generosity on display
 

Monday, December 09, 2019

Flash with his young fans in Salem.

Kent State in the Salem parade

 

Students, faculty and staff joined forces on each Columbiana County campus to make a showing at the Salem and East Liverpool parades. Fortunately, the weather was perfect for each event and thousands of area residents turned out to watch.

During the fast-paced Salem parade, Flash and campus representatives greeted parade-goers while handing out candy and Kent State pencils. Flash is always a fan favorite!

Season’s Readings from the 100 Acre Wood!

For the East Liverpool parade, the campus entered a float representing the 100 Acre Wood with all the characters (Pooh, Tigger, Eeyore, Piglet, Owl, Rabbit, Kanga, Christopher Robin and bees swarming the “hunny” pot) with, of course, Flash. 

Dr. David Dees handing out a book to a young parade-goer.


This year’s entry earned the Mayor’s Choice award and second place in the float category.

Carrying on its traditional “Season’s Readings” theme, the campus handed out nearly 2,500 books to children along the parade route. 


Cutline A: Flash with his young fans in Salem.
Cutline B: Kent State in the Salem parade.
Cutline C: Season’s Readings from the 100 Acre Wood!
Cutline D: Dr. David Dees handing out a book to a young parade-goer.
 

Monday, December 09, 2019

Kent State University at Salem held its fall Undergraduate Research Conference, an event that recognizes students for their research and allows them to share what they learned through discussions with the academic staff. 

Dr. Karen Resendes was the keynote speaker for the 2019 URC.

The conference is open to all undergraduates in any discipline and in any for-credit course on any Kent State campus. Faculty judges evaluate the presentations based on originality; significance; evidence of learning about the research and information gathering process; and overall quality.

Dr. Karen Resendes was the keynote speaker, sharing her experiences with research as an undergraduate and how it helped shape her career path. As an undergrad, she worked in the cell biology laboratories at the College of William and Mary and the National Cancer Institute.

She went on to earn a doctorate in molecular biology, cell biology and biochemistry at Brown University. She is now the co-director of the Drinko Center for Undergraduate Research at Westminster College in New Wilmington, Pa., where she pursues cancer biology research with undergraduate students.  Resendes also works nationally to promote undergraduate research by serving as an executive board member and the biology division chairperson of the national Council on Undergraduate Research.

The URC committee includes Dr. Rachael Blasiman, chair; Dr. Kristenne Robison, Dr. Omid Bagheri, Cyndi Peterson, Dr. Tsunghui Tu and Krista Hawkins.  

The winners of the 2019 Undergraduate Research Conference are:

  • Paper competition
    • First place: John Priddy for “Amish Silence: Offending and Victimization of Amish Society”
  • Poster competition
    • First place: Sarah Miller for “Airway Management: An Exploration into Tracheostomies;”
    • Second place: Ryan Dowling, Sydney McGrath and Rebecca Soliday for “Understanding the Impact of Early Mobility in ICU Patients;”  
    • Third place: John Priddy for “Amish Silence: Offending and Victimization of Amish Society.”
  • Oral Presentation
    • First place: Alicia Lamp for “Attention: You Have It or Your Sorta Have It;”
    • Second place: Michael Laubacher for “Physician Assistants Versus Radiologists and Hospitalists: Why They are Needed;”
    • Third place: Stephanie Giles for “Women of the Wild West.” 

Students (from left) Mackenzie Pringle, Kristina Fusillo and Ashley Joy with Dr. Tsunghui Tu.


Photo A: In the winners circle: (front, from left) Michael Laubacher, Sarah Miller, Stephanie Giles, Alicia Lamp; and (back, from left) Dr. Rachael Blasiman, chair; Dr. David Dees, dean; John Priddy

Photo B: Dr. Karen Resendes was the keynote speaker for the 2019 URC.

Photo C: Students (from left) Mackenzie Pringle, Kristina Fusillo and Ashley Joy with Dr. Tsunghui Tu.


See more pictures on our Facebook page

Friday, December 06, 2019

 

The Direction Home of Eastern Ohio recently donated funds to the Kent State East Liverpool Season’s Readings project, marking the agency’s support of the project for a third year.

Getting ready for the Season’s Readings book distribution are (from left) Danielle Baker-Rose, accessibility specialist for Kent State Columbiana County, and Joe Rossi, CEO of Direction Home of Eastern Ohio.

Formerly known as the Area Agency on Aging Chapter 11, the agency donated $750 to purchase new children’s books, which will be distributed by Kent State to youngsters along the parade route of the East Liverpool Christmas parade.

Joe Rossi, chief executive officer of Direction Home of Eastern Ohio, made the presentation to Kent State East Liverpool.

“We are so proud to be able to support this project for a third year. Our employees embraced this from the beginning, and we feel it is a great way to promote learning at any age,” Rossi said. “The kids can take something home with them that is meaningful and lasting.”

Over the last four years, thousands of books have been collected and handed out to children along the parade route. The books are donated from Kent State East Liverpool students, staff, faculty and administrators, as well as from area libraries, churches or local organizations.

Donations of new or gently used children’s books are accepted throughout the year to support this project that benefits area youth. 


Cutline: Getting ready for the Season’s Readings book distribution are (from left) Danielle Baker-Rose, accessibility specialist for Kent State Columbiana County, and Joe Rossi, CEO of Direction Home of Eastern Ohio.

John Priddy took first place for his research paper that accompanied his poster.
Thursday, December 05, 2019

 

Playing with Jacob’s Ladder, a popular Amish toy


The Kent State East Liverpool Campus held its annual Culture Fair to showcase students’ research, with a focus on Amish cultures through posters and research papers and displays.

The fair included a display of books and publications; food; Amish toys; and music.

There were 46 poster submissions and 35 essays submitted for judging.


This year’s winning essays were:

  • First: Amish Silence: Offending and Victimization of Amish Society – John D. Priddy
  • Second: Death as God’s Will: Death and Dying Practices of the Amish – Katelyn Paolucci
  • Third: Amish Music: The Sounds of an Amish Lifestyle” – Samantha McGarry

​​​​​​The posters are on display on the second floor of Purinton Hall. View additional photos on our Facebook page

The 2019 Culture Fair: Amish Culture



Cutline A: John Priddy took first place for his research paper that accompanied his poster.

Cutline B: The 2019 Culture Fair: Amish Culture

Cutline C: Playing with Jacob’s Ladder, a popular Amish toy
 

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

The circumstances are grim: Beloved Kent State University mascot Flash is stressed out and hasn’t been able to find the crucial student ID on exam day. You and your friends are the only ones who can help. Your group is frantically scrambling to find the lost ID, but time is running out before it becomes too late for Flash to take the exam.

This scenario might sound like something out of a Kent State mystery movie, but it’s actually the situation in the new escape room called ESCAPE in a FLASH at Kent State’s East Liverpool campus.

The Team Challenge, running until March of 2020, has been attempted by 12 high school teams so far, with only two teams having escaped. Bragging rights are not all the winning team receives; students on the winning team are also provided a scholarship for either of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses.

Tina Smith, public relations coordinator at Kent State’s Columbiana County campuses, said the idea for the escape room was developed two years ago. Smith was challenged by David Dees, the dean of Kent State Columbiana County campuses, to get local area high school students “in the door and on the floor” to explore the campus.

Smith worked with Paula Butler, business services account clerk at Kent State Columbiana County campuses, to develop a solution to Dee’s challenge. The pair, as well as lab assistant Megan Rodgers and IT analyst Jordan Steele, tossed around many ideas, such as a Shark Tank-type of competition and a robotics competition.

ESCAPE in a FLASH Logo“Out of nowhere, Paula said ‘an escape room.’ I had never heard of an escape room before,” Smith said. “Our co-worker, Megan Rodgers, walked in and said she had done two or three of them before. She said, ‘Oh my gosh, it’s just so much fun,’ and that’s where it started. We took off from there.”

And ESCAPE in a FLASH was born.

The team involved in the escape room’s development brought items and materials from their own homes to set up the basics before being granted a small budget by the dean.

“We just begged, borrowed and brought from home most of the stuff in the escape room,” Smith said. “When we started we had no budget. Once we got to the point where it was starting to really come to fruition, our dean was like ‘Yeah, this is really cool,’ so then he gave us a small budget.”

Jeff Christopher, senior facilities manager, found the space for the escape room, worked with the architect’s office, and made sure that the escape room was complying with building codes.

Once it was set up over the summer, groups of high school students and employees came to test out the escape room.

“We did some tweaking and some modification based on how those sessions went,” Smith said. “Now we’re up and running, and we have a team challenge for area high schools.”

“I think it’s unique because it incorporates our local history and our Kent State history,” said Ashley Dunlope, admissions counselor. “It gives you this unique scenario of being a college student, you know, where high school students might not even consider that these situations might happen.”

When it was time to fulfill the challenge set forth by Dees, Dunlope sent out an email to teachers, superintendents and principals of local high schools to let them know about this new opportunity. Donald Bean, assistant director of Enrollment Management and Student Services, helped facilitate those strong connections with local schools.

Smith said that Shawn Golden, associate professor of information technology, and Steele were both key to creating the puzzles and piecing together the room’s technology. Using Rodger’s academic strengths and Steele’s support, escape room teams are able to experience the virtual reality lab.

“They’re kind of the mastermind of our puzzles,” Smith said. “You solve one puzzle but it takes you to another puzzle that you have to solve that takes you to another puzzle before you actually get what you’re looking for.”

ESCAPE in a FLASH is free for regional area high school students and teachers as well as Kent State students. All others can experience the escape room for $25 per person.

“We put that money back into the room,” Butler said. “A commercial room is only good for about nine months. We’re hoping to get two years out of ours. We think it’s going to live a little longer before we have to change it.”

Next fall, Smith said they’re planning on running another Team Challenge that will run until spring of 2021.

The team advises people who experience the escape room to “divide and conquer.” She said that all team members must participate by collaborating on what they’ve found and sharing that information.

Even after just a few months of being open to the public, the escape room has created some of Butler’s and Smith’s favorite memories.

“Last week we watched the students. It was one male and he was in the room with four females,” Smith said. “He stayed off to himself, and he solved one or two puzzles completely on his own and didn’t even go and tell the other girls that he had done it. He was so methodical and thoughtful about it, but yet he was a little shy about being with four other girls.”

The team can agree that it does not matter what educational background you have, when it comes to solving escape rooms, communication and problem-solving are key.

Those who are interested in attending the escape room still have time to prove they can solve it in the fastest amount of time.

The team, which spent several evenings at local escape rooms to learn from professionals and best practices, worked together for numerous hours building, gluing, painting, and arranging the escape room to make it the best it could be.

Teams can reserve their ESCAPE in a FLASH spot by calling 330-382-7567 or 330-382-7402.

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

The circumstances are grim: Beloved Kent State University mascot Flash is stressed out and hasn’t been able to find the crucial student ID on exam day. You and your friends are the only ones who can help. Your group is frantically scrambling to find the lost ID, but time is running out before it becomes too late for Flash to take the exam.

This scenario might sound like something out of a Kent State mystery movie, but it’s actually the situation in the new escape room called ESCAPE in a FLASH at Kent State’s East Liverpool campus.

The Team Challenge, running until March of 2020, has been attempted by 12 high school teams so far, with only two teams having escaped. Bragging rights are not all the winning team receives; students on the winning team are also provided a scholarship for either of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses.

Tina Smith, public relations coordinator at Kent State’s Columbiana County campuses, said the idea for the escape room was developed two years ago. Smith was challenged by David Dees, the dean of Kent State Columbiana County campuses, to get local area high school students “in the door and on the floor” to explore the campus.

Smith worked with Paula Butler, business services account clerk at Kent State Columbiana County campuses, to develop a solution to Dee’s challenge. The pair, as well as lab assistant Megan Rodgers and IT analyst Jordan Steele, tossed around many ideas, such as a Shark Tank-type of competition and a robotics competition.

ESCAPE in a FLASH Logo“Out of nowhere, Paula said ‘an escape room.’ I had never heard of an escape room before,” Smith said. “Our co-worker, Megan Rodgers, walked in and said she had done two or three of them before. She said, ‘Oh my gosh, it’s just so much fun,’ and that’s where it started. We took off from there.”

And ESCAPE in a FLASH was born.

The team involved in the escape room’s development brought items and materials from their own homes to set up the basics before being granted a small budget by the dean.

“We just begged, borrowed and brought from home most of the stuff in the escape room,” Smith said. “When we started we had no budget. Once we got to the point where it was starting to really come to fruition, our dean was like ‘Yeah, this is really cool,’ so then he gave us a small budget.”

Jeff Christopher, senior facilities manager, found the space for the escape room, worked with the architect’s office, and made sure that the escape room was complying with building codes.

Once it was set up over the summer, groups of high school students and employees came to test out the escape room.

“We did some tweaking and some modification based on how those sessions went,” Smith said. “Now we’re up and running, and we have a team challenge for area high schools.”

“I think it’s unique because it incorporates our local history and our Kent State history,” said Ashley Dunlope, admissions counselor. “It gives you this unique scenario of being a college student, you know, where high school students might not even consider that these situations might happen.”

When it was time to fulfill the challenge set forth by Dees, Dunlope sent out an email to teachers, superintendents and principals of local high schools to let them know about this new opportunity. Donald Bean, assistant director of Enrollment Management and Student Services, helped facilitate those strong connections with local schools.

Smith said that Shawn Golden, associate professor of information technology, and Steele were both key to creating the puzzles and piecing together the room’s technology. Using Rodger’s academic strengths and Steele’s support, escape room teams are able to experience the virtual reality lab.

“They’re kind of the mastermind of our puzzles,” Smith said. “You solve one puzzle but it takes you to another puzzle that you have to solve that takes you to another puzzle before you actually get what you’re looking for.”

ESCAPE in a FLASH is free for regional area high school students and teachers as well as Kent State students. All others can experience the escape room for $25 per person.

“We put that money back into the room,” Butler said. “A commercial room is only good for about nine months. We’re hoping to get two years out of ours. We think it’s going to live a little longer before we have to change it.”

Next fall, Smith said they’re planning on running another Team Challenge that will run until spring of 2021.

The team advises people who experience the escape room to “divide and conquer.” She said that all team members must participate by collaborating on what they’ve found and sharing that information.

Even after just a few months of being open to the public, the escape room has created some of Butler’s and Smith’s favorite memories.

“Last week we watched the students. It was one male and he was in the room with four females,” Smith said. “He stayed off to himself, and he solved one or two puzzles completely on his own and didn’t even go and tell the other girls that he had done it. He was so methodical and thoughtful about it, but yet he was a little shy about being with four other girls.”

The team can agree that it does not matter what educational background you have, when it comes to solving escape rooms, communication and problem-solving are key.

Those who are interested in attending the escape room still have time to prove they can solve it in the fastest amount of time.

The team, which spent several evenings at local escape rooms to learn from professionals and best practices, worked together for numerous hours building, gluing, painting, and arranging the escape room to make it the best it could be.

Teams can reserve their ESCAPE in a FLASH spot by calling 330-382-7567 or 330-382-7402.

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

National Radiologic Technology Week is held each November to recognize the date that Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered the x-ray, which was Nov. 8, 1895. The annual observation helps promote the important role that medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals play in providing quality patient care and a safe healthcare environment.

To help commemorate this week, rad tech faculty and students from the Salem Campus bagged 690 bags of corn, for a total of 3,657 pounds of fresh produce to be distributed through the Second Harvest Food Bank.

The students also participated in a series of competitions that included the annual Quiz Bowl, informational exhibits and posters that were displayed at clinical sites. The students compete as teams, based on their clinical site placements.

Additionally, the Rad Tech program recognizes outstanding individuals through scholarship presentations.

QUIZ BOWL

First Place: the team of Allyson Buchert, Cameron Drotos, Zach Fry, Michael Laubacher, Lauren Sawdey and Trey Sommers, from UH Portage Medical Center

Second Place: the team of Madison Berta, Robert Buck, Meredith Dawson and Kaitlyn Stock

First place Quiz Bowl team members

Second place Quiz Bowl team members

EXHIBIT COMPETITION WINNERS

First Year Students: Gabtielle Arquilla, Rachael DiFrancesco and Rachael Moore for their “Imaging of the Spine” exhibit at St. Elizabeth Youngstown Hospital

Second Year Students: Maggie Coblentz and Heidi Hauck for their exhibit at Trumbull Regional Medical Center

POSTER COMPETITON

First Place: the team of Cameron Drotos, Zach Fry, Michael Laubacher and Trey Sommers for their poster (How About DaT Scan?) at UH Portage Medical Center

Second Place: the team of Bryanna Morris, Brenna Rito and Kate Yeagley for their poster (Cure Breast Cancer) at Salem Regional Medical Center

GEORGIA ANDERSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

  • Brittany Christmas, second year student
  • Kacian Hamilton, first year student

ROY BELL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

  • Brenna Rito, Clinical Excellence Award
  • Michael Laubacher, Academic Excellence Award


Cutline A: Students and faculty who bagged corn for the Second Harvest Food Bank were (front, from left) Allison Sunderman, Halee Allen, Molli Peroglio, Samantha Michael; and (back, from left) Rachel Moore, Rachael DiFrancesco, Gabrielle Arquilla, Judy Miller, Madison Smith, Margie Iagulli, Jan Gibson.


Cutline B: First place Quiz Bowl team members were (front, from left) Allyson Buchert, Lauren Sawdey; (back, from left) Zach Fry, Trey Sommers, Cameron Drotos, Michael Laubacher.


Cutline C: Second place Quiz Bowl team members were (from left) Robert Buck, Kaitlyn Stock, Madison Berta and Meredith Dawson.

More pictures on our Facebook page…
 

“Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4th and Student Protest in America,”
Wednesday, November 13, 2019

 

Kent State Salem invites the public to two showings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4th and Student Protest in America,” an award-winning documentary about the events of May 4, 1970, that took place on the Kent State University Campus. 

The film will be shown at 5:30 p.m. on Nov. 20 and again at noon on Dec. 4, room 134 in the campus building on St. Route 45. The events are free.

The documentary was produced and directed by Daniel Miller, who attended Kent State from 1968 to 1970. While a student at Kent State, Miller was a musician and civil rights activist. After leaving Kent State, he moved to Oregon and completed his education, receiving his masters and doctorate degrees in telecommunications and film from the University of Oregon, where he is now a professor. He teaches, researches and writes about civil and human rights.

The film presentation helps kick off a months-long series of events on the Salem Campus to help commemorate the 50th anniversary of the events of May 4th at Kent State. Over the next several months, all Kent State campuses will hold events to observe the anniversary of that day.

According to Miller’s website, “Fire in the Heartland” is a documentary “about a generation of young people who stood up to speak their minds against social injustice in some of our nation’s most turbulent and transformative years, the 1960s through the 1970s.” 

Wednesday, November 06, 2019

 

Kent State East Liverpool is holding its eighth annual Undergraduate Research/Culture Fair Dec. 4, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., in Purinton Hall. This year’s theme is Amish cultures.

All Kent State students are welcome to submit research papers and posters on topics related to Amish culture. The deadline for submissions is Nov. 26

Register your attendance, submit papers or to sign up for a tri-fold poster submission

For additional information, contact Dr. Lydia Rose at Lrose17@kent.edu or at 330-382-7572.


 

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

 

Student nurses who volunteered at the RAM free clinic

Earlier this semester, a team of nursing students and faculty members volunteered to work at the Rural Area Mobile (RAM) free clinic held at the Covelli Center in Youngstown.

The team spent a day working in triage, taking vital signs and collecting health history information from individuals preparing for a medical/dental or a medical/vision visit. 

The clinic was staffed by area medical professionals who provided free care to all who sought treatment. It is estimated that more than 700 patients were seen that day, receiving nearly $300,000 in free services.

Representing Kent State Salem’s BSN program were Dr. May Lou Ferranto and Sarah Pierce Brown, along with nursing students Sydney McGrath, Ayla Mroczkowski, Taylor Oliver and Wendy Vargo.

RAM is a major nonprofit provider of mobile clinics that provide free, quality healthcare to those in need. 


Cutline: Student nurses who volunteered at the RAM free clinic are (from left) Ayla Mroczkowski, Sydney McGrath, Wendy Vargo and Taylor Oliver.

Monday, October 28, 2019


Kent State University at East Liverpool recognized the academic achievements of several students during its annual scholarship reception. 

The scholarships and recipients are:

Barnes & Noble Book Scholarship:

  • Abigail Ziegler

David T. Mason Memorial Endowed Scholarship:

  • Hannah White

Dixie F. Leedy Memorial Scholarship:

  • Mattisyn Infanti 

Dr. John W. Hayes Nursing Scholarship:

  • Makayla Ammon
  • Regina Chu
  • Maggie Maharick
  • Kaitlin Reed
  • Danae Stanley
  • Jessica Taylor

Friends of the East Liverpool Campus Scholarship:

  • Jeremy Barton
  • Thomas Cave
  • Addison Guildoo
  • Noel McCoy
  • Corey Snow
  • Kaitlyn Stamp

Gus Markanton Memorial Scholarship:

  • Joshua Call
  • Andrew Jackson

Harold T. Bricker East Liverpool City Schools Scholarship:

  • Sydney Hill

Larry, Donna and Ashley Kannal Nursing Scholarship:

  • Regina Chu

M. Patricia Burnett Scholarship:

  • Lauren Wilson

Norman I. Mayer Nursing Scholarship:

  • Melissa Carter

Pottertown Foundation Scholarship:

  • Caitlynne Devore
  • Megan Hyde
  • Bethany Kholos
  • Amy Pangio

Rutledge Scholarship:

  • Melinda Dailey
  • Kelly May
  • Alissa Opsitnik
  • Angelica Ternasky
  • Deanna Zantopulos

    Single Parent Scholarship:

  • Brittany Hoops
  • Danae Stanley

CCP Opportunity Scholarship:

  • Sierra Donahue
  • Sydney Hill
  • Jamie Hilton
  • Abigail Luckino
  • Hannah White

New Freshman Opportunity Scholarship:

  • Luke Bell
  • Jayson Bott
  • Addison Copeland
  • Kyla Covert
  • Matthew Diddle
  • Jasmine Earich Vietmeier
  • Kyleigh Freeman
  • Korbin Grim
  • Addison Guildoo
  • Nathaniel Hager
  • Elaina Howell
  • Joaquin Johnson
  • Olivia Joseph
  • Logan Joy
  • Katrina Malcolm
  • Kinley Martin
  • Zachari Reinhart
  • Isaac Ricketts
  • Bailie Rohr
  • Aidan Watkins

Opportunity Scholarships:

  • Linda Adkins
  • Makayla Ammon
  • Emily Andreozzi
  • Jeremy Barton
  • Antoinette Basinger
  • Christopher Bates
  • Tayla Bott
  • Joshua Call
  • Katelyn Canei
  • Katelyn Carter
  • Melissa Carter
  • Thomas Cave
  • Regina Chu
  • Cassidy Concato
  • Melinda Dailey
  • Drew Dawson
  • Caitlynne Devore
  • Jordyn Faustino
  • Allison Forbes
  • Chelsea Freshwater
  • Bailey Gortney
  • Kristin Hanna
  • Kimberly Hobbs
  • Brittany Hoops
  • Megan Hyde
  • Andrew Jackson
  • Bethany Kholos
  • Melissa Kolman
  • Sarra Kroesen
  • Lydia Larson
  • Cassandra Lipari
  • Maggie Maharick
  • Nicole Massaro
  • Kelly May
  • Noel McCoy
  • Michaela Mrozek
  • Alissa Opsitnik
  • Amy Pangio
  • Isabel Pedraja
  • Joyce Pugh
  • Kaitlin Reed
  • Isaac Reese
  • Corey Snow
  • Kaitlyn Stamp
  • Danae Stanley
  • Jessica Taylor
  • Angelica Ternasky
  • Logan Tonkovich
  • Elizabeth Wassel
  • Emily Willis
  • Lauren Wilson
  • Tiffany Wright
  • Deanna Zantopulos
  • Abigail Ziegler

Cutline: Scholarship recipients attending the reception at Kent State East Liverpool included (from left) Lydia Larson, Melissa Kolman, Cassandra Lipari, Hannah White, Megan Hyde, Sydney Hill, Mattisyn Infanti, Linda Adkins, Andrew Jackson, Katelyn Carter, Baily Gortney, Bethany Kholos, Maggie Maharick, Bailie Rohr, Brittany Hoops, Caitlynne Devore
 

Monday, October 28, 2019

Kent State University at Salem recognized the academic achievements of several students during its recent scholarship reception.

The awards and recipients are:

Alumni Insurance Studies Scholarship:

  • Jessica Burdette
  • Alyssa Card
  • Myranda Joseph
  • Robin Kovacs
  • Elizabeth Wassel

Barnes & Noble Book Scholarship:

  • Curtis Carrillo

BSN Nursing Scholarship:

  • Nicole Smith

College Credit Plus Salem Opportunity Scholarship:

  • Cassandra Aldish
  • Maia Amato
  • Katelyn Bailey
  • Madison Berta
  • Laura Blakeman
  • Rachel Bowen
  • Danny Davis
  • Casey Dickey
  • Olivia DiLallo
  • Samantha Geary
  • Jillian Giovanni
  • Emma Jarvis
  • Madison Ketchum
  • Gavin McCloskey
  • Samantha Michael
  • Paige Miller
  • Kobi Ream
  • Brooke Sauerwein
  • David Smith
  • Gabrielle Smith

Courtney Family Scholarship:

  • Adam Kollay
  • Abby Smalley
  • Allison Sunderman

Davey Tree Expert Scholarship:

  • Militca Denee
  • Christopher Thompson

Donna J. Sedzmak Student Survivor and Caregiver Scholarship:

  • Robin Kovacs

Dr. James F. Cooney Endowed Scholarship:

  • Diana Ruzic

Garden Club of Youngstown Scholarship:

  • Christopher Thompson

G.E.M. Young Insurance Scholarship:

  • Alyssa Card

Georgia Anderson Radiologic Technology Scholarship:

  • Brittany Christmas
  • Kacian Hamilton

Independent Insurance Agents of Trumbull County Scholarship:

  • Jessica Burdette
  • Alyssa Card
  • Alli Davis
  • Myranda Joseph
  • Madison Ketchum

James and Coralie Centofanti Nursing and Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Scholarship:

  • Brittany Christmas
  • Shelby Handshue
  • Jennifer Hayner
  • Heather Lude
  • Alexis Ludwig
  • McKenzie Martin
  • Alexis Moore
  • Ayla Mroczkowski
  • Brianne Williams

John E. Roncone Scholarship:

  • Joseph Mapel

Joseph P. and Donna J. Sedzmak Accounting and Business Scholarship:

  • Carly Price

Joyce and Tom Butts Scholarship:

  • Alexis Johnson

Kent State Salem Alumni Scholarship:

  • Mattisyn Infanti

Kent State Salem Advisory Board Scholarship:

  • Michaela Huston
  • Rachel Kuttler

Kim E. Goll Scholarship:

  • Casey Dickey

Mary Byers Howett Scholarship:

  • Michaela Huston

Mitch’s Live Your Dream Scholarship:

  • Militca Denee

National Interstate Insurance Leadership Company Scholarship:

  • Faith Foor

Professional Promise Scholarship:

  • Sarrah Tennefoss

Roy Bell Memorial Scholarship:

  • Michael Laubacher
  • Brenna Rito

Rural Scholars Scholarship:

  • Nicholas Berger
  • Peggiann Beverly
  • Nicholas Blower
  • Morgan Briand
  • Connilyn Cross
  • Casey Dickey
  • Alexandria Harman
  • Lokelani Kalima
  • Victoria Mayer
  • Isabel Pedraja
  • Lindsey Rice
  • Sydney Rice
  • Lydia Strawn
  • Brienna Sweitzer
  • Erin Taylor
  • Sarrah Tennefoss
  • Hannah Thomas

Salem Campus eSports Scholarship:

  • Patricia Beltran
  • Catherine Cannon
  • Thomas Siembida
  • Jared Simmons
  • Dominic Spiker
  • Rylie Zeigler

Salem Honors Program Scholarship:

  • Olivia DiLallo
  • Kalie Eastek
  • Faith Foor
  • Samantha Geary
  • Caitlin Giles
  • Stephanie Giles
  • Jillian Giovanni
  • Alexandra Harman
  • Abigail Jackson
  • Mariah Lanzer
  • Michael Laubacher
  • Heather Lude
  • Jaidyn Morgan
  • Abigail Pearson
  • Carly Price
  • Kobi Ream
  • Lindsey Rice
  • Jozie Scott
  • Skyllar Shasteen
  • Tyler Stratton

Salem Psychology Scholarship:

  • Thomas Kornbau

Westfield Insurance Scholarship:

  • Alyssa Card
  • Samuel Johnson
  • Myranda Joseph
  • Kaitlynn Mick
  • Michael Zebroski

Willoway Nursery Scholarship:

  • Militca Denee

Cutline: Honored with the James and Coralie Centofanti Nursing and Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Scholarship were (from left) Brianne Williams, Ayla Mroczkowski, Jennifer Hayner, Marsha and Joe Centofanti, Shelby Handshue, Alexis Ludwig and Brittany Christmas.
 

Dr. Daniel Dankovich
Wednesday, October 23, 2019

 

Dr. Daniel Dankovich, lecturer-biology at Kent State East Liverpool, received the 2019 Outstanding Teaching Award from the University Teaching Council at Kent State. This is the university’s highest honor for nontenure-track faculty.

Dankovich began teaching part-time for Kent State in 2010, teaching on the Salem, Twinsburg, Burton and East Liverpool campuses. He became a fulltime faculty member on the East Liverpool Campus in 2018, teaching human biology and anatomy/physiology.

Dr. Dankovich with Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses

Now living in Canfield, Dankovich graduated from Austintown Fitch High School in 1980. He received two bachelor’s degrees (in biology and psychology) from the Ohio State University in 1984, before earning his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from the National College of Chiropractic in 1989.

Dankovich helps coordinate and participates in study sessions throughout the year that provide opportunities for students to get intensive tutoring and instructional support, as well as help prepare them for exams and testing. He was among the first instructors to use virtual reality as a student learning tool, shifting the way students engage with his anatomy classes.

“Dan is not satisfied with simply being really good,” noted Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO for the Kent State Columbiana County campuses. “Over the last several years, he has dedicated himself to finding even better ways to teach. Dan has dedicated himself to focusing more on student learning, rather than just his lecturing style. ...

“…Individuals who are the best at their profession are never satisfied with just being good. These individuals are on a path to find greatness and Dan represents this in the area of college teaching.”

Dankovich also took the initiative to create a food pantry for students on the East Liverpool Campus and created a student leadership council that helps manage the food distributions.

Dr. Dankovich with Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses

“Like all great educators, Dr. Dankovich understands that being a professor is about more than just what goes on in the classroom,” Dees continued. “Dan always volunteers and/or takes the lead on important projects. His passion for helping students is in everything he does and he role models for his colleagues the best practices in higher education.”

The Outstanding Teaching Award is presented annually to faculty members who consistently showcase astounding skills in classroom teaching. Award winners are formally recognized at the annual University Teaching Council Conference on the Kent Campus.


Cutline A: Dr. Daniel Dankovich

Cutline B: Dr. Dankovich with Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses

Cutline C: Celebrating with Dr. Dankovich (second from right) were (from left) Dr. Susan Rossi, assistant dean of Kent State East Liverpool; Krista Hawkins, nursing faculty at Kent State Salem; Dr. Louise Steele, assistant professor-biology at Kent State Salem; and Dean David Dees.
 

Dr. Rachael Blasiman
Monday, October 21, 2019

 

Dr. Rachael Blasiman, associate professor-psychology at Kent State Salem, received the 2019 Distinguished Teaching Award, sponsored by the Kent State Alumni Association. This is the university’s most prestigious honor in teaching.

She began teaching on the Salem Campus in 2010 and became a full-time instructor in 2012. Blasiman received a Bachelor of Science in biology from Mount Union University, followed by a Master of Arts and a doctorate degree in experimental psychology from Case Western Reserve University.

At Case Western, Blasiman taught two courses and served in its Seminar Approach to General Education and Scholarship (SAGES) program. 

Dr. Blasiman with one of her psychology classes

“I’m incredibly grateful to work at a place like Kent State Salem where teaching is so highly valued, where students are here to learn and improve their lives, and where we have a strong sense of community,” Blasiman shared.

“We have many talented students and faculty, and I am honored to receive an award for something I love doing – teaching students about the wonders of the human mind and working with students to conduct original research in the field of cognitive psychology.”

On the Salem Campus, Blasiman leads the undergraduate student research committee and organizes the annual student research conference. 

At Kent State, she serves on the Center for Teaching and Learning and Undergraduate Research advisory boards, as well as the University Teaching Council. 

Dr. Rachael Blasiman learning of her award

At the national level, Blasiman is a reviewer for the Society for the Teaching of Psychology and an ad hoc reviewer for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology. 

“Dr. Blasiman is a true scholar that has become passionate about understanding the science of student learning. Her research has identified strategies and practices that help students perform at the highest level in the college classroom,” noted Dr. David Dees, dean and CAO of the Kent State Columbiana County campuses. 

 “Dr. Blasiman’s students find her courses challenging, exciting and spaces for true learning. Her research on understanding human learning has not only gathered national acclaim but has also established her as one of the best teachers on our campus.”

Under the support and guidance of Blasiman, one of her students, Hayley Shasteen, won the Kent State University SURE research competition and, then, was recognized nationally by being awarded the prestigious Barry Goldwater Scholarship, one of the first such honorees from Kent State University.

The Distinguished Teaching Award is presented annually to three full-time Kent State faculty members who demonstrate extraordinary teaching in the classroom and a devotion to touching the lives of students. Faculty members are nominated by students and supported by their teaching peers.

Award winners are formally recognized at the annual University Teaching Council Conference on the Kent Campus.


Cutline A: Dr. Rachael Blasiman

Cutline B:  Dr. Blasiman with one of her psychology classes

Cutline C: Dr. Rachael Blasiman learning of her award

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Students from the Kent State East Liverpool physical therapist assistant program observed National PTA Month by donating $800 to the #LaurenStrong Foundation, in support of Beaver Local High School senior Lauren Thomas who suffered a life-altering stroke last year.

Presenting the check to Lauren Thomas (center) were PTA students Kaitlyn Meek and Alissa Opsitnik

The PTA students raised the money through a basket raffle. The baskets contained goods and products from several Columbiana County businesses. Just prior to the check presentation, Thomas drew the winning tickets for the various baskets

Each year, PTA students from the Kent East Liverpool campus find unique ways to increase awareness about their field, while raising funds for a cause chosen by the class.

Lauren Thomas draws a winning ticket.

Thomas was attending a volleyball camp in the summer of 2018 when she suffered a serious stroke. Initially, her family was told that she would likely never walk or talk again, nor understand much of anything. 

More than a year later, after countless medical procedures and hours of therapy, Thomas is back at school and her recovery has been astounding. Through her recovery process, Thomas received enormous support from the local community, as well as support from across the country.

To pay it forward, she and her family established the #LaurenStrong Foundation that will help other families facing similar circumstances. 

By donating to the #LaurenStrong Foundation, the PTA students hope to help raise stroke awareness and the role that physical therapy plays in the recovery process.



Cutline A: Showing support for the #LaurenStrong Foundation and its namesake Lauren Thomas (shown in front with the check) are PTA students (front, left to right) Skylar Fletcher, Sydni Bowker, Mallory Ullom, Emily Glenz, Russel Kolat, Audra Pesta, Autumn Armstrong, Jordyn Faustino, Brandon Blystone, Angel Ternasky; (middle, left to right) Anthony Desarro, Cassidy Concato, Jayla Martin, Deanna Zantopulos, Melinda Dailey, Elyse Price, Nick Mattern, Kelly May, Ellie Norman, Noel McCoy, Taylor Clawson, Dustin Henry, Russel Paugh, Jeremy Barton, John Siefert; (back, from left) Alexis Shelley, Sydney Voorhees, Nick Adkins; and with the check (front from left) Alissa Opsitnik, Kaitlyn Meek. 

Cutline B: Presenting the check to Lauren Thomas (center) were PTA students Kaitlyn Meek and Alissa Opsitnik.

Cutline C: Lauren Thomas draws a winning ticket.

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

A staff member from the office U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan from Ohio’s 13th District (second from left) met with OTA students Amy Pangio , Katelyn McKinney, Ryan Bost and Cassidy Wint.

OTA student Baily Gortney and Melissa Queen (far right) met with Ohio Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, 16th District, and his staff member.

 

The Kent State East Liverpool occupational therapy assistant class of 2020 traveled to Washington, D.C., to participate in the annual Hill Day, sponsored by The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). This event provides OT practitioners and students a chance to take messages straight to the offices of their state representatives to lobby about healthcare issues related to their field. 

This year, 16 students helped represent Kent State East Liverpool. They were accompanied by Kathy Swoboda, program director, as well as faculty member Brandy Britenbaugh.


Cutline A: OTA students attended Hill Day 2019, including (front, from left) Lydia Larson, Brittany Hoops, Melissa Queen, Caitlynne Devore, Megan Hyde, Baily Gortney, Katelyn McKinney, Bethany Kholos, Cassandra Lipari, Brandy Britenbaugh, faculty; and (back, from left): Madeline Swickard; Kathy Swoboda, program director; Amy Pangio, Cassidy Wint, Lauren Wilson, Ryan Bost, Haley Kirkbride, Isaac Reese

Cutline B: OTA student Baily Gortney and Melissa Queen (far right) met with Ohio Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, 16th District, and his staff member. 

Cutline C: A staff member from the office U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan from Ohio’s 13th District (second from left) met with OTA students Amy Pangio , Katelyn McKinney, Ryan Bost and Cassidy Wint.
 

Thursday, October 10, 2019


The inaugural Kent State Columbiana County Volleyball Classic took place Oct. 7, when the Salem Quakers hosted the East Liverpool Potters for a full night of volleyball action.

Flash and Dean David Dees (center) presented $500 scholarships to (from left) Kaylee Freeman of Salem; Cece Peachy of East Liverpool; Emily Recktenwald of East Liverpool; and Taylor Troy of Salem.

The evening featured freshman, JV and varsity games between the cross-county rivals, with Salem High School winning all contests. In a hard-fought varsity match, Salem High School defeated East Liverpool High School, earning the right to keep the traveling winner’s plaque for the first year. 

Flash helped entertain the players and fans, tossing t-shirts into the stands and interacting with all. 

A highlight of the night was the presentation of four $500 scholarships that were each presented to seniors from the two schools. Receiving the scholarships were Cece Peachy and Emily Recktenwald from East Liverpool High School; and Kaylee Freeman and Taylor Troy from Salem High School.

Flash is always a fan-favorite.

 

Winning the drawings for Bluetooth speakers were Jessica Mackey of East Liverpool and Abbie Davidson of Salem.

Kent State Columbiana County sold raffle tickets for various gift baskets with the proceeds going to the new Columbiana County Women's Leadership Development Scholarship.

The Kent State County Classic represents the strong foundation of learning in East Liverpool and Salem, as each community is home to one of the university’s two Columbiana County campuses. 


Cutline A: Salem High School Quakers won the first-ever Columbiana County Volleyball Classic by defeating East Liverpool High School.

Cutline B: Flash and Dean David Dees (center) presented $500 scholarships to (from left) Kaylee Freeman of Salem; Cece Peachy of East Liverpool; Emily Recktenwald of East Liverpool; and Taylor Troy of Salem.

Cutline C: Flash is always a fan-favorite.

See more photos on our Facebook page

Monday, September 30, 2019

 

In September, several law enforcement officers and their K9 partners spent a day at the Kent State City Center for an intensive training session. 

Kent State Officer Anne Spahr and Coco conduct a classroom search

The day was organized by Officer Anne Spahr of the Kent State University Police Department, who explained that the units train regularly for a minimum of 16 hours each month.

An officer and his K9 partner prepare to search.

Participating in this training session were Spahr and her K9 partner, Coco, of the Kent State explosive detection K9 team; Officer Miguel Witt and K9 Dexter, also of the Kent State explosive detection team; Officer Ed Stoltz and K9 Rex of the Cleveland State Police Department explosive detection team; Officer Pam Helmick and K9 Halo of the University of Akron Police Department’s explosive detection team; and Agent Andrew Koch of the Medway Drug Enforcement Agency’s narcotics detection team.

Spahr explained that the training involves placing, or hiding, training aids (narcotics and/or explosives) throughout the building and allowing the dogs to conduct a search just as they do when responding to bomb threats, protective sweeps or searches.


Cutline A: Law enforcement officers and their K9 partners during a training session at the City Center.

Cutline B: Kent State Officer Anne Spahr and Coco conduct a classroom search.

Cutline C:  An officer and his K9 partner prepare to search.

Kent State Salem USG officers for 2019-2020 are (from left) Charlie Wilson, Emma Angle and Heather Kornas.
Monday, September 23, 2019

 

Kent State University at Salem announces the Undergraduate Student Government officers for the 2019-20 academic year.

The officers include Charlie Wilson, president; Emma Angle, vice president; and Heather Kornas, secretary/treasurer.

The Salem USG meets on alternating Thursdays on campus. All students are welcome to attend the meetings to share ideas and discuss campus matters. Members of other student clubs are especially encouraged to attend.

Scheduled meetings are:

  • October      
    •  3  Student Lounge
    • 17 Academic Learning Commons
    • 31  Student Lounge
  • November
    • 14  Academic Learning Commons

The USG is hosting movie night on campus with the showing of Nightmare Before Christmas on Oct. 17. Details will be announced soon.

The group is currently holding a fundraising through RADA Cutlery. The items include kitchen utensils, knifes, dip mixes, desserts, cookbooks and other products. Proceeds from the sales will be used for student activities on and around campus. The link to shop is https://radafundraising.com/?rfsn=3140285.827461.


Cutline: Kent State Salem USG officers for 2019-2020 are (from left) Charlie Wilson, Emma Angle and Heather Kornas.

The captains of the Salem High School volleyball team with Flash. They include (from left) Hayden Carner, Elly Exline and Jenna McClish.
Tuesday, September 17, 2019

 

Kent State’s Columbiana County campuses will welcome fans from both ends of the county for the inaugural Kent State Volleyball Classic on Monday, Oct. 7, as the Salem Quakers host the East Liverpool Potters. The competition begins at 5 p.m. with the freshmen team match-up, followed by the JV and varsity games.

Volleyball Classic Logo

Kent State Columbiana County will award $500 scholarships to four individual high school seniors attending the game, as well as a set of Bluetooth speakers to two individual high school students. Kent’s mascot, Flash, will be there to cheer on the teams and toss t-shirts into the crowd.

Raffle tickets can be purchased that night for a variety of prizes, including tickets to the MAC men’s and women’s basketball tournaments; Kent State apparel; and items from Libs Market in Salem. Proceeds from the raffle will benefit the Columbiana County Women’s Leadership Development Scholarship.

At the end of the game, a traveling plaque will be presented to the winning team by Dean Dr. David Dees.  

Kent State students, staff and faculty are encouraged to attend the event and put your Golden Flash pride on display. Wear your blue and gold and cheer on both teams!


Cutline: The captains of the Salem High School volleyball team with Flash. They include (from left) Hayden Carner, Elly Exline and Jenna McClish.
 

James Hildeg was named Clinical Instructor of the Year by Kent State East Liverpool physical therapist assistant students
Monday, September 16, 2019

 

James Hideg was selected as 2019 Clinical Instructor of the Year by students and staff of the physical therapist assistant program at Kent State East Liverpool. A licensed physical therapist, he is the owner and president of University Sports Physical Therapy, located in Youngstown.

As a clinical instructor, Hideg works with PTA students who are placed in the facility as part of their educational experience and training. He has been an active clinical instructor for Kent State’s physical therapist assistant program at the East Liverpool and Ashtabula campuses for several years. 

Hideg is a credentialed clinical instructor through the American Physical Therapy Association and a certified athletic trainer. He is active in his community and highly involved with youth athletes in the Youngstown area.

Hideg was nominated for this award by Kent State East Liverpool PTA students. “He challenged me and allowed me to think critically, and he encouraged me to believe in myself,” stated one student. 

Kent State East Liverpool offers an associate degree program for students interested in becoming physical therapist assistants. To learn more, visit www.kent.edu/columbiana. 


Cutline: James Hideg was named Clinical Instructor of the Year by Kent State East Liverpool physical therapist assistant students. Presenting him with the award is Katie Sutton, academic coordinator of PTST clinical education at Kent East Liverpool.

Thursday, September 12, 2019

Kim Steele-Marks, director of the Human Development and Family Studies program, helped kids make calming bottles, complete with glitter, beads and bubbles.

The Kent State Salem Campus hosted the second STEAM University, a free day-long event organized by the Columbiana County Educational Service Center for area students in pre-K through fifth grade. This year’s event added the “A” for arts, while again offering dozens of hands-on activities to promote science, technology, engineering and math.

The Early Childhood Education program helped kids make roller coasters for marbles. Pictured are (from left) Dr. Tsung-hui Tu, program director; students Connie Cross, Jordin Floyd, Amanda Reiter, Emily Forsythe, Elizabeth Callahan, Connor Stewart; and Dr

Several local businesses and organizations provided more than 40 different fun hands-on activities for kids to learn how STEAM subjects are used every day in jobs by local individuals and how these topics are important in our region. The vendors included OH WOW!, a kid-oriented learning center from Youngstown.

There were rabbits, a lizard, an owl, a hawk, police cruiser, a SWAT vehicle, fire trucks, robots, balloons, plants, computers, musical instruments and much more for kids to enjoy.

Representing Kent State Salem were faculty and students from the nursing, rad tech, horticulture, early childhood education and human services programs. 

There were hundreds of students from area schools districts, including preschools, private and public schools.