Research & Science

BioBlack Team Poses with their bacteria-dyed tote bad and dress dyed with bacterium
The words “biology” and “design” might not typically intertwine; however, Kent State University’s Biodesign Challenge course was created to challenge the idea that the two separate disciplines could not collaborate. During the fall of 2019, 24 students from seven different majors worked in teams to create a biodesign project. The collaborative nature of the course also excited the students.

News

Health
Apple and Google partnered in early April to create a new smartphone app that uses Bluetooth to track coronavirus cases. Using a technology called contact tracing, the app alerts a user when they come in contact with someone who has been positively diagnosed with COVID-19. Gokarna Sharma, assistant professor in Computer Science, recently answered 10 questions about the new app based on his professional opinion. Sharma is experienced in algorithms, blockchain and smart technologies such as this.
Research & Science
Joseph D. Ortiz, Ph.D., professor and assistant chair in the College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Geology at Kent State University, recently authored a “News and Views” article in Nature Geoscience that discusses research carried out by another research team that reassessed the melt history and timing of the collapse of the Eurasian Ice Sheet Complex during the Last Deglaciation.
Research & Science
April’s observance as Autism Awareness Month is coming to a close, but research into the whys and hows of autism is always ongoing at Kent State University. Michael N. Lehman, Ph.D., director of the Brain Health Research Institute at Kent State, said the university supports autism research that focuses on basic discoveries within the brain, as well as applied human research of students with autism, which makes Kent State’s body of research unique and diverse.
Research & Science
There is a very good chance that technology, incubated at Kent State University, could play an integral role in improving NASA astronauts’ performance on the next space missions to the moon and Mars.
Research & Science
Nuclear physics researchers at Kent State University and all over the world have been searching for violations of the fundamental symmetries in the universe for decades. Much like the “Big Bang” (approximately 13.8 billion years ago), but on a tiny scale, they briefly recreate the particle interactions that likely existed microseconds into the formation of our universe which also likely now exist in the cores of neutron stars.