POL The Politics of Land, Race, and Resistance: Settlers Vs. Natives in Italy and Europe, 1860-2018 | Kent State University

POL The Politics of Land, Race, and Resistance: Settlers Vs. Natives in Italy and Europe, 1860-2018

Course Name: POL The Politics of Land, Race, and Resistance: Settlers Vs. Natives in Italy and Europe, 1860-2018

Description: This course examines theories of Settler Colonialism as well as compares cases from North America (US), Europe (Italy) Africa (Zimbabwe & South Africa), and the Middle East (Israel). Settler Colonialism originates out of the legal systems of Europe when as colonizing powers they sought to protect their citizens in distant lands. Over time, European power went beyond standard colonialism (working with colonized leaders to extract resources while opening up and exploiting new markets) by seeking to extend Europe into non-European states by using European settlers to apply a logic of elimination and replace the native populations in these locales. Older settler colonial states seemed to have achieved their mission in states like the US, Canada, and Australia. Late-comers (end of the 19th century/beginning of the 20th Century) to settler colonialism have been less successful. Italy had at least three settler colonial experiments in Libya, Ethiopia, and Somalia end in failure. Insurgents evicted the French from Algeria and the British from Zimbabwe, Zambia, and South Africa. Israel continues its settler colonial project in historic Palestine. Yet, settler colonialism is not a relic of the past. It is a part of our contemporary politics. The invasion of settler colonial attempts is a structure, not an event. Systems designed with a settler colonial framework express pathologies that manifest similarly and differently from one another in today’s societies, economies, and politics. The purpose of this course is to compare and contrast these cases as a way of learning about the legacies and lived experiences of these transnational politic projects. Thus, we will emphasize and learn not just how the settler colonizer changed a place but how it also changed the contemporary practices of the country of origin.

Credit Hours:

Prerequisites:  None