Principles for the Evaluation and Reward of Faculty Scholarship | Department of Biological Sciences Handbook | Kent State University

Principles for the Evaluation and Reward of Faculty Scholarship

The Department of Biological Sciences criteria for the evaluation and reward of faculty scholarship have as their foundation the scholarship of discovery, integration, application, and teaching as endorsed by the Faculty Senate of Kent State University, October 1992.  Section V of the handbook describes how these criteria are applied during evaluation of candidates for reappointment, tenure, and promotion.

I.     Role and responsibility of the faculty.  Faculty in the Department of Biological Sciences are expected to contribute to the Department, the Campus, the College, and the University according to the terms of their appointment.  Generally, faculty contribute inclusively to education, service, and research.  In each case, high quality scholarship is expected.  Furthermore, each faculty member is expected to advise students as well as to provide service to the Department, the Campus, the College, and the University.

II.    Principles of evaluation.  The Department of Biological Sciences at Kent State University is a multidisciplinary unit.  Hence, many factors, both objective and subjective, must be considered when evaluating faculty performance in scholarship and service.  The primary criteria for review must include the faculty member’s contributions in the areas of scholarship of discovery, integration, application, and teaching (summarized below and in Table 1) as well as professional integrity and University citizenship.  

The Scholarship of Discovery involves the generation of new knowledge, disciplinary and pedagogical, as outlined in Table 1.

The Scholarship of Integration interprets and brings new insight to what has been discovered, examining it in a broad and, in some cases, a multidisciplinary context, as outlined in Table 1.

The Scholarship of Application involves the use of existing knowledge to solve important problems, as outlined in Table 1.

The Scholarship of Teaching involves actions associated with education in the undergraduate and/or graduate degree program, as outlined in Table 1.

University Citizenship includes service activities not necessarily tied to one’s special field of knowledge which make significant positive contributions to the advancement of the educational, scholarly, and governance goals and missions of the Department, the Campus, the College, or the University.

Although the standards for evaluating scholarly activity and productivity, such as publications and other scholarly pursuits may be stated easily, the originality, quality, and value of the work may be difficult to assess.  Application of such standards in reappointment, tenure and promotion proceedings are described in Section V of this handbook, while applications of such standards in merit considerations are described in Section VI.

  1. Scholarship of Discovery, Integration, Application.  All faculty members in Biological Sciences are expected to sustain a strong record in the areas of scholarship of discovery, integration and/or application. 

 

Pedagogical discovery, integration, and application, resulting in publications and presentations, will be considered in the review process and can be considered under the Scholarship of Discover, Integration, and Application and/or the Scholarship of Teaching.  Attempts to secure extramural funding for instructional development will be considered during review.

B.   Scholarship of Teaching.  All faculty members in Biological Sciences are expected to sustain a strong record in undergraduate and/or graduate education.  Faculty must stimulate active learning and critical thinking by providing an honest and intelligible account of subject content and process.

It is recognized that these criteria are difficult to evaluate quantitatively.  However, certain evidences are obtainable and, when considered together, can provide a means to assess instructional quality.  Written comments from students, colleagues within and outside the Department, Departmental Chairs, and the candidate will be considered if available to the Advisory Committee.  Student evaluations may provide useful information when considered in light of the student’s level and background.  Student evaluations of faculty teaching must be a part of the submitted record of candidates for promotion.

  1. University Citizenship.  Being an active and contributing citizen of the Department, the Campus, the College, and the University is required of all faculty members.  However, service cannot outweigh a faculty member’s performance in his or her primary responsibilities in scholarship.

Significant public service, related to one’s own profession, may be considered as part of the review process for reappointment, tenure and promotion, although such activity is not requisite for the granting of such.  Such endeavors might include, as examples, forming and leading groups, and presenting talks and speeches.

  1. Outside of the standard Boyer Categories significant public service, related to one’s own research area, may be considered as part of the review process for reappointment, tenure and promotion, although such activity is not requisite for the granting of such.  Such endeavors might include, as examples, forming and leading groups, and presenting talks and speeches.

Approved by BSCI FAC  .

Approved BSCI full faculty 

Approved by Dean, Arts and Sciences and Provost, xxx x, xxxx.

TABLE 1.   Categorical examples of scholarly activity within the Department of Biological Sciences.

Scholarship of Discovery, Integration, Application, and Teaching, as well as University Citizenship constitute avenues of professional activity expected of faculty members of the Department of Biological Sciences.  Within these categories, we recognize a variety of activities to be characteristic of each of the four themes of scholarship.  While activities emphasized will vary considerably among individuals, the scholarly activity of all faculty and the merits provided for these activities, should be evaluated within the framework of each scholarship theme.

The following table provides examples characteristic of our discipline which should be considered in evaluating performance of BSCI faculty.  These lists are not all-inclusive and the activities may fit more than one category.  Rather, they are intended to illustrate broad categorical examples of scholarly activities for biological scientists.

Scholarship of Discovery

  • peer-reviewed publications
  • extramural funding of disciplinary and pedagogical research
  • presentations of research
  • theses and dissertations directed to completion

Scholarship of Integration

  • review papers, books & book chapters                                                           
  • serving on professional advisory boards outside the University community
  • symposium presentations                                                 
  • writing textbooks                                                               
  • writing laboratory methods manuals
  • books edited or review
  • participatory memberships in professional organizations

Scholarship of Application

  • experimental methods manuals                                                                                                       
  • museum specimen production                                                                                         
  • research patents                                                                  
  • student advising
  • published study guides or instructors manuals
  • holding instructional workshops
  • manuscript & grant reviews
  • consulting within/outside University community
  • journal editorship and editorial board membership
  • serving as officer in a professional society
  • organizing a professional conference, symposium, or invited session

Scholarship of Teaching

  • graduate student research training                                   
  • undergraduate research training
  • evaluations of undergraduate and graduate student instruction
  • mentoring, tutoring
  • developing and restructuring courses

University Citizenship

  • advising student organizations
  • public presentations of University activities
  • serving on committees and advisory boards in the Department, the Campus, the College, and the University