CRIM From the Magna Carta to the Beheading of Kings: The Origins of Modern | Kent State University

CRIM From the Magna Carta to the Beheading of Kings: The Origins of Modern

Course Name: CRIM From the Magna Carta to the Beheading of Kings: The Origins of Modern Criminology

Description: In this class we explore what crime “is”; a crime against society or a punishment for individuals mis-behavior.  From the readings of Aristotle and Socrates, to the debate between Locke and Hobbes, the polemics of these philosophers leads us to the modern thoughts on criminology, that is, the classical and positivist schools. We will explore the impact of the Magna Carta on human rights, that culminated in the beheading of Charles I in 1649 by the parliamentary forces of Oliver Cromwell’s men for the kings high treason against England. Emerging from Charles I’s execution, the classical school of Bentham and Beccaria engages in a polemic discussion against the positivist school of Garofolo, Lombroso, Ferri, &  Goring. We will also explore the Sociological Aspect of crime developed by Tarde, Durkeim, and Bonger as well as the psychiatric aspects of crime developed by Aschaffenburg, Ray, and Maudsley.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None