Erik Smith

Erik Tyler Smith

Department of Geography
Ph.D. Student and Research Assistant
Campus:
Kent
Office Location:
445 McGilvrey Hall
Contact Information

Biography

I want to understand how extreme events will impact humans and to predict how climate change will alter these extremes so that we can pinpoint future vulnerabilities. My research focuses on atmospheric and oceanic circulations and how they affect winter weather in the Northern Hemisphere. My dissertation, which expands upon my thesis, examines cold air outbreaks (CAOs) across the globe to see: 1.) How they have changed over time, 2.) The relationship between teleconnections and CAOs in different regions, 3.) The ability of climate models to predict extreme cold on a subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) scale, 4.) Opportunity for improved S2S predictions using statistical and machine learning timeseries models.  (Personal Website  |  Kent State Research Page)

Other Research Interests: 

1.) Seasonal/sub-seasonal forecasting

2.) Climate modeling

3.) Linkages between the Arctic and mid-latitudes

4.) Climate change and national security

5.) Impacts of extreme weather on human mortality

6.) Effective communication of climate-related data

7.) Human perceptions of weather and climate 

 

Publications:

ACCEPTED

1.) Smith, Erik, and Sheridan, S. C. (2020). “Where do Cold Air Outbreaks occur and how have they changed?” Geophysical Research Letters: doi.org/10.1029/2020GL086983.

2.) Smith, Erik, Lee, C. C., Pirhalla, D., Ransibrahmanakul, V. Chuanmin, H., Barnes, B. B., & Sheridan, S. C. (2019). “A synoptic climatological analysis of the atmospheric drivers of water clarity variability in the Great Lakes.” Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology: doi.org/10.1175/JAMC-D-19-0156.1.

3.) Adams, R., Lee, C. C., Smith, E. T., & Sheridan, S. C. (2020). “The relationship between atmospheric circulation patterns and extreme temperature events in North America.” International Journal of Climatology: doi.org/10.1002/joc.6610.

4.) Sheridan, S. C., Lee, C. C., Adams, R., Smith, E. T., Pirhalla, D., & Ransibrahmanakul, V. (2019). “Temporal modeling of anomalous coastal sea‐level values using synoptic climatological patterns: ” Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans.: doi.org/10.1029/2019JC015421.

5.) Smith, Erik, and Sheridan, S. C. (2019). “The Influence of Extreme Cold Events on Mortality in the United State.” Science of the Total Environment: doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.07.466.

6.) Smith, Erik, and Sheridan, S. C. (2018). “The Influence of Atmospheric Circulation Patterns on Cold Air Outbreaks in the Eastern United States.” International Journal of Climatology: doi.org/10.1002/joc.5935.

7.) Smith, Erik, and Sheridan, S. C. (2018). “The Characteristics of Extreme Cold Events and Cold Air Outbreaks in the Eastern United States.” International Journal of Climatology: doi.org/10.1002/joc.5408.

SUBMITTED

8.) Sheridan, S. C., Lee, C. C., & Smith, E. T. (2020). A comparison between station observations and reanalysis data in the identification of extreme temperature events doi.org/10.1002/essoar.10502708.1.

9.) Lee, C. C., Adams, R., Smith, E. T., Obarein, O., Sheridan, S. C. (2020). “Examining trends in multiple parameters of seasonally-relative extreme temperature and dew point events across North America.” International Journal of Climatology.

10.) Lee, C. C., Barnes, B. B., Sheridan, S. C., Smith, E. T., Chuanmin, H. Pirhalla, D., Ransibrahmanakul, V., Adams, R. (2019). “Using Machine Learning to Model and Predict Water Clarity in the Great Lakes.” Journal of Great Lakes Research.

11.) Smith, Erik, and Cromley, G. (2020). “The Role of Weather on Airborne Parachute Operations during the French Indochina War.” Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers.

12.) Smith, Erik, Obarein, O., Sheridan, S. C., & Lee, C. C. (2020). “A new method to assess trends in atmospheric circulation patterns across North America.” Climatic Change.

 

Curriculum Vitae:

Expertise

Extreme Cold, Winter Climate Variability, Synoptic Climatology, Meteorology, Physical Geography