Golden Insights Blog Archive | The Center for Corporate and Professional Development | Page 3 | Kent State University

Golden Insights Blog Archive

The Center for Corporate and Professional Development
Sep. 14, 2016

Writing Action Items Blog PostNo, I’m not talking about mind control, but something much easier. Follow the below steps and you can greatly increase the probability that your reader will do what you want. First, I believe that people, in general, are helpful (but to a limit). They are willing to spend some (short) time to do what you ask of them. The key is how much time they are willing to spend.

Christine Zust
Sep. 07, 2016

HandshakeOne of the most powerful communication tools you possess is your nonverbal language, or body language. Yet all too often people are too busy to pay attention to what their actions say about them. What others see/feel/experience in action guides their interpretation of your personal style. Be mindful of the delicate interplay between verbal and nonverbal language. The key to successful communication is to ensure that your verbal and nonverbal language are in alignment and consistent.

Deborah Easton
Aug. 23, 2016

Program ParticipantsHave you ever been frustrated by the detailed answer someone gave you to a simple question? Today’s society values brevity. People send short but frequent text messages to update others on their whereabouts and happenings. Few people listen to an entire State of the Union Address, but instead prefer to be informed later by the summary sound bites provided by the news media. This is not a new phenomenon created by technology, however. 

Jessica Thomas
Aug. 19, 2016

Program ParticipantsTypically communicating change within an organization is a one size fits all and a one-way experience. In other words, leaders communicate information about a change that will be occurring the same way they do other general information. Announcements are made by email or the information is shared in a meeting. Rarely are feedback mechanisms in place, messages crafted by audience or sent by the most influential people. I call it “vanilla” messaging - very generic and not really impactful or comforting during times of change.

The Center for Corporate and Professional Development
Aug. 17, 2016

Image of Writing ExampleI don’t know about you, but I often receive emails that are confusing and unclear. After reading them, I still don’t know what the author wants from me. If you have experienced this, or have noticed this in your own writing, then read on for a few tips on streamlining your writing, which can be applied to any form of business writing (emails, reports, proposals, etc.)

Deborah Easton
Aug. 10, 2016

Program ParticipantCommunication is successful when all parties share the same meaning. Shared meaning happens when everyone pictures the information as similarly as possible. 

Deborah Easton
Jul. 27, 2016

Program ParticipantA problem has been reoccurring for years. Everyone agrees it is time to stop talking about it and finally implement a solution. Yet, every time a solution is presented to decision-makers, the idea is met with resistance and no action is taken. Once this situation has happened a number of times, people who were creative thinkers and enthusiastic problem-solvers have now become complacent and silent.

Kristy Frieden
Jul. 12, 2016

Program ParticipantIf we want to communicate with influence we need to forget the Golden Rule - “Treat others as you would like to be treated.” Of course we all want to be treated with dignity and respect; that is a given. But beyond that, it is important not to approach or communicate with others in the way we like to be treated, but approach them in the way that suits them the best; the Platinum Rule.

Kristy Frieden
Jul. 05, 2016

Program ParticipantResearch shows that people would rather talk with someone nice over someone knowledgeable. Think about that for a moment. Can you remember a time in your career that you knew the person who had the answer to the question you had, but they weren’t very nice; so instead you asked around among the people you liked, hoping they had the answer you needed?

Deborah Easton
Jun. 28, 2016

Program ParticipantHave you ever been frustrated by the detailed answer someone gave you to a simple question? Today’s society values brevity. People send short but frequent text messages to update others on their whereabouts and happenings. Few people listen to an entire State of the Union Address, but instead prefer to be informed later by the summary sound bites provided by the news media. This is not a new phenomenon created by technology, however. 

Deborah Easton
Jun. 14, 2016

Communication ImageHave you ever been around people who say whatever they think without any consideration for the appropriateness of their remarks? Perhaps you finally decided to approach them about their lack of tact, but received the response: “That’s just the way I am. People need to get used to me.”

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