EATING HEALTHY ON A TIGHT BUDGET AND COOKING WITH KIDS

Eating illustration

EATING HEALTHY ON A TIGHT BUDGET

Even though home-cooked meals are the best option to stay on budget, the amount of money you spend in grocery stores can add up. Here are some tips to eat healthy on a tight budget:

  • Shop smart: Create meal plans and grocery lists ahead of time and be sure to eat before you head to the grocery store, as shopping when hungry can increase unnecessary food purchases. Be sure to watch for coupons and discounts to reduce your grocery bills.

  • Pick less expensive proteins: Try less expensive cuts of meats such as chicken thighs. Cut up, portion into several containers and freeze. Thawing and refreezing reduces meat quality. Keep shelf-stable proteins on hand like canned beans, tuna and nuts.

  • Stock up on canned and frozen foods: Frozen fruits and vegetables can last for months or years. Canned goods can be stored without being refrigerated. Be sure to drain excess water and wash off produce to reduce sugar and salt content.

—Nutrition and Dietetics program, College of Education, Health and Human Services


 

COOKING WITH KIDS

Cooking with Kids

Getting kids to eat something other than their preferred foods (like chicken tenders and mac and cheese) may be difficult, but getting them involved in the planning and cooking process helps open their minds to try something new. Here are some ideas to implement at home:

  • Get Them Interested: Have children read recipes with you and help create shopping lists. Explore new cultures by selecting recipes from around the globe.

  • Keep Them Safe: Teach them the importance of hand washing and cleaning as you go, so foods are not cross-contaminated. Clarify the dangers of raw ingredients and explain how to safely use a knife (start with plastic). Be sure to talk about the dangers of hot surfaces and how to properly use appliances.

  • Get Them Involved: Children can help with mixing, kneading and other hands-on tasks. They can also help add ingredients as you are cooking. Use the time to talk about what is happening to the ingredients when you apply heat.

— Chef Anthony Hamilton and Chef Andrew Eith, Hospitality Management program, College of Education, Health and Human Services

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