Spring 2018 Honors Courses | Kent State University

Spring 2018 Honors Courses

The following course descriptions are provided by instructors of Honors courses. Clicking on the course title will direct you to the course description. Course descriptions are intended to help students in making selections for registration. Course information and descriptions are subject to change. Students should note the following designations which mark appropriate courses: D diversity domestic course; G diversity global course; + mixed Honors/non-Honors course; # mixed Honors/non-Honors/graduate student course.

Humanities

Status
Subj CRN Course Sec Title Instructor Time Day Bld Rm Hr
  COMM 12228 26000 2 Criticism of Public Discourse D+ James Trebing 915 1030 MW TLH 158 3
Full
ENG 13498 22072 3 Great Books Since 1700 - Honors Thomas Schmitzer 1205 1255 MWF SFH 117 3
Full
PHIL 20672 11001 17
Introduction to Philosophy - Honors G

Anthony Fernandez

215 330

MW

BOW

217

3

Full
PHIL 17081 21001 16 Introduction to Ethics - Honors G

Linda Williams

1230 145 TR BOW 315 3

FINE ARTS 

Status
Subject CRN Course Sec Title Instructor Time Day Bld Rm Hr

Full

ARCH 10487 10012 2 Global Architectural History II  Honors + Steven Rugare 915 1030 TR CAE 120 3

Full

ARTH

10681

22007

25 Art History: Renaissance to Modern Art - Honors Diane Scillia 345 500 TR TBA TBA 3

Full

ARTH

16083

22007

27 Art History: Renaissance to Modern Art - Honors

Diane Scillia

915 1030 TR CVA 140 3

Full

MUS

16069

22111 20 The Understanding of Music -  Honors

Linda Angotti

215 330 TR CPA 0D105 3

Full

MUS 16093 22121 17 Music as a World Phenomenon - Honors

Priwan Nanongkham

345 500 MW CPA 0D001 3

Full

THEA 18740 11000 14 The Art of the Theatre

Dane Castle

1100 1215 TR CPA D304 3

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Status
Subj CRN Course Sec Title Instructor Time Day Bld Rm Hr
Full
ANTH 10388 18210 3 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology   -  Honors G Joy St. James 1100 1215 TR LRH 249 3
Full
CACM 11626 11001 7 Introduction to Conflict Management   -  Honors D Theresa Repicky 915 1030 TR BOW 311 3
Full
ECON 13022 22060 1 Principles of Microeconomics -  Honors Emmanuel Dechenaux 345 500 MW BSA 324 3
Full
ECON 13045 22061 1 Principles of Macroeconomics   -  Honors Ludmila Leontieva 345 500 MW BSA 217 3
Full
PSYC 17475 11762 8 General Psychology   -  Honors D Jeffrey Ciesla 215 330 MW KTH 60 3

Full

PSYC 17476 11762 9 General Psychology  -  Honors D TBA 215 330 TR MCG 311 3
Full
PSYC 20790 20651 4
Child Psychology - Honors D
William Merriman

915 1030

TR

KTH

145

3

Full

PSYC 17527 21211 3 Psychology of Everyday Life   -  Honors D TBA 345 500 TR KTH 60 3

Full

SOC 18112 22778 1 Social Problems -  Honors G Stephen Webster 955 1045 MWF MLH 105 3

BASIC SCIENCES

Status
Subj CRN Course Sec Title Instructor Time Day Bld Rm Hr
  BSCI 11208 10120 2 Biological Foundations  Honors + (Lab Honr) Gregory Tinkler 215 305 MWF CHH 101 4
  CHEM 11852 10971 1 Honors General Chemistry II Scott Bunge 1100 1150 MTWF ISB 190 4

ADDITIONAL

Status Subj CRN Course Sec Title Instructor Time Day Bld Rm Hr

Full

COMM 12121 15000 28 Introduction To Human Communication  - Honors TBA 530 645 MW ANX 245 3

Humanities

 

COMM        26000         002    Criticism of Public Discourse - Honors D +        

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

The purpose of the course is to train students to be critics of public discourse in a diverse society and includes a critical examination of selected public speeches representing diverse viewpoints on a variety of historic and contemporary issues, including the U.S. Civil War, World War II, the civil rights movement, political rhetoric, feminist rhetoric, gay rhetoric, and other contemporary social controversies, emphasizing methods of evaluating public oral communication and the heritage of public discourse in free society. Students will prepare oral and written critiques that identify, analyze, and evaluate the use of rhetorical resources and that emphasize the resolution of differences. In addition to the basic course material and assignments, Honors students will examine modern and post- modern critical theories beyond the neo-Aristotelian method including Burkean, feminist and ideological theories. Supplemental readings will inform student efforts in expanded critical methodologies. Post-modern methods will then be applied to the diversity section of the course. In addition to the 8-10-page paper required for the standard course, Honors students will be required to write two additional 10-12-page papers that will provide the basis for their two oral presentations. The objective of these written assignments is to expand and improve academic writing skills (as opposed to creative, journalistic, or other types) with emphasis on the production and written presentation of humanistic research. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

 

ENG  22072         003    Great Books Since 1700 - Honors            

The course will focus on major works that reflect and simultaneously affect the modern mind.  The impact of Enlightenment thinking on a medieval world and its evolution into the modern era will serve as a focus for this Great Books II course. 

The philosophical implications of the works considered this semester will also be a major part of our discussion in the class.  The class will focus on discussion, and students will be encouraged to participate in the discussion to develop an environment of vigorous analysis.  Critical thinking skills are to be developed both in the discussion and in the papers written for the course.

The emergence of Existentialism from Nietzsche to the present will be a developed and this as a reaction against nihilism.  “A splendid time is guaranteed for all.”

Textbook:

  •  Faust- Goethe
  • Candide-Voltaire
  • Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
  • Dubliners. James Joyce
  • The Stranger. Albert Camus
  • Waiting for Godot. Samuel Beckett
  • The Hobbit.  JRR Tolkien

Examinations, papers, and reports:

Students are required to write three papers for the semester.  These will be written on three of the works read during the course.  The papers are to be approximately 1000 words or about four pages.  The best way to understand a literary work is to write about it.

There is no mid-term or final examination.  The details of each assignment will be covered in depth in class. In addition to the papers, quizzes are given regularly covering the assigned readings.  Prerequisite: none. 

 PHIL  11001        017    Introduction to Philosophy - Honors G

How do we come to have cognitive access to the world around us? Are perception and reasoning reliable guides to an objective reality?  What is “truth” and can we ever come to know it? Are there truths in ethics and morality? Are there purely subjective truths? What is the relationship between subjectivity and consciousness? What, after all, is a conscious mind? Is it something that can define a person even as s/he changes over time? What is the relationship between the mind and the body? Can an artificial machine ever come to have a conscious mind?

These are some of the deepest questions in philosophy, and we will tackle them in this course. Although the topics mentioned above are intimately related, it will be useful to impose a structure on them for the length of the semester. We can say that the questions just raised belong to four major areas of philosophy: ethics, epistemology, philosophy of mind and metaphysics. We will explore each of these areas, with careful readings of both historical and contemporary sources.

Prerequisite: None

 

 PHIL  21001         016    Introduction to Ethics - Honors G             

This course is designed to introduce you to some of the ancient and contemporary, Western and non-Western, and male and female writings on ethics. We will begin with a discussion of divine ethics. We move on to an examination of Aristotle’s virtue ethics. Next we will study two normative ethical theories, based on duty (Kant) and utility (Mill) respectively. We will end with an ethic associated with feminism—caring ethics (Noddings). Students are expected to critically analyze and evaluate these theories in addition to reflecting upon their influence in their own lives. Prerequisite: None

 

Fine Arts

 

ARCH         10012         002    Global Architectural History II -  Honors +

Students in the honors section of the course will engage in close reading of several key texts in architectural theory. These readings will include essays and manifestos by Perrault, Viollet-le-Duc, Frank Lloyd Wright, Otto Wagner, Adolf Loos, Le Corbusier, and others, as well as scholarly papers on issues related to colonial and postcolonial architecture. Their response to these readings will take the form of short assignments involving graphic and written analysis. Honors students will complete a more extensive (2500 word) research-based version of the paper assignment for the course, working on a topic of their choice. No Prerequisite. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: ARCH 10011 or ARTH 22007.

 

ARTH 22007 25 & 27 Art History: Renaissance to Modern Art – Honors

This course aims to give an understanding of some of the most significant artists, styles, and ideas of the western artistic tradition, from the fourteenth century to the present. The course is also an introduction to the history of art as a discipline. Alongside the completion of reading assignments in the survey text and three examinations based on the text, course notes, and internet research, students will be expected to take part in class discussions focused upon a selection of scholarly articles on reserve. Students will also be required to complete a research paper. Each student (with some assistance) determines the topic of that paper early in the semester and is led through the research and writing process via several handouts, each of which we go over carefully in class. Prerequisite: None.

 

MUS  22111         020    The Understanding of Music - Honors

Course is designed for students to become more aware of music as it applies to their everyday lives. They will learn about various musical elements—to include rhythm, melody, harmony, key, voices/instruments, etc.—as well as performance perspectives in different style periods. Students will also explore several styles/genres of music and gain knowledge of the development of music history from before Bach to the Beatles and beyond. Moreover, they will recognize and identify the names of significant artists, composers, performers, conductors, and compositions in all periods of musical history. Prerequisite: none.

 

MUS  22121         017    Music as a World Phenomenon - Honors G

Students are exposed to a variety of world music traditions and extra-musical associations. Students will be asked to identify and associate musical traditions and related cultural aspects of various regions through aural recognition and analysis. A sampling of musics from around the world (ie. Oceania, India, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, the Caribbean, the Americas, Asia, etc.) will be provided. Written project includes a travel report researching an area of the student's choice. Prerequisite: none.

 

THEA 11000 014 The Art of the Theatre – Honors G +

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

This course is designed to increase theatre audience awareness and understanding of theatrical production process, theatre traditions and rules, and the role of theatre in different cultures. It is a participation course; class discussions, creative projects, and writing are strong components of the course. Students are required to attend plays on campus and to write reaction papers (theatre reviews) afterwards. In addition to class participation and preparation, writing assignments, and projects, students will be evaluated via exams and quizzes. Group and service learning projects may be included. Students will be expected to think creatively and critically in all their work for the course. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: None. 

 

Social Sciences

 

ANTH 18210         003    Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - Honors G

Students have come of age in a world where the human population is rapidly growing while technological advances are breaking down barriers of distance and language. As a result, there are more opportunities for interactions across cultures than ever before in human history. But what is a culture? What is it worth to keep a culture from changing or to keep a language alive? Is it worth dying for? Answers to these questions shape our lives and inform foreign and domestic policies for all governments. Cultural Anthropology seeks to strengthen students understanding of our world by focusing attention on contemporary cultural diversity and the opportunities and challenges presented by such diversity. Assessments will include three exams, one small project (e.g. making a genealogy chart), and one 6-10-page paper on an appropriate topic of the student’s choice that will be due toward the end of the semester. Prerequisite: None. 

 

 CACM 11001 007 Introduction to Conflict Management - Honors D

Here is a course that can change the way you handle conflict. Not bad for 3 credits.... We begin from the premise that conflict is a normal part of life, and is neither good nor bad in and of itself. It can reveal injustices and be a source of personal growth and social transformation. But conflict can also breed alienation, and may be waged with all manner of violence, including war. So our question becomes: what tools can individuals, groups, and governments use to manage or wage their conflicts in constructive ways? This course introduces positive conflict management processes, including active listening and communication skills, principled negotiation, mediation, arbitration, victim and criminal-offender mediation, and nonviolent direct action. Activities and exercises will help you develop your own conflict management skills. Prerequisite: None. 

 

ECON         22060         001    Principles of Microeconomics – Honors

This is an introductory course in microeconomic theory and its applications. It is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and to apply principles of economic analysis to the day-to-day decision-making of individuals and households (consumers) and to different types of firms. Students are introduced to the basic models of market structure and how firms behave under these different structures. We will examine concepts such as what determines market supply and demand, how firms decide how much to produce in order to maximize profits under different circumstances, and a wide range of economic policy issues. The classroom presentation will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and in-class exercises. Students will have opportunities to apply economic theory to a number of policy issues in written assignments, class presentations, and discussions. Prerequisite: Minimum 45 ALEKS math score; or minimum 22 ACT math score; or minimum 530 SAT math score; or one course from MATH 00023 to 49999. 

 

ECON         22061         001    Principles of Macroeconomics – Honors

The course is designed to include lecture, student presentations, discussions, problem sets, and exams. Main subject of macroeconomics is the economy as a whole, so this course discusses roles of government entities and policies in affecting aggregate production, consumption, investment, and government expenditures. topics include role of money, the banking system, inflation, unemployment, and economic growth. The basic objective of this method of teaching is to help students understand how various tools of government policies influence the economy, and how their impact spreads through various channels of our daily lives. Prerequisite: ECON 22060

 

PSYC 11762         008    General Psychology - Honors D

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. As such, a broad number of topics that cover the diversity of behavior studied by psychologists will be covered, including sensation and perception; human development; memory, language, and problem solving; personality; psychopathology and therapy; and social interactions. Class meetings will be a mixture of presentations, discussion, exercises, and demonstrations. By the end of this course, it is expected that students will be able to:

  • Describe psychological theories, principles and concepts relevant to the following topics: history and methods, physiology (biology of behavior, consciousness, perception), cognition (learning, thought, language), social, organizational, developmental, personality and psychopathology and its treatment.
  • Articulate knowledge of classic as well as contemporary research in each of the major subfields of psychology.
  • Recognize diversity and individual differences and similarities in a variety of contexts.
  • Be able to think critically about research findings and apply what you have learned to real world situations.

Students will be expected to demonstrate how well they have achieved these objectives through class discussion, exams, and homework assignments. Assignments will include short papers, application/reflection papers, and application questions.

Text: Weiten, W., Psychology: Themes and Variations. Briefer Version, 9th edition. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. (ISBN-13: 978-1-133-93906-1) 2013

You have several options for the textbook. There are e-book and loose-leaf (ISBN-13: 978-1-133-95910-6) versions available from the publisher at reduced prices; you can also rent it directly from the publisher or get only the chapters that we cover (www.cengagebrain.com). Prerequisite: none. 

 

 PSYC 11762         009    General Psychology - Honors D

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of the human mind in all of its manifestations, including sensation and perception; human development; memory, language, and problem solving; motivation and emotion; personality; psychopathology and therapy; and social interactions. Class meetings will be a mixture of discussion, student and faculty presentations, exercises, and demonstrations. The primary objectives are for the student to understand the human mind by learning how psychologists use behavior to understand mental processes. Prerequisite: none.

 PSYC 20651         004    Child Psychology - Honors D

 In this course, we will review the data, concepts and theories of child pscyhology that contribute to the understanding of child development from conception to age 18. We will explore the biological, cognitive, cultural, and social factors in the development of infants, children, and adolescents. Prerequisite: none. 

 

PSYC 21211         003    Psychology of Everyday Life - Honors D

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

A review of theories, concepts and data that contribute to the understanding of human adjustment. Topics may include the following: personality, stress and coping, transitions from adolescence to adulthood, psychological disorders and psychotherapy. Prerequisite: PSYC 11762.

SOC  22778         001    Social Problems - Honors G

This course provides an overview of the sociological study of social problems.  Why are sociologists interested in social problems?  The obvious answer is that the problems are SOCIAL in nature and sociologists are interested in how they are related to the SOCIAL world.  A less obvious answer is that early sociologists carved out a unique place for their discipline by studying social problems.  A more contemporary explanation for sociology’s interest in social problems is that sociologists are interested in how social problems are socially constructed.  For example, while children have been physically beaten throughout history, sociologists want to know why child abuse has only recently been recognized as a social problem (since the early 1960's).  So, sociologists are interested in how social problems are related to the social world, how sociology can help society better understand and solve social problems, and how some social issues become social problems (e.g. child abuse) and others do not (e.g. sibling violence). The textbook used in the course is NOT a traditional Social Problems textbook.  Instead the book used is Thinking About Social Problems by Donileen Loseke which provide a contrast between the Objectivist perspective on social problems and the Constructionist perspective on social problems. Students will be required to complete TWO position papers describing ONE social problem of their own choosing.   Students will be asked to write their first paper using the Objectivist perspective and their second paper using the Constructionist perspective.  Students will be asked to share their papers with the entire class via e-mail and give a short (10 minute) presentation of each paper in class. Prerequisite: None.

 

Basic Sciences

 

BSCI 10120         002    Biological Foundations - Honors + (Lab HONR Only)

Principles of biology—cell biology, energetics, reproduction and heredity, molecular genetics, animal systems—presented within an evolutionary perspective. In lecture there will be four exams, including the final exam. The Honors component may include a series of readings from biological literature and scientific journals. The laboratory includes investigative, as well as observational, exercises. Short laboratory quizzes and laboratory practical exams are given, and reports about some laboratory exercises are required. The Honors students will have the following work that differs from non-Honors students: Separate lab with additional assignments involving writing about biology in the news; Lab quizzes are designed to be more challenging; Lecture exams will have a different format for Honors students—not just multiple choice but some short answer/essay question.  Prerequisite: None. 

 

CHEM         10971         001    Honors General Chemistry II

Chemistry 10961 is a continuation of CHEM 10960. Emphasis is placed on both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of mixtures, equilibria in solution, chemical kinetics, and energy relationships. This course provides an introduction to various topics of chemistry such as organic, electrochemical, polymer, environmental, and biochemistry. Applications of these different subjects to the medical field will be discussed. The grade for the course will be based on exams, quizzes, and homework sets.

Required text: Chemistry – an Atoms-focused Approach, Gilbert et al, 2nd edition, Norton Publishing 2017 Prerequisite: CHEM 10970 with minimum C grade.

 

Additional

      

COMM        15000         028    Introduction to Human Communication - Honors

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

Honors Introduction to Human Communication emphasizes communication as a mutually shared process. Students will explore both classical and contemporary theories and concepts drawn from a variety of disciplines including communication, philosophy, psychology, and sociology to develop an understanding of the nature and functions of human communication in interpersonal, group, and public contexts. Prerequisite: None.

Status

Subj

CRN

Course

Sec

Title

Instructor

Time

Day

Bld

Rm

Hr

 

ARCH

10515

45291

3

Seminar: The Modern in Spain -  Honors +

Brett Tippey

430 545

TR

CAE

317

3

 

BSCI

11368

40154

2

Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease  - Honors +

Derek Damron

215 330

TR

HDN

111

3

 

CHEM

11874

40099

1

Senior Honors Thesis

TBA

       

4

 

CLAS

12011

41304

2

Latin Literature in Translation  Writing Intensive - Honors +

Jennifer Larson

215 500

T

WTH

208

3

 

COMM

12275

35912

5

Gender and Communication -  Honors D

Cristin Crompton

1100 1215

TR

TLH

130

3

 

COMM

12286

45007

2

Freedom of Speech - Honors +

Paul Haridakis

215 330

TR

TLH

130

3

Full

ECON

13075

42079

2

European Economic Issues -  Honors +

Donald Williams

635 920

M

BSA

205

3

 

ENG

13617

39395

2

St: The Literature of India - Honors +

Uma Krishnan

1230 145

TR

SFH

121

3

Full

ENG

13641

43092

2

Teaching Poetry In The Schools  - Honors +

Katie Daily

530 815

T

   

3

 

EPSY

13726

29525

4

Educational Psychology - Honors

Anne Morrison

215  330

MW

WTH

216

3

 

FDM

13858

10023

2

Fashion Visuals -  Honors +

Kim Hahn

850  940

M

   

1

 

FDM

13859

10024

1

Fashion Visuals Laboratory  -Honors

Kihm Hahn

215 445

M

ROC

114

2

Full

FDM

13886

10053

2

Introduction to Fashion Technology -Honors +

TBA

955 1045

M

   

1

Full

FDM

13887

10054

1

Introduction to Fashion Technology Laboratory -  Honors

William Perrine

215 445

M

ROC

124

2

Full

FDM

13911

20013

2

History of Costume -  Honors 

Jean Drusedow

345 500

TR

   

3

 

FDM

13997

40199

2

Senior Fashion Design Thesis II  - Honors +

Linda Ohrn

800 1030

MW

ANX

134a

3

 

FDM

14004

40291

1

Seminar in Fashion Merchandising  Writing Intensive  - Honors +

Jewon Lyu

850  940

MWF

ROC

116

3

 

FDM

21131

45095

6

St: Conscious Leadership in Fashion Honors +

Jihyun Kim

215  330

TR

ROC

306

3

 

FIN

14037

36053

2

Business Finance - Honors +

Marc Via

1100  1215

TR

BSA

213

3

 

HIST

21220

38095

3

ST: History of Espionage - Honors +

Brian Hayashi

215 330

MW

BOW

223

3

 

HIST

21221

38295

3

ST: Global Migrations - Honors +

Timothy Scarnecchia

345 500

MW

BOW

218

3

Cancel

HONR

14826

30297

4

Col: Us Law and Legal Reasoning  The First Amendment  - Honors

Barton Bixenstine

345 500

MW

JHN

55

3

 

ID

21730

14012

2

Design and Human Behavior - Honors +

Terrence Uber

530 645

TR

MCG

240

3

 

ID

21722

44014

2

History of Interiors II - 16th Through 19th Century - Honors +

TBA

915 1030

TR

CAED

124

3

 

ID

21721

44041

2

Current Issues In Interior Design - Honors +

Cary Johnson

110-200

TR

CAED

130

1

 

ID

21729

44611

2

Interior Design Research and Programming - Honors +

Jill Lahrmer

Web

Web

WEB

CRS

 2

 

ID

21728

44631

2

Inquiry For Evidence Based Design - Writing Intensive - Honors +

Pamela Evans

1100 1150

W

CAED

317

1

Full

ITAL

15075

35597

2

Col: Thieves Beggars and Whores: Boccaccios Decameron and The Novella In The Middle Ages -  Honors

Kristin Stasiowski

215  500

T

SFH

117

3

 

ITEC

15080

39525

4

Educational Technology – Honors

Gandolfi, Enrico

425  705

T

WTH

205

3

Full

JMC

15183

26001

60

Writing Across Platforms - Honors +

Candace Bowen

1100  105

MW

FRH

417

3

 

JMC

15200

28001

60

Principles of Public Relations - Honors +

Stefanie Moore

1230  145

TR

FRH

317

3

 

JMC

15241

40006

60

Law of Mass Communication - Honors +

Mark Goodman

345  500

MW

FRA

340

3

 

JMC

15247

40010

60

Ethics and Issues In Mass Communication - Honors  +

Janet Leach

1100  1215

TR

FRH

213

3

Full

JMC

15265

40095

60

St: Introduction to Film – Honors

Ronald Russo

215  500

M

FRA

339

3

 

MATH

15609

12003

3

Analytic Geometry And Calculus II  -Honors +

John Neuzil

955  1045

MTWRF

MSB

114

5

 

MIS

15813

24053

3

Computer Applications - Honors +

Geoffrey Steinberg

745  900

TR

CWH

306

3

Full

MIS

15911

44285

4

Integrated Business Policy and Strategy -  Honors  +

Asli Arikan

1100  1215

TR

BSA

108

3

Full

NURS

16465

20020

4

Foundations of Assessment and Communication in Nursing - Honors

Mary Bacha Ann Marie James

1030 1210

M

 

HDN

 

 

201

3

955 1055

T

207

1205 145

T

201

900 1200

W

206

     
     
     
     

Full

NURS

16478

20030

3

Foundations of Nursing Interventions Honors

Debra Cifani Sarah Bixler Timothy Meyers Natalie Miller Cline

1030 1210

800 1000

1100 1200

700 130

M
                          T

T
                            R

HDN HDN HDN TBA

107 201 208

5

 
 
 

Full

NURS

16483

20030

8

Foundations of Nursing Interventions Honors

Debra Cifani Sarah Bixler Timothy Meyers

1030 1210 800 1000 1100 1200 700 130

M

HDN HDN HDN TBA

107 201 208 TBA

5

T

T

W

Full

NURS

16591

40872

2

Introduction to Evidence Based practice Honors +

TBA

320 410 530 815

M

HDN HDN

105 201

3

Full

PAS

16812

20200

2

Recovering the Past: Kent to Memphis – Honors +

Christina McVay

345 500

T

ORH

150

3

 

PH

17002

30005

2

Social and Behavioral Science Theories in PH

Kristina Knight

955 1045

MWF

MLH

231A

3

 

PH

20479

30033

3

Public Health Policy and Decision Making – Honors

John Staley

1205 1255

MWF

ORH

340

3

 

POL

17380

10500

3

World Politics - Honors

Gabriella Paar-Jakli

215  330

MW

BOW

224

3

 

SOC

21007

32673

2

Urban Sociology - Honors  +

Richard Adams

745 900

TR

BOW

204

3

 

SOC

18192

42478

2

Adolescence in Society - Honors   +

Timothy Owens

915  1030

TR

WTH

107

3

 

THEA

18866

41306

1

Professional Aspects: Design and Technology  - Honors +

Tamara Honesty

1100 1215

TR

CPA CPA CPA

B041 B042 D024

3

 

THEA

18871

41499

2

Musical Theatre Showcase -  Honors +

Therese Kent Jonathan Swoboda

215 330

TR

CPA

D205

2

 

UC

19040

10097

912

DKS: First Year Experience Honors

Ólöf Thórdardóttir

110 200

W

JHN

55

1

 

UC

21095

20095

2

ST: Innoviation Course: Be Smarter Than Your Smartphone - Honors +

John West

915 1030

TR

LCM

101

3

 

VCD

19156

40053

2

Graphic Design Studio – Glyphix Honors +

Larrie King

1100 145

MW

OFF

SITE

3

 

VCD

19175

45000

2

Graphic Design Perspectives – Writing Intensive Honors

Jessica Barness

Web

Web

WEB

CRS

3

ARCH 45291        003    Seminar: The Modern in Spain -  Honors +

An analysis of Spanish architecture (1898-1992).  Focuses on Spain as a case study of fundamental twentieth-century issues in architecture and the allied design disciplines.  Emphasizes the use of historiography and proper source criticism in architectural history.

This course includes non-honors undergraduate students, honors undergraduate students and graduate students.  It is designed for students interested in twentieth century Spain, and who are majoring in Architecture, Architectural Studies, Spanish, History or Art History.  In principle, the honors undergraduate students are expected to perform at a level comparable to the graduate students.  Honors students engage in a semester-long research project that includes a basic literature review, an abstract, an outline, a rough draft and a final version.  Honors students are required to present their research from the course in poster format at the Kent State University Undergraduate Research Symposium. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: ARCH 10011 and 10012; or ARCH 20112 and 20113; or ARTH 22006 and 22007; or HIST 11051; or SPAN 38421.

 

BSCI 40154         002    Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease -  Honors +

In this course, we will be covering the how the disease diabetes develops (Type I vs Type II), normal physiology of the heart and vasculature (structure, contractile properties, signaling in response to catecholamines and other hormones, important biochemical changes within cells, etc.) and subsequent pathophysiology of the heart and vasculature following inception of the disease.  Selected publications relevant to the topics will be presented and discussed by the Honors and Graduate students. Laboratory experiences using animal models of diabetes to demonstrate changes in cardiovascular dynamics will be provided. Prerequisite: BSCI 40430; or BSCI 30140 and BSCI 30130

 

CHEM         40099         001    Senior Honors Thesis

For departmental honors may be started summer prior to senior year. Register each semester during senior year. Minimum total credit 5-hours. Prerequisite: Departmental and honors college approval.

 

CLAS 41304         002    Latin Literature in Translation -  Writing Intensive - Honors +

In this course we will approach the civilization and culture of the Romans through their literature, including poetry (drama, lyric, elegy, epic, satire) and prose (history, rhetoric, the novel). Students will gain a broad knowledge of the landscape of Roman literature and be able to place specific authors in their cultural and historical contexts, and they will be able to identify and describe the main genres of Roman literature as well as specific characteristics of canonical authors. Finally, students will trace the impact of cultural change on the evolution of Roman literature and engage with the hermeneutical problems raised by reading translated works. Although the course is a survey, the material will be examined in depth. Although not required, it is recommended that students have taken The Roman Achievement or another introduction to Roman culture before starting this course.

Honors students will complete an additional essay assignment and a term paper of ten pages on a topic of their choice approved by the instructor. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

 

COMM        35912         005    Gender and Communication - Honors D

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

This course explores how gender is socially constructed in everyday communicative interactions and institutional contexts, including close relationships, organizations, school settings, and the media. In the process, this course uncovers how the social construction of gender perpetuates power imbalances in society. Prerequisite: None.

Objectives of Course:

  • to discuss how gender is communicatively created in different interpersonal, organizational, and institutional contexts.
  • to examine how gender is socially constructed through language and everyday practices in ways that perpetuate power imbalances in society.
  • to encourage students to draw connections between theories and their own experiences.
  • to encourage students to examine their own attitudes and behaviors concerning communication and gender, and theory and practice.
  • to discuss the historical and social reasons behind women’s and men’s movements as well as how these movements have been enacted and have promoted change in gender communication.
  • to enhance students’ research, analysis, writing, and presentational skills.

 

COMM        45007         002    Freedom of Speech – Honors +

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

Freedom of Speech is a senior-level course with senior-level expectations. Each student is expected to develop as a writer as well as know the topical material. Some objectives are to develop an understanding of speech and the maturing individual, freedom of speech, and nature and responsibilities; to develop an awareness of specific issues and current controversies regarding freedom of speech in the United States and elsewhere; to develop an awareness of specific issues regarding local and regional free speech issues as well as those issues specific to various organizations and institutions. Honors students will be expected to research a topic of contemporary significance, for example, an examination of recent or pending court cases involving the First Amendment. They will then be expected to present their research to the class at the end of the semester. The Honors student will produce a lengthier paper and will be evaluated at an Honors level. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: None.

 

ECON         42079         002    European Economic Issues - Honors +

This course examines current economic issues in the European Union, including the monetary union and Euro, unemployment, immigration, health care, social security, poverty and inequality, and the British decision to leave (Brexit)). The historical development and structure of the EU will also be covered. Students completing the course will develop an awareness of the role that the EU plays in the world economy, and the special challenges it faces in coordinating monetary, fiscal, and social policy. Students will be able to compare EU social policy with that in the United States. They also will be able to analyze current social and demographic trends and their effects on key economic variables. Finally, students will develop their written and oral communication skills.

The course includes a required 10-day trip to Brussels, Luxembourg and Paris over the Spring Break (March 23-April 2), and will have an additional course fee of approximately $2100. Learning will be assessed through examinations, short papers, and in-class presentations. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: ECON 22060 and ECON 22061; and special approval.

 

ENG  39395         002    St: The Literature of India - Honors +

In this class, we will be studying selected texts from ancient times to the present. These books include texts that have been translated from Sanskrit and Pali to English, as well as texts that have been written in English. Analyzing these texts both individually and collectively will provide you with an opportunity to understand how the present generation Indians live in a society, where they are nostalgic about their past culture and traditions and yet, forward thinking about their future.

In addition, watching movies will provide you a different perspective on how many of the themes- discussed in the texts- are displayed on a visual medium. Combination of the texts and movies will also provide you an opportunity to do a comparative analysis of the global issues and to view the linguistic nuances presented by these literary writers in their translation of languages from Sanskrit, Hindi, and Urdu. Please note that this is a mixed course consisting of Honors and non-Honors. Only the Honors students will be expected to write an additional reflective response at the end of the semester.  Prerequisite: ENG 21011 or HONR 10297

 

ENG  43092         002    Teaching Poetry in The Schools - Honors +

This course will explore different approaches to teaching poetry writing to students (grades 3-12) with the aim of increasing your understanding of and appreciation for the practice of both writing and teaching creative writing. We will also study and discuss the uses of creative writing as a means of developing literacy and promoting human growth within the context of schools and communities. We will spend the first part of the semester creating and discussing a variety of writing prompts and using them ourselves, so that we will have a chance to experience the assignments that we will ask our students to do. During the second half of the semester we will teach in pairs, using these prompts in local schools. Some flexibility of scheduling is required, since, in addition to our evening class, you will be visiting local classrooms during the day beginning mid-semester. At the end of the semester each student will compile a short anthology with an introduction and commentary of their students’ poetry and will participate in a large poetry reading on campus, entitled Giving Voice, with local-area students in the Spring in the KSU Ballroom. Honors students will meet with the instructor at the beginning of the semester to design the Honors component to the course which will involve regular meetings as a group throughout the semester, possibly more in-depth analysis of teaching prompts, and a final essay reflecting on your teaching experience. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisites: junior standing and special approval. Texts:

Jack Collom & Sheryl Noethe, Poetry Everywhere (Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 2006)

Dorothea Lasky, Dominic Luxford & Jesse Nathan, Open the Door: How to Excite Young People about Poetry (McSweeney's Books, 2013)

 

EPSY         29525         004    Educational Psychology – Honors

The course examines major theories of human development and learning, motivation, instructional Strategies, assessment, and similarities and differences in learners.

The approach to relational learning used in this class is based on social constructionist theory. Learning will occur through engaged-learning activities, through on-line and in-class discussions led by students and the professor. Active participation is required of all enrolled students. The instructor is not the sole source of information; we are all actively learning together. Class sessions will provide a space for critical thinking, rich discussion and reflection.

Teacher candidates will create lessons dealing with real life problems for “real live” teachers and students using engaged learning environments as a backdrop for lesson designs. We will work in classrooms and take “field trips” to Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Lake View Cemetery, and on-line with local teachers who promote sustainable life styles.

Text:

Santrock, J. (2009). Educational Psychology, 4th ed., Boston: McGraw Hill.

The Mentoring Project supports this relational learning class. You may choose to participate in the mentor project and receive support from an EdPsych Mentors who have been successful in this class in previous semesters. Prerequisites: CULT 29535.

 

FDM  10023         002    Fashion Visuals – Honors +

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

The study of fashion information, research sources, color theory, two-and three-dimensional design and visual presentation formats as they apply to the fashion industry. This is a mixed Honors/non Honors course. Prerequisite: fashion design (FD) or fashion merchandising (FM) major. Corequisite: FDM 10024

 

FDM  10024         001    Fashion Visuals Laboratory – Honors

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

Laboratory applications in the study of fashion information, research sources, color theory, two-and three-dimensional design and visual presentation formats as they apply to the fashion industry. Prerequisite: fashion design (FD) or fashion merchandising (FM) major. Corequisite: FDM 10023.

 

FDM  10053         002    Introduction to Fashion Technology – Honors +

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

Introduces students to the fundamental concepts, procedures, and techniques used in digital imaging software and information database software. A survey of current and emerging technologies used in fashion design, merchandising and production contexts is presented. Prerequisite: fashion design (FD) or fashion merchandising (FM) major. This is a mixed Honors/non Honors course. Prerequisite: fashion design (FD) or fashion merchandising (FM) major. Co-requisite: FDM 10054

 
FDM  10054         001    Introduction to Fashion Technology Laboratory – Honors

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

Laboratory applications of fundamental concepts, procedures, and techniques used in digital imaging software and information database software. A survey of current and emerging technologies used in fashion design, merchandising, and production contexts is presented and applied. Prerequisite: fashion design (FD) or fashion merchandising (FM) major. Corequisite: FDM 10053.

 

FDM  20013         002    History of Costume - Honors +

The focus of this course will be the chronological study of historic costume and accessories from pre-history through the present day. It will include a consideration of the political, economic, and social history that influenced past fashions. The Honors section meets in the Museum Director's office in the Museum's Schweigert Library. The Honors students have more direct hands-on experience with costumes from each period and have essay exams.

Prerequisite: HIST 11050 or HIST 11051 or ARTH 22006 or ARTH 22007.

 

FDM  40199         002    Senior Fashion Design Thesis II - Honors +

Continuation of Senior Fashion Design Thesis I. Finalize senior thesis project; critical review and reflection on outcome in a short analysis. The final thesis submission will be displayed through a juried venue. Prerequisite: FDM 40099. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: FDM 40099.

 

FDM  40291         001    Seminar in Fashion Merchandising Writing Intensive – Honors +

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

Repeatable for credit) Capstone course in Fashion Merchandising. Builds and expands on all merchandising-related coursework with the goal of integrating content and applying it to real-life scenarios through critical thinking and analysis. A coherent portfolio demonstrating student efficacy with overall program content is completed. Prerequisite: FDM 30260 and FDM 30262 and FDM 35011 and FDM 35270.

FDM  45095         006    ST: Conscious Leadership in Fashion – Honors ++

In-depth study of conscious leadership principles as applied to the future leaders of the business in the fashion industry. Conscious leadership is a purpose-ddriven practice adopted by business leaders who recognize and cultivate interdependence of all stakeholders for the business: team members, investors, clients/customers, and society. Conscious leaders cultivate deep awareness and authenticity, and offer an inspirational vision for our shared futures.  Conscious leadership includes the concepts of mindful leadership, authentic leadership, ethical leadership, and values-based leadership. Conscious capitalism builds on the foundations of capitalism – voluntary exchange, entrepreneurship, competition, freedom to trade, and the rule of law. These are essential to a healthy functioning economy, as are other elements of conscious capitalism including purpose, trust, compassion, collaboration, and value creation. Grounded on conscious capitalism paradigm and its methods, the course will introduce more progressive and purposeful ways to lead and manage the businesses in the fashion industry.  Case studies of the conscious leadership will be examined. In addition to the course projects and requirements given to the regular, non-honors section, honors students registered in honors section will work with the whole group on one project which will simulate the team-based work environment for collaborative process on the project development and implementation process including but not limited to ideation, section process, implementation, and evaluation on exemplary leadership case study in the fashion business with core mission on enhancing corporate social responsibility. The whole group will discuss and determine the workload and content matters through collaborative process by applying the leadership skills learned in class. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: Permission.

 

FIN    36053         002    Business Finance - Honors +

This is an introductory course in Finance. Students will be exposed to the basic concepts and tools needed to understand the financial aspects of business management. For finance majors, the course will provide the foundation for upper level finance course work. For other majors, the course will provide a base of knowledge and skills in business finance that will assist anyone who needs to make or understand financial decisions, either for their personal benefit or for a business. Many of the topics covered in this course will help advance the personal financial sophistication of the students in areas such as loans, mortgages, saving, investing, and retirement planning. The course is taught in a lecture format and tested through three (3) exams and a comprehensive final. Honors College members will be required to perform research, analysis, and report writing, in addition to the non-Honors requirements, through an Honors College project. The Honors College project is intended to provide students with a deeper and more detailed understanding of financial decision making by examining topics such as capital structure, financial markets, and firm valuation. In the project, the students will work individually, with the instructor and/or within a group setting. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: cumulative 2.500 GPA; and ACCT 23020 or ACTT 11000; and ECON 22060 or HONR 21197; and ECON 22061.

HIST    38295         003    ST: Global Migrations - Honors +

This course will be a contemporary 21st century history of global migrations as well as an historical examination of migrants and refugees in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course will look at case studies of colonial immigration policies, the shift in policies in the post-colonial state, issues with bhoth historical and recent migrations and refugees and how these patterns fit with previous historical patterns. This course will also look at the history of diplomacy over refugees and migrants, which will be of value to IR and political science students as well as history majors. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. 

 

 

ITAL  35597 002 Col: Thieves Beggars and Whores: Boccaccio’s Decameron and The Novella in The Middle Ages – Honors

The Decameron, one of the most entertaining, beloved and imitated prose works ever written, is an accurate reflection of fourteenth-century life in Italy. Like Dante's Divine Comedy, this human comedy was written not only to delight, but also to instruct by exploring both our spiritual and our natural environment. Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375), considered by some typically medieval and by others one of the first truly modern literary figures to emerge from the darkness of the Middle Ages into the light of the Renaissance, shows himself, as author of The Decameron, to be both a passionate believer and a passionate critic as he reconstructs society, destroyed by the Black Plague, through the perfection of his 100-fold narrative. Boccaccio’s Decameron, of course, generated a flourishing early modern tradition of proto-novelistic short-story collections (think of Marguerite de Navarre and Cervantes), but also provided substantial material for the nascent dramatic tradition (from Machiavelli’s Mandragola to Shakespeare’s All’s Well).  His biographical collection, of Famous Women, was an indispensable source and model for the wide-spread debates on the status of women.  His Genealogy of the Gentile Gods was a staple of the Renaissance mythographical tradition. The Decameron will be read in English translation. All reading, writing, and class discussion will be in English.

Required Texts:

The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio (Author), Wayne a. Rebhorn (Translator)

Paperback: 1024 pages

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (December 8, 2014)

ISBN-13: 978-0393350265

 

ITEC  39525         004    Educational Technology – Honors

ITEC 39525 Educational Technology is designed to help you develop the necessary technological competencies to successfully support the teaching profession.  In this course, you will develop knowledge and skills in designing, implementing, and assessing learning experiences, using various digital tools and resources to support teaching, learning, and research. Honors students will consider the increasingly important role of technology in educational settings to enhance teaching and learning among today’s digital learners. Students will learn strategies for effectively integrating technology with educational content and standards. Course content includes

  • Design and develop digital-age learning experiences and assessments
  • Use existing educational technologies to support teaching, learning, and research
  • Design learning materials with instructional technologies and Internet resources
  • Develop social media literacy skills for teaching, learning, and research
  • Address legal, social, and ethical issues associated with the use of instructional technologies
  • Understand use and applications of assistive technology and universal design

Prerequisite: CULT 29535.

 

JMC  26001         060    Writing Across Platforms- Honors +

This course will introduce you to significant elements of covering and writing news including: timeliness and context (what makes news), basic reporting skills (gathering and evaluating information), understanding principles of accuracy and fairness, and learning basic multimedia storytelling skills. The emphasis throughout this course is on clear, concise writing. At the end of this course, you should be able to recognize and write different types of news stories on deadline. You should be able to put stories into context for your audience, produce and package them for maximum impact and you should be grounded in the journalistic tenets of accuracy, objectivity and ethics. Course Objectives: 1. Know where and how to find news and develop story ideas; 2. Conduct interviews; find and develop good sources for basic news stories; 3. Learn how to effectively interview live sources and how to evaluate other sources such as reports, documents, press releases, websites; 4. Think, organize and package reporting for print and consider multimedia storytelling options; 5. Report and write good multi-source news stories; 6. Report and write good news stories for online and broadcast; 7. Understand and use different social media for journalism and PR; 8. Use proper AP style and grammar in all journalistic writing. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class Pre- or corequisites: JMC 20001 or JMC 20003; and JMC 20006

 

JMC  28001         060    Principles of Public Relations- Honors +

Principles of Public Relations is the foundational course for students majoring in the field and a stimulating elective for those who seek a better understanding of the strategic communications, persuasion, and relationship-building practices used by businesses and organizations. This course provides a basic understanding of the public relations profession and the strategies and tactics used by its practitioners. Students will examine public relations in practice through relevant case studies and exercises. Students will gain an appreciation of the history, growth, and societal impact of public relations, as well as fundamental theories of communications and public opinion theory. They will develop an appreciation of public relations ethics and law. This course will introduce students to public relations career paths in the business, nonprofit, and public sectors. Finally, Principles of Public Relations introduces students to the global practice of PR and global issues that influence cross-cultural communications. Students in this class are challenged to apply PR theory to practice with a wide variety of assigned clients. In addition, each student will be required to select a client to represent throughout the semester. Course assignments will require students to write clearly, cogently, frequently, and on deadline – all critical public relations skills. Students will learn and apply primary and secondary PR research skills, including surveys, polling, focus groups, and interviews. This class uses several forms of instruction: in-class lecture with emphasis on discussion and debate; individual exercises that focus on learning application, critical thinking, problem-solving, creativity, and writing; and team exercises that require students to work together on PR problems. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class.

 

JMC    40006 060     Law of Mass Communication – Honors +

This course will help you develop 1) an understanding of how the law affects mass media and its practitioners, 2) an ability to identify legal issues and apply your knowledge to specific situations likely confronted by working media professionals, 3) an appreciation of the history and role that the First Amendment and other protections for free expression and press freedom play in a diverse American society. Honors students will meet with the instructor for an additional 50-minute period each week that will focus on discussion and interaction and include some additional readings.  They will also take essay-style exams, make a brief in-class presentation and write a 8-10 page research paper. This class is recommended for students considering law school or who would like a more in-depth experience with media law. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class.  Prerequisite: minimum 2.000 cumulative GPA; and a advertising (ADV), digital media production (DMP), journalism (JNL), photojournalism (PHOJ), public relations (PR) majors or media literacy (MELT) minor; and junior standing.

 

JMC  40010         060    Ethics and Issues in Mass Communication - Honors+

The goal of this course is to help identify media ethics dilemmas and refine ethical problem-solving skills for future media practitioners whose decisions have power and influence on vast and varied audiences in an information-saturated society. The course introduces applied ethics through theory, real-world case studies, in-depth discussion, activities and projects. It is the Writing-Intensive Course for all JMC undergraduates so writing skills are emphasized and writing competency is expected. Participation is imperative. Requirements include written learning logs (5-10), reading and writing case studies, reflective “journal” assignments, supplemental reading(s), one digital media assignment or podcast and a final research paper. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: 2.000 overall GPA; and a school of journalism and mass communication (JMC) major; and senior standing; and at least 18 hours of JMC courses with a C- (1.700) or better, including a grade of C- (2.700) or better in JMC 20004 or JMC 26001 or JMC 30004.

 

JMC  40095         060    St: Introduction to Film – Honors

Analyze films from different American genres (documentary, comedy, indies, animation, suspense, etc.); and a few from historical Western movements (Dada, Film Noir, German Expressionism, French New Wave, etc.) and other cultures (Senegal, New Zealand, Japan, etc.): with Johnny Depp's The Rum Diary, Goddard's Breathless, Will Ferrell's Stranger Than Fiction or Anchorman, John Green's The Fault In Our Stars, Neil Gaiman's Coraline 3D, Amy Schumer's Trainwreck costarring LeBron James, and icons like Alfred Hitchcock's Rope, Orson Welles' The Lady From Shanghai, the Bond series with Skyfall and or Spectre, Audrey Hepburn's Breakfast at Tiffany's, and many more-which may include one of your suggested films. Possibly a field trip to a local theater for a film premiere.

Options for Honors final project: you can create a short film; perform a song, dance, skit or scene from a film; create original, or provide a cover of, theme or background music; write part of an original script/screenplay or lengthen/alter an already existing script; recreate or create costumes, and or a costume analysis; recreate or create set props (paintings, sculpture, furniture, etc.); recreate or create an architectural set drawing; recreate or create film posters; create an animation; construct a marketing plan; write a research/analysis paper, etc. So, you can tailor your project (or paper) to your major or area of interest. a quality film involves personnel from many disciplines: writers, camera/audio operators, actors, dancers, musicians, costumers, set designers, etc. This is not a group project; each student creates an individual project on a film and topic of their choice. Prerequisite: none.

 

MATH         12003         003    Analytic Geometry and Calculus II - Honors +

A continuation of MATH 12002. In this semester, we study techniques of integration, applications of integration, and sequences and series. We also introduce ordinary differential equations, polar coordinates, parametric equations and vectors. Honors students will be responsible for a group presentation. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: Minimum C grade in MATH 12002 or MATH 12012.

 

MIS   24053         003    Computer Applications - Honors +

Students in the Honors section will explore the Internet and the wide variety of services that it provides. Students will learn various search strategies to employ while "surfing" and will also learn how to publish their own information for the world to share. Different types of data (text, numeric, graphic, sound, and video) will be investigated and discussed. The students working as one team will develop a web-based database driven web-site for a real client. All work will be conducted in the College of Business computer lab and on an Internet server provided by Dr. Steinberg. The material in this special section is supplemental to the regular MIS 24053 section. Students in this section will be expected to complete all assignments that the main 24053 section requires. The main section covers Windows, spreadsheet, database, e-mail, data communications, and Internet. NOTE: Online lecture is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class; separate lab time is all Honors. This is a mixed Honors/non Honors course. Prerequisite: None.

 

MIS   44285 004 Integrated Business Policy and Strategy - Honors +

This is a "capstone" course. Unlike other business courses that concentrate narrowly on a particular business function, this course takes a broader perspective and is concerned with making the total organization successful. A basic understanding of the basic business disciplines is therefore assumed, as students will build upon prior work completed in economics, finance, marketing, organizational behavior, etc. This course will provide an opportunity for integrating the previous material and delving into it in greater depth. Through a presentation of theory and discussion of business cases, the course will teach managerial decision making by practicing critical thinking and debating. The overall goal being to develop participants’ ability to understand how different organizations choose to compete in a given marketplace, and understand why some succeed and others fail, the course will present a number of theoretical concepts, principles and analytical frameworks, as well as some practical managerial ideas and devices, not excluding reward systems and governance mechanisms. The course pedagogy will combine lectures on strategic management theory and discussion of relevant business cases. Through the use of the case-method, students are placed “in the shoes” of practitioner general managers and asked to analyze business situations and make recommendations for action. Finally, honors students are expected to meet with the professor and participate in designing one or two research projects that would be matched to their abilities and interests -- or occasionally be complementary to them. Grades will be awarded on the basis of exam performance, written case analyses, honors research project(s) and active participation in class discussions. This is a mixed Honors/non Honors course. Prerequisites: ACCT 23020 and ACCT 23021 and ECON 22060 and ECON 22061 and MKTG 25010 and MIS 24053 and MIS 24163 and MIS 24056 and MIS 34060 and FIN 26074 and FIN 36053; and minimum 2.500 overall GPA; and major within the College of Business Administration; and senior standing.

 

NURS 20020 004 Foundations of Assessment and Communication in Nursing –Honors

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

The course content for Honors NURS 20020 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 20020. This Honors course is for nursing students enrolled in the first nursing course having a laboratory component. Students enrolled in the Honors program will be socialized to the greater context of professional nursing and role development by engaging in an Honors Colloquium. Each student explores a specialty in nursing of particular interest to that student. Students have the opportunity to learn about scholarly faculty projects and consider potential mentored opportunities for Honors theses or projects within the College of Nursing. Prerequisite: Special approval.

NURS         20030         003    Foundations of Nursing Interventions -  Honors

Course description is meant as a guide and is subject to change with the instructor assignment.

The course content for Honors NURS 20030 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 20030. This Honors course is for nursing students enrolled in the second nursing course having a clinical component. Each student or small group explores a patient problem and evidence based practice interventions to address the concern. Students choosing to pursue an Honors thesis or project begin working with a faculty mentor with whom they will complete their work. Honors Colloquium participation continues. Prerequisite: NURS 20020 with a grade of C (2.000) or better.

NURS         20030         008    Foundations of Nursing Interventions – Honors

The course content for Honors NURS 20030 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 20030. This Honors course is for nursing students enrolled in the second nursing course having a clinical component. Each student or small group explores a patient problem and evidence based practice interventions to address the concern. Students choosing to pursue an Honors thesis or project begin working with a faculty mentor with whom they will complete their work. Honors Colloquium participation continues. Prerequisite: NURS 20020 with a grade of C (2.000) or better.

 

NURS         40872         002    Introduction to Evidence Based Practice - Honors +

The course content for Honors NURS 40872 is parallel to the content of non-Honors NURS 40872. This Honors course is for students in the third semester of the nursing sequence concurrently enrolled in one of the four statistics courses required in the College of Nursing curriculum. Faculty-led project participation continues during this term. Honors students register for Introduction to Evidence Based Practice and receive focused material to enhance their abilities to conduct a successful honors project. Students explore opportunities to contribute to the faculty-led project and develop preliminary plans to conduct an independent honors project within the scope of the faculty member’s expertise. Initial honors project planning occurs. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisites: NURS 31010 or PH 30002 or PSYC 21621 or SOC 32200; and NURS 20030 and MATH 10041.

 

PAS  20200         002    Recovering The Past: Kent to Memphis -  Honors   +

The purpose of this course is to help students see connections between the past and the present, as well as how the individual can have a positive impact not just on his or her local community but also on national and global levels.

We will begin with a focus on local history, specifically history dealing with race in America from the middle of the nineteenth century to the turn of the twentieth. The first three weeks will focus on abolitionist John Brown and will include a visit to the John Brown archives at the Hudson Public Library and other local sites, as well as an optional two-day trip to Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia, where Brown attacked the Federal Arsenal in 1859, and Charles town, where we will visit the courtroom where he was tried and the site of his hanging.

For the next three weeks, we will investigate Frederick Loudin, whose parents were the first blacks to settle in Portage County in the 1820s. In the 1880s Loudin led the famed Fisk Jubilee Singers, today credited with introducing the world to African American music, on a six-year world tour.  We will visit the Portage County Historical Society in Ravenna, which owns a wealth of material on Loudin and his family, including a scrapbook from the world tour. We will also look at the house (now privately owned) which Loudin built in Ravenna in the 1890s as well as visit the family plot in Maple Grove Cemetery.

We will then spend four weeks on the increased racism in America toward the turn of the century and specifically Ida B. Wells’ national anti-lynching campaign, which she began in the wake of the 1892 lynchings of three African American businessmen in Memphis.

During spring break, students will travel first to Fisk University in Nashville to see Jubilee Hall, built in the 1870s from the Singers’ proceeds; then we will spend four days in Memphis, in part working to restore the black cemetery where the three lynching victims were buried but also visiting relevant sites such as the National Civil Rights Museum.

Students enrolled in this class may be expected to participate in fund-raising activities to defer some of the cost of transportation to the service sites. Students may also need to be prepared to cover some of their own costs for the week in Memphis (approximately $100). NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class.

Readings will include the following:

  • excerpts from Bob O’Connor, The Perfect Steel Trap: Harpers Ferry 1859 and from tony Horowitz, Midnight Rising
  • excerpts from Andrew Ward, Dark Midnight When I Rise: The Story of the Fisk Jubilee Singers
  • Jacqueline Jones Royster, ed., Southern Horrors and Other Writings: The Anti-Lynching Campaign of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1900

 

PH     30005 002 Social and Behavioral Science Theories in Public Health - Honors +

This course provides a structured analysis of social and behavioral theories and their applications relevant to public health practice. The course is designed to introduce the concepts fundamental to the understanding of factors that influence human health behaviors. The course focuses on theories, concepts, and models from a range of social and behavioral sciences disciplines and their applications to health promotion and disease prevention. Ideally, the knowledge and skills gained in this course can be applied in the development, implementation and evaluation of prevention programs that address health concerns of individuals and populations. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: none.

 

PH     30033         003    Public Health Policy and Decision-making - Honors +

Nutrition and exercise. Healthcare. Ebola response. Reducing medical errors and MRSA. These are just a few of the policy issues affecting the public’s health. An important and closely related issue is the critical question of whether the policies we put in place to deal with these issues are indeed effective. Do the policies that drive public health programs and interventions go as planned, or do they have unintended consequences? You only need look as far as the news media to see many public health policies portrayed as “breaking news” because of failures or shortcomings. Maybe the question we should be asking is how do policy makers even arrive at significant public health policies in the first place, how they implement them, and what they do when things don’t go as planned. This class will provide the answers you are looking for! Well, maybe not all the answers, but this course will introduce you to the policy-making process and the “nuts and bolts” of policy formulation, implementation, and modification in the public health arena.  A substantial focus of this course will be on the critical evaluation and analysis of public health issues, including real-world multidimensional considerations of the implications of enacting specific public health policies on our health and wellbeing.”

As this would be a mixed Honors course, Honors students would likely meet with the professor outside of class 2-3 times during the semester to discuss an additional project addressing a public health policy issue. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: none.

SOC  32673         002    Urban Sociology - Honors   +

Why study urban sociology? One of the most relevant reasons is that most people in the United States and other countries around the world live in them. Second, urban areas have long been the center of trade, economic activity, culture, and the arts. In this course, therefore we will cover the history and development of urban areas overtime (urbanization), paying attention to sociological theories of power and stratification. In addition, we will examine how sociological theories of culture and social interaction help to explain why people habhave the way they do in different ubran environments (urbanism). In addition to the books and assignments for the non-Honors section, students in the Honors section will be involved in a semester long project that asks them to read analyses of six cities around the world (New York City, Toronto, Tokyo, Amsterdam, Shanghai, Berlin) and apply what they learn to an analysis of Cleveland. As part of the project, students will write a group paper, present their findings to the class in a PowerPoint presentation, and develop a website using Google Sites to show how Cleveland compares to these other cities. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: SOC 12050 and junior standing.

 

SOC  42478         002    Adolescence in Society - Honors   +

This course will consider a range of current sociological topics (inequality, poverty, health and illness, drug use) at they relate to adolescence and young adulthood. We will consider how sociologists define what adolescence means and how definitions of this stage in the human life course have changed over time. The class covers both sociological and psychological theories relevant to understanding adolescents and how they navigate social interactions and social situations as they learn to be fully functioning adult members of society. True to the sociological tradition, the class will emphasize the contested and socially constructed nature of adolescence and young adulthood. We will also consider the unique problems faced by adolescents in the 21st Century from their perspective and how adults view adolescents as both valued and dangerous members of society. Finally, we will focus on how adolescents can actively change their social environment through policy change, activism, and collective action. Assignments consist of empirical readings related to adolescence and emerging adulthood, examinations containing both objective and short answer questions, a research paper, and several written homework analytic /application papers. The Honors students will read an extra book and present its contents orally to the rest of the class. This book will also be on the final examination. Their research paper will be about a third longer (15 rather than 10 pages) compared to the non-Honors students in the class. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: SOC 12050 and junior standing.

 

THEA 41306 001    Prof. Aspects: Design & Technology – Honors +

This course introduces students to the business aspects of being a working professional in the entertainment industry/performing arts. A study of the practical demands and requirements of a professional career in design and technology, including portfolio development, resumes, unions, job market, financial matters and career prospects. Use of computers as a resource and tool emphasized. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

 

THEA 41499 002 Musical Theatre Showcase - Honors +

Development, promotion, and presentation of a Musical Theatre showcase for industry casting personnel in New York City. Audition required prior to registration for this course. Repeatable for credit. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: senior standing and special approval.

 

UC 10097 912    Destination Kent State: First Year Experience – Honors

Returning Freshmen in Florence Students Only

Course assists students in making a successful academic transition to the university through experiential or intellectually engaging discipline-based content. Required of all first year students.

UC 20095 002   ST: Innovation Course: Be Smarter Than Your Smartphone – Honors

This course uses the development of the smart phone to illustrate the multi-disciplinary nature of innovation. It provides an understanding of the technologies that make the smart phone possible, how the smart phone has changes the patterns and nature of our communications and the implications for marketing and business.

 

VCD  40053 002 Graphic Design Studio-Glyphix - Honors +

Students are selected by portfolio review and VCD faculty recommendations. A "realistic" graphic design studio in which students, under the direction of a "creative director" (VCD faculty member) solve "real" problems in a "real" studio environment for "real" clients. Students participate in staff meetings, client meetings and presentations, vendor meetings, field trips to service bureaus and printers, photo shoots, and press checks. Students prepare production schedules, requests for quotations, budgets, thumbnails, roughs, comprehensives, and finished art. Students are exposed to the day-to-day operations of a design studio. NOTE: This is a mixed Honors/non-Honors student class. Prerequisite: none.

 

VCD  45000 002 Graphic Design Perspectives Writing Intensive – Honors

Comprehensive exploration of design starting with Gutenberg and moving into present day. Topics include font development, print processes, illustration, photography, architecture, industrial design, 19th & 20th century art as well as graphic design. This course relates how historical events impacted design through these periods and will help students recognize how present design trends have correlation to the past, encouraging them to explore their environment for influences and inspiration. All students will do a research project and Honors students will be required to do additional reading and write a lengthier dissertation than non-Honors students. Prerequisites: ENG 21011; and junior standing.