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Kent State Faculty, Staff and Alumni Invited to Celebrate Black Studies Programs

Posted Jul. 9, 2012
enter photo description
Kent State Emeritus Professor and alumnus
Tim Moore
, ’73, says a lot of people influenced
the creation of the Black Studies Program at Kent
State. Events that celebrate the creation and
development of the program will take place on
July 14 and 15
.

Kent State University faculty, staff members and alumni who attended the university between 1967 and now are invited to an event that celebrates the creation and development of the Black Studies Program and Cultural Center. The program, which began as the Institute for African American Affairs in 1969, led to the development of the Center of Pan-African Culture and the Department of Pan-African Studies. These operations have helped to shape the educational and cultural experiences of all Kent State students, as well as faculty and staff members.

The celebration event will feature a picnic on Saturday, July 14, at Horseshoe Lake Park in Shaker Heights from noon to 8:30 p.m. Feel free to bring your own prepared dish as well. A photo shoot of all who have been involved with or impacted by the program will take place on Sunday, July 15, at Ritchie Hall on the Kent Campus at 1 p.m. Plan on arriving no later than 12:30 p.m. Participants also will have the opportunity to tour the recently renovated Ritchie Hall with refreshments served.

Silas Ashley, ‘74, an alumnus of the Department of Pan-African Studies, is organizing the event and says he hopes the photo shoot captures the faces of those who made the center a reality.

“It will be a memorable weekend that will never be forgotten,” Ashley says. “How often do you have the opportunity to have a ball while engaging in something historic, as well?”

Emeritus Professor and alumnus Tim Moore, ’73, who was a former associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and who studied and taught in the Department of Pan-African Studies for more than 40 years, credits the institute for promoting scholarly lectures, research and publications, as well as significant cultural programming in the Center of Pan-African Culture.

“A lot of people influenced the creation of the Black Studies Program at Kent State and many more have benefited from the program,” says Moore. “This is an opportunity to get everyone together to celebrate both those who were involved in developing the center and department and those who passed through the program as students.”

For more information about the event, contact Ashley at silasashley@cs.com or 1-786-302-4239.

For more information about the Department of Pan-African Studies and the Center of Pan-African Culture, visit www.kent.edu/CAS/PAS.