Media at the Movies: School of Journalism and Mass Communication Presents Showing of "Merchants of Doubt" Followed by Ethics Discussion | Kent State University

Media at the Movies: School of Journalism and Mass Communication Presents Showing of "Merchants of Doubt" Followed by Ethics Discussion

Join Kent State University’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication for a movie screening and media ethics discussion at the second annual Media at the Movies, presented by the Media Law Center for Ethics and Access. The event will take place at 6:30 p.m. on March 8 in the Franklin Hall First Energy Auditorium (Room 340).

The event will feature a screening of "Merchants of Doubt," a provocative, somewhat satiric documentary about people who “spin” scientific data in the media. The 2014 documentary explores how these pundits-for-hire have effectively spread confusion about well-studied public threats like tobacco smoke and global warming.

Following the movie, panelists from various backgrounds will lead a discussion about ethics issues the film brings to light. Panelists include Jim Crutchfield, retired president and publisher of the Akron Beacon Journal and trustee of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation; Kim Garchar, Ph.D., associate professor of philosophy at Kent State; Beth Hallisy, APR, president of Beth.LLC, a public relations and writing firm; and David Hertz, managing director of Dix & Eaton.

“The film raises fascinating ethics questions about the responsibilities of pundits, public relations professionals and journalists,” says Jan Leach, associate professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication and director of the Media Law Center for Ethics and Access.

  • Admission is free, and popcorn and bottled water will be served.
  • The film will begin promptly at 6:45 p.m.
  • The panel discussion and Q&A will begin around 8:15 p.m.

The Public Relations Student Society of America chapter at Kent State is co-sponsoring this event.

Learn more about Kent State’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication