Research

For Robert Twieg, Ph.D., a professor in Kent State University’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, the recent news of his longtime collaborator William E. Moerner winning the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry was actually no surprise at all. In fact, he believes that “he’s deserved it for a while.”

A research group at Kent State University has described the structure of a new type of liquid crystal that had been predicted theoretically but never seen.

A Kent State University neurobiologist is one of four researchers in the U.S. awarded grants by the Jérôme Lejeune Foundation for projects to improve cognition in individuals with Down syndrome.

Kent State University hosts its inaugural Water Research Symposium, titled “Human Impacts on Water: Ohio’s Most Important Natural Resource” and co-sponsored by the Cleveland Water Alliance, on Thursday, Nov. 14, from 7-9:30 p.m. and Friday, Nov. 15, from 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center in downtown Kent, Ohio. The purpose of this symposium is to provide opportunities for scholarly interactions between regional and international aquatic scientists and for the general public to learn more about the importance of water.

To meet current U.S. coal demand through surface mining, an area of the Central Appalachians the size of Washington, D.C., would need to be mined every 81 days.  

Information technology drives our global economy and promises transformational approaches to the world’s most serious challenges, including healthcare, education and environmental. Yet a smaller percentage of American high school and university students take computer science courses today than they did 20 years ago.

L. Gwenn Volkert, associate professor of computer science at Kent State University, has been selected to participate in the second phase of a national effort aimed at increasing and broadening participation in computer science.

Information technology drives our global economy and promises transformational approaches to the world’s most serious challenges, including healthcare, education and environmental. Yet a smaller percentage of American high school and university students take computer science courses today than they did 20 years ago.

L. Gwenn Volkert, associate professor of computer science at Kent State University, has been selected to participate in the second phase of a national effort aimed at increasing and broadening participation in computer science.

Information technology drives our global economy and promises transformational approaches to the world’s most serious challenges, including healthcare, education and environmental. Yet a smaller percentage of American high school and university students take computer science courses today than they did 20 years ago.

L. Gwenn Volkert, associate professor of computer science at Kent State University, has been selected to participate in the second phase of a national effort aimed at increasing and broadening participation in computer science.

Kent State University and Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute will co-fund two pilot research projects as part of an initiative to enhance collaborations between the two institutions. Following a competitive review process, two teams comprising researchers from each institution will receive $100,000 each for collaborative research that will lead to co-submission of grant proposals to federal and nonfederal agencies.

Kent State University Professor of Anthropology C. Owen Lovejoy, Ph.D., has joined the university’s Presidential Search Committee.

“In our planning for the presidential search, trustees recognized the unique perspective and value that Professor Lovejoy would bring to our process,” said Richard Marsh, Kent State trustee and chair of the Presidential Search Committee. “Though he was unable to accept our invitation in July due to prior commitments, we are pleased that he can join now as our search has moved into high gear in recruitment.” 

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