Undergraduate Electives | School of Digital Sciences | Kent State University

Undergraduate Electives

A list of pre-approved electives for the Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, and Minor in Digital Sciences is given below.  Requests for consideration of other courses as approved electives should be submitted to the student's advisor in the School of Digital Sciences. In order to meet upper-division requirement 1 or more courses may need to be upper-division.

CADT 22005 - MULTIMEDIA AND GAME DESIGN
Covers the creation of interactive multimedia presentations. Development of flowcharts, roughs and interactive navigation systems. Integration of images, animation, video, sound and custom code for the creation of an interactive multimedia presentation. Prerequisite: none.


COMM 21008 - SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIES
(Cross-listed with JMC 21008) Designed to help students understand and use social media in critical and strategic ways that will improve their lives and careers. Helps students harness the power and potential of the social Web, including strategies used to position and market organizations as well as individuals. Exposes students to the latest social-media applications and to critical views of social media's impact on business, society and culture. Students are also introduced to interaction perspectives of social media, which are embedded within both the communication studies and the journalism and mass communication curriculum. Students emerge from the class with a strategic plan designed to enhance their lives and their careers. Prerequisite: none.

COMM 26001 - PUBLIC COMMUNICATION IN SOCIETY
Examines communication in public settings. Content includes issues in mass media, political communication and political advertising, news, crisis communication, public opinion, and communication in executive, legislative and judicial settings. Students explore the influence of mediated messages via application of mass communication theories and constructs. Prerequisite: none. 

COMM 35600 - COMMUNICATION IN SMALL GROUPS AND TEAMS
Focuses on the application and practice of group communication skills and techniques applied to goal-oriented small group situations. The course explores communication theory and research about small groups and teams, relating in group and teams, managing conflict in groups and teams, leadership in groups and teams, and problem-solving in groups and teams. Prerequisite: None. 

COMM 41000 - SPORTS COMMUNICATION
Advanced treatment of interpersonal communication theory and research. Interpersonal principles are applied to group and organizational contexts. Prerequisite: COMM 20001 and minimum grade of C (2.000) in COMM 20000; and pass the Grammar Test with a 680 or better or have a minimum grade of C (2.000) in COMM 21000; and a cumulative GPA of 2.000 or better. 

COMM 43000 - COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN INTERACTION
Aims to help students develop a critical understanding of diverse newer media and how they are used, and affect human interaction. In achieving this goal, students are expected to learn how newer media are different from and similar to face-to-face communication or traditional mass media, newer media's social and psychological effects on human interactions, and theoretical frameworks explaining these media. Prerequisite: none.

COMM 45006 - MEDIA USE AND EFFECTS
The course examines the ways in which communication scholars have conceptualized and analyzed media processes, uses and effects. We explore such issues as media portrayals, news coverage, political campaigns, sex and violence in the media, media entertainment, children and television, and newer communication technologies. Prerequisite: None.

COMM 45957 - LANGUAGE, MEANING AND COGNITION
Overview of language use in social contexts, including basic components of language production; semantics; pragmatics (speech acts); the production and comprehension of sentences; message production; message comprehension; language and society (conversational rules; coherence); individual differences in language use (adaptive ability, gender differences); powerful vs. powerless speech; and intercultural considerations. Prerequisite: none. 

COMT 20021 - C SHARP PROGRAMMING
Introductory concepts of C Sharp: Development environment, variables, decisions, looping, arrays, strings, methods, exception, and event handling. Prerequisite: None. 

COMT 21200 - ETHICAL HACKING
Tools and techniques ethical hackers and security testers use to discover vulnerabilities and solutions to protect computer networks. Prerequisite: COMT 21002 or CS 33211 or DSCI 26010; or TECH 23010 and TECH 26301.

COMT 36302 - ADVANCED C SHARP PROGRAMMING
Advanced concepts of C Sharp including classes and objects, inheritance, polymorphism, arrays, exception handling, files and streams and XAML. Prerequisite: COMT 20021. 

COMT 36308 - ERGONOMICS IN COMPUTER SYSTEMS
Introduction to ergonomics, usability design, and assessment methods for the development of computer hardware, software, and systems. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

COMT 36310 - MULTIMEDIA DEVELOPMENT TOOLS
Course focuses on advanced technologies for Web development, including DHTML, plug-ins, etc. Students will learn to create more interactive and dynamic web sites. Prerequisite: COMT 21011. 

COMT 36318 - SURVEY OF INFORMATION SECURITY, INTERNET FRAUD AND COMPUTER FORENSICS
This lecture-based, survey course provides a non-technical introduction to contemporary issues in information security, Internet fraud and computer forensics. Prerequisite: ENG 21011 or HONR 10297; and junior standing. Course Attributes: Writing Intensive Course  

COMT 36320 - COMPUTER FORENSICS
Hands-on skills in incident response, forensic preparation, and data recovery, and analysis. Prerequisite: COMT 21002 or CS 33211 or DSCI 26010 ;or TECH 23010 and TECH 26301.

COMT 36321 - NETWORK FORENSICS
Emphasizing hands-on skills in live incident response, the proper use of network forensic tools, network monitoring, live data capture, evidence analysis, data integrity and other related topics. Prerequisite: COMT 21002 or CS 33211 or DSCI 26010; or TECH 23010 and TECH 26301. 

COMT 36330 - LOCAL AREA NETWORK SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS
Examines the primary issues involved in securing resources in a LAN, including threat assessment, countermeasures, best practices, security protocols, cryptography and management-related issues. Prerequisite: COMT 21002 or CS 33211 or DSCI 26010; or TECH 23010 and TECH 26301.

COMT 42000 - SOCIAL MEDIA SECURITY
Personal and corporate social media presence, security risks, intellectual property and ethical issues. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 


CS 10001 - COMPUTER LITERACY
Introduction to history, language, procedures, applications, abuses and impact of computers. Hands-on experience with microcomputers. Not open to students with previous experience. Prerequisite: None. 

CS 10051 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE
An introductory, broad and hands-on coverage of aspects of computer science, including algorithms, problem solving, operating systems concepts, computer architecture, programming languages and modern applications. Three-credit lecture with one-credit lab. Prerequisite: none. Course Attributes: Kent Core-Math and Crit Reason, LER-Math and Crit Reasoning 

CS 13001 - COMPUTER SCIENCE I-PROGRAMMING AND PROBLEM SOLVING
Computer science concepts including algorithm development and problem solving strategies focused on procedural abstraction. High-level programming concepts including data types, expressions, program structures, functions, parameter passing, scope, extent, arrays, introduction to recursion and an introduction to object oriented-concepts. Prerequisite: MATH 11010 or MATH 12001 with a minimum grade of C (2.000). 

CS 13011 - COMPUTER SCIENCE IA-PROCEDURAL PROGRAMMING
Computer science concepts including algorithm development and problem solving strategies focused on programming abstractions. High-level programming concepts including variables, branching, iteration, and functions. Prerequisite: MATH 11010 or MATH 12001 with a minimum grade of C (2.000).

CS 13012 - COMPUTER SCIENCE IB-OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING
Computer science concepts including algorithm development and problem solving strategies focused on programming abstractions. High-level programming concepts including introduction to recursion and an introduction to object oriented-concepts. Prerequisite: CS 13011 with a minimum grade of C (2.000). 

CS 13401 - USER LEVEL COMPUTER SECURITY
Introduction to computer and network safety; detection and removal of viruses, detection and defense against spyware and rootkits, firewall description and use, protection mechanisms against computer system hacking, spam, identity theft and phishing, protecting wireless networks, safe computing. Includes many in-lecture tutorials. Prerequisite: none. 

CS 23001 - COMPUTER SCIENCE II-DATA STRUCTURES AND ABSTRACTION
Computer science concepts and problem solving focusing on data structure and abstraction. Object-oriented concepts and programming including encapsulation, information hiding, object design, generics, polymorphism and an introduction to inheritance. Dynamic memory structures including dynamic arrays, pointers, linked-lists and the use of recursion for problem solving. Abstract data types including stacks, queues, lists, trees and graphs. Prerequisite: CS 13001 or CS 13012 with a minimum grade of C (2.000). Corequisite: CS 23022.

CS 23022 - DISCRETE STRUCTURES FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE
(Cross-listed with MATH 23022) Discrete structures for computer scientists with a focus on: mathematical reasoning, combinatorial analysis, discrete structures, algorithmic thinking, applications and modeling. Specific topics include logic, sets, functions, relations, algorithms, proof techniques, counting, graphs, trees, Boolean algebra, grammars and languages. Prerequisite:minimum grade of C (2.000) in MATH 11009 or 11010.

CS 33007 - INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE SYSTEM DESIGN
An introduction to the basic theoretical aspects of database systems, file organization, search methodologies, language design and performance evaluation techniques, initial modeling concepts and their use in hierarchical, network, relational and object-oriented database designs. Prerequisite: minimum grade of C (2.000) in CS 23001. 

CS 33101 - STRUCTURE OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES
Introduction to syntax, semantics, behavior and implementation issues in imperative, functional, logic and object-oriented languages; type theory, concurrency, data dependency, nondeterminism and internet languages. Prerequisite: C (2.000) or better in CS 23001. 

CS 33211 - OPERATING SYSTEMS
Introduction to operating systems, processes and threads, CPU scheduling, mutual exclusion and synchronization, deadlock, memory management, file systems, networking and distributed systems. Prerequisite: CS 23001 with a minimum grade of C (2.000). Pre or Co-requisite: CS 35101. 

CS 33223 - UNIX TOOLS
Course will cover UNIX operating system environment topics that will make the user more productive. Topics will include the user environment, shells, files, the file system, editors, scripting languages, document processing, processes, remote access and documentation. Prerequisite: CS 13001. 

CS 33901 - SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
An introduction to software engineering concepts: life cycle models; modeling languages; requirements analysis; specification; design; testing; validation; project management and maintenance. Prerequisite: C (2.000) or better in CS 23001. 

CS 35101 - COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
Functional overview of computer systems, interconnection of basic components, system performance measures, instruction set design, arithmetic logic unit, control unit, memory system, pipelining, interrupts and input-output. Prerequisite: CS 13001.

CS 43202 - SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION
(Cross-listed with CS 53202) The setting up and day-to-day administration of multiuser multitasking systems, such as the various versions of UNIX, together with the analysis of problems which can arise in these activities. Prerequisite: CS 33211.

CS 43203 - SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING
(Slashed with CS 53203) Implementation and maintenance of system programs, system utilities; command interpreters, editors, file maintenance programs, text processors. Interrupt handling. Device drivers. Prerequisite: CS 23001 with a minimum grade of C.

CS 46101 - DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS
(Cross-listed with CS 56101) Introduction to algorithmic concepts, design and complexity analysis of algorithms, searching, sorting, graphs, geometric algebraic and parallel algorithms. Prerequisite: MATH 12003 and C (2.000) or better in CS 23001. 


DSCI 10310 - MY STORY ON THE WEB
A first course in understanding the web's impact on our private and public lives. Introductory course that enables students to establish a web presence and persona by the end of the semester. Through the storytelling initiative and creating these sites, students investigate web site design, storytelling, multimedia, intellectual property, ethical considerations and social media. Prerequisite: none.

DSCI 19995 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN DIGITAL SCIENCES
(Repeatable for credit)Analysis of significant and current issues in digital sciences not covered in regular courses. Offered when opportunities and resources permit; the topic is announced when the course is scheduled. Prerequisite: none.

DSCI 23410 - COGNITION IN TECHNOLOGY
Introduction to the basics in human cognition as they affect technology and as technology affects human cognition. Addresses designing technologies to fit and enhance cognition, augmenting cognition with technology, and cognitive tools, as well as the impact of technology on various cognitive processes. Leverages both traditional and online course delivery. Prerequisite: none.

DSCI 26010 - TELECOMMUNICATION INFRASTRUCTURE
Provides an overview of communications infrastructure for public switched telephone networks, wireless networks, and local area networks. Other topics covered include network routing, LAN concepts and technologies, VoIP, and PBX. Prerequisite: none.

DSCI 29995 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN DIGITAL SCIENCES
(Repeatable for credit)Analysis of significant and current issues in digital sciences not covered in regular courses. Offered when opportunities and resources permit; the topic is announced when the course is scheduled. Prerequisite: none.

DSCI 31010 - ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE
Enterprise architecture facilitates the alignment of IT and IS investment decisions with business goals. Enterprise architecture is increasingly used in the industry as a result of the continued emergence of new technologies and ongoing pressures to reengineer business processes to achieve improved efficiency and greater customer focus. Enterprise architecture identifies the main components of an organization and the ways in which these components work together. The components include performance and strategy, people, business capabilities, applications, technology, knowledge and information, as well as financial and other resources. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

DSCI 33310 - HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION
A survey course intended to provide a broad foundation of HCI principles, concepts, and techniques relevant to multiple digital science concentrations. Focuses on understanding HCI through fundamental design concepts and applying these to a range of interface design problems. Covers the spectrum of a user-centered design process (research, sketching, prototyping, evaluation, etc). Balances a broad conceptual understanding of HCI with detailed interface design issues. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

DSCI 39995 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN DIGITAL SCIENCES
(Repeatable for credit)Analysis of significant and current issues in digital sciences not covered in regular courses. Offered when opportunities and resources permit; the topic is announced when the course is scheduled. Prerequisite: none.

DSCI 49910 - EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN DIGITAL SCIENCES
(Cross-listed with DSCI 59910) Explores new and emerging technologies in the digital sciences, examining each technology from multiple viewpoints representative of the interdisciplinary nature of the digital sciences. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

DSCI 49992 - INTERNSHIP IN DIGITAL SCIENCES
(Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours) A credit-bearing work experience with educational outcomes, utilizing and enhancing a student's academic learning in practical occupational situations. The student is expected to complete pre-determined assignments, which may include a weekly journal, final paper, or experience report. Satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) graded. In-progress (IP) mark permissible. Prerequisites: junior standing and special approval. Course Attributes: Experiential Learning Requirement

DSCI 49995 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN DIGITAL SCIENCES
(Repeatable for credit)Analysis of significant and current issues in digital sciences not covered in regular courses. Offered when opportunities and resources permit; the topic is announced when the course is scheduled. Prerequisite: none.

DSCI 49996 - INDIVIDUAL INVESTIGATION IN DIGITAL SCIENCES
(Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours) Independent study carried out by a student under the supervision of a faculty member. Subject content, objectives, assignments and evaluation methods may vary. Prerequisite: junior standing and special approval.


ENG 20002 - INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL WRITING
Introduction to communication practices within technical communities. Planning, drafting, revising and editing. Process descriptions, object descriptions, instructional texts, technical correspondence, problem reports, critical reflection. Prerequisite: ENG 11011 or HONR 10197.

ENG 30062 - PRINCIPLES OF TECHNICAL WRITING
Introduces theoretical principles of technical communication. Extensive practice in the use, evaluation and production of complex technical documents including research reports/research proposals. Emphasis on oral, written and electronic communication. Prerequisite: 21011 and junior standing. 

ENG 30063 - PROFESSIONAL WRITING
Practice norms and strategies of effective workplace communication. Prerequisites: ENG 21011 or HONR 10297 with a minimum grade of C- (1.700); and junior standing. Course Attributes: TAG - Business 


ENTR 27056 - INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP
The study of the entrepreneurial process from conception to birth of a new venture. This includes attributes of successful entrepreneurs, opportunity recognition, innovation, venture screening, risk assessment, risk tolerance, identification of resources and business planning to learn how to turn opportunities into viable business. Prerequisite: none. 


GEOG 29160 - MAPPING OUR WORLD
Introduction to maps and their uses, stressing their importance as a vehicle for understanding and communicating information about our world and its spatial characteristics. Prerequisite: None. 

GEOG 49070 - GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE
(Cross-listed with GEOG 59070 and GEOG 79070) Introduction to theories and methods for geographic data processing, including data capture and input data storage and management and data analysis and displays. Emphasis is on laboratory exercises using GIS software packages for real world applications. Non-geographers should contact the Department of Geography to discuss the course prerequisites. Prerequisite: GEOG 29160. 

GEOG 49076 - SPATIAL PROGRAMMING
(Cross-listed with GEOG 59076 and GEOG 79076) Examination of the design, development and use of geographic information technologies with computer programming to model, process and visualize geographic phenomena. Prerequisite: GEOG 49070. 

GEOG 49080 - ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE
Advanced theories and techniques for handling geographic information systems, including 2D and 3D processing of geographic information, detection and analysis of geographic patterns, 2D and 3D mapping of geographic information, modeling of geographic processes, and an overview of GIS programming tools. Prerequisite: GEOG 49070. 

GEOG 49085 - WEB AND MOBILE GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE
(Cross-listed with GEOG 59085 and GEOG 79085) Explores how web and mobile phones present opportunities and challenges to the field of GIScience. This includes the examination of the use, design, and development of cyberinfrastructure-enabled GIS emphasizing web- and mobile-based interfaces and technologies. GIS experience recommended. Prerequisite: None.

GEOG 49162 - CARTOGRAPHY AND GEOVISUALIZATION
(Slashed with GEOG 59162 and GEOG 79162) Study of the design and production of dynamic, interactive, multimedia web-based mapping. Data acquisition and processing, symbolization, composition, text and color utilization. Prerequisite: GEOG 49070. Corequisite: GEOG 49163. 

GEOG 49163 - CARTOGRAPHY AND GEOVISUALIZATION LABORATORY
(Cross-listed with GEOG 59163 and GEOG 79163) Practical experience in the techniques of data acquisition and processing for dynamic, multimedia, and online map production and geovisualizations. Prerequisite: GEOG 49070. Corequisite: GEOG 49162. 


ITEC 47413 - DIGITAL VIDEO IN EDUCATION
(Cross-listed with ITEC 57413 and ITEC 77413) Students learn how to produce their own video programs, beginning with the planning and scripting process, developing camerawork and audio recording skills, and editing the final production. They also learn how to obtain footage in the field and work with other participants. In addition, the use of video for instruction is explored, with an emphasis upon how it can be effectively integrated into curricula and used to enhance lessons in dynamic ways. Prerequisite: None.

ITEC 47427 - TECHNOLOGY AND LEARNING
Overview of technology used in education. Focuses on implementing and facilitating learner- centered curriculum with computer technology. Students develop web-based instructional materials. Prerequisite: none. 

ITEC 47430 - COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN EDUCATION
Preparation for use of computers effectively in variety of educational settings. Students should have some expertise with computers. Focus on advanced applications in education. Macintosh and Windows. Prerequisite: none.


JMC 20001 - MEDIA, POWER AND CULTURE
Fosters critical understanding of mass media in their historical, ideological, economic and cultural contexts. Examines what forces influence media and how media influence consumers. Prerequisite: none. Course Attributes: Diversity Course-Domestic, Kent Core-Social Sciences, LER-Social Sciences, Trnfr Module-Social Sciences

JMC 21001 - PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING
Advertising history, purposes, techniques, media and research; analysis of functions of advertising organizations. Prerequisite: None. Course Attributes: TAG - Communication 

JMC 21008 - SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIES
(Cross-listed with COMM 21008) Designed to help students understand and use social media in critical and strategic ways that will improve their lives and careers. Helps students harness the power and potential of the social Web, including strategies used to position and market organizations as well as individuals. Exposes students to the latest social-media applications and to critical views of social media's impact on business, society and culture. Students are also introduced to interaction perspectives of social media, which are embedded within both the communication studies and the journalism and mass communication curriculum. Students emerge from the class with a strategic plan designed to enhance their lives and their careers. Prerequisite: none.

JMC 28001 - PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
Explores strategic role and function of public relations in business, nonprofit public institutions and society. Covers public relations practice from development to present. Prerequisite: None. 


MIS 24163 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
(Equivalent to BMRT 11009) Introductory course in management and organizational design. The leading contributions in the area are reviewed and practical implications are developed. The course covers the principles that most management professors have come to expect in an introductory course: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. In addition, the students need to be aware of critical issues managers must be aware of to succeed: diversity, globalization, ethics, technology, among them. The course serves as an introduction to many upper level business courses. Prerequisite: minimum sophomore standing.

MIS 34036 - ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS AND BUSINESS PROCESSES
Introduction to the structure and use of Enterprise Computer Systems. Course topics include Networking, Telephony and VoIP, Mainframe and ClientServer, Virtualization, Database, Security, Collaboration and Social Networking and Datacenter Operations. Prerequisites: minimum cumulative 2.500 GPA; and MIS 24053 with a minimum C (2.000) grade; and MIS 24065. 

MIS 34054 - USING INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR SOLVING BUSINESS PROBLEMS
Examine key concepts about information systems that are relevant for business managers. The focus will be on promoting an understanding of the use of IS in solving business problems. There will also be hands-on assignments. Prerequisites:Cumulative 2.500 GPA; and MIS 24053 or COMT 11000. Course not open to computer information systems (CIS) majors. 

MIS 34060 - OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
A survey course in operations management that covers the managerial concepts and the quantitative tools used in the design, planning operation and control of operations systems. Prerequisites: MIS 24053 or COMT 11000; and MIS 24056 or MATH 10041 or BMRT 21004. 

MIS 34068 - SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
This is an introductory course in Systems Analysis and Design. Students will be presented with the concepts, techniques, and methodologies that are required for the successful development of information systems. Application of methods and concepts to real-world problems will be emphasized. Prerequisites: minimum cumulative 2.500 GPA; and MIS 24053 or COMT 11000 with a minimum grade of C (2.000); and minimum C (2.000) grade in MIS 24065, ENG 21011, COMM 15000 and MATH 11010. 

MIS 34070 - PROGRAMMING THEORY AND APPLICATIONS
Programming in a strongly-typed language environment with an emphasis on problem-solving. Prerequisite: minimum cumulative 2.500 GPA; and MIS 24053 with a minimum C (2.000) grade; and MIS 24065 with a minimum C (2.000) grade. 

MIS 34158 - MANAGERIAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
Introduce the main components of health care information technology, with emphasis on the components that distinguish the health care delivery system from other business enterprises. Prepares students as clinical managers and consultants who must rely upon or manage information technology to accomplish their objectives. Prerequisite: MIS 34157. 

MIS 34165 - DYNAMICS OF LEADERSHIP
This course discusses management and leadership concepts and does so by blending theory and practice. Cases studies, practical application approaches, personal assessment and opportunities to develop individual and group leadership skills are possible. In addition, many organizational behavior concepts are blended throughout the course. Students that have already passed MIS 34175 will not receive graduation credit for MIS 34165. Prerequisites: MIS 24163 or BMRT 11009. 

MIS 44042 - NETWORK THEORY AND APPLICATIONS
Presentation of current and emerging network technologies and services, including business applications and performance issues. Topics include transmission media, modulation and signaling schemes, switching and multiplexing techniques, local and wide area network protocols and standards, and internetworking devices. Prerequisite: minimum cumulative 2.500 GPA; and MIS 24053 with minimum C (2.000) grade; and MIS 24065.

MIS 44043 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
Development of skills and knowledge associated with the utilization, design, implementation, and administration of database management systems in organizations. Emphasis is on enterprise-level database systems. Prerequisites: minimum cumulative 2.500 GPA; and 24053 with a minimum C (2.000) grade; and MIS 24065.

MIS 44045 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
Management of information systems resources in organizations of all types and sizes; IT best practices; the effective and efficient use of IS in support of the organization's mission and to achieve competitive advantage in today's global economy; the impact of IT on enterprises, users, customers, society, and the environment. Prerequisites: senior standing; and minimum cumulative 2.500 GPA; and MIS 24053 with a minimum C (2.000) grade; and MIS 24065.

MIS 44049 - NETWORK MANAGEMENT AND CYBERSECURITY
The course explores technologies and business issues related to computer networking and security, with emphasis on the protocols in modern business networking such as Ethernet and TCP-IP. Topics also include cybersecurity threats and defenses, privacy, cloud and parallel computing, and map-reduce. Prerequisites: minimum cumulative 2.500 GPA; and MIS 24053 with a minimum grade of C (2.000); and MIS 24065. 

MIS 44062 - SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
Students learn the basic analytical tools needed to coordinate business operations across the value chain. Course involves hands-on coverage of supply chain management with emphasis on supplier partnering and development, customer relations management, strategic sourcing and pricing, e-business, measuring supply chain performance, mass customization, planning supply and demand coordination in the supply chain. Prerequisite: minimum 2.500 GPA and junior standing. 


PSYC 11762 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
Introduction to the scientific approach to understanding human behavior and mental processes such as emotions, perceptions and cognitions. Topics may include personality, social and environmental factors, biological aspects of behavior and the experience of emotion and psychological disorders. Prerequisite: none. Course Attributes: Diversity Course-Domestic, Kent Core-Social Sciences, LER-Social Sciences, TAG - Social/Behavior Sciences, Trnfr Module-Social Sciences

PSYC 40445 - COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY
Covers the mental processes that underline human thought and behavior, such as attention, memory, comprehension, reasoning, problem-solving and language. Considers established and current theoretical models, research methods and experimental results. Prerequisite: PSYC 11762.


TECH 10001 - INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Introduction to the operation and use of computer systems in technology-related applications. Laboratory assignments include the use of microcomputers for solving technical problems. Prerequisite: None.

TECH 26010 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Describes Computer Engineering Technology concepts and principles. Topics include computer hardware, computer hardware operations, digital systems design, networking hardware, technology of networking, computer aided design and embedded systems. Pre/corequisite: MATH 11022.

TECH 26301 - NETWORKING HARDWARE I
A hands-on, applied engineering-focused course emphasizing the operation, maintenance, and performance aspects of personal computer networking hardware. Topics include networking hardware operation, characteristics, configuration, and troubleshooting fundamentals. Course also includes network standards, protocols, configuration, topologies, and administrative fundamentals as related to networking hardware systems. Note: This course is part of the Networking Hardware course sequence required for students enrolled in the Computer Engineering Technology concentration. Prerequisite: TECH 16010 or 21021 or DSCI 26010.

TECH 33010 - COMPUTER HARDWARE
Introduction to the hardware, architecture and operation of the personal computer and associated devices. Topics include personal computer architecture and operation fundamentals, basic hardware, data busses and ports, hardware component packaging, auxiliary hardware components, computer assembly, basic hardware installation, configuration and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

TECH 36302 - NETWORKING HARDWARE II
Continuation of TECH 26301. In-depth coverage of personal computer-based enterprise networking systems hardware with a focus on network hardware and software configuration, fault analysis, diagnostics, and troubleshooting. Topics include router and switch operation, programming, configuration, and troubleshooting, along with overall enterprise network maintenance, troubleshooting, and repair. Course also includes WAN and VLAN fundamentals, intermediate TCP_IP, and network administration and maintenance as related to fielding and maintaining networking hardware components and systems. Prerequisite: TECH 26301.

TECH 43050 - INVENTIVE PROBLEM SOLVING
Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, TRIZ, is a collection of powerful problem-solving tools for a broad range of inventive problems. Capstone web-based course for students finishing their bachelors degree. Assists students in utilizing material learned in earlier courses to solve many real world problems in multiple disciplines. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

TECH 43222 - COMPUTER HARDWARE ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE
Internal architecture and operation of digital computers. Topics include computer processor datapaths and control, computer memory datapaths and control, pipelining and parallel processing, memory architecture and management, IO control, system bus architecture and properties, and computer control timing and synchronization. Prerequisite: TECH 26010 or TECH 33222. 

TECH 46312 - WIRELESS NETWORK AND TELECOMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
Topics covered include the Public Switch Telephone Network infrastructure, electronic switching systems, transmission systems and emerging wireless networks. Note: This course is part of the Networking Hardware course sequence required for students enrolled in the Computer Engineering Technology concentration. Prerequisites: TECH 36302

TECH 46330 - VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING IN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The course content includes programming in a high-level object-oriented, event- driven visual programming language, Visual Basic 2010 Express, conditional statements, iterative statements, arrays, object oriented programming, classes, objects, methods, inheritance, exception handling, graphical user interfaces with Windows Forms. Prerequisite: TECH 10001 or TECH 16010. 

TECH 46350 - NETWORK MANAGEMENT AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGY
Course covers the technical aspects of centrally managed and distributed Wide Area Networks, with an emphasis on the techniques used to maintain and improve the performance of telecommunications and data networks. Students will use software packages to monitor the real-time performance of a network and to diagnose various networking hardware and software problems. Topics include the five stacks of network management (fault management, configuration management, performance management, security management, and accounting management). Examples of current specific network management products are reviewed. Prerequisite: TECH 36302.


VCD 14001 - VISUAL DESIGN LITERACY
Examines the topics visual communication design theory, two-dimensional graphic design, environmental graphic design, typography, illustration, photographic illustration, and interactive media. Introduction to how and why professionals in the field of visual communication design create meaning and context through their work. Students explore the language of visual communication, how it is influenced by form, content and context. Prerequisite: none. 

VCD 14002 - COMMUNICATING WITH COLOR
Introduction to color as it applies to fields of design and related areas. Topics covered include the vocabulary of color, the primary elements of color theory, color systems, color printing, color in film and online, and the effects of lighting on color. Students gain an appreciation for how color influences design and commerce through an understanding of basic practices of color forecasting and a study of how color perception is influenced by cultural differences. Prerequisite: none. 

VCD 34004 - VISUAL ETHICS
An extension of the information covered in the course Visual Literacy or Introduction to Visual Communication Design. Topics include the understanding of visual form, responsibility of the designer, photographer, and illustrator and those working in collaboration with visual communicators. Looks at image manipulation, copyright laws and ethical and professional guidelines. Also covered are topics such as sustainable design practices, acting as an advocate of the consumer and audience member. Discussion topics include credibility, dignity and developing a personal philosophy towards visual ethics. Prerequisite: VCD 14001 or VCD 13000. 

VCD 37000 - VISUAL DESIGN FOR MEDIA: ADVANCED
A lab course in which students apply design concepts to computer-generated communication pieces using a layout software program. May not be used toward degree requirements by visual communication design majors. Prerequisite: none.