Area Students Selected to Represent Region at National Scholastic Art Competition | Kent State University
Pictured are Gold Key Portfolio Award winners (from left to right) Nalyn Schell, Isabella Victory and Jennifer Greathouse.
Pictured are Gold Key Portfolio Award winners (from left to right) Nalyn Schell, Isabella Victory and Jennifer Greathouse.

Area Students Selected to Represent Region at National Scholastic Art Competition

GlenOak High School tops regional wins with three portfolio award recipients

Traveling along Canton’s Market Avenue North, one might overlook Sancta Clara Monastery. But 17-year-old Nalyn Schell not only visited the religious structure for two days, she had the opportunity to photograph its nuns.

“There’s this mystery about the building just beyond the trees and how it relates to society,” says Ms. Schell, of Perry Township. “It’s this place I had driven by and was curious about. I wanted to put a face on it.”

Her depiction of the nuns resonated with judges of the 2018 Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Competition hosted by Kent State University at Stark. Garnering a Gold Key Portfolio Award win, Ms. Schell’s work was completed in GlenOak High School’s commercial photography program, which led the region with three Gold Key Portfolio Award winners. Other GlenOak commercial photography students earning the top honor are Jennifer Greathouse, of Lake Township, and Isabella Victory, of Plain Township.

Nalyn Schell's depiction of the nuns at Sancta Clara Monastery resonated with judges of the 2018 Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Competition hosted by Kent State University at Stark.

“It is a wonderful validation of the hard work that my students put in to what they do,” says Jeannene Mathis-Bertosa, adjunct professor at Kent State Stark, who teaches the career-tech program that is open to GlenOak, Hoover, Lake and Jackson high school students. Ms. Mathis-Bertosa instructs a college-level photography course using the photo lab at GlenOak High School.

“It’s a wonderful partnership with Kent State Stark, and the Scholastic Art accolade is wonderful for our school district, which gives an incredible amount of support to the arts and to career education,” she says.

The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards are the largest, longest-running and most prestigious recognition programs for creative young people in the United States.

“This is a strong competition, and it’s not just a local thing. It’s a national thing,” says Jill Balderson, co-chair of the regional event and Plain Local Schools’ representative. “We are happy to be a part of it and provide this opportunity for area students.”

The work of regional portfolio, Gold Key and American Vision winners will be forwarded to the national level of the Scholastic Art Awards judging process in New York City. Winners will be announced at the National Student Art Exhibition of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in June.

Other recipients of the Gold Key Portfolio Award are Allyson Carver, Buckeye High School; Tyler Glasenapp, Medina High School; Lara Ketonen, Aurora High School; Isabella Kobak, Firestone High School; Madeline Shaub, Jackson High School; Emily Shonk, Indian Valley High School; Ray Stewart, Firestone High School; and Camille Volk, Revere High School. 

More than 400 pieces of artwork from middle and high school students, representing schools in Stark, Summit, Portage, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties, were recognized in the regional Scholastic Art competition this year.

An awards ceremony for students and their families was held on Saturday, Jan. 27, in the Kent State Stark Conference Center. Kent State Stark is one of 90 regional partners that sponsor the local awards program.

“Kent State University at Stark is proud to again host this incredible event,” says Jack McWhorter, Ph.D., associate professor of art at Kent State Stark and regional affiliate coordinator of the Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Exhibit and Awards Ceremony. “The best way to characterize this competition is it truly sets the standard for work at the middle school and high school levels.”