Past Events

The Summer 2019 Educators Summit is designed to prepare middle school and high school teachers to educate a new generation about the history and legacy of May 4, 1970, and its relevance to contemporary issues and events. This workshop is offered FREE to teachers. Teachers will earn 20 contact hours for participation in the Summer 2019 workshop (free), or may opt to register for 1 or 2 graduate workshop credit hours ($162/credit hour). An additional graduate credit opportunity will be available for a follow-up cohort experience offered for the 2019-2020 school year. For more information, contact Dr. Todd Hawley (thawley1@kent.edu) or Dr. Annette Kratcoski (akratcos@kent.edu).

Two community keynotes will be presented as part of the Voices for Change Educators Summit. These evening sessions are free and open to the public; registration is required. The July 31 community keynote will be presented by Thomas Grace, scholar and instructor of American history and one of the nine students wounded on May 4, 1970. Mr. Grace is the author of the book Death and Dissent in the Long Sixties (2016).

The Summer 2019 Educators Summit is designed to prepare middle school and high school teachers to educate a new generation about the history and legacy of May 4, 1970, and its relevance to contemporary issues and events. This workshop is offered FREE to teachers. Teachers will earn 20 contact hours for participation in the Summer 2019 workshop (free), or may opt to register for 1 or 2 graduate workshop credit hours ($162/credit hour). An additional graduate credit opportunity will be available for a follow-up cohort experience offered for the 2019-2020 school year.

Two community keynotes will be presented as part of the Voices for Change Educators Summit. These evening sessions are free and open to the public; registration is required. The August 1 keynote will feature student activist, poet, and artist Sara Abou Rashed. Afterward, David Hassler, director of Kent State’s Wick Poetry Center, will lead guests in contributing to a community-created poem for the 50th Commemoration of May 4, 1970, using the Wick Center’s Thread poetry app.

The Summer 2019 Educators Summit is designed to prepare middle school and high school teachers to educate a new generation about the history and legacy of May 4, 1970, and its relevance to contemporary issues and events. This workshop is offered free to teachers. Teachers will earn 20 contact hours for participation in the Summer 2019 workshop (free), or may opt to register for 1 or 2 graduate workshop credit hours ($162/credit hour). An additional graduate credit opportunity will be available for a follow-up cohort experience offered for the 2019-2020 school year.

The two decades of the 60s and 70s were emblematic of political and societal transformations. With the events of May 1968, anti-war protests and womenʼs liberation movement, this climate of unrest marked the emergence of the radical or ʻcounter-designʼ movement which questioned the rationalism and functionalism of modernity by proposing utopian ideas and manifestos that could reinvent cities and create a revolution in architecture Prospects for Radical Change exhibit offers the chance to explore the projects of fifteen individuals and collectives from this period, half a century after their existence.

The Wick Poetry Center is now accepting poetry submissions as part of the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the May 4 shootings. The poems should resonate with the themes of peace, conflict transformation, and student advocacy. We are accepting submissions in three categories: youth, adult student, or adult non-student. Poet, songwriter, and novelist, Naomi Shihab Nye, will select one winner from each category who will receive $500 and an all-expenses-paid trip to Kent State University to read their poems during the May 4 Music and Poetry Event on April 21.

Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4th, and Student Protest in America is a documentary film about a generation of young people, who stood up to speak their minds against social injustice in some of our nation’s most turbulent and transformative years, the 1960s through the 1970s. On May 4th, 1970, thirteen of these young Americans were shot down by the National Guard in a shocking act of violence against unarmed students.

Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4th, and Student Protest in America is a documentary film about a generation of young people, who stood up to speak their minds against social injustice in some of our nation’s most turbulent and transformative years, the 1960s through the 1970s. On May 4th, 1970, thirteen of these young Americans were shot down by the National Guard in a shocking act of violence against unarmed students.

Join five KSU Fashion School faculty who will share their inspiration and process behind their designs for the exhibition that marks the 50th commemoration of May 4th. Free for Students and with General Admission.

The Wick Poetry Center invites people from around the world to contribute a line or stanza to a global community peace poem titled “My Voice.” As Kent State University approaches the 50th anniversary of the May 4 shootings, the themes of the poem will reflect peace, conflict transformation, and advocacy. The Wick Poetry Center will begin accepting submissions on Sept. 15, 2019.

The Laugh in Peace comedy tour is coming to Kent State University. This is sure to be a meaningful evening of interesting dialogue and connecting, featuring Muslim Comedian Gibran Saleem and Rabbi/Stand-up Comic Bob Alper. Hillel is participating in this event with the Muslim Student Association with important leadership from the School of Peace and Conflict Studies. This event marks the start of a dialogue series for the Jewish and Muslim students on campus and the culminating event for a monthly dialogue series for Temple Israel of Akron and the Islamic Society of Akron and Kent.

Sonia Sanchez, a recipient of the Anisfield-Wolf Fellowship, is a poet, playwright, activist, and educator. Ms. Sanchez will be discussing and offering her reflections on how poetry student activism, peace, and civil rights brings change with an emphasis on the legacy of May 4. All these themes are as central and relevant today as they were 50 years ago.

The 15th annual Poynter KSU Media Ethics Workshop will address media ethics issues and covering activism at a day-long program on Thursday, Sept. 19 at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University. The Workshop – titled “Act. Action. Activism?” – will feature a keynote address by the print and broadcast journalism teachers at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Kelly McBride, the Poynter Institute’s senior vice president and chair of its new Craig Newmark Center for Ethics and Leadership, will moderate and facilitate major parts of the Ethics Workshop. The Media Ethics Workshop will also feature two sessions on media coverage and activism related to the events at Kent State on May 4, 1970.

You're invited to the opening reception celebrating our two newest exhibits: "Culture/Counterculture: Fashions of the 1960s and '70s" & "Wearing Justice: A Tribute to May 4th." This reception is open to the public. The exhibition "Culture/Counterculture" looks at fashions of the 1960s and early 1970s with a particular focus on the generation gap during that period. The exhibition is scheduled to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Kent State’s shootings on May 4, 1970. Almost 50 years ago, the shootings of Kent State University students by the Ohio National Guard brought to a head the cultural divides that had split the nation. There was a sharp contrast between supporters of the establishment and those opposed – the culture and the counterculture.

Please join The Kent State University Press and author Howard Ruffner to celebrate the publication of "Moments of Truth: A Photographer's Experience of Kent State 1970. Mr. Ruffner became a witness and documentarian to the historic events of May 4, 1970. His intensely personal book collects nearly 150 of his photographs, including those that appeared in Life magazine, as well as many never before published.

The exhibition Culture/Counterculture looks at fashions of the 1960s and early 1970s with a particular focus on the generation gap during that period. The exhibition is scheduled to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Kent State’s shootings on May 4, 1970. Almost 50 years ago, the shootings of Kent State University students by the Ohio National Guard brought to a head the cultural divides that had split the nation. There was a sharp contrast between supporters of the establishment and those opposed – the culture and the counterculture. These cleavages in society saw their clear expression in the fashions of the time. The exhibition draws from the rich holdings of the university’s historic costume collection, private and institutional lenders including the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as well as archival material from the May 4 collection. Open: September 20, 2019 - September 6, 2020

Community Engaged Learning at Kent State University will host its annual gathering for faculty, staff, and community partners. Networking and professional development opportunities will be offered (learning session titles will be announced soon). Participants may also receive a tour of the May 4th Visitor Center and presentation by their staff.

This online social media project will recreate the 1969 – 1970 school year at Kent State University through the voices of Chic Canfora, Tim Moore, Jerry Lewis, Tom Grace, and Laura Davis. Each memory, from the mundane to the profound, will help paint a more personalized picture of the issues the divided campus and the events that brought everyone together. This program is similar to print versions of “look-backs” in history. Currently, the goal is to have at least three posts a week continuing to May 2020.

Alan Canfora, who was shot through the wrist on May 4, 1970, leads a guided tour of the historic May 4 site including the memorials, the commons, and the Prentice Hall parking lot. This is a unique opportunity to tour the site with one of the survivors and leading experts of the May 4, 1970 shootings. This event is prior to the PTSD panel discussion later that evening. The tour is free but registration is requested. Meet at the May 4 Visitors Center. Register to attend