Reappointment, Tenure, Promotion for Tenure-Track and Full Time Non-Tenure Track Faculty | Kent State University

Reappointment, Tenure, Promotion for Tenure-Track and Full Time Non-Tenure Track Faculty

  1. Reappointment for Tenure-Track Faculty

    The policies and procedures for reappointment are included in the University Policy Register 6-16 and Addendum C of the Tenure-Track Collective Bargaining Agreement (TT CBA). Each academic year, reappointment guidelines for faculty are distributed by the Office of the Provost. These guidelines will be given to all tenure-track faculty and Ad Hoc Committee members. Tenure-track faculty members are reviewed by the Department’s Ad Hoc Reappointment Committee.

    For tenure-track faculty, reappointment is contingent upon demonstration of appropriate progress toward the requirements for tenure. Performance expectations develop from initial letters of appointment, any additional written initial expectations and the Director’s annual reappointment letters. These expectations of individual faculty members may differ significantly, given each faculty member’s experience, background and assignments. In annual reappointment materials, the faculty member must establish and articulate both short- and long-term goals, then document progress toward meeting those goals. Specific concerns expressed by the Ad Hoc Reappointment Committee members and/or the Director in annual reappointment reviews during the probationary period must be addressed by the faculty member in subsequent reappointment reviews.

    According to the University Policy Register (6-14) and Addendum B of the TT CBA assistant professors following the traditional tenure clock are granted or denied tenure by March 15 of their sixth year. However, if an assistant professor carries some years of credit toward tenure, he or she could be eligible earlier. The maximum credit toward tenure is typically two years, but “in extraordinary circumstances” additional credit may be granted at the time of appointment after consultation with the Faculty Advisory Committee. Faculty members appointed as either associate professors or professors have a three-year probationary period before they are eligible to apply for tenure.

    For faculty members following the traditional tenure clock for Assistant Professors, the review after completion of three (3) full years in the probationary period at Kent State University is particularly critical. Upon completion of the third year of the probationary period, faculty reviewing a candidate for reappointment should consider the record of the candidate’s achievements to date. This record should be considered a predictor of future success. The hallmark of a successful candidate is compelling evidence of positive development in teaching, scholarly/creative activity, and service, per the criteria detailed in this section of the Handbook.

    If concerns about a faculty member’s performance are raised during the reappointment process, the Ad Hoc Reappointment Committee and the Director shall provide detailed, prescriptive comments to serve as constructive feedback. If such concerns arise during a review that occurs after completion of three (3) full years in the probationary period, the Director and the candidate’s mentor, in consultation with the FAC, will advise and work with the candidate on a suitable, positive plan for realignment with the School’s tenure and promotion expectations; however, the candidate is solely responsible for her/his success in implementing this plan. Failure to meet performance expectations or failure to satisfactorily address concerns expressed by the Ad Hoc Reappointment Committee or by the Director may result in a negative reappointment recommendation to the Dean.

  2. Tolling Policy

    From time to time, personal and/or family circumstances may arise that require a probationary faculty member to request that her/his probationary period be extended. Upon request, a faculty member may be granted an extension of the probationary period, which has been traditionally called “tolling” or “stopping the tenure clock.” The University policy and procedures governing modification of the faculty probationary period are included in the University Policy Register. (See University Policy Register 6-13)

  3. Tenure and Promotion for Tenure-Track Faculty

    The policies and procedures for tenure and promotion are included in the University Policy Register 6-14 and 6-15 and in Addenda A and B of the TT CBA. Each academic year, tenure and promotion guidelines for Kent and Regional Campus faculty are distributed by the Office of the Provost. These guidelines will be given to all tenure-track faculty and Ad Hoc Committee members.

    Tenure and promotion are separate decisions. The awarding of tenure must be based on convincing, documented evidence that the faculty member has achieved:

    1. a strong record of effective instruction and curricular engagement

    2. a significant body of scholarly/creative work that has undergone meaningful peer review and that has had a demonstrable impact on her/his discipline and profession, meeting or exceeding expectations as defined in initial appointment letters and other written initial expectations and in annual reappointment letters (See below for further detail.)

    3. a track record of effective service relevant to the mission of the School and to the mission of the University

    Tenure considerations may include evaluation of accomplishments prior to arrival at Kent State University, but primary emphasis should be on work conducted while on the tenure track. Such considerations also may include grant proposals submitted but not funded, proposals pending, creative works and papers “in review” or papers “in press,” graduate students currently advised, and any other materials that may reflect on the candidate’s potential for a long-term successful career. The tenure decision is based on all of the evidence available to determine the candidate’s potential to pursue a productive career.

    Promotion, on the other hand, is based solely on a candidate’s accomplishments completed during the review period.

    Candidates for promotion to Associate Professor must meet all the qualifications for tenure. They must also show potential for a career likely to achieve national/international recognition, as evidenced by the body of work presented in the promotion file.

    Promotion to Professor recognizes the highest level of university achievement and national/ international prominence. Evidence for this prominence includes:

    1. sustained excellence in teaching and service;

    2. a record of scholarly/creative activity in highly significant venues that has undergone meaningful peer review and that has had a demonstrable and sustained impact on the candidate’s discipline and profession;

    3. a record of substantial prominence in and impact on the field.

    External funding for scholarly/creative activity or programmatic support also provides strong evidence of prominence and external validation of excellence. Many factors and criteria, both subjective and objective, are considered in recommending a faculty member for tenure and advancement in academic rank. The overall evaluation of a candidate for tenure and promotion shall include consideration of the faculty member’s personal integrity and professional behavior, as recognized by the University community. A sound ethical approach to all aspects of teaching, research, publication, and the academic profession are expected of all who seek tenure and promotion in the School.

  4. Criteria for Tenure and Promotion for Tenure-track Faculty

    The School of Journalism and Mass Communication hires tenure-track faculty at the assistant professor level, generally with a terminal degree of either a Ph.D., J.D., or a M.F.A.; or a master’s degree with significant professional experience, as determined by the search committee in consultation with the Director and Dean.

    1. Teaching

      Faculty are expected to develop a strong track record in the classroom, as exhibited by responsiveness to teaching evaluations from professional colleagues and teaching peers, as well as students, professional improvement and industry engagement as appropriate. Criteria for the evaluation of teaching are listed in Table 1 in the Appendix to this Section of the Handbook. Course revision is defined as making a substantial modification to a course, such as addition of distance learning options or multi-media instruction, formally proposing to change course content/format, etc. Other information, such as written comments from students, colleagues within and beyond the School, College, or University administrators shall be considered when available. Peer reviews and summaries of Student Surveys of Instruction (including all student comments) must be submitted as part of a candidate’s file for reappointment, tenure and promotion. Copies of representative syllabi, examinations, and other relevant teaching material also should be available for review.

    2. Scholarly/Creative Work

      The School’s tenured and tenure-track faculty are expected to be engaged in endeavors that support the School’s mission. It is expected that these activities will lead to presentation and then to publication in quality scholarly or professional venues. Evaluation criteria are listed in Table 2 in the Appendix to this Section of the Handbook.

      The quality of the work and the venues are important components in tenure and promotion decisions. Tenure is granted with the expectation that the faculty member will continue to be engaged at the same or a higher level of quality.

      Given the School’s professional mission, published journalism of the highest quality qualifies as published research, using standards defined in more detail below.

      Publication, for purposes of this document, is used in the broadest sense to include multiplatform distribution to defined audiences in print, web, audio, video, or mobile formats. Considering the proliferation of open-access information and audience-generated content, we anticipate that scholarly/creative activity may be published and evaluated in new ways, such as online or in other digital venues. It is up to the tenure or promotion applicant to assess and document how his or her work is significant in leading professional change. Such documentation must include meaningful peer review conducted in a detached and dispassionate manner.

      Generally, the School expects tenure-track faculty to build a body of scholarly, journalistic, and/or creative work that:

      a. shows substantial and consistent engagement by exhibiting focused growth that is documented by professional evaluations or assessments.

      b. extends to publication or presentation in appropriate professional or academic venues as defined below.

      c. engages peer or juried review or other evidence of detached, dispassionate vetting by peers or recognized experts as defined below.

      d. creates a positive recognition and reputation for those scholarly and creative endeavors, leading in time to national recognition measured by citations or letters of recognition, invitations to present or publish, awards and honors, or other documented means.

      e. aids communities and media organizations in better understanding their roles in a democratic society and/or advances the body of knowledge about the processes, economics, uses, effects, freedoms, and responsibilities of professionals and audiences of journalism and mass communication. The School recognizes the importance of faculty working in and with emerging media and technologies. Such work is essential to the future of media-related businesses and organizations. We also encourage faculty to build partnerships locally, regionally, and nationally.

       

    3. Service

      The School defines service as administrative service within the university, professional service through academic and professional associations and provision of professional expertise to public and private entities beyond the university.

      Service activity is expected and required; however, service of any magnitude cannot be considered more important than a candidate’s teaching and scholarly/creative responsibilities. Nonetheless, a faculty member’s willingness to make contributions to the overall progress of the School is an important measure of the faculty member’s fitness for tenure or promotion.

      Contributions as a University citizen include service to the School, the College, and the University as outlined in Table 3. The merits of University service should be evaluated as to (1) whether or not the candidate chaired the committee listed and (2) the importance of the service to the mission of the unit served. Other components of citizenship include active participation in School events, such as faculty- undergraduate- and graduate-student recruitment, seminars, and department meetings, etc.

      Additional components of service include public outreach and professional or academic service. These may differ in their importance among faculty members, depending on each faculty member’s duties and responsibilities within the School.

      Expectations in service for promotion to Professor are higher than for promotion to Associate Professor.

    4. Note on external funding and collaboration

      The School recognizes and supports the value of teaching, scholarly/creative, or service endeavors that generate external funding, particularly when the work is aligned with the goals and missions of the School, College, University, or our professions. Similarly, collaboration among colleagues within the School, College, and University and other universities is encouraged.

    5. Evaluation tables and documentation examples

      The text in this section and the tables in the Appendix to this section are designed to facilitate assessing performance of candidates being evaluated for tenure and promotion. During the probationary period, these tools should be used for developmental assistance and projection of future success in achieving tenure and promotion and for determining the faculty member’s qualification for reappointment.

      Tables 1, 2, and 3 in the Appendix provide worksheets for use in the evaluation of candidates. For promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor, the faculty member must meet the criteria for at least a “very good” evaluation in scholarly/creative activity and at least a “very good” evaluation in teaching. University citizenship must at least meet the minimum School criteria as outlined in Table 3. These same categories and assessment tools apply for tenure decisions.

      A candidate for promotion to Professor must meet the criteria for an “excellent” evaluation in either scholarly/creative activity or teaching and no less than “very good” in the other category. Service must exceed the minimum School criteria. A candidate for promotion to Professor may not have equal activity in scholarship, teaching and service, as he/she becomes more specialized.

      Given the wide range of venues in which scholarly/creative work may be published or presented, faculty are expected to provide clear documentation regarding publication or presentation of scholarly/creative work. Such documentation should include an assessment of its quality, impact or contribution to the body of professional or scholarly knowledge.

      Conference papers and presentations, for example, generally do not carry equal weight with published articles or creative work. Original scholarship or journalism based on original reporting or research, for example, generally would be weighted more heavily than analysis or review of another’s work. In collaborations, the contributions of each author should be clear.

      Assessment may be through traditional scholarly peer-review processes, demonstrated by client or external colleague evaluation, or adjudication (e.g., critical reviews, letters from acknowledged experts). Examples of acceptable assessment are provided below. Reviews by close colleagues and collaborators do not carry the same weight as dispassionate reviews by more objective, detached, external colleagues.

      For peer-reviewed articles, faculty are expected to document:

      • acceptance rate
      • quality of the publication
      • targeted audience
      • impact of the article
      • citations

      For peer-reviewed paper sessions, faculty are expected to document:

      • acceptance rate
      • significance of the organization
      • indication of how paper or presentation may advance to publication

      For invited papers or presentations, faculty are expected to document:

      • the significance of the organization
      • significance of the presentation, cited in a letter from the person who extended the invitation
      • audience for the paper or presentation

      Books also represent scholarly/creative activity. The relative weight depends on such factors as the original research behind the text, the importance of the book to the field and the candidate’s role as single author, multiple author or editor. Faculty are expected to document:

      • publishing process
      • targeted audience
      • copies sold
      • reviews or other evaluations
      • citations

      For articles in professional media, faculty are expected to document:

      • the circulation of the publication
      • description of audience
      • significance of the article, cited in a letter from the supervising editor, when available
      • other external validation such as awards or contests
      • citations, references
      • description of the reporting, research and/or creative process used to produce the article
      • acceptance rate

      For articles and blogs online, faculty are expected to document:

      • unique visitors or other accepted measures
      • links
      • significance of the organization that owns the web site
      • significance of the work, cited in a letter from the supervising editor, critical reviews or other evidence or in the case of a blog, qualified outside resources
      • other documented citations

      For video/broadcast work in professional reporting or production, faculty are expected to document:

      • selection for distribution by a television station, network or online
      • description of audience
      • significance of the work, cited in a letter from the supervising producer, when available
      • assessment through professional or academic awards competitions
      • reviews from relevant professional or academic experts.

      In addition to reporting/writing/producing, the practice of journalism encompasses such creative activities as editing, photography, and design for print and digital media. These are to be vetted in a similar fashion to the three preceding examples.

      The practice of public relations, on behalf of businesses and/or nonprofit organizations, encompasses:

      • Conducting formal communication audits and/or research initiatives.
      • Developing strategic public relations campaigns or programs that produce measurable results.
      • Developing and executing substantial public relations initiatives such as websites, social-media campaigns, large-scale events, etc.
      • Providing senior-level counsel leading to the adoption of more effective and ethical public relations practices.

      Although the School puts the highest value on original research and creative activity, the following also are valued as part of a candidate’s portfolio: book reviews, grant proposals, as well as reviewing manuscripts and programs.

      Faculty also may apply their expertise as advisers or consultants in significant problem-solving activities for an organization and may create workshops and seminars for professional audiences. Candidates will be expected to provide evaluation and impact of their work.

      Because of the heavy teaching responsibilities for tenure-track faculty members at the regional campuses, expectations for scholarly and creative activity will not be as great as they are for faculty on the Kent campus.

  5. Full Time Non-Tenure Track Appoint, Renewal and Promotion

    1. Appointment and Renewal of Full Time Non-Tenure Track Faculty

      Assignments for full time non-tenure track (FTNTT) faculty vary widely. Terms for renewal are explained in Article X of the Collective Bargaining Agreement for Full Time Non-Tenure Track Faculty (FTNTT CBA). Criteria are developed by the academic units. Documentation guidelines for FTNTT Full Performance Reviews are provided in the FTNTT CBA, Addendum B. For regular FTNTT faculty, formal third-year reviews are required. For FTNTT faculty in JMC, evaluation should follow standards for teaching and service in Tables 4 and 5. Evaluation criteria for professional development are outlined in the next section and standards are noted in Table 6. For FTNTT faculty with duties other than teaching, evaluation appropriate for their assigned duties will be developed.

    2. Promotion of Full Time Non-Tenure Track Faculty

      Faculty may apply for promotion in the third year of a cycle of three one-year appointments.

      There are six academic ranks for FTNTT faculty members: Lecturer, Associate Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor and Professor. Criteria for promotion are set forth in Addendum C of the FTNTT CBA. Candidates are eligible for promotion to Associate Lecturer or Associate Professor after completing five consecutive years as an FTNTT and successfully passing one three-year performance review. They are eligible for promotion to Senior Lecturer or Professor after five full years in rank as an Associate Lecturer/Associate Professor. They will be assessed on their performance of assigned duties, professional development and university citizenship. See the FTNTT CBA, Addendum C, Section 1, Paragraph F for a more complete statement of criteria.

      According to the FTNTT CBA, evidence of “significant and continuous accomplishments in Performance, Professional Development, and Professional and Creative Activity” is required for promotion. Contributions in university citizenship will help the candidate’s file and may be required. The Provost ultimately makes promotion decisions after receiving recommendations from the college Dean. The Dean is advised by the Non-Tenure Track Promotion Advisory Board, whose members review the candidates’ files.

  6. Criteria for Promotion of Full Time Non-Tenure Track Faculty

    The School of Journalism and Mass Communication hires most full time non-tenure track faculty at the assistant professor level, generally with a terminal degree of either a Ph.D., J.D., M.F.A., or a master’s degree with significant professional experience, as determined by the search committee in consultation with the Director and Dean.

    1. Teaching

      Full time non-tenure track faculty generally teach more than tenure-track faculty, and they are evaluated primarily on their track record in the classroom, as exhibited by responsiveness to teaching evaluations from professional colleagues and teaching peers, as well as students, professional improvement, and industry engagement as appropriate. This rigorous review is detailed in Table 4 of the Appendix to this Section of the Handbook.

    2. Service

      Full time non-tenure track faculty in JMC who have service obligations specified on their workload statements or letters of appointment are expected to provide service to the school. A faculty member’s willingness to make contributions to the overall progress of the School is an important measure of the faculty member’s fitness for promotion.

      Contributions as a University citizen include service to the School, the College, and the University as outlined in Table 5. The merits of University service should be evaluated as to (1) whether or not the candidate chaired the committee listed and (2) the importance of the service to the mission of the unit served. Other components of citizenship include active participation in School events, such as faculty- undergraduate- and graduate-student recruitment, seminars and department meetings, etc.

      Additional components of service include public outreach and professional or academic service. These may differ in their importance among faculty members, depending on each faculty member’s duties and responsibilities within the School.

      Expectations in service for promotion to Senior Lecturer/Professor are higher than for promotion to Associate Lecturer/Associate Professor. The former requires that the candidates exceed service expectations. The latter requires that the candidates meet them.

    3. Professional Development

      In addition to showing significant success in teaching, full time non-tenure track faculty candidates for promotion must show they have accomplished a great deal professionally. Given that the areas for professional development within JMC are broad, professional development is evidenced via the effective alignment of activities to the workload statement/appointment letter. Examples might include (but are not limited to) professional awards, active roles in professional organizations, or publication / appearance / presentations in an industry specific outlet, or creative works relevant to the field. Table 6 in the Appendix to this Section of the Handbook outlines evaluation criteria.

      Expectations in professional development for promotion to Senior Lecturer/Professor are higher than promotion to Associate Lecturer/Associate Professor. The former requires that the candidates exceed professional development expectations. The latter requires that the candidates meet them.

  7. Other Faculty Personnel Actions

    1. Appointment and Employment Procedure and Regulations of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication

      Definitions

      In accordance with the definition in the University Policy Register, the sum of a faculty member’s “teaching, research, and/or administrative responsibilities and assignments constitutes full-time employment (one hundred percent full-time employment) at Kent State University.” JMC faculty include employees who are either tenure-track (those both tenured and probationary) or full time non-tenure track at the Kent and regional campuses.

      Graduate student appointees who are assigned responsibility for sections of structured courses are considered members of the instructional staff for the period they have such classroom or laboratory responsibilities.

    2. Faculty Additions and Replacements

      Should a faculty position become available, after approval of the Dean and Provost, the Director will convene a search committee from among the full-time faculty members, though members may also come from other schools, departments and the student body. This committee will institute a formal search, in line with University, College, Equal Opportunity Commission and Affirmative Action regulations.

      When any candidate is interviewed on campus, all faculty members shall have the opportunity to meet with the candidate and express their confidential observations and recommendations, either written or oral, to the Director. The Director will consider these observations and recommendations, and, after formal consultation with the search committee and the FAC, nominate a candidate to the Dean.

    3. Letters of Appointment

      Formal letters of appointment for both probationary tenure-track and full time non-tenure track faculty shall be formulated, stating terms and expectations for the individual faculty member in teaching, scholarly/creative activity and service, so that he or she may be positively considered for reappointment, tenure, and promotion. This is normally done at the time of hiring.

      The letters must be approved and agreed to by the Dean, the Director, and the faculty member and may be revised with the permission of the faculty member. Ultimate approval of letters of appointment is the responsibility of the Provost. In addition to the formal letters of appointment, the Director and the new faculty member, in consultation with an assigned mentor, may develop additional written expectations for specific teaching, scholarly/creative activity, and service in the initial year of work.

    4. Graduate Faculty Membership

      1. Graduate faculty membership shall be assigned to those faculty members with appropriate educational backgrounds, who have produced scholarly/creative activity of sufficient quality and consistency to merit professional recognition and who are effective in providing the appropriate training for graduate students (or have the potential for providing such training).

      “Appropriate educational background,” as it relates to the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, normally shall mean possession of the doctorate or terminal master’s degree. It also may mean possession of a non-terminal master’s degree with significant professional experience. Appropriate degrees vary within mass media-related disciplines and across the country, depending upon the emphases of the program and the academic/professional expertise of the faculty member.

      Scholarly/creative activity of sufficient quality to merit professional recognition as it relates to JMC should be interpreted through Tenure and Promotion criteria described in this section.

      Graduate Faculty Status for Kent Campus Faculty Members

      Graduate Faculty status for Kent Campus faculty members is obtained by preparing documentation (application and supporting data sheet) and submitting it to the Graduate Faculty Committee of the School for evaluation and recommendation to the Director, who in turn recommends to the College Dean and to the Associate Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies.

      2. The following statuses may be recommended for a graduate faculty member:

      a. Associate Member, Level 1 (A1): May teach graduate courses and serve on master’s thesis and project committees.

      b. Full Member, Level 1 (F1): May do the above and may direct projects and comprehensive exams at the master’s level. Before serving as a sole director of a project, the member must first co-direct two projects with a graduate faculty member eligible to be the sole director of a project. Before serving as a sole director of an exam, the member must first co-direct two exams with a graduate faculty member eligible to be the sole director of an exam.

      c. Full Member, Level 2 (F2): May do the above and may direct theses. Before serving as a sole director of a thesis, the member must first co-direct two theses with a graduate faculty member eligible to be the sole director of a thesis.

      d. Full Member, Level 3 (F3): May do the above and may serve on doctoral committees and co-direct doctoral dissertations.

      e. Full Member, Level 4 (F4): May do the above and may direct a doctoral dissertation.

       

      1. Criteria for Membership in the Graduate Faculty

        General criteria for membership is set forth in the University Policy Register (6-15.1).

        1. In JMC, a Full Member (Level F1) of the Graduate Faculty:

        a. Must possess a doctorate or other appropriate terminal degree and demonstrate the potential for substantial scholarly research or creative activity, or

        b. Must possess a master’s degree and significant professional experience and a record of substantial and sustained professional publication or creative activity, or

        c. Must possess a bachelor’s degree, along with significant and prominent professional experience in his or her field and an outstanding record of professional publication or creative activity.

        2. A Full Member (Level F2) of the Graduate Faculty:

        a. Must hold a doctorate or equivalent terminal degree appropriate to the faculty member’s teaching and research discipline, and must demonstrate a substantial and sustained record of appropriate scholarly research or creative activity, or

        b. Must hold a master’s degree for which a thesis was written, along with significant professional experience in his or her field, and must demonstrate a substantial and sustained record of appropriate scholarly research or creative activity.

        3. A Full Member (Level F3) of the Graduate Faculty:

        a. Must meet all criteria for Level F2, and

        b. Must demonstrate a significant record of graduate teaching, advising, and research direction, including experience in directing or co-directing graduate-student research, and

        c. Must have demonstrated significant scholarly or creative activity in the past five years, and

        d. Must demonstrate a significant record of professional involvement.

        4. A Full Member (Level F4) of the Graduate Faculty:

        a. Must meet all criteria for Level F3, and

        b. Must demonstrate a significant record of research direction, including experience in directing or co-directing graduate student research, and

        c. Must demonstrate a current and continuing record of scholarly or creative activity, and

        d. Must demonstrate a continuous record of significant professional involvement.

        5. An Associate Member of the Graduate Faculty:

        a. Must possess a doctorate or other appropriate terminal degree and demonstrate the potential for substantial scholarly research or creative activity, or

        b. Must possess a master’s degree and significant professional experience, and demonstrate the potential for substantial scholarly or professional research or creative activity, or

        c. Must possess a bachelor’s degree plus significant and prominent professional experience and must demonstrate the potential for outstanding professional publication or creative activity.

        6. Temporary Graduate Faculty Member: This status shall be assigned to a faculty member whose participation in the graduate program is desired by the graduate department for a limited period or for a limited objective. Normally, this status should be assigned to lead to the appropriate instruction of a graduate course for a semester or appropriate service on a graduate examination committee, a thesis committee, or a dissertation committee. Upon the completion of the temporary assignment, the status of Temporary Graduate Faculty Member is withdrawn.

    5. Summer Teaching

      While summer teaching is not included as part of regular 9-month faculty contracts and appointments, faculty wishing to teach during the summer will be given the opportunity to do so, primarily on the basis of program need and secondarily on the basis of available financial resources. Generally, all faculty members shall be consulted by the Director and/or sequence coordinators concerning their desire to teach during the summer. The Director follows the guidelines and procedures for summer employment set forth in Article IX, Section 4 of the TT CBA and Article IX, Section 2 of the FTNTT CBA.

    6. Evaluation of Teaching

      Formal student evaluations, using KSU-mandated evaluation questions, plus additional questions devised by the School, are conducted for each course taught during regular academic semesters by full- and part-time faculty. Results of the evaluations are made available to the individual faculty member, along with the average score for courses in the appropriate norming group. Evaluations are public records.

    7. Leaves

      1. Travel:

      Faculty are encouraged to attend professional and academic meetings and conferences for professional enrichment. Attendance at such meetings is considered an authorized absence, provided that appropriate arrangements have been made for class coverage. The required forms for this type of leave are available from the Director. The form must be completed and approved before the faculty member’s leave.

      2. Leaves of Absence:

      Leaves of absence, including sick leave, shall follow College and University regulations as stated in the University Policy Register 6-11 and must be approved by the Dean. Appropriate documentation must be completed by all concerned parties.

      3. Professional Improvement Leave for Tenure-Track Faculty:

      Faculty professional improvement leave may be available to all those who qualify, in accordance with regulations and provisions in the University Policy Register 6-12 and 6-12.101. Faculty members requesting a faculty professional improvement leave must submit a proposal to the FAC and the Director for review, after which it is reviewed by the College Advisory Committee, the Dean and other appropriate University officials and committees. Final approval comes from the Provost and is subject to available funding.

      4. Professional Development Leave for FTNTT Faculty

      Full time non-tenure track faculty may apply for leaves of absence for professional development according to the provisions of the FTNTT CBA, Article XVI, Section 2.

    8. Faculty Grievance and Appeals

      A. University Procedures

      Kent State University maintains a formal grievance and appeals procedures established by the TT CBA (Article VII) and the FTNTT CBA (Article VII).

      B. School Procedures for Informal Resolution

      The faculty and the Director are encouraged to maintain open communication to the extent that formal University grievance and appeals procedures will normally not be required. To this end, the following procedure is recommended for the internal arbitration of a faculty grievance, should it be necessitated:

      Step 1: The grieving faculty member shall meet with his/her sequence coordinator, and a reasonable effort shall be made to resolve the grievance.

      Step 2: If the grievance is not resolved in Step One, the faculty member may elect to bring his/her grievance before the FAC, which shall make an advisory recommendation to the Director.

      Step 3: If the grievance is not resolved in Step Two, the faculty member shall meet with the Director who will make a final effort to resolve the grievance at the School level.

      Should the issue remain unresolved at the School level, the Director’s Office will notify the Dean regarding the unresolved grievance and the results of the informal actions that have occurred in Steps One through Three.

      In regard to the above procedure, it is important to note the following from the University Grievance and Appeals Procedure: “Any settlement, withdrawal, or other disposition of a grievance at the informal stage shall not constitute a binding precedent in the settlement of similar complaints or grievances.”