School of Theatre and Dance - Full Handbook

  1. Matters of School Governance and Related Procedures

    1. Handbook Modification, Amendment and Revision

      The implementation, modification, amendment and revision of this Handbook are governed by the applicable Collective Bargaining Agreement. The School faculty will review and update this Handbook, as needed, but at least every three (3) years. Suggestions for modifications or amendments to the Handbook may be initiated at any time by the Director or by any faculty member. Proposed modifications or amendments are subject to discussion, revision, and recommendation by the FAC. When a proposed modification or amendment involves a major change in School policy or practice the Director may seek the recommendation of the entire faculty. If the Director concurs with a proposed modification, amendment or revision, he/she will recommend the change(s) to the Dean. All modifications, amendments and revisions of the Handbook require the approval of the Dean. In reviewing this Handbook the Dean may request revisions before lending final approval.  If these revisions are not adopted by the School, the Dean shall consult the CAC with regard to the provision(s) in dispute before making a final determination and certifying final approval of the Handbook. Further, the Dean may direct that the Handbook be modified, amended or revised to reflect changes in College or University policy. 

    2. Structure and Organization of the Department

      1. Administrative and Service Positions

        1. School Director

          The School Director of Theatre and Dance (hereinafter “Director”) is the chief administrative officer of the School and reports directly to and is accountable to the Dean of the College of the Arts (hereinafter “Dean”). The Director is responsible for recording, maintaining, and implementing the policies and procedures stated in this Handbook through regular and thorough consultation with the School faculty and committees. The Director's duties and responsibilities shall include but are not limited to the following:

          1. Ensure School compliance with University, Administrative and Operational Policies, rules, regulations and any applicable Collective Bargaining Agreement.
          2. Develop and carry out administrative and educational policies in the School in consultation with the School faculty.
          3. Develop the School’s budget.
          4. Recommend new staff and faculty appointments to the Dean in consultation with the faculty.
          5. Recommend the reappointment, non-reappointment, tenure, promotion, sanction and/or dismissal of faculty members in the School.
          6. Appoint and direct the nonacademic staff of the School.
          7. Serve as Producing Director of all School and Porthouse Theatre productions.
          8. Recommend leaves of absence for faculty members in the School, including but not limited to Professional Improvement Leaves and other academic leaves and/or non-academic leaves, including but not limited to leaves of absence without pay, sick leave, temporary disability leaves, court leaves and/or military leaves of absence.
          9. Notify the Dean of the absence or resignation of a faculty member.
          10. Implement course changes through the appropriate committees.
          11. Assign workload to faculty members in consultation with the faculty.
          12. Schedule classes and rooms through the appropriate University offices.
          13. Oversee the preparation of reports to University officials, as required and appropriate.
          14. Maintain custody of University property allocated to the School.
          15. Supervise the academic counseling of student majors in the School.
          16. Communicate and work with the appropriate College and University staff on fund-raising and advancement initiatives to benefit the School of Theatre and Dance.
          17. Promote positive communication and morale within the School.
          18. Represent the School and communicate the views of its faculty in College and University affairs.
          19. Keep the School informed of the views and policies of the College and University administrations.
          20. Maintain appropriate balance and emphasis among the various disciplines of the School.
          21. Perform other tasks and duties as assigned, all of which cannot be cataloged and may include but not be limited to: following the progress of graduates; maintaining relationships with the Regional Campuses; providing orientation to new faculty; developing brochures of course syllabi.

          The Director is an ex-officio, non-voting member of all School committees, and may make appointments as necessary and permitted to School committees and to the various administrative and service positions in the School.

          The selection, review, and reappointment of the Director are the responsibilities of the Dean, who consults with the School faculty on such matters. Procedures for the selection, review and reappointment of the Director are included in the applicable Collective Bargaining Agreement.

        2. Graduate Coordinator

          The Graduate Coordinator is appointed by the Director after consultation with the Graduate Studies Committee (hereinafter “GSC”) and the Graduate Faculty. The appointment is for a three (3) year term and is renewable. The Graduate Coordinator must be a full member of the Graduate Faculty holding the rank of Associate Professor or Professor. The Graduate Coordinator chairs the GSC and oversees the operation and development of the School's graduate programs. The Graduate Coordinator serves as the School liaison to the Graduate Studies. The duties of the Graduate Coordinator shall include but are not limited to:

          1. Oversee and coordinate admissions into the School's graduate programs.
          2. Facilitate, with the advice of the GSC, the awarding of graduate assistantships and teaching fellowships.
          3. Serve as School liaison to the College of the Arts, the Graduate College Council and the Graduate Studies.
          4. Conduct performance evaluations of graduate student teaching.
          5. Implement the current policies of the School's graduate programs and the current policies of the College of the Arts.
          6. Maintain and process graduate student records and inform students of their standing and progress toward degrees.
          7. Conduct reviews and make recommendations on Graduate Faculty status in consultation with the GSC.
          8. Facilitate changes and improvements in graduate curricula, requirements, and programs.
          9. Chair meetings of the GSC.
          10. Serve as advisor for the School's Graduate Student Forum.
          11. Approve individual investigations and special topics courses at the graduate level.
        3. Dance Division Coordinator

          The Dance Division Coordinator for the School is appointed by the School Director in consultation with the graduate faculty, the FAC, and the College Dean. Any regular full-time, tenured Dance Division faculty member shall be eligible for this appointment. The appointment is for a three-year term and is renewable. The functions of the Dance Coordinator are established by the School Director and include, but are not limited to, the following tasks:

          1. Oversee and coordinate recruitment and admissions into the School's dance division.

          2. Convene meetings of the dance faculty.

          3. Represent dance faculty at school meetings

          4. Schedule dance courses.

          5. Initiate and coordinate changes and improvements in dance curricula, requirements, and programs.

          6. Maintain dance student records and advise dance students

          7. Recommend Dance division teaching and non-teaching assignments to the School Director.

          8. Recommend production responsibilities for all activities pertaining to dance productions, including but not limited to the Faculty Dance Concert, Kent Dance Ensemble, Student Dance Concert, and BFA Senior projects.

          9. Perform other duties as assigned.

        4. Additional Administrative Appointments

          Appointments to other administrative positions are made by the Director in consultation with the FAC. Appointments will be dependent upon the specific requirements of the position and an individual’s qualifications for the position.

        5. Non-Academic Staff

          The School's non-academic staff includes all classified and unclassified staff positions within the School including but not limited to the Administrative Assistant and secretarial staff. Each position has specific duties as defined in the applicable position description.

    3. School Committees

      All School committees are advisory and recommendatory to the Director. The membership, structure, and function of some of the School's committees are governed by University, Administrative and Operational Policies and the applicable Collective Bargaining Agreement. The Director may establish ad hoc committees in consultation with the FAC. The Director will welcome requests from faculty members for positions on the School’s various committees. The Director, when making appointments to School committees, will be mindful of the diversity of disciplines within the School and will consider the expertise and interests necessary for the effective functioning of specific committees.

      1. The Faculty Advisory Committee (FAC)

        The FAC is structured and operates in compliance with the applicable Collective Bargaining Agreement. The FAC is elected directly by the full-time faculty of the School. The FAC shall consist of nine members as follows:

        • TWO (2) representatives from tenure track dance faculty on the Kent campus.
        • TWO (2) representatives from tenure track theatre faculty in the acting area on the Kent campus.
        • TWO (2) representatives from tenure track theatre faculty in the design/technology area on the Kent campus. 
        • ONE (1) representative from tenure track theatre faculty in the area of theatre history/criticism on the Kent campus.
        • ONE (1) representative from non-tenure track full-time theatre and dance faculty on the Kent campus.
        • ONE (1) representative from tenure track or full-time non-tenure track regional campus theatre faculty on the regional campus.

        Tenure-track faculty members shall constitute a majority of the members of the FAC.

        The FAC elects one tenured member to act as the School representative to the College Advisory Committee (hereinafter “CAC”).

        FAC terms are for one (1) year. Elections are conducted in the Spring Semester and the FAC members assume office at the beginning of the Fall Semester. 

        The FAC is convened and chaired at least once per term by the Director who, in consultation with the FAC, sets the agenda for its meetings. FAC members may request that items be added to the agenda. Additional meetings of the FAC may be called by the Director, as needed, or upon a request by at least one-half of the members of the FAC. The FAC elects one (1) tenured member to act as the School representative to the College Advisory Committee (hereinafter “CAC”). 

      2. The Graduate Studies Committee (GSC)

        The GSC includes the following faculty members:

        1. All full-time faculty having graduate faculty status in the School.
        2. The Graduate Coordinator, who serves as the GSC Chair.
        3. One graduate student elected by the School’s Graduate Student Forum.

        The GSC and the Graduate Coordinator provide oversight and development of the School’s graduate program. The GSC is responsible for evaluating applications for admission and evaluating and recommending candidates for graduate appointments. The GSC is also responsible for monitoring the progress and academic performance of graduate students in the School. The GSC reviews proposals for new graduate courses, changes in course content and related curricular matters, and conducts periodic reviews of the School’s graduate program as a whole. 

      3. The Curriculum Committee (CC)

        The CC includes the following faculty members:

        1. Committee Chair and Faculty members appointed by the School Director.
        2. One (1) undergraduate student representative appointed by the UGCC.

        The CC provides oversight and development of the School’s undergraduate program. The UGCC makes recommendations on any and all matters that affect the undergraduate program of the School including but not limited to faculty proposals for new courses, changes in course content, major requirements, and other curricular matters. The CC reviews and decides student appeals regarding course substitution. The CC shall elect one (1) member with full graduate faculty status to serve on the College Curriculum Committee.

      4. Student Academic Complaint Committee

        The Student Academic Complaint Committee is composed of faculty members appointed by the School Director.  The School Director appoints the Chair of the Student Academic Complaint Committee. The policies and procedures of this committee are governed by University Policy 3342-4-02.3, including but not limited to the addition of at least one (1) student representative to the committee. An undergraduate student will be added to the committee for complaints from undergraduate courses and a graduate student will be added to the committee for complaints from graduate courses. 

        In the event that a member of the Student Academic Complaint Committee is the subject of or may otherwise be involved with a student complaint, the FAC will select a replacement from the full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty.

      5. Reappointment, Tenure, and Promotion Committee

        The policies and procedures which govern the School’s Ad Hoc Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion (RTP) Committee are included in University Policy. Procedural and operational guidelines for this committee are provided annually by the Office of the Provost. This committee reviews materials relevant to the professional performance of faculty who are candidates for reappointment, tenure, or promotion in rank, and to make recommendations to the Director on each of these personnel decisions. The recommendations of this committee and the Director, together with the materials assembled for the committees, are forwarded to the Dean of the College. The Ad Hoc Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion Committee is composed by all tenured members of FAC and all full professors in the School of Theatre and Dance.

      6. Other Ad Hoc Committees

        The Director may establish, charge, and appoint the membership of ad hoc committees as required by the School. In establishing ad hoc committees, naming members and designating a committee chair, the Director shall consult with the FAC. The Director will welcome requests and preferences from the faculty before establishing and making appointments to ad hoc committees.

      7. Other Standing Areas and Committees of the School

        • Dance Division Area Faculty
        • Performance Area Faculty
        • Design/Tech/ Production Area Faculty
        • History/Literature/Criticism Area Faculty
        • Student Production
        • Production Committee
        • Season Selection Committee
  2. Teaching Assignments and Workload Including Workload Equivalencies and Related Procedures

    1. Faculty Ranks & Appointments

      Normally, an earned terminal degree or equivalent professional experience in a related discipline is required for all faculty appointments to a tenure-track position in the School.

      The basic definitions of faculty ranks are the following:

      1. Assistant Professor

      This rank is normally the entry-level rank for tenure-track faculty holding the terminal degree or equivalent professional experience in an appropriate discipline. 

      2. Associate Professor

      Hire to or promotion to this rank presumes prior service as an Assistant Professor, significant academic achievements, and possession of the terminal degree or equivalent professional experience in an appropriate discipline. 

      3. Professor

      Promotion to this rank requires credentials and achievements beyond those required for promotion to Associate Professor. This rank is reserved for senior faculty members who have made sustained and significant impact and achieved significant recognition in their discipline. 

      4. Research Associate and Research Assistant

      These ranks are reserved for individuals who are engaged in research and who are not normally assigned teaching responsibilities. Such positions are typically supported by extramural grant funds and are not tenure-track appointments. Faculty members who hold these ranks do not vote on School committees and do not participate in School governance.

      5. Adjunct Faculty Appointments

      Adjunct faculty appointments are made by the School Director in consultation with the FAC. Adjunct faculty members do not vote on School Committees and do not participate in School governance.

      6. Visiting Faculty Appointments

      Visiting faculty appointments at an appropriate faculty rank may be made when leaves of absence occur or special needs arise and funds are available. A visiting faculty member is typically a faculty member from another institution who is employed by the School for a period not to exceed one (1) year. In the event that a Visiting faculty member is employed in that capacity for a second consecutive year, the visiting faculty member will then become a full-time non-tenure track (NTT) faculty member.

      7. Full-Time Non-Tenure Track Faculty (NTT) Appointments

      Full-time non-tenure track faculty (NTT) appointments are made on an annual basis (See, Section VI of this Handbook). NTT appointments are not included under the umbrella of the University policy and procedures regarding faculty tenure (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-14) and NTT faculty members are not entitled to any rights with regard to tenure.

      8. Part-Time Faculty Appointments

      When the School cannot meet its teaching needs from the ranks of its full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty, full-time non-tenure track (NTT) faculty and graduate students, part-time faculty appointments will be made by the Director from an established pool of qualified applicants not currently on regular appointment at the University. 

    2. Graduate Faculty Status

      As a terminal degree granting School, the School normally requires that all faculty hired for tenure-track positions be eligible for appointment to the graduate faculty as associate or full members. The Administrative policy regarding graduate faculty is included in the University Policy Register. (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-15.1) 

    3. Recruitment of Faculty

      The School supports the goals of equal opportunity and affirmative action in recruiting and in making appointments to the faculty. Search procedures follow the policies and procedures set forth in the CBA. Search Committees are appointed by the Director in consultation with the FAC. Search committees include a student member selected by the faculty members serving on the search committee. Following the search, the search committee recommends to the Director that two (2) or three (3) candidates be invited to campus for an interview. Each candidate who is invited to campus for an interview will present a seminar/studio class before the School. The search committee will recommend its choice of candidates to the Director. Committee recommendations are advisory to the Director who makes a recommendation to the Dean. If the Dean concurs with the Director, a recommendation is forwarded to the Office of the Provost. If the Director's recommendation is different than that of the search committee and the faculty, the Director shall inform the Dean of all recommendations and the reasons for the disagreement.

    4. Role and Responsibility of the Faculty

      Each faculty member is expected to contribute to the School, Campus, College, and the University according to the terms and conditions of his/her letter of appointment.  Some faculty members make their primary contribution in teaching while others emphasize research and/or creative activity. High quality teaching and scholarly activity are expected of all faculty members. Service to the School, Campus, College, and the University is also expected of each faculty member.

      Faculty members are expected to provide students with a syllabus which includes the subject matter to be covered in a course, a listing of assignments and/or reports, approximate dates of examinations, grading standards, attendance requirements, and other pertinent details of the conduct of the class. A Student Survey of Instruction (hereinafter “SSI”) is required in each course in each semester and will be conducted under the auspices of the Director pursuant to applicable University policies and procedures. Probationary faculty members are required to undergo peer review of teaching during each year of the probationary period.  Supervision and direction of undergraduate research projects and theses is part of the teaching function.

      Scholarly activity is expected of all faculty members, although the extent and/or type of activity may vary with the terms of each faculty member’s assignment and campus location. Faculty involved in research and/or creative activity and the graduate program are expected to present evidence of their endeavors as witnessed by publication, proposals submitted for extramural funding, performances and juried exhibitions and dissemination of research and/or creative activity in various venues as appropriate to the discipline. Activity in professional organizations and the training of graduate students is also expected.

      Service to the University is a responsibility of each faculty member. School, Campus, College, and University committee or task force membership is expected as a normal part of a faculty member’s contributions. Outstanding service may be considered during the review of a faculty member, but service alone will not reduce the expectations of quality teaching and scholarly activity. Public service is encouraged and recognized as a part of the professional responsibilities of each faculty member, although contributions in this area can be expected to vary widely due to the nature of the various disciplines within the School.

    5. Faculty Code of Ethics

      All members of the School faculty are expected to maintain the highest ethical standards as teachers, scholars, university citizens and colleagues. The University policy regarding faculty code of professional ethics can be found in the University Policy Register. (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-17)

    6. Faculty Workload and Workload Equivalencies

      All full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty of the School are expected to carry a maximum workload of twenty-four (24) credit hours per academic year. Full-time non-tenure track faculty members are expected to carry a maximum workload of thirty (30) credit hours per academic year. (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-18) The workload for each individual faculty member is assigned by the Director with the approval of the Dean. The FAC shall advise the Director on issues related to teaching assignments, class schedules and the appropriate application of workload equivalents. In addition, the Director may, in consultation with the FAC and with the concurrence of the Dean, assign workload equivalencies for specific duties that are considered essential to the academic mission of the School. The Director shall provide each faculty member with a statement of her/his workload.

      Workload Equivalencies

      Activity       Credit Hr Equitv

      Director, Major Production                                                                             3

      Artistic Director, Faculty Dance Concert                                                        3

      Designer, Major Production                                                                            1-3

      Music Director, Major Production                                                                  1-3

      Technical Director, per semester                                                                     6-9

      Technical Director, Major Production                                                             1-3

      Performer, Major Production                                                                          1-3

      Vocal or Movement Coach, Major Production                                                1-3

      Fight or Dance Choreographer, Major Production                                          1-3

      Faculty Director/Coordinator, Student Productions/Projects                           1-3

       

      Dance Division Coordinator                                                                           3-6

      Program Coordinator                                                                                      1-3

      Graduate Coordinator                                                                                     1-3

      Porthouse Artistic Director                                                                             3-6

       

      Extraordinary class size (over 50% above capacity)                                        1-3

      Research/Creative Activity                                                                             1-3

      Curriculum/Course Development                                                                    1-3

      Not all faculty members contribute to the School in the same manner. A faculty member whose primary responsibilities are undergraduate teaching and undergraduate programs may teach and serve in a greater diversity of courses than a faculty member who is also a member of the graduate faculty. 

      Most of the School faculty members will be either a full or associate member of the graduate faculty. All faculty members are expected to be involved in significant research and/or creative activity, serve on graduate student committees, and direct graduate student research.

      In the interest of maintaining a high standard of teaching and the desirability of faculty involvement in research and service activities, overload assignments are strongly discouraged. Overload assignments (i.e. workload assignments which total more than twenty-four (24) credit hours per academic year for tenured and tenure-track faculty and which total more than thirty (30) credit hours for full-time non-tenure-track faculty) will be made only in unusual circumstances. Such assignments require the agreement of the faculty member, and the approval of the Director and the Dean.

    7. Teaching Assignments and Class Schedules

      The School Director assigns faculty members to teach courses. The primary considerations for course assignments are prior teaching experience, subject expertise, and shared responsibility among the faculty for service and introductory courses. Questions regarding teaching assignments should be addressed to the Director. In the case of a dispute or request for reassignment the faculty member may request review by the FAC which will make a recommendation to the Director.

      Scheduling of classes is the responsibility of the Director. The primary consideration for scheduling classes is student need with regard to meeting program or major requirements within a reasonable time frame. In addition, the scheduling of some classes may be determined by the need to serve nontraditional students.

      1. Summer Teaching Assignments

        The Director welcomes requests for summer teaching assignments from all full-time faculty members. Summer teaching cannot be guaranteed to any faculty member and most summer teaching assignments are for a partial load. The size, content, and staffing of summer courses are dictated by budgetary constraints and curricular needs. Within these requirements, faculty members are offered summer teaching assignments within their area of expertise on a rotation system. Faculty members may elect not to accept a summer assignment.

    8. Other Faculty Duties

      Full time faculty members are expected to schedule and attend at least five (5) office hours per week (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-18.101). The office hours shall be posted on the faculty member's office door and communicated to the School office as well as to the faculty member's students. If a student, for a legitimate reason or reasons, is unable to meet during the faculty member’s scheduled office hours, the faculty member shall make appointments to meet with the student at an alternate time.

      In order to assist in student advising, faculty members should maintain current knowledge of University, College, and School programs and requirements.

      Faculty members are expected to participate in recruitment programs, graduation ceremonies and other activities that are appropriate to their role as a faculty member in the School.

    9. Sanctions

      A sanction is a documented corrective action in response to a faculty member's unsatisfactory performance of his/her duties and responsibilities as a member of the faculty. (See, “Sanctions for Cause” in the Collective Bargaining Agreement

    10. Faculty Leaves

      All leaves, sponsored or unsupported, personal or professional, are subject to the approval of the Director, the Dean and the Provost.

      University leaves include but are not limited to:

                  1.      Research leaves.

                  2.      Leaves of absence without pay.

                  3.      Faculty professional improvement leaves.

                  4.      Research/Creative Activity appointments.

    11. Faculty Absence and Travel Policy

      Faculty members who will be absent from campus for professional or personal reasons must submit a Request for Absence Form with the Director. The request should be made at least one (1) month prior to the planned absence and is subject to the approval of the Director and the Dean. Arrangements for any classes to be missed during the absence must be addressed to the satisfaction of the Director before approval will be granted.

      Attendance at professional meetings is encouraged and approved travel expenses incurred in attending such meetings will be reimbursed when approved prior to travel according to the University's travel policies and are subject to the availability of School funds. In general, greater amounts of support will be granted to meeting participants (i.e. those presenting a paper or chairing a session) than to faculty members who simply attend professional meetings. 

    12. Faculty Sick Leave

      The Director is responsible for keeping complete records of faculty sick leave; however, faculty members are also required to submit the appropriate sick leave forms to the Director. Faculty members are also required to submit the use of sick leave online after an absence and within the timelines established by the Division of Human Resources.

    13. Outside Employment and Outside Activities

      Faculty members may engage in professional activities outside the university provided the activities do not interfere with the faculty member's teaching, research, or service responsibilities to the School, Campus, College or University (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-24). These activities must not compete with University activity or the faculty member’s employment with the University and must be approved in advance by the Director and the Dean. Each academic year, each faculty member must disclose and seek approval for all outside employment or other outside activities on the form provided by the University. Any outside employment or other outside activities are subject to the Faculty Code of Ethics and the University’s conflict of interest policies. (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-17 and 3342-6-23)

    14. Copyright Restrictions

      All faculty members should be aware of current copyright laws, which restrict the copying of published materials. For further information, contact the University’s Office of Legal Affairs.

    15. Adcademic Misconduct

      The University policy regarding misconduct in research and scholarship and the Administrative policy and procedures regarding allegations and instances of misconduct in research and scholarship is included in the University Policy Register. (See, University Policy Register 3342-3-05 and 3342-2-05.01)

    16. Faculty Grievance and Appeal Procedures

      1. Informal Procedure

      Any faculty member who believes that he/she may have a grievance is strongly encouraged, before initiating a formal grievance or appeal, to talk with the Director about any issue(s) of concern.  The Director may seek the advice and recommendation of individual faculty members or faculty advisory groups as well as the Dean in seeking informal resolution of a dispute or complaint.

      2. Formal Procedure

      Formal procedures for addressing grievances affecting the terms and conditions of employment of faculty are described in the applicable Collective Bargaining Agreement.  Disputes involving substantive academic judgments are subject to a separate academic appeals process governed by the applicable Collective Bargaining Agreement.

      Faculty grievances that are not directly related to the terms or conditions of employment and are not academic appeals are appropriately addressed within the School, whenever possible.  The Director and/or faculty members will initiate an informal dialogue with all parties involved in a dispute and strive to reach a resolution agreeable to all parties.

       

  3. Reappointment, Tenure, and Promotion: Criteria and Processes Relating to Other Faculty Personnel Actions

    1. Reappointment

      The policies and procedures for reappointment are included in the University policy and procedures regarding faculty reappointment (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-16). Each academic year reappointment guidelines for Kent and Regional Campus faculty are distributed by the Office of the Provost. Probationary tenure-track faculty members are reviewed by the School’s Ad Hoc RTP Committee.

      Overall Evaluation: The overall evaluation of a candidate for reappointment must include consideration of the faculty member's personal integrity and professional behavior as recognized by the University community. A sound ethical approach to all aspects of teaching, research, creative activity, publication, and the academic profession is expected of all who seek reappointment in the School. A candidate who fails to demonstrate likely success in the tenure process will be notified promptly that she/he will not be reappointed.

      Peer Review: Probationary faculty will provide, in consultation with the Director, two peer reviews (2) by faculty members and/or professionals with expertise in the field to evaluate the faculty member’s teaching performance. A written report of the evaluation is submitted to the faculty member for placement in his/ her reappointment file.  

      File:Probationary faculty will create an updated file that is submitted electronically via the online system designated by the University for this purpose. These materials are made available to the Ad Hoc RTP Committee. Each probationary faculty member is discussed by the committee, which then votes on the faculty member’s reappointment. Individual ballots are uploaded by each AD Hoc RTP Committee members through the online system designated by the University. The Director independently assesses the accomplishments of each probationary faculty member and forwards her/his recommendation and the committee's recommendation to the Dean.

      Feedback and Concerns: In the event that concerns about a candidate’s performance are raised during the reappointment process, the Ad Hoc RTP Committee and the Director shall provide detailed, prescriptive comments to serve as constructive feedback .If such concerns arise during a review that occurs after completion of three (3) full years in the probationary period, the Director, in consultation with the FAC, will advise and work with the candidate on a suitable, positive plan for realignment with the School’s tenure and promotion expectations; however, the candidate is solely responsible for her/his success in implementing this plan.

      Notification: Probationary faculty members who are not to be reappointed must be notified according to the schedule established in the Collective Bargaining Agreement. For faculty members whose appointment is on the Regional Campuses, recommendations on reappointment from the Director are forwarded to the Dean and the appropriate Regional Campus Dean.

      Planning: For probationary faculty, reappointment is contingent upon demonstration of adequate progress toward the requirements for tenure. The faculty member must have established and articulated short and long term plans for achieving these goals. For faculty members following the traditional tenure clock for Assistant Professors, the review after completion of three (3) full years in the probationary period at Kent State University is particularly critical. Upon completion of the third year of the probationary period, faculty reviewing a candidate for reappointment should consider the record of the candidate’s achievements to date. This record should be considered a predictor of future success. The hallmark of a successful candidate is a record of compelling evidence of impact upon the discourse of her/his discipline. This record can be demonstrated through review of the candidate’s research and creative activities, teaching and service.

      Responding to Concerns and Suggestions: Specific concerns expressed by the Ad Hoc RTP Committee and/or the Director during the probationary period should be addressed by the candidate in subsequent reappointment reviews.

      Tolling/Stopping the Tenure Clock: From time to time, personal and/or family circumstances may arise that require an untenured faculty member to request an extension of her/his probationary period. Upon request, a faculty member may be granted an extension of the probationary period which has been traditionally called “tolling” or “stopping the tenure clock.” The University policy and procedures governing modification of the faculty probationary period is included in the University Policy Register. (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-13)

    2. Tenure and Promotion

      The policies and procedures for tenure are included in the University policy and procedures regarding faculty tenure (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-14) and the policies and procedures for promotion are included in the University policy and procedures regarding faculty promotion (See, University Policy Register 3342-6-15).  Each academic year tenure and promotion guidelines for Kent and Regional Campus faculty are distributed by the Office of the Provost. 

      Tenure and promotion are separate decisions. The granting of tenure is a decision that plays a crucial role in determining the quality of university faculty and the national and international status of the University. The awarding of tenure must be based on convincing documented evidence that the faculty member has achieved a significant body of scholarship that has had an impact on her/his discipline, excellence as a teacher, and has provided effective service

      Overall Evaluation: The overall evaluation of a candidate for tenure and promotion shall include consideration of the faculty member's personal integrity and professional behavior as recognized by the University community. A sound ethical approach to all aspects of teaching, research, publication, and the academic profession are expected of all who seek tenure and promotion in the School.

      Tenure: The tenure decision is based on all of the evidence available to determine the candidate’s potential to pursue a productive career. On the other hand, promotion is recognition based on a candidate’s accomplishments completed during the review period and promotion decisions are based on performances, exhibitions and installations reviewed, papers published, grants received as well as teaching evaluations and service to the University. 

      The candidate is expected to continue and sustain, over the long term, a program of high quality teaching, scholarship and service relevant to the mission of the candidate’s academic unit(s) and to the mission of the University. For tenure, evaluation may refer to (but not count) accomplishments prior to appointment at Kent State in order to establish consistency.  Grant proposals submitted but not funded, proposals pending, creative works and papers “in review” or papers “in press,” graduate students currently advised, and any other materials that may reflect on the candidate’s potential for a long-term successful career may be considered.

      Promotion: Consideration for promotion to Professor differs from consideration for promotion to Associate Professor.  Promotion to Associate Professor is recognition for establishing a career likely to achieve national/international prominence as evidenced by performances, exhibitions and installations reviewed, extramural grants received, papers published in refereed literature, presentations, students graduated, etc. Promotion to Professor recognizes the highest level of university achievement and national/international prominence. Evidence for this prominence includes a record of sustained creative activity in highly significant venues, major extramural funding from highly competitive funding sources and a record of increased prominence in and impact on the field. 

      Regional Campus Faculty: Regional campus faculty are evaluated by the same criteria/categories as Kent campus faculty.  However, as the categories of teaching and service are the primary missions of the regional campus system, they should be given a higher priority in their review.

      Mentoring: The School affirms the university policy and procedures regarding faculty reappointment (see the University Faculty Handbook)which states probationary faculty members will have the opportunity to establish a mentoring relationship ( formal or informal)  as an aid in satisfying unit and/or regional campus requirements for tenure. Probationary faculty will, shortly after appointment, consult with the Director to determine the mentoring plan. The mentoring experience will be reviewed during annual reappointment conferences with the Director and as needed throughout the academic year.

    3. Criteria for Tenure and Promotion

      The Ad Hoc RTP Committee shall consider Scholarship, Teaching and Service of faculty performance when making recommendations on tenure and promotion. The tables and text below are designed to facilitate assessment of performance of those candidates who are being evaluated for tenure and promotion. During the probationary period, these tools should be used for developmental assistance and projection of future success in achieving tenure and promotion.

      Tables (Charts): Tables 1, 2, and 3 provide guidelines for the assessment of a faculty member’s performance and a rating scale for use in the evaluation of candidates. For promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor the faculty member must meet the criteria for an “excellent” rating in either scholarship or teaching with at least a “very good” rating in the other category. University citizenship must at least meet the minimum School criteria as outlined in Table 3. These same categories and assessment tools apply for tenure decisions.

      Promotion for Professor: A candidate for promotion to Professor must meet the criteria for an “excellent” rating in scholarship and teaching. University citizenship must exceed the minimum School criteria.  A candidate for promotion to Professor may not necessarily have equal activity in scholarship, teaching and service as he/she becomes more specialized.

      Documentation of a faculty member’s achievements may be demonstrated in a seminar, performance or other presentation of scholarly or creative work (lecture, demonstration, etc.) presented to the School prior to a faculty member’s application for tenure or promotion.  For Assistant Professors, this seminar/presentation of creative work may typically be presented during the faculty member’s third full year in this rank.  For promotion to Associate Professor and Professor, the seminar/presentation of creative work may be the year prior to an anticipated promotion application.

      1. Scholarship

        Scholarship is an essential and critical component of University activity. The originality, quality, impact and value of the work must be assessed. To assist this process, the candidate shall submit the names of at least five (5) experts in her/his field who are considered capable of judging the candidate's work. Moreover, the candidate must provide the Ad Hoc RTP Committee with ample descriptive evidence of his/her scholarly activity.  A faculty member's specific area of specialization may be a factor in the number and size of grants received and in the scope and time required for research and the resulting publications. 

        In addition to creative activity, research and scholarly publications, other scholarly activities including but not limited to serving on national grant review bodies, presenting at refereed professional meetings, chairing society committees, and presenting papers before learned societies should be considered. These activities complement creative activity, scholarly publications and grant funded research. Faculty members are expected to hold membership in professional societies.  Expected activities include attending and participating in institutes, conferences and seminars; inclusive of the organization of institutes, conferences, seminars, and workshops.

        1. Standards for the Evaluation of Scholarship in Research/Creative Activity

          The School of Theatre and Dance utilizes the following standards for assessing scholarship:

          • Broad knowledge of the field
          • Clarity of goals
          • Implementation of appropriate methods and procedures
          • Effective use of appropriate resources
          • Effective communication and presentation
          • Significance of results and impact on the field

          All faculty of the School are expected to seek excellence in research/creative activity. Assessment indicators are provided in Tables 1A and 1B.

          Indicators of the quality of a faculty member’s research/ creative activity record include the quality and quantity of performances, exhibitions, installations and published work as well as the faculty member’s success in obtaining extramural funds. All faculty members in the School are expected to produce records of scholarship in research/ creative activity that reflect their disciplinary focus. Attributes of an individual faculty member’s scholarly activity may vary across disciplines.

          To achieve “excellent” in the category of research/creative activity at the time a faculty member stands for tenure and promotion, she/he should have established a research and or creative activity program which demonstrates an impact upon his/her discipline.

          Within this context, during annual reappointment reviews, each faculty member who will seek tenure or promotion is obligated to provide evidence supporting his/her record of research/creative activity. This obligation will be met by providing specific information about the significance of performances, exhibitions and installations, article and journal quality and impact, funding history and plans, and description in the faculty member’s supplementary materials of any other evidence of scholarship that the faculty member deems appropriate. In turn, the members of the School’s Ad Hoc RTP Committee and the Director shall evaluate a candidate’s record in light of the School’s expectations for a successful tenure decision.   

        2. Tables

          Table 1A. Reappointment Tenure and Promotion Rubric for Scholarship in Research/Creative Activity

           

          Criteria

          Definition

          Accomplishments Corresponding to the Assessment Score

          Excellent

          Nationally/Internationally recognized research program, and/or body of creative activity

          Demonstrated record of publications1, grants2, and/or performances3, exhibitions and installations, invitations to give presentations, development/advancement work research-related service to federal/state organizations, awards, recognition from artistic and/or scientific societies4

          Very Good

          Emerging nationally

          recognized research, and/or body of creative activity

          Demonstrated record of publications  and ”seed” grants, and/or performances, exhibitions, installations and presentations at well-recognized  meetings or venues with rigorous review criteria.

          Good

          Active research and/or body of creative activity

          Some peer-reviewed

          publications or ”seed” grants, some performances, exhibitions, installations or presentations at meetings/seminars

          Weak

          Limited research and/or body of creative activity

          Occasional publications, performances, exhibitions, installations or

          meeting presentations

          Poor

          No research and/or body of creative activity

          No publications, performances, exhibitions, installations,

          presentations, or grants

           

          Note: definitions in footnotes below refer to the meaning of “publications,” “grants,” and “recognition” throughout Table 1 A.

           

          1Publications include: plays, scripts, scores, reviews, articles in peer-reviewed journals of recognized quality books, and book chapters. Evaluation of publication record will include an assessment of quality, length, and quantity and impact on the field..

          2“Grants” refers to extramural funding where the role of the faculty member in securing the funding is clearly demonstrated and which are of sufficient magnitude to support research at a level and duration appropriate for the discipline, including, as appropriate funds for supplies, materials and personnel (graduate students, research technicians and/or post-doctoral associates).  - “Seed Grants” are extramural grants that are not of sufficient magnitude to fully support doctoral students or are intramural grants.  "Seed Grants" should be designed to lead to successful applications for “Grants.” Grantsmanship should be commensurate with the field of research with the recognition that the dollar amount of awards varies among fields.

          3Performance refers to creative activity subject to critical review. Evaluation of performance creative activity record will include an assessment of quality and quantity. For venue ranking, see Table B.

          Examples: The following are examples of scholarship in research/creative activity in the disciplines of theatre and dance. All should be either juried, reviewed, adjudicated, commissioned, invited or otherwise subject to critical review.”

          (Note: This list is not exhaustive)

          • Basic refereed or invited researched publications- books, articles, plays, scores
          • Professional creative activity- including invited juried exhibitions, paid presentations/performances, services, choreographic, directorial works and design work normally subjected to critical review.
          • Presentation of original work normally subjected to critical review through jury, referee, invitation, or commission.
          • Technical solutions of design problems
          • Research patents
          • Presentations, lecture-demonstrations normally subject to critical review through jury, referee, invitation or commission
          • Conference presentations with national organizations.
          • Editing of journals, books anthologies normally subject to critical review
          • Professional Vocal/ Movement/Acting Coaching – inclusive of voice/dialect coaching and fight coaching.
          • Restaging or recreating original work for productions outside the University
          • Dramaturgical work for professional companies
          • Creative works with digital technologies
          • Pedagogical research and publication in refereed publications
          • Development of new techniques, technologies that advance the profession
          • Producing Professional work for the University
          • Guest Artist Performances for the University
          • Professional consulting work
          • Published technical solutions/drawings
          • Computer applications

          Table 1B Creative Activity Venue Ranking for Guidance in RTP Decisions

          This list is not comprehensive, is meant to serve as examples only and does not represent multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary research, creative activity, publication and presentation.

          Rank

          Venues

          A Venues Highest ranking venues in discipline as measured by impact

           

          • Tier 1 and Tier 2 Opera Companies
          • National / International  Dance Companies
          • National and International Dance Theatres
          • National and International Festivals (choreography and performance)
          • Broadway/ Off  Broadway
          • Production contracts
          • LORT A, B, C Theatre Companies
          • Feature film / commercial releases

          B Venues Middle tier venues

           

          • Off-Off Broadway
          • (Regional Opera Companies not Tier 1 or 2)
          • Regional Dance Companies
          • Regional Dance Theatres
          • Regional Festivals (choreography and performance)
          • Professional Regional Theatres (CORST, COST non-LORT or LORTD, URTA contract, SPT or letter of  agreement, LOA, guest artist contract)
          • Independent films/ web series
          • Non- Profit Theatre Companies  (ANCT) agreement
          • Casino/ Cabaret Union contracts
          • Academic Guest artist positions with accredited institutions ( URTA, NASD, NAST)

          C Venues Lower tier venues

           

          Community Theatres with guest contracts Code showcases

          • Community-based Dance Companies
          • Community-based Dance Theatres
          • Community Festivals (choreography and performance)
          • Academic Guest artist positions  with  non-accredited institutions
          • Volunteer design work

           

      2. Teaching

        Criteria for the evaluation of teaching are listed in Table 2. Course revision is defined as making a substantial modification to a course such as developing several new laboratories, addition of distance learning options, formally proposing to change course content/format, etc.

        Other information such as written comments from students, colleagues within and beyond the School, College or University administrators shall be considered when available.  Peer reviews and summaries of Student Surveys of Instruction (including all student comments) must be submitted as part of a candidate’s file for reappointment, tenure and promotion. Copies of representative syllabi, examinations, and other relevant teaching material should also be available for review. Documentation related to graduate student, undergraduate student, and post-doctoral student training should be included in materials provided by a candidate for reappointment, tenure and promotion. Faculty members are expected to mentor graduate students (particularly at the doctoral level) and/or postdoctoral students. Evaluation of teaching will account for differences in missions and expectations across campuses. 

        The following are examples of teaching scholarship in the disciplines of theatre and dance. (Note: This list is not exhaustive)

        • Publications and  presentations on pedagogy
        • Teaching awards
        • Graduate student research training/creative activity
        • Undergraduate student research training/creative activity
        • Involvement in curricular development or review
        • Classroom presentations
        • Coaching or advising student creative projects
        • Original pedagogical research
        • Grant applications, funding for teaching methods
        • Thesis/ MFA project direction
        • Culminating or Comprehensive Project Direction.
        • Writing/editing textbooks, manuals, worksheets
        • Published study guides or instructors’ manuals
        • Conducting instructional workshops
        • Development of instructional materials and methods
        • Demonstration of creative teaching strategies
        • Significant contributions to course content
        • Active involvement in a teaching-related professional organization.
        • Advising student organizations
        • Student academic advising and supervision of students
        • Vocal/movement/acting coaching for the school
        • Advising student creative work
        • Restaging or reconstructing choreography for the school
        • Restaging theatrical productions for the school
        • Dramaturgical work for the school
        • Performing in School productions
        • Direction, choreography, music direction for the school
        • Dance therapy
        • Professional certification (e.g. Combat, rigging, Somatic, etc.)

        Table 2. RTP Teaching Evaluation Rubric

        Teaching Assessment 

        Definition

        Accomplishments Corresponding to the Assessment Score

        Excellent

        Innovative teacher; provides leadership in instructional

        development

        Develop/revise courses, develop research projects for students (undergraduate and/or graduate), excellent student and peer perceptions, and instructional creativity, and actively participate in curricular revisions.   Positive peer reviews and student assessments.

        Very Good

        Innovative teacher. Provides consistent evaluation and communication measurements.

        Develop/revise courses, good student and peer perceptions, work with graduate and/or undergraduate students in research and/or creative activity.  Positive peer reviews and student reviews.

        Good

        Improving teacher. Provides consistent evaluation and communication measurements.

        Meets obligations well Evidence supports good student and peer communications.  Peer reviews and student reviews indicate improvement.

         

        Fair

        Average teacher

        Evidence supports average student and peer perceptions. Peer reviews and student assessments may be inconsistent/ indicate improvement.

         

        Poor

        Substandard,

        ineffective teacher

        Below average student and peer perceptions, pattern of

        Complaints. Consistent negative  Peer reviews and student assessments

         

      3. Service

        1. Faculty member's contributions in Service include service to the School, the Campus, the College, and the University as outlined in Table 3. The merits of University service should be evaluated as to (1) whether or not the candidate chaired the committee listed and (2) the importance of the service to the mission of the unit served. Less tangible components of citizenship include active participation in School events such as faculty and graduate student recruitment, seminars, School meetings and seminars, contributions to School and University special events (e.g. development/fund raising events), etc.

        Being an active and useful citizen of the School, Campus, College, and University is expected and valued; however, service of any magnitude cannot be considered more important than a candidate's research and other scholarly activity and instructional responsibilities. Expectations in service for promotion to Professor are higher than for promotion to Associate Professor.

        Table 3.Reappointment/Promotion and Tenure Evaluation Rubric for Service

        Service Assessment

        Examples of Accomplishments Corresponding to the Assessment Score

        Exceeds obligations

        Significant role in School, Campus

        College and/ or University as evidenced by productive service on committees, to the profession, and community; active participation in significant events, specific administrative assignments, meaningful public outreach.

        Meets obligations

        Meets the minimal School/Campus

        Obligations.

        Does not meet obligations

        Does not meet School/Campus

        obligations in a timely manner and/ or does not actively participate in significant departmental/campus events.

        2. Other components of service are also considered (including public outreach and public and professional service) in reappointment, tenure and promotion decisions and may differ in their importance among faculty members depending on each faculty member’s duties and responsibilities within the School.

        Examples: The following are examples of Service in the disciplines of theatre and dance. (Note: This list is not exhaustive)

        • Non-refereed reviews of books, journals, performances
        • Non-refereed symposium/conference presentations
        • Lecture-demonstrations not subject to critical review through jury, referee, invitation, or commission
        • Serving on advisory boards within/outside university community   
        • Public presentations of university activities
        • Serving in professional organizations
        • School development including recruitment, public relations
        • Manuscript and grant application reviews
        • Consulting within/outside university
        • Organizing/coordinating exhibitions, performances, projects
        • Mentorship of junior faculty
        • Participation on boards, Arts councils and community events
        • Producing student performances, exhibitions
        • Participating in university development productions
        • Serving on school, college and university committee
    4. Renewal of Appointment and Third-Year Full Performance Reviews of Full-Time Non-Tenure Track (NTT) Faculty

      1. Renewal of Appointment

        Appointments for full-time non-tenure track (NTT) faculty are governed by the applicable Collective Bargaining Agreement and are made annually.  Renewal of appointment is contingent upon programmatic need, satisfactory performance of previously assigned responsibilities, and budgeted resources to support the position. Each NTT faculty member has a specified track: Instructional, Clinical, Practitioner, or Research as defined in the CBA for Full-time, NTT faculty.

      2. Third-Year and Six-Year Full Performance Review

        The third-year full performance reviews of (NTT) faculty are governed by the applicable Collective Bargaining Agreement. Each academic year, guidelines for the third-year full performance reviews for NTT faculty at the Kent and Regional Campus are distributed by the Office of the Provost. The third-year full performance review concludes with the College or, if applicable, the division of the Regional Campuses’ level of review and determination. The period of performance to be reviewed is the three (3) full academic years of appointments including that portion of the third appointment that is subject to evaluation and assessment at the time of the review.

      3. Performance Reviews (after (9) years of consecutive employment and two (2) Full Perfromance Reviews)

        After nine (9) years of consecutive appointments, and every three (3) years thereafter, bargaining unit members shall undergo a “simplified” performance review. The performance review will follow the procedures and timelines established by the University, as annually distributed through the Office of Faculty Affairs, concluding with the college or, if applicable, the division of the regional campuses’ level of review and determination. Members will electronically submit to the unit a vitae, summaries of student surveys of instruction, if applicable, and a narrative of up to five (5) pages in which the faculty member describes her/his professional activities during the past three (3) years.

      4. Criteria for considerations in performance reviews for third year faculty

        Non-tenure track faculty members usually make their primary contribution in undergraduate teaching or emphasize contributions to the co-curricular production program. In each specialization, a high quality of teaching is expected. Therefore greater weight will be given to these areas. Activities emphasized will reflect individual assignments made by the School Director and the specific track of each faculty member (Instructional, Clinical, Practitioner, Research). Collegial behavior should be reflected in the record of each faculty member.

        1. Teaching-Related Performance:

          This category embraces activities related to the teaching of specific courses, creative work on the school’s main stage production season, and the interaction with students in and out of the classroom. Creative contributions to the theatre and dance seasons may also be evaluated as Teaching. Areas of evaluation include knowledge of subject matter, teaching methodologies, intellectual and educational integrity, and faculty/student interaction.

          1. Mode of Evaluation of Teaching

            1. Demonstration of excellence in teaching may be shown through (but not limited to) measures of student achievement, self-evaluation, workshops, teaching portfolios, peer and student evaluations, external evaluators, letters, awards. 

            2. Qualitative standards. No distinction is made on the basis of quantity alone, e.g., a “magic number” guaranteeing reappointment does not exist. Teaching is an ongoing activity and work is normally spread among a variety of evaluative documents.

          2. Criteria for Evaluation

            1. Broad knowledge of the field
            2. Implementation of appropriate methods and procedures
            3. Effective use of appropriate resources
            4. Effective communication and presentation
            5. Significance of results
          3. Criteria Governing Documentation

            Evidence of performance for reviews may be demonstrated by self-evaluation, peer evaluation and student evaluation.  Candidates must document their accomplishments by offering appropriate evidence, such as the following:

            1. A self-evaluation providing an assessment of the candidate’s teaching during the period under review as well as the candidate’s performance of other responsibilities and accomplishments during the period under review.
            2. Syllabi for courses taught during the period under review as well as examples of course materials used in teaching.
            3. Measures of student achievement, such as student performances, portfolios, publications, etc.
            4. Evaluation Summaries of Student Surveys of Instruction (SSI) for all courses taught during the period under review.
            5. An up-to-date curriculum vita.
            6. Peer reviews of teaching.
            7. Other materials that may document his/her responsibilities during the period under review.
          4. The following is a list of examples by which teaching may be assessed in the discipline (List is not exhaustive)

            • Publications, presentations on pedagogy
            • Teaching awards
            • Graduate student research training/creative activity
            • Undergraduate student research training/creative activity
            • Involvement in curricular development or review
            • Development and restructuring of courses
            • The creation of course syllabi
            • Classroom presentations
            • Coaching or advising projects
            • Choreography
            • Original pedagogical research
            • Grant applications, funding for teaching methods
            • Thesis/MFA Comprehensive/Culminating project direction
            • Writing/editing textbooks, manuals, worksheets
            • Published study guides or instructors’ manuals
            • Conducting instructional workshops
            • Development of instructional materials
            • Advising student organizations
            • Student advising and supervision of students
            • Advising student creative work
            • Vocal/movement/acting coaching
            • Dance Therapy
            • Professional certification (e.g. Combat, rigging, Somatic, etc.)
        2. Others:

          The following is a list of some examples of work in the discipline in an additional area of specialization as outlined in the Offer of Appointment (List is not exhaustive)

          • Creative activity for the school, such as design, performance, technical direction, musical direction
          • Musical Accompaniment for dance or theatre courses
          • Technical solutions/drawings
          • Technical solutions of design problems
          • Consulting within/outside the University
          • Writing computer materials
          • Directing or choreographing school productions
          • Choreography and performance in school productions

          NTT faculty members are expected to undergo a Full Performance Review. The Full Performance Review will follow the format, procedures and timelines established by the University, as annually distributed through the Office of Faculty Affairs, concluding with the college or, if applicable, the division of the regional campuses' level of review and determination. The Ad Hoc RTP Committee in consultation with the Director, will provide NTT faculty members undergoing review two peer reviews (2) by faculty members and/or professionals with expertise in the field to evaluate the faculty member’s teaching performance. A written report of the evaluation is submitted to the faculty member for placement in his/ her reappointment file.

          A written report is submitted to the Director for placement in the faculty member's electronic review file. NTT faculty will also submit an updated file electronically online via the system that is designated by the University for this purpose. The Director independently assesses the accomplishments of each NTT faculty member and forwards to the Dean her/his recommendation. NTT faculty members whose appointments will not be renewed must be notified by the timelines established in the applicable Collective Bargaining Agreement whether lack of adequate satisfaction with performance or the absence of anticipated continuing programmatic need or budgeted resources to support the position is the reason.

          The overall evaluation during the third-year full performance review shall include consideration of the faculty member’s personal integrity and professional behavior as recognized by the University community. A sound ethical approach is expected of all NTT faculty members who seek renewal of appointment in the School.

  4. Criteria, Performance Expectations & School Procedures Relating to President's Faculty Excellence Awards & Merit Criteria

    1. President's Faculty Excellence Awards

      1. General Principles

        1. When provided for in the CBA, the University will establish an additional salary pool for the purpose of recognizing exceptional performance by a Faculty member which leads to the achievement of national or international recognition.

        2. All Faculty members are eligible for consideration for these awards. For an initial award, all of the Faculty member’s accomplishments while at the University shall be considered. Normally, Faculty members are eligible to receive an award under this Section once in any three-year period; however, an additional award in the same three-year period or in any subsequent award period would be based on additional achievements since the last award. If a Faculty member earned national or international recognition before joining the University, she/he may be considered; however, the Faculty member’s record since being hired at the University must justify an award. Similarly, a Faculty member’s past achievements that have been previously recognized by any special salary increase(s), will not be considered for an award under this Section.

        3. Awards will be granted to Faculty members based on exceptional performance leading to the achievement of national or international recognition. National or international recognition may be demonstrated in research, teaching, and/or service. Faculty members in all disciplines will be considered and the measures of national or international recognition will be appropriate to the discipline.

        4. The President will award the total amount available in the designated pool during the time period specified in the Agreement. The number of awards per year, the amount of individual awards, and the total amount awarded in each year of the Agreement will be in the sole discretion of the President of the University and the President’s decision is final.

      2. Procedures

        1. During each award period, the Provost shall request nominations, which may come from department Chairs/Directors, Deans, Faculty advisory body, or individual Faculty members. Those who are nominating colleagues (or self) for this award should provide a discipline-specific context so that reviewers of the nominations understand how to assess the achievement of “national or international recognition.” A standard form for nominations will be distributed by the Provost’s office and nominations will be collected by the unit administrator for each academic unit on this form.

        2. At regional campuses, in Colleges without Departments or Schools, or in the University Libraries the Dean will consult with the appropriate Faculty advisory body and make a       recommendation to the Provost. This recommendation will include all nomination forms submitted, and a summary listing the names and academic units of all Faculty members nominated, whether or not the College or the Campus recommended an award, and the amount recommended (if any).

        3. In Colleges with Departments or Schools, the Chair/Director will consult with the FAC and make a recommendation to the Dean. This recommendation will include all nomination forms submitted, and a summary listing the names and academic units of all Faculty members nominated, whether or not the Department/School recommended an award, and the amount recommended (if any). The Dean will then consult with the CAC regarding the nominations and recommendations from the Department/School level before making a recommendation to the Provost which will include all materials provided to the Dean by the Department or School in addition to the Dean’s recommendation.

        4. The Provost shall make a final recommendation of the awardees which is subject to the approval of the President. President’s Faculty Excellence Awards will be distributed at the beginning of the next academic year, and will become part of the Faculty member’s base annual contract salary. The awards will be added to the Faculty member’s salary after all other applicable salary increments have been entered.

      3. Procedures

        1. The Provost shall distribute the Kent Campus pool on a per capita basis to the academic units of the Kent Campus. The Provost shall distribute the Regional Campuses pool on a per capita basis to each of the regional campuses within the Division of Regional Campuses.

        2. Eighty percent (80%) of the allocation shall be distributed on a per capita basis to each college, college without departments or schools, University Libraries or regional campus and shall be for the purpose of establishing merit awards at the academic unit or regional campus level. For colleges with departments or schools on the Kent campus, the Dean shall distribute the 80% pool on a per capita basis to the academic units in the College.

        3. Twenty percent (20%) of the allocation shall be reserved for use in the sole discretion of the College or regional campus Dean to supplement awards or to make additional merit awards in the College, regional campus or University Libraries.

        4. At each academic unit and regional campus, preliminary assessment of materials submitted for evaluation will be made by an ad hoc Faculty body composed of the Faculty advisory body identified for that purpose according to the criteria in the academic unit/campus section of the Faculty Handbook and any other Faculty applying for an award who wish to participate in the evaluation. The ad hoc Faculty body will make an advisory recommendation to the academic unit or regional campus administrator concerning the allocation of merit awards in each of the three (3) categories of research/creative activity, teaching, and/or service.

        5. Following receipt and consideration of these advisory recommendations from the ad hoc Faculty body, the academic unit or campus administrator will make a preliminary determination of merit awards, and will notify all Faculty of the preliminary determinations for all Faculty members in the academic unit or campus. A Faculty member will have the right to request reconsideration of the preliminary determination. This request will be considered by the ad hoc Faculty body, which will make an advisory recommendation on the merits of the request to the academic unit or campus administrator. The academic unit or campus administrator makes the final determination on the allocation of the merit awards at this level.

        6.  The final determination of a department Chair or school director shall be transmitted to the appropriate Dean, along with a justification for the awards based on the criteria for merit awards as established in the academic unit/campus section of the Faculty Handbook. The final determination of a regional campus Dean, along with a justification for the awards based on the criteria for merit awards as established in the academic unit/campus section of the Faculty Handbook, shall be transmitted to the Provost or his/her designee. The final determination of the Dean of an academic unit without departments or schools shall be transmitted directly to the Provost, along with a justification for the awards based on the criteria for merit awards as established in the academic unit/campus section of the Faculty Handbook.

        7. While there is no guarantee that all who are eligible and apply for a merit award will receive one, no limit shall be imposed on the number or percent of eligible Faculty who may receive an award in each academic unit or regional campus. In some cases, two or more Faculty members may have equally meritorious performance in a given category; however, in no case should all eligible Faculty members in an academic unit or campus receive identical merit awards in any of the three (3) categories of research/creative activity, teaching, and service. Instead, differences in award amounts shall reflect differences in Faculty performance in each of the three (3) categories.

        8. Upon receipt of final determinations from department Chairs/school directors in Colleges with departments and schools or from the ad hoc Faculty body in Colleges without departments or school, University Libraries, or regional campuses, the Deans of Colleges with departments and schools, Deans of Colleges without departments or schools, the Dean of University Libraries and the Regional Campus Deans, shall distribute his/her discretionary pool and distribute the final merit awards

        9. Procedures and timelines for determining merit awards for any given year shall be conducted in accordance with guidelines issued by the Office of the Provost, following consultation with the Association. The Association shall be provided at least five (5) days to review and comment upon the proposed guidelines. Criteria, performance expectations, and academic unit/campus procedures for assessing meritorious performance shall be included in academic unit/campus sections of the Faculty Handbook and communicated to the Faculty in advance of the submission of materials for review.

        10. Merit awards will become part of the continuing bargaining unit member’s base annual contract salary at the beginning of the employment contract for the academic year after the award is given. The award will be added to the bargaining unit member’s salary after all other salary increments, including any necessary adjustments to meet minimum salary levels (floors), have been entered.

    2. Merit Awards

      1. General Principles

        1. When provided for in the CBA, the University will establish an additional salary pool for the purpose of recognizing documented meritorious Faculty performance. The parties agree that the purpose of merit awards is to both reward meritorious performance during the period reviewed and motivate future meritorious performance.

        Three (3) broadly-defined categories of documented meritorious Faculty performance, consistent with the mission of the academic unit/campus and the evaluative criteria and relative weighting defined in the academic unit/campus section of the Faculty Handbook, are to be recognized through merit awards: (1) documented meritorious performance in research and/or creative activities; (2) documented meritorious performance in teaching; and (3) documented meritorious service to the unit/campus, college, University, and/or academic profession.

        2. When merit awards are available, pools for this purpose shall be established separately for the Kent campus (the “Kent Campus pool”) and for the Division of Regional Campuses (the “Regional Campus pool”). In each year, the Kent Campus pool shall be equal to the designated percentage of the previous academic year’s base annual contract salaries of Faculty members eligible for consideration for a merit award under Section D below. In each year, the Regional Campuses pool shall be equal in per capita amount for eligible Faculty members from the Division of Regional Campuses to the per capita amount calculated for eligible Faculty members from the Kent Campus by the application of the above formula.

        3. Each academic unit on the Kent Campus and each Regional Campus will determine what percentage of the merit award pool shall be used to support awards in each of the three (3) categories identified in Section 4.A. of this section. However, no academic unit or Regional Campus shall allocate less than 20% of the merit award pool to support any of the three (3) categories. This determination shall be made by each academic unit and campus prior to the review of materials submitted by Faculty members applying for merit awards and shall be included in the academic unit/campus section of the Faculty Handbook.

        4. To be eligible for consideration for a merit award, an individual must be a current member of the bargaining unit and have been a member of the bargaining unit for the majority (more than 50%) of the period established as the review period for the awards. Only documented meritorious performance that took place while the individual was a member of the bargaining unit may be considered when allocating merit awards. In the case of long term projects, some portion of the work, including its final phase, may have been undertaken while the Faculty member was not a member of the bargaining unit. In such cases, only the portion of the work that was undertaken while the Faculty member was a member of the bargaining unit may be considered when allocating merit awards.

      2. School Criteria

        Three (3) broadly-defined categories of (1) documented meritorious performance in research and/or creative activities; (2) documented meritorious performance in teaching; and (3) documented meritorious service to the unit/campus, college, University, and/or academic profession. Each member of the FAC evaluates each faculty member who has applied for merit and assigns a point value rating based on the following criteria. The available merit pool dollar amount is divided by the aggregate number of points assigned in order to determine the monetary value of each point.

        The following represents the School’s understanding of threshold-level performance:

        1. Research and Creative Activity (40%)

          That scholarly/creative competence to discharge on-load and assigned activities and efforts to manifest a scholarly/creative presence beyond the University, can be established.

          Research/Creative Activity

          Scholarship/Creative

          Activity 

          Definition

          Accomplishments Corresponding to the Assessment Score

          Excellent

          High Merit (3)

          Nationally/Internationally recognized research and/or body of creative activity

          Demonstrated record of publications1, grants2, and/or performances3, exhibitions and installations, invitations to give presentations, development/advancement work research-related service to federal/state organizations, awards, recognition from artistic and/or scientific societies4

          Very Good

          Medium Merit (2)

          Emerging nationally

          recognized research program, and/or body of creative activity

          Demonstrated record of publications and ”seed” grants, and/or performances, exhibitions, installations and presentations at well-recognized meetings or venues with rigorous review criteria.

          Good

          Low Merit (1)

          Active research and/or body of creative activity

          Some peer-reviewed

          publications or ”seed” grants, some performances, exhibitions, installations or presentations at meetings/seminars

          Weak

          No Merit (0)

          Limited research and/or body of creative activity

          Occasional publications, performances, exhibitions, installations or

          meeting presentations

           

          1Publications include: plays, scripts, scores, papers in peer-reviewed journals of recognized quality journals books, and book chapters. Evaluation of publication record will include an assessment of quality and impact on the field as well as quantity. Papers of exceptional length, impact and quality are given particular consideration. 

          2“Grants” refers to extramural funding where the role of the faculty member in securing the funding is clearly demonstrated and which are of sufficient magnitude to support research at a level and duration appropriate for the discipline, including, as appropriate funds for supplies, materials and personnel (graduate students, research technicians and/or post-doctoral associates).  - “Seed Grants” are extramural grants that are not of sufficient magnitude to fully support doctoral students or are intramural grants.  "Seed Grants" should be designed to lead to successful applications for “Grants.” Grantsmanship should be commensurate with the field of research with the recognition that the dollar amount of awards varies among fields.

          3Performance refers to public creative activity subject to critical review. Evaluation of performance creative activity record will include an assessment of quality as well as quantity.

          4Recognitions from scientific, artistic and scholarly societies include, for example, election to office, editorial board membership, editorship, etc. Service to federal/state institutions includes service on federal proposal panels, site visits, and other research related activities.

        2. Teaching (40%)

          That there is a relationship between the subject described and the subject taught; class time is used thoroughly and effectively; there is a syllabus; course goals and assignments are specified; course counseling is available; out-of-class requirements are guided and supervised. creative project advising

          Teaching

          Teaching/University Assessment

          Examples of Accomplishments Corresponding to the Assessment Score

          Excellent Teaching

           

          High Merit (3)

          Develop/revise courses, develop research projects for students (undergraduate and/or graduate), excellent student and peer

          perceptions, instructional creativity, actively participate in

          curricular revisions

          Peer reviewed teaching awards at the University, regional or national level.

          Exceeds Obligations

          Very Good Teacher

          Medium Merit (2)

          Develop/revise courses, good student and peer perceptions, work with graduate and/or undergraduate students in research and/or creative activity.

          Meets Obligations/Good teacher.

          Low Merit (1)

          Meets obligations well.  Good student and peer perceptions

          No Merit (0)

          Fair Teacher.

        3. Service (20%)

          Kent State service responsibilities--committee assignments, curricular advising, thesis advising, , production advising, registration and special duties, etc.--are discharged as assigned and as required by reasonable deadlines.

          Service

          Service Assessment

          Examples of Accomplishments Corresponding to the Assessment Score

          Excellent Service

           

          High Merit (3)

          Significant role in School, Campus

          College and/ or University as evidenced by productive service on committees, active participation in significant events, effectively chairing committees, specific administrative assignments, and meaningful public outreach.

           

          Exceeds Service Obligations

          Medium Merit (2)

          Consistent level of active participation and leadership in School and University activities.

          Meets Service Obligations

          Low Merit (1)

          Occasionally take on significant leadership roles. Active participant.

          Does Not Meet obligations

          No Merit (0)

          Meets the minimal School obligations or does not participate in School activities

  5. Other School Guidelines

    1. Goals and Mission of the School of Theatre and Dance

      The primary objectives of the School are to:

      1. Create an academic environment that promotes the intellectual and professional development of students and faculty;
      2. Develop and advance scholarly activity and creative activity, graduate education, and undergraduate education commensurate with the goals and mission of Kent State University;
      3. Provide programs for all students that meet the educational, artistic, and technological demands of the disciplines represented in the School;
      4. Offer courses in theatre, dance, and professional fields which provide the base for the career goals of students and faculty; and
      5. Provide the public with service commensurate with the goals and mission of Kent State University.

      Implicit in these objectives is our responsibility as teachers, which includes but is not limited to educating undergraduate and graduate students and providing continuing education while promoting and clarifying the role and philosophy of education in theatre and dance.

      A strong commitment to research and creative activity encompasses creating and maintaining an intellectual environment which allows us to advance knowledge, develop art and continue service to the public. 

      The School of Theatre and Dance values service to the University and to the general public. Our service should reflect the role of the University in the local community, in the State of Ohio, and in the nation.

      The School of Theatre and Dance provides students with liberal and professional education and prepares them for careers in the performing arts as artists, scholars, and educators. The School of Theatre and Dance production season serves as the primary laboratory for the development of student artistic expression and technique. As part of performing arts, theatre and dance reflect and communicate cultural values and identities intrinsic to human existence. As such, the study of theatre and dance is central to the humanities curriculum.

    2. Students

      1. Student Appointments to Committees

        Students, both undergraduate and graduate, are of primary concern to all faculty members, and students' academic needs are of primary importance to the School therefore  students participate in various School committees including the Curriculum Committee (CC), Graduate Studies Committee (GSC), and those ad hoc committees where students' viewpoints are useful and appropriate.  Student appointments to committees are made by the Director in consultation with the faculty members involved in and affected by a specific committee's work.

      2. Advising

        Full time Tenure track faculty are required to advise and counsel undergraduate and graduate students on academic matters. Individual faculty members are responsible for providing academic counseling to undergraduate students assigned to them and to other undergraduate students who seek such advice, as needed.  Student advising at the graduate level is conducted by the student's "major professor," the Graduate Coordinator and the advisor of the student’s comprehensive (acting) or culminating (design and technical) project.

      3. Student Academic Misconduct

        The University’s Administrative policy regarding student cheating and plagiarism is included in the University Policy Register. (See, University Policy Register 3342-3-01.8)

      4. Student Grievances and Academic Complaints

        The University’s policies and procedures that govern student grievances and student academic complaints are included in the University Policy Register. (See, University Policy Register 3342-4-02.102, 3342-02-3 and 3342-8-01.4)

      5. Transfer Credit

        The Office of Advising and Academic Services appoints an Advisor who is responsible for the evaluation of undergraduate transfer credit and may consult with a faculty member who teaches the specific course or courses at issue. Questions of transfer credit for other subject areas should be referred to the College office.

        Graduate transfer credit is evaluated according to the process described in the current Graduate School Catalog. Both master’s and doctoral transfer credit may be accepted if the criteria are met and the student's advisor, the Graduate Studies Committee, and the Dean approve the transfer credit.

      6. Privacy of Student Records

        The Director is responsible for ensuring that all members of the School comply with all laws and University Policies, which govern the privacy of student education records, including but not limited to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).  These regulations require, among other things, that faculty members keep thorough academic records and forbid the posting of grades by name, social security number or any other system that might identify a student with her/his education record. For further information, contact the University’s Office of Legal Affairs.

      7. Student Evaluations

        All courses are evaluated each semester, including summer sessions, using the approved Student Survey of Instruction (SSI). The SSI should be conducted during the last week of class, prior to final’s week. Faculty members are informed of the day and time for the evaluation and graduate students administer the SSIs under the direction of a School staff person.  At no time should the faculty member being reviewed be present in the room during the survey. SSIs are returned in a sealed envelope to the School office. The School staff arranges for the appropriate scoring of SSIs according to the approved group norms for the School. SSIs are not available to individual faculty members until after grades are submitted to the Registrar. SSIs and the results are maintained the School office and are available for faculty review. SSIs for Regional Campus faculty are administered and maintained by the campus at which the course is taught.

    3. Curricular Policies and Procedures

      1.   Curricula

      Curricular changes may be proposed by any faculty member for consideration by the Curriculum Committee and the Graduate Studies Committee.  Either of these committees may initiate curriculum changes. The proposal must be submitted to the faculty at least five (5) working days prior to a vote by the entire faculty. If the recommendation from either committee is not unanimous, a minority report may be submitted with the recommendation.  If recommended by a majority, the proposal is forwarded to the Director whose recommendation is sent to the College for consideration.

      2.   Final Exams

      Final examinations in all courses must be offered at the time and date specified in the University’s schedule of final examinations. Changes of the time and/or date of a final examination require prior approval of the Director, but in any case, the exam must also be offered at the time scheduled and publicized by the University for those students who desire to take the exam at that time.

      3.   Grades

      Faculty members must inform students of their progress throughout the semester. Grades are a faculty member's responsibility and should be assigned fairly and objectively. Submission of final grades must comply with University Policy, including but not limited to the deadline for the timely submission of grades. Failure of faculty members to provide grades in compliance with University Policy will be taken into consideration in reappointment, promotion, tenure and merit decisions. 

      Materials used in computing grades (e.g., exams, papers, reports, etc.) should be retained by the faculty member for five (5) years after final grades are submitted. Students have a right to inspect the written work performed during a course and discuss the grade with the faculty member.

      4. Audits

      Students may audit without credit any course subject to space availability and departmental approval. An audited course is not counted as part of the course load, but students must go through registration procedures and pay the normal registration fees. An instructor may impose whatever attendance requirements deemed necessary. The students must be informed of these requirements at the beginning of the semester. Failure to meet such attendance requirements subjects the students to being withdrawn from the course by the instructor. This will be accomplished by the instructor’s insertion of the mark W at the time of final grades. Faculty members have the discretion to determine conditions and requirements for the audit.