Appendix A: Graduate Faculty Classification Criteria and Application for Graduate Faculty Membership | Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies Faculty Handbook | Kent State University

Appendix A: Graduate Faculty Classification Criteria and Application for Graduate Faculty Membership

(Revised and approved October 2009)

Graduate Faculty are either Associate Members (A) or Full Members (F) who (1) may teach graduate courses and serve on master’s committees; (2) may direct master’s theses; (3) may serve on doctoral committees and (with Departmental approval) co-direct doctoral dissertations; (4) may direct doctoral dissertations. Combinations possible for faculty in the Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies are A1, A2, F3 and F4. Also possible is the Temporary Associate Member who is appointed for a specific, limited purpose such as teaching a special course or serving on a particular master’s or dissertation committee.

The University conducts a review of all Graduate Faculty every five years. An individual faculty member may, however, apply for a change of graduate faculty status before the end of the five-year period. All faculty members who desire new or continuing member ship in the Graduate Faculty must submit a Departmental “Application for Graduate Faculty Membership” form (see below) to the Chairperson. On this form, faculty will provide information based on the criteria below and apply for classification in the corresponding category.

Modern and Classical Language Studies

Criteria for the Five Categories of Membership on the Graduate Faculty

For all categories:

a. Possession of the Ph.D. or other terminal degree in the appropriate language and/or discipline; and

b. Potential for quality teaching at the undergraduate level, and the graduate level, for new members of the graduate faculty; evidence of quality teaching at the undergraduate, and especially at the graduate level, for continuing members of the Graduate Faculty.

c. The qualifications appropriate to each respective category.

1. A1: May Teach Graduate Courses and Serve on Master’s Committees

Evidence of an active program of research and scholarship in the areas itemized in Section IV, G, 1 and 2 of this Handbook or evidence of pertinent professional experience. With regard to a research program, the work must either carry the potential for publication for untenured faculty or, for tenured faculty, have resulted in actual publication. A representative case would be two refereed published articles, book chapters, or creative works within a five-year period, or other forms of scholarly activity, such as competitive extramural grant activity (funded or unfunded), as described in this Handbook (See below.) In the case of pertinent professional experience, the experience must be directly related to the area of the graduate course or courses to be taught.

2. A2: May Direct Master’s Theses

Evidence of an active program of research and publication during the last five years. A representative case would be three refereed published articles, book chapters, or creative works within this time period, or other forms of scholarly activity, such as competitive extramural grant activity (funded or unfunded), as described in this Handbook (See below.)

3. F3: May Serve on Doctoral Committees, and (with Departmental Approval) Co-direct Doctoral Dissertations

Evidence of an active program of research and publication that has resulted in national visibility during the last five years in the areas itemized in Section IV, G, 1 and 2 of this Handbook. A representative case would be five substantial refereed published articles, book chapters, or creative works within this time period, plus several other forms of scholarly activity, such as competitive extramural grant activity (funded or unfunded), as described in this Handbook. (See below.)

4. F-4: May direct doctoral dissertations

Evidence of an active program of research and scholarly activity that has resulted in significant outcome and international visibility during the last five years in the areas itemized in Section IV, G, 1 and 2 of this Handbook. A representative case would be the publication of a minimum of seven refereed articles, book chapters, or creative works within this time period; or a refereed scholarly or creative monograph; or a refereed translation of a scholarly book or book-length translation of a creative work; or electronic content deemed equivalent to any of the above; or other significant research; plus several other forms of scholarly activity, such as competitive extramural grant activity (funded or unfunded), as described in this Handbook (see below).

5. Temporary Associate Membership: May Teach a Graduate Course, Serve on a Master’s Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation Committee, and Co-direct a Master’s Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation. This category is solely for adjunct and non-tenure-track faculty.

Evidence of an existing program of research and scholarship in the areas itemized in Section IV, G, 1 and 2 of this Handbook or evidence of pertinent professional experience. In the case of pertinent professional experience, the experience must be directly related to the area of the graduate course or courses to be taught.

 

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATE FACULTY MEMBERSHIP

                Name:

                Date:

Degree                   Year Conferred    Discipline                                               University

 

For all following categories, please include only information which dates between March 31, 2xxx and April 1, 2xxx [appropriate five-year period specified].

Teaching at Kent State University

A. List, by academic year, all graduate courses which you have taught over the past five years. Include cross-listed courses.

AY 2xxx-xx:

AY 2xxx-xx:

AY 2xxx-xx:

AY 2xxx-xx:

AY 2xxx-xx:

B. Evidence of Quality Teaching at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels

N.B.: Before completing this section, please refer to Section IV, E, “Evaluation of Instruction” and G, 1, “Teaching and Advising” in the Department Handbook.

Aside from student evaluations, cite evidence of quality teaching (e.g., nominations for teaching awards, development of new courses, participation in special curricular activities, program development, teaching grants, mentoring of students, recruiting majors, special advising activities, etc.).

Research and Scholarly Activity

N.B.: Before completing this section, please refer to Section IV, G, 2, “Research and Scholarly Activity” in the Department Handbook. List all items in reverse chronological order.

A. Refereed Publications

For each item, indicate the type of publication (e.g., scholarly book, article, chapter in book, translation, bibliography, textbook, edited book, co-edited or co-authored book, monograph, book review, computer software, electronic journal, videotape, creative writing, etc.). Provide complete bibliographical information (date, publisher, volume number, pages, etc.)

B. Non-refereed Publications

C. Grant Activity

List, with dates, all intramural and extramural grant applications which you have submitted within this time period. Indicate (1) the title of the project, (2) the name of the granting agency, (3) the amount of the grant sought, (4) your involvement (e.g., principal investigator), and (5) whether the application was “funded” or “not funded.”

D. Scholarly Consulting Work

List your service to the scholarly community as a referee or editor for a journal, consultant for a press, reviewer for candidates for promotion or tenure at other universities, etc.

E. Presentations at Professional Meetings

1. Refereed Abstracts

List the titles of papers you have presented to professional organizations. Include panels in which you have participated.

Date                        Title of Paper                                                                        Name of Organization

2. Invited Presentations

List the titles of presentations which you have been invited to make. Include panels on which you have been invited to participate.

Date                        Title of Presentation                                                           Name of Organization

F. Direction of Master’s Theses

List only theses for which you were the principal director

Student’s Name                    Title of Thesis                                                       Date Completed

G. Membership on Master’s Thesis Committees

List only theses for which you served as a member of the thesis committee.

Student’s Name                    Title of Thesis                                                       Date Completed

H. Co-direction of Dissertations

List only dissertations for which you served as co-director.

Student’s Name    Department          Title of Dissertation                             Date Completed

I. Membership on Doctoral Dissertation Committees

List only dissertations for which you served on the dissertation committee

Student’s Name    Department          Title of Dissertation                             Date Completed

J. Other Scholarly Accomplishments and Activity

List any scholarly activities, awards, or recognitions which are not included above.

Faculty Signature

After reviewing the Departmental criteria for Graduate Faculty membership and itemizing the pertinent activities and accomplishments, I apply for classification in the following category (circle one):

A1 (may teach graduate courses and serve on master’s committees)

A2 (may direct master’s theses)

F3 (may serve on doctoral committees and, with Departmental approval, co-direct doctoral dissertations)

F4 (may direct doctoral dissertations)

Temporary Associate Member

                                                __________________________________________________                                                                                (Signature)

 

Examples of Scholarship in MCLS: The following list gives examples of the range of publications that count as “scholarship” in MCLS.

Examples of Scholarship in Language, Literature and Culture include but are not limited to: books, edited books, and articles that expand existing knowledge in literary studies, cultural studies, philology, textual criticism, second language acquisition and related disciplines. Examples include original criticism and analysis of literary or popular texts, films, or other visual or aural media; studies of the relationship between texts and their historical and cultural contexts; studies of material culture and its relationship to other aspects of a given culture; studies dealing with linguistic and philological questions in individual texts or parts of texts; quantitative or qualitative studies of issues in language acquisition. Scholarship also includes the integrative work involved in interpretations of literary texts, films, other visual and aural media, or material culture according to psychological, sociological, historical, or philosophical perspectives; studies that use comparative techniques or combine methods from more than one discipline; synthetic studies that draw upon existing scholarship to summarize the state of an issue or problem in a given field.

Applied scholarship in Language, Literature and Culture includes but is not limited to: studies in language, literature, culture, linguistics, or language pedagogy applied to such non-academic matters as business, economic issues, social problems, and political activity; projects, events and programs that target audiences outside the academy (such as elementary or high school students, employees of a business, or self-selected members of the general public) and increase awareness of linguistic and cultural diversity; public readings, film presentations or exhibits organized around societal issues relevant to cultural diversity and/or the global community; language/cultural immersion projects; outreach projects that address awareness of cultural and/or linguistic diversity.

Examples of Scholarship in Pedagogy include but are not limited to: books, edited books, and articles that expand existing knowledge as it relates to the foreign language classroom and instruction in foreign languages. Examples include development of new methodologies and theories; creating infrastructures for future instruction and theories; implementation of new or innovative teaching strategies in the classroom; making private teacher knowledge public; case studies; quantitative and qualitative empirical studies; action research; critical evaluation and testing of learning strategies; critical reflection on one’s own or others' teaching practices, theories, methodologies or strategies; articles and books on pedagogy that can be used for multiple disciplines; articles and books that bridge previous research on foreign language theories, methodologies or strategies; technological innovations; analysis of interdisciplinary pedagogical methodologies, strategies or theories; interdisciplinary models for formative and summative assessments.

Applied scholarship in Pedagogy includes but is not limited to: pedagogical manuals; language acquisition textbooks; pre-service and in-service teacher training; articles on language pedagogy outside of education settings; collaboration with businesses and governmental agencies; serving schools and school districts as an external consultant; models for pre-service and in-service teacher training.

Examples of Scholarship in Translation Studies include but are not limited to: books, edited books, and articles that critique specific translations, compare multiple translations, analyze the linguistic, cultural, cognitive or semantic patterns or variables in translators’ practices synchronically or diachronically; translators’ prefaces or essays discussing the methods used; translations of, for instance, a novel, a play, a book of poems, or a scholarly non-fiction text; studies that analyze translation corpora to reveal patterns or variables in translation; the development of innovative teaching methods; research on assessment and quality control issues; articles and books that integrate existing knowledge and provide an innovative interpretive analysis; the interpretation of texts; terminology articles and resources such as handbooks and guides that integrate the principles of terminology with specific field content in technical communications, information science, computational linguistics, etc.; the creation of corpora or of CAT tools; innovative computational approaches to terminology management.

Applied scholarship in Translation studies includes but is not limited to: textbooks; translations for the purposes of a non-academic public that are available for peer review and evaluation according to accepted standards; development of assessment tools; trade articles about new translation tools or programs; standards for specific industries; the creation of monolingual and multilingual technical glossaries and dictionaries in accordance with terminological principles.