Environmental Science and Design Research Initiative

Grassland in Magersfontein (near Kimberley, South Africa), 1900 Ecosystems in today's world are responding to a wide variety of environmental changes. What happens when these changes interact? That was the topic of a recent paper published by Dr. David Ward and international colleagues and graduate students in the journal Scientific Reports. Although climate change is often viewed as the overriding global...

Workers install a green roof onto the lower roof of Taylor Hall at Kent State University. The plants will help insulate the building, control water runoff and provide less glare. At the 16th Annual CitiesAlive Conference recently held in New York City, a consortium of Ohio universities was selected as one of the first four North American regional centers of living architecture by Green Roofs for Healthy Cities and the Green Infrastructure Foundation.  Faculty from Kent State University will join colleagues from the...

Workers install a green roof onto the lower roof of Taylor Hall at Kent State University. The plants will help insulate the building, control water runoff and provide less glare. Congratulations to Raissa Mendonca-PhD student in the lab of David Costello.   One of our Biological Sciences graduate students (Raissa Mendonca ) has been selected for the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Chris Lee Award: https://www.setac.org/page/SETACAwardSICA.  They only give one of these out a year to an outstanding...

Environmental Science and Design Research Initiative

Workers install a green roof onto the lower roof of Taylor Hall at Kent State University. The plants will help insulate the building, control water runoff and provide less glare. The Environmental Science and Design Research Initiative (ESDRI) was excited to be able to offer competitively awarded seed grant funding to research teams in Spring semester 2018.  ESDRI was established in 2017 to support faculty efforts to achieve continued scholarly success in areas of research concerning both natural and built systems. The...

Elizabeth Herndon, Ph.D, assistant professor of geology in Kent State University, received a five-year, $487,000 Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation. The greenhouse effect is one of the most widely known causes of global climate change. It is currently caused by an excess of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere due to burning of fossil fuels. Some natural processes can help slow climate change by removing CO2 from the atmosphere. For example, plants filter CO2 out of air and transfer carbon...

Kayakers to Paddle From Kent to Cleveland for 5th Annual Crooked River Commute Two days and 50 miles. That is how long it will take kayakers to paddle the Cuyahoga River from Kent State University to Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative for the 5th annual Crooked River Commute. The event is intended to promote the river as a shared asset for education, recreation, and sustainability.   ...

Division of Research & Sponsored Programs

Road Construction Leads to Wetlands Research On Campus For anyone who has traveled to Kent State over the summer, the Summit Street construction project has been quite an inconvenience for drivers. For Lauren Kinsman-Costello, though, it’s an opportunity to make the campus more ecologically friendly and establish trends in biology, chemistry, geology and ecology. The assistant professor of...

Division of Research & Sponsored Programs

Up on the Roof Biologists and Architects Innovate Vegetated Rooftops to Link Cities With Natural Systems What some call a sustainable answer to urban flaws, Anna Droz calls research. As a biological sciences doctoral student in Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences, Droz’s curiosity has developed into a passion, maybe even an obsession, to...

Division of Research & Sponsored Programs

toxic waters Like a financial analyst who pores over numbers to predict the next big trend, Joseph Ortiz, Professor of Geology at Kent State University, is an expert at crunching earth data. An oceanographer, Ortiz’s most recent efforts are focused on the harmful algae blooms that plague Lake Erie and pose a threat to the safety of lake-front communities and...

Division of Research & Sponsored Programs

Seeking Answers In the Arctic Arctic permafrost typically functions as a vast freezer that preserves decaying plant matter for thousands of years, but rapidly warming climate is thawing permafrost and accelerating decomposition. Increased plant growth is needed to capture carbon that is released from decomposing organic matter, but plant growth depends on whether plants can...