Female lacrosse players in a game
Thursday, October 06, 2022

Many Kent State University student-athletes will qualify for additional preparation for success after graduation under a benefits program slated to launch in fall 2023.
 
The Ready FLASH (For Life After Sport Holistically) program, announced today by Kent State Director of Athletics Randale L. Richmond, follows the 2021 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that opened the door for colleges and universities to offer education-related benefits on top of scholarships. Richmond noted that the Ready FLASH program will help student-athletes to be successful as they transition into life after sports. 
 
“Kent State puts students first, and this program will inspire retention and degree completion,” Richmond said. “The academic and student development focus of Ready FLASH will be a valuable tool to help our student-athletes maintain a high level of success in the classroom as well as personally and professionally.”
 
Kent State’s overall student-athlete academic performance is consistently among the highest in the Mid-American Conference (MAC). Last spring, 70% of Kent State student-athletes recorded GPAs of a 3.0 or higher, with 51 at a perfect 4.0.
 
Ready FLASH will follow requirements of both the NCAA and the MAC. The latter has stipulated a focus on the conference’s four “core sports,” which are football, men’s and women’s basketball, and volleyball. Kent State’s plan will encompass additional sports in keeping with the university’s commitment to gender equity.
 
Details of the Kent State plan include:
 

  • For headcount scholarship student-athletes, a total annual award of $5,980 in educational benefits will be possible as determined by the NCAA v. Alston U.S. Supreme Court ruling.
  • These funds are intended for education-related benefits, such as laptops, class projects, science equipment, education-abroad opportunities and career preparation. 
  • The university will withhold half of each annual award and will release those funds to the student-athlete upon completion of their Kent State undergraduate degree. 
  • One quarter of the award will be available in both the fall and spring semesters, and distribution is contingent upon the student-athlete’s completion of a series of career, leadership and personal development programs while maintaining a required level of academic performance.

  
The additional funding needed for the program will come from adjusting Kent State Athletics’ portion of existing student fee support to pre-pandemic level, which is approximately a 4 percentage point difference.
 

Female lacrosse players in a game
Thursday, October 06, 2022

Many Kent State University student-athletes will qualify for additional preparation for success after graduation under a benefits program slated to launch in fall 2023.
 
The Ready FLASH (For Life After Sport Holistically) program, announced today by Kent State Director of Athletics Randale L. Richmond, follows the 2021 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that opened the door for colleges and universities to offer education-related benefits on top of scholarships. Richmond noted that the Ready FLASH program will help student-athletes to be successful as they transition into life after sports. 
 
“Kent State puts students first, and this program will inspire retention and degree completion,” Richmond said. “The academic and student development focus of Ready FLASH will be a valuable tool to help our student-athletes maintain a high level of success in the classroom as well as personally and professionally.”
 
Kent State’s overall student-athlete academic performance is consistently among the highest in the Mid-American Conference (MAC). Last spring, 70% of Kent State student-athletes recorded GPAs of a 3.0 or higher, with 51 at a perfect 4.0.
 
Ready FLASH will follow requirements of both the NCAA and the MAC. The latter has stipulated a focus on the conference’s four “core sports,” which are football, men’s and women’s basketball, and volleyball. Kent State’s plan will encompass additional sports in keeping with the university’s commitment to gender equity.
 
Details of the Kent State plan include:
 

  • For headcount scholarship student-athletes, a total annual award of $5,980 in educational benefits will be possible as determined by the NCAA v. Alston U.S. Supreme Court ruling.
  • These funds are intended for education-related benefits, such as laptops, class projects, science equipment, education-abroad opportunities and career preparation. 
  • The university will withhold half of each annual award and will release those funds to the student-athlete upon completion of their Kent State undergraduate degree. 
  • One quarter of the award will be available in both the fall and spring semesters, and distribution is contingent upon the student-athlete’s completion of a series of career, leadership and personal development programs while maintaining a required level of academic performance.

  
The additional funding needed for the program will come from adjusting Kent State Athletics’ portion of existing student fee support to pre-pandemic level, which is approximately a 4 percentage point difference.
 

Female lacrosse players in a game
Thursday, October 06, 2022

Many Kent State University student-athletes will qualify for additional preparation for success after graduation under a benefits program slated to launch in fall 2023.
 
The Ready FLASH (For Life After Sport Holistically) program, announced today by Kent State Director of Athletics Randale L. Richmond, follows the 2021 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that opened the door for colleges and universities to offer education-related benefits on top of scholarships. Richmond noted that the Ready FLASH program will help student-athletes to be successful as they transition into life after sports. 
 
“Kent State puts students first, and this program will inspire retention and degree completion,” Richmond said. “The academic and student development focus of Ready FLASH will be a valuable tool to help our student-athletes maintain a high level of success in the classroom as well as personally and professionally.”
 
Kent State’s overall student-athlete academic performance is consistently among the highest in the Mid-American Conference (MAC). Last spring, 70% of Kent State student-athletes recorded GPAs of a 3.0 or higher, with 51 at a perfect 4.0.
 
Ready FLASH will follow requirements of both the NCAA and the MAC. The latter has stipulated a focus on the conference’s four “core sports,” which are football, men’s and women’s basketball, and volleyball. Kent State’s plan will encompass additional sports in keeping with the university’s commitment to gender equity.
 
Details of the Kent State plan include:
 

  • For headcount scholarship student-athletes, a total annual award of $5,980 in educational benefits will be possible as determined by the NCAA v. Alston U.S. Supreme Court ruling.
  • These funds are intended for education-related benefits, such as laptops, class projects, science equipment, education-abroad opportunities and career preparation. 
  • The university will withhold half of each annual award and will release those funds to the student-athlete upon completion of their Kent State undergraduate degree. 
  • One quarter of the award will be available in both the fall and spring semesters, and distribution is contingent upon the student-athlete’s completion of a series of career, leadership and personal development programs while maintaining a required level of academic performance.

  
The additional funding needed for the program will come from adjusting Kent State Athletics’ portion of existing student fee support to pre-pandemic level, which is approximately a 4 percentage point difference.
 

Jessica Hudson
Wednesday, October 05, 2022

Jessica Hudson is the new president of the Summa Foundation and chief development officer for Summa Health. In her new roles she will lead the strategic direction and operations. Hudson, BA '04, MS '07, MBA '11, is a proud alumna who obtained three degrees from Kent State University. Before working at Summa, Hudson worked at Kent State, where she was responsible for fundraising and building relationships. Starting at Summa in March 2013, Hudson has accomplished many things, such as surpassing $100 million for the "Caring for You" campaign, according to Crain’s Cleveland Business.

​​Learn more about Jessica Hudson and Summa Foundation as she answers these five questions.

Why are you excited about your new roles at Summa?

In my role as president at Summa Foundation and chief development officer for Summa Health, I am excited and grateful to serve our supporters and the community by inspiring unprecedented levels of philanthropic support to enhance the patient experience and empower clinical excellence.

What is the key to growing relationships across communities?

Being authentic, asking questions and listening. I think we all want to feel connected to others and share our successes and lessons. Over time, this builds a genuine trust which leads to strong bonds.

What makes you proud to work at Summa?

I have worked at the Summa Foundation for nearly 10 years. The culture of compassion and the highest quality of care inspires me each day at Summa. Summa is focused on serving our community through addressing the social determinants of health and addressing the barriers people experience when they seek access to healthcare, such as transportation, food security and social support. Summa Health is the safety net provider for our community and we care for all, regardless of one’s ability to pay.

How did Kent State help set you up for success in the world of corporate communications?

I studied English, library science and business. All of those subjects taught me the importance of clear and concise communication and how to use research and data to drive successful business outcomes.

What advice do you have for Kent State students?

Kent State is one of the best universities in Ohio. Be a lifelong learner, continue to build your network and remember to have some fun!

Jessica Hudson
Wednesday, October 05, 2022

Jessica Hudson is the new president of the Summa Foundation and chief development officer for Summa Health. In her new roles she will lead the strategic direction and operations. Hudson, BA '04, MS '07, MBA '11, is a proud alumna who obtained three degrees from Kent State University. Before working at Summa, Hudson worked at Kent State, where she was responsible for fundraising and building relationships. Starting at Summa in March 2013, Hudson has accomplished many things, such as surpassing $100 million for the "Caring for You" campaign, according to Crain’s Cleveland Business.

​​Learn more about Jessica Hudson and Summa Foundation as she answers these five questions.

Why are you excited about your new roles at Summa?

In my role as president at Summa Foundation and chief development officer for Summa Health, I am excited and grateful to serve our supporters and the community by inspiring unprecedented levels of philanthropic support to enhance the patient experience and empower clinical excellence.

What is the key to growing relationships across communities?

Being authentic, asking questions and listening. I think we all want to feel connected to others and share our successes and lessons. Over time, this builds a genuine trust which leads to strong bonds.

What makes you proud to work at Summa?

I have worked at the Summa Foundation for nearly 10 years. The culture of compassion and the highest quality of care inspires me each day at Summa. Summa is focused on serving our community through addressing the social determinants of health and addressing the barriers people experience when they seek access to healthcare, such as transportation, food security and social support. Summa Health is the safety net provider for our community and we care for all, regardless of one’s ability to pay.

How did Kent State help set you up for success in the world of corporate communications?

I studied English, library science and business. All of those subjects taught me the importance of clear and concise communication and how to use research and data to drive successful business outcomes.

What advice do you have for Kent State students?

Kent State is one of the best universities in Ohio. Be a lifelong learner, continue to build your network and remember to have some fun!

Jessica Hudson
Wednesday, October 05, 2022

Jessica Hudson is the new president of the Summa Foundation and chief development officer for Summa Health. In her new roles she will lead the strategic direction and operations. Hudson, BA '04, MS '07, MBA '11, is a proud alumna who obtained three degrees from Kent State University. Before working at Summa, Hudson worked at Kent State, where she was responsible for fundraising and building relationships. Starting at Summa in March 2013, Hudson has accomplished many things, such as surpassing $100 million for the "Caring for You" campaign, according to Crain’s Cleveland Business.

​​Learn more about Jessica Hudson and Summa Foundation as she answers these five questions.

Why are you excited about your new roles at Summa?

In my role as president at Summa Foundation and chief development officer for Summa Health, I am excited and grateful to serve our supporters and the community by inspiring unprecedented levels of philanthropic support to enhance the patient experience and empower clinical excellence.

What is the key to growing relationships across communities?

Being authentic, asking questions and listening. I think we all want to feel connected to others and share our successes and lessons. Over time, this builds a genuine trust which leads to strong bonds.

What makes you proud to work at Summa?

I have worked at the Summa Foundation for nearly 10 years. The culture of compassion and the highest quality of care inspires me each day at Summa. Summa is focused on serving our community through addressing the social determinants of health and addressing the barriers people experience when they seek access to healthcare, such as transportation, food security and social support. Summa Health is the safety net provider for our community and we care for all, regardless of one’s ability to pay.

How did Kent State help set you up for success in the world of corporate communications?

I studied English, library science and business. All of those subjects taught me the importance of clear and concise communication and how to use research and data to drive successful business outcomes.

What advice do you have for Kent State students?

Kent State is one of the best universities in Ohio. Be a lifelong learner, continue to build your network and remember to have some fun!

Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future
Tuesday, October 04, 2022

The Kent State community planted more than 100 trees in the Climate Change Grove to help offset the university’s carbon footprint and provide a way to research the effects of climate change in our immediate environments.

Located behind the Warren Student Recreation and Wellness Center, the grove was created through a partnership between University Facilities Management and the Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences. The trees have been planted by Kent State staff, students, alumni and other volunteers. 

 

Image
Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future

The grove is a reforestation and research project that will be monitored for the next 100 years. 

“We've been working on this since 2018,” Melissa Davis, the horticulture facilities director, said. “We won't have the final results, of course, climate change is a slow process, and so is this research.”

Davis explained the importance of reforesting this area on the Kent Campus. With growing zones shifting, this research is essential.

“We are monitoring how plants will behave as climate changes,” Davis said. “As climates continue to warm, we're seeing that the natural forest communities and USDA growing zones are shifting to the north.”

Several students volunteered at the Trees for the Future planting on Friday. Many students said they were happy to help reforest this area on campus.

 

Image
Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future

Angela Tipton, a senior fashion design major, attended the event to declare her love for the planet and involve her friends in helping the planet. 

“I love Earth, and I joined the sustainability club this year,” Tipton said. “They sent this event out in an email and I thought it was cool so I brought some friends.”

Dominique Ivory, senior psychology major, volunteered to plant trees for some relaxation.

“I just figured I’d come out here and volunteer because school is pretty stressful and this is a good way to ‘whoosah’ everything out,” Ivory said, referencing the movie "Bad Boys II." 

Talia Rahim, aeronautical systems engineering technology major, was encouraged by her friends to come to the event. She’d had prior experience with environmental projects. 

“I say yes to every opportunity,” Rahim said. “I even removed invasive species from Kaiser Valley National Park.”

Several tree species are being monitored in the grove as the climate changes. Davis said the research will take time, but it’s for the future. 

 

Image
Kent State Pose for a Picture at Trees for the Future

“There are some species of trees that are expected to decrease as climates change. By the year 2100 we’ll have results,” Davis said. “Others will be able to take this and continue this research moving forward. It's something that we felt we could start for future generations.”

For more information about the Kent State’s Climate Change Grove, visit www.kent.edu/einside/news/kent-state's-new-climate-change-grove-supports-research-and-sustainability-efforts

Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future
Tuesday, October 04, 2022

The Kent State community planted more than 100 trees in the Climate Change Grove to help offset the university’s carbon footprint and provide a way to research the effects of climate change in our immediate environments.

Located behind the Warren Student Recreation and Wellness Center, the grove was created through a partnership between University Facilities Management and the Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences. The trees have been planted by Kent State staff, students, alumni and other volunteers. 

 

Image
Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future

The grove is a reforestation and research project that will be monitored for the next 100 years. 

“We've been working on this since 2018,” Melissa Davis, the horticulture facilities director, said. “We won't have the final results, of course, climate change is a slow process, and so is this research.”

Davis explained the importance of reforesting this area on the Kent Campus. With growing zones shifting, this research is essential.

“We are monitoring how plants will behave as climate changes,” Davis said. “As climates continue to warm, we're seeing that the natural forest communities and USDA growing zones are shifting to the north.”

Several students volunteered at the Trees for the Future planting on Friday. Many students said they were happy to help reforest this area on campus.

 

Image
Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future

Angela Tipton, a senior fashion design major, attended the event to declare her love for the planet and involve her friends in helping the planet. 

“I love Earth, and I joined the sustainability club this year,” Tipton said. “They sent this event out in an email and I thought it was cool so I brought some friends.”

Dominique Ivory, senior psychology major, volunteered to plant trees for some relaxation.

“I just figured I’d come out here and volunteer because school is pretty stressful and this is a good way to ‘whoosah’ everything out,” Ivory said, referencing the movie "Bad Boys II." 

Talia Rahim, aeronautical systems engineering technology major, was encouraged by her friends to come to the event. She’d had prior experience with environmental projects. 

“I say yes to every opportunity,” Rahim said. “I even removed invasive species from Kaiser Valley National Park.”

Several tree species are being monitored in the grove as the climate changes. Davis said the research will take time, but it’s for the future. 

 

Image
Kent State Pose for a Picture at Trees for the Future

“There are some species of trees that are expected to decrease as climates change. By the year 2100 we’ll have results,” Davis said. “Others will be able to take this and continue this research moving forward. It's something that we felt we could start for future generations.”

For more information about the Kent State’s Climate Change Grove, visit www.kent.edu/einside/news/kent-state's-new-climate-change-grove-supports-research-and-sustainability-efforts

Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future
Tuesday, October 04, 2022

The Kent State community planted more than 100 trees in the Climate Change Grove to help offset the university’s carbon footprint and provide a way to research the effects of climate change in our immediate environments.

Located behind the Warren Student Recreation and Wellness Center, the grove was created through a partnership between University Facilities Management and the Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences. The trees have been planted by Kent State staff, students, alumni and other volunteers. 

 

Image
Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future

The grove is a reforestation and research project that will be monitored for the next 100 years. 

“We've been working on this since 2018,” Melissa Davis, the horticulture facilities director, said. “We won't have the final results, of course, climate change is a slow process, and so is this research.”

Davis explained the importance of reforesting this area on the Kent Campus. With growing zones shifting, this research is essential.

“We are monitoring how plants will behave as climate changes,” Davis said. “As climates continue to warm, we're seeing that the natural forest communities and USDA growing zones are shifting to the north.”

Several students volunteered at the Trees for the Future planting on Friday. Many students said they were happy to help reforest this area on campus.

 

Image
Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future

Angela Tipton, a senior fashion design major, attended the event to declare her love for the planet and involve her friends in helping the planet. 

“I love Earth, and I joined the sustainability club this year,” Tipton said. “They sent this event out in an email and I thought it was cool so I brought some friends.”

Dominique Ivory, senior psychology major, volunteered to plant trees for some relaxation.

“I just figured I’d come out here and volunteer because school is pretty stressful and this is a good way to ‘whoosah’ everything out,” Ivory said, referencing the movie "Bad Boys II." 

Talia Rahim, aeronautical systems engineering technology major, was encouraged by her friends to come to the event. She’d had prior experience with environmental projects. 

“I say yes to every opportunity,” Rahim said. “I even removed invasive species from Kaiser Valley National Park.”

Several tree species are being monitored in the grove as the climate changes. Davis said the research will take time, but it’s for the future. 

 

Image
Kent State Pose for a Picture at Trees for the Future

“There are some species of trees that are expected to decrease as climates change. By the year 2100 we’ll have results,” Davis said. “Others will be able to take this and continue this research moving forward. It's something that we felt we could start for future generations.”

For more information about the Kent State’s Climate Change Grove, visit www.kent.edu/einside/news/kent-state's-new-climate-change-grove-supports-research-and-sustainability-efforts

Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future
Tuesday, October 04, 2022

The Kent State community planted more than 100 trees in the Climate Change Grove to help offset the university’s carbon footprint and provide a way to research the effects of climate change in our immediate environments.

Located behind the Warren Student Recreation and Wellness Center, the grove was created through a partnership between University Facilities Management and the Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences. The trees have been planted by Kent State staff, students, alumni and other volunteers. 

 

Image
Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future

The grove is a reforestation and research project that will be monitored for the next 100 years. 

“We've been working on this since 2018,” Melissa Davis, the horticulture facilities director, said. “We won't have the final results, of course, climate change is a slow process, and so is this research.”

Davis explained the importance of reforesting this area on the Kent Campus. With growing zones shifting, this research is essential.

“We are monitoring how plants will behave as climate changes,” Davis said. “As climates continue to warm, we're seeing that the natural forest communities and USDA growing zones are shifting to the north.”

Several students volunteered at the Trees for the Future planting on Friday. Many students said they were happy to help reforest this area on campus.

 

Image
Kent State Students Planting Trees at Trees for the Future

Angela Tipton, a senior fashion design major, attended the event to declare her love for the planet and involve her friends in helping the planet. 

“I love Earth, and I joined the sustainability club this year,” Tipton said. “They sent this event out in an email and I thought it was cool so I brought some friends.”

Dominique Ivory, senior psychology major, volunteered to plant trees for some relaxation.

“I just figured I’d come out here and volunteer because school is pretty stressful and this is a good way to ‘whoosah’ everything out,” Ivory said, referencing the movie "Bad Boys II." 

Talia Rahim, aeronautical systems engineering technology major, was encouraged by her friends to come to the event. She’d had prior experience with environmental projects. 

“I say yes to every opportunity,” Rahim said. “I even removed invasive species from Kaiser Valley National Park.”

Several tree species are being monitored in the grove as the climate changes. Davis said the research will take time, but it’s for the future. 

 

Image
Kent State Pose for a Picture at Trees for the Future

“There are some species of trees that are expected to decrease as climates change. By the year 2100 we’ll have results,” Davis said. “Others will be able to take this and continue this research moving forward. It's something that we felt we could start for future generations.”

For more information about the Kent State’s Climate Change Grove, visit www.kent.edu/einside/news/kent-state's-new-climate-change-grove-supports-research-and-sustainability-efforts

Students forming the letter "K" on campus.
Tuesday, October 04, 2022

Some students knew Kent State was their calling since middle school. Others were enchanted by the beautiful campus or impressed by prestigious academic programs.

But all 4,251 students in the Kent State University Class of 2026 can now call Kent State home — and each of their stories is as unique as their class.

Hailing from 39 U.S. states and Washington, D.C., this freshman class also represents 31 countries, more than doubling the freshman international student population from the previous year.

The Class of 2026 shines bright academically, with 54% boasting a GPA of 3.5 or higher and a record-setting one in seven students being members of the Honors College.

A record 19% of freshmen are from underrepresented groups, which includes African American, Hispanic, Native American and multiracial students, and nearly 34% are the first in their family to attend college.

So, who are the students behind these numbers? We sat down with a few freshmen to tell us all about their journey to Kent State and to send themselves a message for 2026.

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

4,251 Enrolled Freshmen
835 Transfer Students
1,437 First-Generation
 

Meet Jeremiah Lockett

Image
Photo of Jeremiah Lockett

Major: Psychology

Growing up, Jeremiah always knew he wanted to help people, but never knew which avenue to take. After discovering the importance of therapy, he knew psychology was the path for him, and Kent State would help get him there.

While on a visit to the Kent Campus with his parents, Jeremiah felt the excitement and energy of campus and saw that his parents felt the same way.

"We talked the whole time during our tour about how amazing this school was," he said. "They both told me how I would really thrive here. I think that was a heavy push toward me going to this school."

Now that Jeremiah is a full-fledged Golden Flash, he is excited to begin his journey in becoming a therapist.

"While I want to help others by giving them healthy solutions to what they're going through, I also want to help by normalizing therapy," he said. "I'm majoring in psychology because one day I will be the person that others know they can come to with their struggles. I will be the person that they won’t have a doubt in their mind that cares about them. I will be the person that helps them."

 

Jeremiah's message to himself in 2026

I hope we made everyone proud, and I hope we made ourselves proud.

 

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

759 Out-of-state
80% From Ohio
3,399 Ohio Residents
 

 

Meet Kaitlynn Banbury

Image
Photo of Kaitlynn Banbury

Major: Exercise Science

Hailing from the quaint village of Danville, Ohio, Kaitlynn is excited to be part of a bustling campus that is home to thousands of new friends, peers and colleagues. She says, "I am most excited about truly challenging myself as a person and meeting new people. I am from a village so being able to have an opportunity like this one is unheard of."

Among the many reasons why Kaitlynn chose Kent State, she said she felt safe on campus and appreciated how frequently Kent State kept in touch with her throughout the admissions process.

Having a best friend as an influence certainly swayed her decision as well! 

"My best friend convinced me to go here," she said. "She wanted to attend here since we were juniors in high school and once she heard that I applied and got accepted, we decided to go on a tour together and I just fell in love!"

Looking to reach new heights academically, Kaitlynn is excited to begin the exercise science program so she can fulfill her dream of being a physical therapist.

"Once I obtain my undergrad degree, I want to pursue getting my master's in physical therapy and becoming a physical therapist for athletes."

 

Kaitlynn's message to herself in 2026

Dear Kaitlynn, I hope you have learned more about who you are and who you want to become. There are many feats that you have gone through to even get to getting your degree, but the adventure is not over! Make sure you go above and beyond in all you do, and stay smart.

 

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

3.5 Average GPA
14% Honors College
587 Honors College
 

 

Meet Edison Chen

Image
Photo of Edison Chen

Major: Architecture with a minor in Photography

Edison Chen was not about to let the 90 miles between his hometown of Hopewell, Pennsylvania, and Kent State deter him from attending KSU's prestigious architecture program. He chose Kent State specifically for his program's reputation.

"I chose Kent State because of the reputation it has for its architecture program. I like the atmosphere and loved all the things that people enrolled at Kent State told me about. Kent State made me feel at home and that was something very important to me when I decided to go."

Ever since he stepped onto a construction site and saw blueprints, he was sold. In high school, he began taking computer-aided design courses to strengthen his passion for building models and constructing houses.

As for his dream job?

"My dream job has to be me as a lead architect. The reason is simple. I love helping people build their dreams. If I can help someone plan the perfect house, then I also feel the satisfaction and happiness they get."

 

Edison's message to himself in 2026

“Happiness is not something you should postpone. It is something designed for the present. I want you to enjoy every moment of your life as the true journey has just begun.


 

Meet Ky'Aira Boyd

Image
Photo of Ky'Aira

Major: American Sign Language/English Interpreting

Ky'Aira's journey to Kent State started early. She knew it was where she belonged since middle school. She wasn't sure what to major in, but once she decided on the American sign language/English interpreting program, all the pieces fell into place.

"I was exposed to the language at a summer camp when I was 9 years old and always had a desire to learn it since then. But, I wasn't sure how to get the help I needed to know it. Then, when I applied to Kent State and saw that they offered ASL/EI as a major, my mind was set on Kent."

She credits two of her high school teachers, Mrs. Morgan-Stank and Mrs. Shelly-Brown, for giving her confidence in making her decision.

"I trust them both and their encouraging words supported my choice of university. Not only did they help me in the confidence of my decision, but they also helped me get into the Bridges Summer Program here, as well as took me school shopping! Mrs. Morgan-Stank even drove me here."

Ky'Aira looks forward to pursuing her dream of interpreting, saying, "My dream job is to interpret in churches and at different sermon and fellowship events. Interestingly enough, I have a love for the word of God and things of that nature."

 

Ky'Aira's message to herself in 2026

Being a first-gen looks good on you.


 

Meet Lauren Vaughn

Image
Photo of Lauren Vaughn

Major: Public Health with a minor in Political Science and Spanish

When Lauren dreams of a future career, she dreams big. As she should! With a major in public health and two minors in political science and Spanish, there is a world of opportunity at Kent State for Lauren.

She said instead of having a dream job at the moment, she has a dream plan. "I want to do work in some level of government right out of college," she said. "I plan on getting my master's and maybe even my Ph.D. later down the road. I also want to start a nonprofit so I can help lower-income communities get the same public health outreach."

With a large breadth of ambition, it is easy to see why she chose Kent State as her academic home. To her, making that decision was easy.

"I am a very indecisive person, however when it came to deciding on a college, I knew there was only one place for me: Kent State. Before I even set foot on the campus, it just felt like the place I was supposed to be."

 

Lauren's message to herself in 2026

I would definitely congratulate myself on not giving up and powering through the hard days. The next four years are not going to be easy, but I know that KSU will be here to help me through. 


 

Meet Elijah Chaffin

Image
Photo of Elijah Chaffin

Major: Journalism with a minor in Photography

Elijah knew journalism was for him after attending a broadcast news class in high school. And, during a visit to Kent State, he immediately felt at home and was impressed by the student media opportunities.

"One thing that I am excited about is TV2. Out of all universities in Ohio, Kent State is the only one that actually focuses on student media programs. Kent also has so many different programs and clubs that are unique to Kent."

With so many opportunities to expand his journalistic portfolio, he is excited to reach his goal of becoming a traveling journalist.

"I think it would be so much fun and exhilarating to go to other countries and report about wars, events or celebrations, and learn more about different countries' cultures by being immersed in them."

 

Elijah's message to himself in 2026

"Whatever happened, you made it. Go and chase your dreams!"


 

Meet Morgan Nicholson

Image
Photo of Morgan Nicholson

Major: Zoology

Ever since Morgan participated in a program on animal science and technology in high school, she knew working with animals was her calling in life.

"I adore animals as well as the medical field," she said. "The thought of being able to help and save these creatures is just mind blowing to me!"

Ever since stepping on campus, Morgan knew Kent State would be the university to help her reach her dream job of being a veterinarian. "I chose Kent State because I absolutely fell in love with the campus. I love the diversity here and I adore how many clubs and activities they have for students to participate in," she said.

After deciding on Kent State, Morgan needed to apply. She found support and guidance from her parents in helping her through the admissions process.

"My parents were most helpful when it comes to influencing me to attend Kent State. They helped me get all the information I needed, and helped me to step out of my shell and apply."

 

Morgan's message to herself in 2026

"Congratulations on graduation! I am so proud of you for all of the hard work these last four years!"

 

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

Top 3 Enrolled Colleges

1,045 College of Arts and Sciences
583 College of Education, Health and Human Services
537 College of the Arts
 
Students forming the letter "K" on campus.
Tuesday, October 04, 2022

Some students knew Kent State was their calling since middle school. Others were enchanted by the beautiful campus or impressed by prestigious academic programs.

But all 4,251 students in the Kent State University Class of 2026 can now call Kent State home — and each of their stories is as unique as their class.

Hailing from 39 U.S. states and Washington, D.C., this freshman class also represents 31 countries, more than doubling the freshman international student population from the previous year.

The Class of 2026 shines bright academically, with 54% boasting a GPA of 3.5 or higher and a record-setting one in seven students being members of the Honors College.

A record 19% of freshmen are from underrepresented groups, which includes African American, Hispanic, Native American and multiracial students, and nearly 34% are the first in their family to attend college.

So, who are the students behind these numbers? We sat down with a few freshmen to tell us all about their journey to Kent State and to send themselves a message for 2026.

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

4,251 Enrolled Freshmen
835 Transfer Students
1,437 First-Generation
 

Meet Jeremiah Lockett

Image
Photo of Jeremiah Lockett

Major: Psychology

Growing up, Jeremiah always knew he wanted to help people, but never knew which avenue to take. After discovering the importance of therapy, he knew psychology was the path for him, and Kent State would help get him there.

While on a visit to the Kent Campus with his parents, Jeremiah felt the excitement and energy of campus and saw that his parents felt the same way.

"We talked the whole time during our tour about how amazing this school was," he said. "They both told me how I would really thrive here. I think that was a heavy push toward me going to this school."

Now that Jeremiah is a full-fledged Golden Flash, he is excited to begin his journey in becoming a therapist.

"While I want to help others by giving them healthy solutions to what they're going through, I also want to help by normalizing therapy," he said. "I'm majoring in psychology because one day I will be the person that others know they can come to with their struggles. I will be the person that they won’t have a doubt in their mind that cares about them. I will be the person that helps them."

 

Jeremiah's message to himself in 2026

I hope we made everyone proud, and I hope we made ourselves proud.

 

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

759 Out-of-state
80% From Ohio
3,399 Ohio Residents
 

 

Meet Kaitlynn Banbury

Image
Photo of Kaitlynn Banbury

Major: Exercise Science

Hailing from the quaint village of Danville, Ohio, Kaitlynn is excited to be part of a bustling campus that is home to thousands of new friends, peers and colleagues. She says, "I am most excited about truly challenging myself as a person and meeting new people. I am from a village so being able to have an opportunity like this one is unheard of."

Among the many reasons why Kaitlynn chose Kent State, she said she felt safe on campus and appreciated how frequently Kent State kept in touch with her throughout the admissions process.

Having a best friend as an influence certainly swayed her decision as well! 

"My best friend convinced me to go here," she said. "She wanted to attend here since we were juniors in high school and once she heard that I applied and got accepted, we decided to go on a tour together and I just fell in love!"

Looking to reach new heights academically, Kaitlynn is excited to begin the exercise science program so she can fulfill her dream of being a physical therapist.

"Once I obtain my undergrad degree, I want to pursue getting my master's in physical therapy and becoming a physical therapist for athletes."

 

Kaitlynn's message to herself in 2026

Dear Kaitlynn, I hope you have learned more about who you are and who you want to become. There are many feats that you have gone through to even get to getting your degree, but the adventure is not over! Make sure you go above and beyond in all you do, and stay smart.

 

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

3.5 Average GPA
14% Honors College
587 Honors College
 

 

Meet Edison Chen

Image
Photo of Edison Chen

Major: Architecture with a minor in Photography

Edison Chen was not about to let the 90 miles between his hometown of Hopewell, Pennsylvania, and Kent State deter him from attending KSU's prestigious architecture program. He chose Kent State specifically for his program's reputation.

"I chose Kent State because of the reputation it has for its architecture program. I like the atmosphere and loved all the things that people enrolled at Kent State told me about. Kent State made me feel at home and that was something very important to me when I decided to go."

Ever since he stepped onto a construction site and saw blueprints, he was sold. In high school, he began taking computer-aided design courses to strengthen his passion for building models and constructing houses.

As for his dream job?

"My dream job has to be me as a lead architect. The reason is simple. I love helping people build their dreams. If I can help someone plan the perfect house, then I also feel the satisfaction and happiness they get."

 

Edison's message to himself in 2026

“Happiness is not something you should postpone. It is something designed for the present. I want you to enjoy every moment of your life as the true journey has just begun.


 

Meet Ky'Aira Boyd

Image
Photo of Ky'Aira

Major: American Sign Language/English Interpreting

Ky'Aira's journey to Kent State started early. She knew it was where she belonged since middle school. She wasn't sure what to major in, but once she decided on the American sign language/English interpreting program, all the pieces fell into place.

"I was exposed to the language at a summer camp when I was 9 years old and always had a desire to learn it since then. But, I wasn't sure how to get the help I needed to know it. Then, when I applied to Kent State and saw that they offered ASL/EI as a major, my mind was set on Kent."

She credits two of her high school teachers, Mrs. Morgan-Stank and Mrs. Shelly-Brown, for giving her confidence in making her decision.

"I trust them both and their encouraging words supported my choice of university. Not only did they help me in the confidence of my decision, but they also helped me get into the Bridges Summer Program here, as well as took me school shopping! Mrs. Morgan-Stank even drove me here."

Ky'Aira looks forward to pursuing her dream of interpreting, saying, "My dream job is to interpret in churches and at different sermon and fellowship events. Interestingly enough, I have a love for the word of God and things of that nature."

 

Ky'Aira's message to herself in 2026

Being a first-gen looks good on you.


 

Meet Lauren Vaughn

Image
Photo of Lauren Vaughn

Major: Public Health with a minor in Political Science and Spanish

When Lauren dreams of a future career, she dreams big. As she should! With a major in public health and two minors in political science and Spanish, there is a world of opportunity at Kent State for Lauren.

She said instead of having a dream job at the moment, she has a dream plan. "I want to do work in some level of government right out of college," she said. "I plan on getting my master's and maybe even my Ph.D. later down the road. I also want to start a nonprofit so I can help lower-income communities get the same public health outreach."

With a large breadth of ambition, it is easy to see why she chose Kent State as her academic home. To her, making that decision was easy.

"I am a very indecisive person, however when it came to deciding on a college, I knew there was only one place for me: Kent State. Before I even set foot on the campus, it just felt like the place I was supposed to be."

 

Lauren's message to herself in 2026

I would definitely congratulate myself on not giving up and powering through the hard days. The next four years are not going to be easy, but I know that KSU will be here to help me through. 


 

Meet Elijah Chaffin

Image
Photo of Elijah Chaffin

Major: Journalism with a minor in Photography

Elijah knew journalism was for him after attending a broadcast news class in high school. And, during a visit to Kent State, he immediately felt at home and was impressed by the student media opportunities.

"One thing that I am excited about is TV2. Out of all universities in Ohio, Kent State is the only one that actually focuses on student media programs. Kent also has so many different programs and clubs that are unique to Kent."

With so many opportunities to expand his journalistic portfolio, he is excited to reach his goal of becoming a traveling journalist.

"I think it would be so much fun and exhilarating to go to other countries and report about wars, events or celebrations, and learn more about different countries' cultures by being immersed in them."

 

Elijah's message to himself in 2026

"Whatever happened, you made it. Go and chase your dreams!"


 

Meet Morgan Nicholson

Image
Photo of Morgan Nicholson

Major: Zoology

Ever since Morgan participated in a program on animal science and technology in high school, she knew working with animals was her calling in life.

"I adore animals as well as the medical field," she said. "The thought of being able to help and save these creatures is just mind blowing to me!"

Ever since stepping on campus, Morgan knew Kent State would be the university to help her reach her dream job of being a veterinarian. "I chose Kent State because I absolutely fell in love with the campus. I love the diversity here and I adore how many clubs and activities they have for students to participate in," she said.

After deciding on Kent State, Morgan needed to apply. She found support and guidance from her parents in helping her through the admissions process.

"My parents were most helpful when it comes to influencing me to attend Kent State. They helped me get all the information I needed, and helped me to step out of my shell and apply."

 

Morgan's message to herself in 2026

"Congratulations on graduation! I am so proud of you for all of the hard work these last four years!"

 

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

Top 3 Enrolled Colleges

1,045 College of Arts and Sciences
583 College of Education, Health and Human Services
537 College of the Arts
 
Students forming the letter "K" on campus.
Tuesday, October 04, 2022

Some students knew Kent State was their calling since middle school. Others were enchanted by the beautiful campus or impressed by prestigious academic programs.

But all 4,251 students in the Kent State University Class of 2026 can now call Kent State home — and each of their stories is as unique as their class.

Hailing from 39 U.S. states and Washington, D.C., this freshman class also represents 31 countries, more than doubling the freshman international student population from the previous year.

The Class of 2026 shines bright academically, with 54% boasting a GPA of 3.5 or higher and a record-setting one in seven students being members of the Honors College.

A record 19% of freshmen are from underrepresented groups, which includes African American, Hispanic, Native American and multiracial students, and nearly 34% are the first in their family to attend college.

So, who are the students behind these numbers? We sat down with a few freshmen to tell us all about their journey to Kent State and to send themselves a message for 2026.

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

4,251 Enrolled Freshmen
835 Transfer Students
1,437 First-Generation
 

Meet Jeremiah Lockett

Image
Photo of Jeremiah Lockett

Major: Psychology

Growing up, Jeremiah always knew he wanted to help people, but never knew which avenue to take. After discovering the importance of therapy, he knew psychology was the path for him, and Kent State would help get him there.

While on a visit to the Kent Campus with his parents, Jeremiah felt the excitement and energy of campus and saw that his parents felt the same way.

"We talked the whole time during our tour about how amazing this school was," he said. "They both told me how I would really thrive here. I think that was a heavy push toward me going to this school."

Now that Jeremiah is a full-fledged Golden Flash, he is excited to begin his journey in becoming a therapist.

"While I want to help others by giving them healthy solutions to what they're going through, I also want to help by normalizing therapy," he said. "I'm majoring in psychology because one day I will be the person that others know they can come to with their struggles. I will be the person that they won’t have a doubt in their mind that cares about them. I will be the person that helps them."

 

Jeremiah's message to himself in 2026

I hope we made everyone proud, and I hope we made ourselves proud.

 

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

759 Out-of-state
80% From Ohio
3,399 Ohio Residents
 

 

Meet Kaitlynn Banbury

Image
Photo of Kaitlynn Banbury

Major: Exercise Science

Hailing from the quaint village of Danville, Ohio, Kaitlynn is excited to be part of a bustling campus that is home to thousands of new friends, peers and colleagues. She says, "I am most excited about truly challenging myself as a person and meeting new people. I am from a village so being able to have an opportunity like this one is unheard of."

Among the many reasons why Kaitlynn chose Kent State, she said she felt safe on campus and appreciated how frequently Kent State kept in touch with her throughout the admissions process.

Having a best friend as an influence certainly swayed her decision as well! 

"My best friend convinced me to go here," she said. "She wanted to attend here since we were juniors in high school and once she heard that I applied and got accepted, we decided to go on a tour together and I just fell in love!"

Looking to reach new heights academically, Kaitlynn is excited to begin the exercise science program so she can fulfill her dream of being a physical therapist.

"Once I obtain my undergrad degree, I want to pursue getting my master's in physical therapy and becoming a physical therapist for athletes."

 

Kaitlynn's message to herself in 2026

Dear Kaitlynn, I hope you have learned more about who you are and who you want to become. There are many feats that you have gone through to even get to getting your degree, but the adventure is not over! Make sure you go above and beyond in all you do, and stay smart.

 

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

3.5 Average GPA
14% Honors College
587 Honors College
 

 

Meet Edison Chen

Image
Photo of Edison Chen

Major: Architecture with a minor in Photography

Edison Chen was not about to let the 90 miles between his hometown of Hopewell, Pennsylvania, and Kent State deter him from attending KSU's prestigious architecture program. He chose Kent State specifically for his program's reputation.

"I chose Kent State because of the reputation it has for its architecture program. I like the atmosphere and loved all the things that people enrolled at Kent State told me about. Kent State made me feel at home and that was something very important to me when I decided to go."

Ever since he stepped onto a construction site and saw blueprints, he was sold. In high school, he began taking computer-aided design courses to strengthen his passion for building models and constructing houses.

As for his dream job?

"My dream job has to be me as a lead architect. The reason is simple. I love helping people build their dreams. If I can help someone plan the perfect house, then I also feel the satisfaction and happiness they get."

 

Edison's message to himself in 2026

“Happiness is not something you should postpone. It is something designed for the present. I want you to enjoy every moment of your life as the true journey has just begun.


 

Meet Ky'Aira Boyd

Image
Photo of Ky'Aira

Major: American Sign Language/English Interpreting

Ky'Aira's journey to Kent State started early. She knew it was where she belonged since middle school. She wasn't sure what to major in, but once she decided on the American sign language/English interpreting program, all the pieces fell into place.

"I was exposed to the language at a summer camp when I was 9 years old and always had a desire to learn it since then. But, I wasn't sure how to get the help I needed to know it. Then, when I applied to Kent State and saw that they offered ASL/EI as a major, my mind was set on Kent."

She credits two of her high school teachers, Mrs. Morgan-Stank and Mrs. Shelly-Brown, for giving her confidence in making her decision.

"I trust them both and their encouraging words supported my choice of university. Not only did they help me in the confidence of my decision, but they also helped me get into the Bridges Summer Program here, as well as took me school shopping! Mrs. Morgan-Stank even drove me here."

Ky'Aira looks forward to pursuing her dream of interpreting, saying, "My dream job is to interpret in churches and at different sermon and fellowship events. Interestingly enough, I have a love for the word of God and things of that nature."

 

Ky'Aira's message to herself in 2026

Being a first-gen looks good on you.


 

Meet Lauren Vaughn

Image
Photo of Lauren Vaughn

Major: Public Health with a minor in Political Science and Spanish

When Lauren dreams of a future career, she dreams big. As she should! With a major in public health and two minors in political science and Spanish, there is a world of opportunity at Kent State for Lauren.

She said instead of having a dream job at the moment, she has a dream plan. "I want to do work in some level of government right out of college," she said. "I plan on getting my master's and maybe even my Ph.D. later down the road. I also want to start a nonprofit so I can help lower-income communities get the same public health outreach."

With a large breadth of ambition, it is easy to see why she chose Kent State as her academic home. To her, making that decision was easy.

"I am a very indecisive person, however when it came to deciding on a college, I knew there was only one place for me: Kent State. Before I even set foot on the campus, it just felt like the place I was supposed to be."

 

Lauren's message to herself in 2026

I would definitely congratulate myself on not giving up and powering through the hard days. The next four years are not going to be easy, but I know that KSU will be here to help me through. 


 

Meet Elijah Chaffin

Image
Photo of Elijah Chaffin

Major: Journalism with a minor in Photography

Elijah knew journalism was for him after attending a broadcast news class in high school. And, during a visit to Kent State, he immediately felt at home and was impressed by the student media opportunities.

"One thing that I am excited about is TV2. Out of all universities in Ohio, Kent State is the only one that actually focuses on student media programs. Kent also has so many different programs and clubs that are unique to Kent."

With so many opportunities to expand his journalistic portfolio, he is excited to reach his goal of becoming a traveling journalist.

"I think it would be so much fun and exhilarating to go to other countries and report about wars, events or celebrations, and learn more about different countries' cultures by being immersed in them."

 

Elijah's message to himself in 2026

"Whatever happened, you made it. Go and chase your dreams!"


 

Meet Morgan Nicholson

Image
Photo of Morgan Nicholson

Major: Zoology

Ever since Morgan participated in a program on animal science and technology in high school, she knew working with animals was her calling in life.

"I adore animals as well as the medical field," she said. "The thought of being able to help and save these creatures is just mind blowing to me!"

Ever since stepping on campus, Morgan knew Kent State would be the university to help her reach her dream job of being a veterinarian. "I chose Kent State because I absolutely fell in love with the campus. I love the diversity here and I adore how many clubs and activities they have for students to participate in," she said.

After deciding on Kent State, Morgan needed to apply. She found support and guidance from her parents in helping her through the admissions process.

"My parents were most helpful when it comes to influencing me to attend Kent State. They helped me get all the information I needed, and helped me to step out of my shell and apply."

 

Morgan's message to herself in 2026

"Congratulations on graduation! I am so proud of you for all of the hard work these last four years!"

 

 

CLASS OF 2026 BY THE NUMBERS

Top 3 Enrolled Colleges

1,045 College of Arts and Sciences
583 College of Education, Health and Human Services
537 College of the Arts
 
Professor Scott Hallgren Conducting Orchestra for Score of Local Film
Thursday, September 29, 2022

Scott Hallgren, associate professor in the School of Media and Journalism, teaches several classes in digital media production with a focus on sound in picture. He recently showcased his skills outside the classroom by composing the score for a local short film while also releasing his first book. 

The film “The Resistance” was directed by Kara White and focuses on British female spies during World War II. The film will now be submitted to multiple film festivals, Hallgren said.

He also previously composed the music for the Emmy-nominated civil rights documentary “We Shall Not Be Moved: The Nashville Sit-Ins.”

 

Image
Scott Hallgren teaching a class at Kent State

“I've been lucky to get some very different projects,” Hallgren said. “A horror movie, a detective movie, a horror romance, which was wild. This was a more serious movie, a World War II short about British spies and the Nazis. And we got to use a small orchestra in the studio for the score.”

Hallgren also released a book this past summer tapping into life lessons with his work in the industry. 

 

Image
Scott Hallgren holding his book "Composing for the Screen"

Hallgren’s book, “Composing for the Screen,” is about networking and career development for undergraduate and graduate students considering a music career in the film, television or gaming industries.

“Why don't I take my experiences, the mistakes I made, the things I got right, the changes that are happening,” Hallgren asked, “and incorporate that into the questions I'm going to ask people when I interview them?”

He was pleased with the result and thinks students will be, too.

“It came out better than I thought it was going to,” Hallgren said. “Nobody covers the business side, and this is as comprehensive an introduction to the business side as I think you're going to find.”

Hallgren hopes readers will learn lessons about themselves and the industry from his book.

“First is to figure out if this is something for them,” Hallgren said. “You could spend a couple of years trying to find work, meeting people and decide it's not for you.”

These lessons are something Hallgren tries to pass on in the classroom as well. 

“My goal is to teach students to aspire to create things that you couldn’t imagine before,” Hallgren said. “Another goal is teaching them to be storytellers with sound and music. It's worth coming to work every day knowing that people are having a good time here and they’re doing well out in the professional world.” 

To learn more about Hallgren’s book, visit www.routledge.com/Composing-for-the-Screen/Hallgren/p/book/9781032004440

To learn more about digital media production, visit www.kent.edu/mdj/digital-media-production

Professor Scott Hallgren Conducting Orchestra for Score of Local Film
Thursday, September 29, 2022

Scott Hallgren, associate professor in the School of Media and Journalism, teaches several classes in digital media production with a focus on sound in picture. He recently showcased his skills outside the classroom by composing the score for a local short film while also releasing his first book. 

The film “The Resistance” was directed by Kara White and focuses on British female spies during World War II. The film will now be submitted to multiple film festivals, Hallgren said.

He also previously composed the music for the Emmy-nominated civil rights documentary “We Shall Not Be Moved: The Nashville Sit-Ins.”

 

Image
Scott Hallgren teaching a class at Kent State

“I've been lucky to get some very different projects,” Hallgren said. “A horror movie, a detective movie, a horror romance, which was wild. This was a more serious movie, a World War II short about British spies and the Nazis. And we got to use a small orchestra in the studio for the score.”

Hallgren also released a book this past summer tapping into life lessons with his work in the industry. 

 

Image
Scott Hallgren holding his book "Composing for the Screen"

Hallgren’s book, “Composing for the Screen,” is about networking and career development for undergraduate and graduate students considering a music career in the film, television or gaming industries.

“Why don't I take my experiences, the mistakes I made, the things I got right, the changes that are happening,” Hallgren asked, “and incorporate that into the questions I'm going to ask people when I interview them?”

He was pleased with the result and thinks students will be, too.

“It came out better than I thought it was going to,” Hallgren said. “Nobody covers the business side, and this is as comprehensive an introduction to the business side as I think you're going to find.”

Hallgren hopes readers will learn lessons about themselves and the industry from his book.

“First is to figure out if this is something for them,” Hallgren said. “You could spend a couple of years trying to find work, meeting people and decide it's not for you.”

These lessons are something Hallgren tries to pass on in the classroom as well. 

“My goal is to teach students to aspire to create things that you couldn’t imagine before,” Hallgren said. “Another goal is teaching them to be storytellers with sound and music. It's worth coming to work every day knowing that people are having a good time here and they’re doing well out in the professional world.” 

To learn more about Hallgren’s book, visit www.routledge.com/Composing-for-the-Screen/Hallgren/p/book/9781032004440

To learn more about digital media production, visit www.kent.edu/mdj/digital-media-production

Professor Scott Hallgren Conducting Orchestra for Score of Local Film
Thursday, September 29, 2022

Scott Hallgren, associate professor in the School of Media and Journalism, teaches several classes in digital media production with a focus on sound in picture. He recently showcased his skills outside the classroom by composing the score for a local short film while also releasing his first book. 

The film “The Resistance” was directed by Kara White and focuses on British female spies during World War II. The film will now be submitted to multiple film festivals, Hallgren said.

He also previously composed the music for the Emmy-nominated civil rights documentary “We Shall Not Be Moved: The Nashville Sit-Ins.”

 

Image
Scott Hallgren teaching a class at Kent State

“I've been lucky to get some very different projects,” Hallgren said. “A horror movie, a detective movie, a horror romance, which was wild. This was a more serious movie, a World War II short about British spies and the Nazis. And we got to use a small orchestra in the studio for the score.”

Hallgren also released a book this past summer tapping into life lessons with his work in the industry. 

 

Image
Scott Hallgren holding his book "Composing for the Screen"

Hallgren’s book, “Composing for the Screen,” is about networking and career development for undergraduate and graduate students considering a music career in the film, television or gaming industries.

“Why don't I take my experiences, the mistakes I made, the things I got right, the changes that are happening,” Hallgren asked, “and incorporate that into the questions I'm going to ask people when I interview them?”

He was pleased with the result and thinks students will be, too.

“It came out better than I thought it was going to,” Hallgren said. “Nobody covers the business side, and this is as comprehensive an introduction to the business side as I think you're going to find.”

Hallgren hopes readers will learn lessons about themselves and the industry from his book.

“First is to figure out if this is something for them,” Hallgren said. “You could spend a couple of years trying to find work, meeting people and decide it's not for you.”

These lessons are something Hallgren tries to pass on in the classroom as well. 

“My goal is to teach students to aspire to create things that you couldn’t imagine before,” Hallgren said. “Another goal is teaching them to be storytellers with sound and music. It's worth coming to work every day knowing that people are having a good time here and they’re doing well out in the professional world.” 

To learn more about Hallgren’s book, visit www.routledge.com/Composing-for-the-Screen/Hallgren/p/book/9781032004440

To learn more about digital media production, visit www.kent.edu/mdj/digital-media-production

Professor Scott Hallgren Conducting Orchestra for Score of Local Film
Thursday, September 29, 2022

Scott Hallgren, associate professor in the School of Media and Journalism, teaches several classes in digital media production with a focus on sound in picture. He recently showcased his skills outside the classroom by composing the score for a local short film while also releasing his first book. 

The film “The Resistance” was directed by Kara White and focuses on British female spies during World War II. The film will now be submitted to multiple film festivals, Hallgren said.

He also previously composed the music for the Emmy-nominated civil rights documentary “We Shall Not Be Moved: The Nashville Sit-Ins.”

 

Image
Scott Hallgren teaching a class at Kent State

“I've been lucky to get some very different projects,” Hallgren said. “A horror movie, a detective movie, a horror romance, which was wild. This was a more serious movie, a World War II short about British spies and the Nazis. And we got to use a small orchestra in the studio for the score.”

Hallgren also released a book this past summer tapping into life lessons with his work in the industry. 

 

Image
Scott Hallgren holding his book "Composing for the Screen"

Hallgren’s book, “Composing for the Screen,” is about networking and career development for undergraduate and graduate students considering a music career in the film, television or gaming industries.

“Why don't I take my experiences, the mistakes I made, the things I got right, the changes that are happening,” Hallgren asked, “and incorporate that into the questions I'm going to ask people when I interview them?”

He was pleased with the result and thinks students will be, too.

“It came out better than I thought it was going to,” Hallgren said. “Nobody covers the business side, and this is as comprehensive an introduction to the business side as I think you're going to find.”

Hallgren hopes readers will learn lessons about themselves and the industry from his book.

“First is to figure out if this is something for them,” Hallgren said. “You could spend a couple of years trying to find work, meeting people and decide it's not for you.”

These lessons are something Hallgren tries to pass on in the classroom as well. 

“My goal is to teach students to aspire to create things that you couldn’t imagine before,” Hallgren said. “Another goal is teaching them to be storytellers with sound and music. It's worth coming to work every day knowing that people are having a good time here and they’re doing well out in the professional world.” 

To learn more about Hallgren’s book, visit www.routledge.com/Composing-for-the-Screen/Hallgren/p/book/9781032004440

To learn more about digital media production, visit www.kent.edu/mdj/digital-media-production

Sara Bayramzadeh's Health Care Design Concept
Monday, September 26, 2022

A substantial amount of time and effort goes into the design of health care environments. In an emergency department, you need optimal conditions to save lives. Researchers at Kent State University are being recognized for their work in creating designs that offer a top level of care.

The Center for Health and Design has awarded Sara Bayramzadeh, Ph.D., assistant professor and Elliot Professor in Health Care Design, the Touchstone Award – Gold Category for conceptual design.

According to the center, the Touchstone Award, “with its rigorous judging by accomplished and renowned industry veterans – represents the pinnacle of achievement for evidence-based design by practitioners, firms and teams.”

Bayramzadeh’s team submitted an entry for an evidence-based design project for a Level l trauma room.

Image
Sara Bayramzadeh and Team wokrking on efficient trauma room design

“We are looking to design safer and more efficient trauma rooms,” she said.

While working on the project, Bayramzadeh adopted an evidence-based design approach, meaning design decisions were based on credible evidence to achieve the best possible outcomes. This included multiple stages of research.

Bayramzadeh worked with an interdisciplinary team, including healthcare professionals from Cleveland Clinic, faculty from Kent State University and Master of Healthcare Design students.

“It was an educational process for the whole team,” Bayramzadeh said.

Trauma rooms play a pivotal role in saving lives because accidents occur at any time and place and the space needs to be responsive to the needs of the patients.

“It’s an unpredictable environment,” Bayramzadeh said. “They need to be providing that maximum level of care and ensure they’re equipped to be able to treat patients and help them stay alive.”

Bayramzadeh and her team began working on the project in fall 2019.

When designing a trauma room, Bayramzadeh said there was a focus on four areas: workflow, interruptions/disruptions, technology integration and sensory stimulation.

Image
Trauma Room Design

“We conducted literature reviews, case studies and design thinking sessions with clinicians,” she said.

 A full-scale mockup of the design was built with cardboard. 

“Six or seven people from Cleveland Clinic came in and role-played scenarios to get an impression of the environmental experience and evaluate the design,” Bayramzadeh said.  

In October 2021, another set of simulations were done using augmented reality. Bayramzadeh said they were able to visualize some other design alternatives before submitting the final project to the center. 

“This is a very prestigious and competitive award in the field of healthcare design,” Bayramzadeh said. “So, I'm very honored to have been selected for this.”

This project was funded under grant number R18 HS 27261-01 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The authors are solely responsible for this document’s contents, findings, and conclusions, which do not necessarily represent the views of AHRQ. Readers should not interpret any statement in this report as an official position of AHRQ or of HHS. None of the authors has any affiliation or financial involvement that conflicts with the material presented in this report.

To learn more about the Touchstone Award, visit www.healthdesign.org/certification-outreach/awards-recognition/touchstone-awards.

To learn more about the project, visit www.kent.edu/caed/toward-model-safety-and-care-trauma-room-design.

Sara Bayramzadeh's Health Care Design Concept
Monday, September 26, 2022

A substantial amount of time and effort goes into the design of health care environments. In an emergency department, you need optimal conditions to save lives. Researchers at Kent State University are being recognized for their work in creating designs that offer a top level of care.

The Center for Health and Design has awarded Sara Bayramzadeh, Ph.D., assistant professor and Elliot Professor in Health Care Design, the Touchstone Award – Gold Category for conceptual design.

According to the center, the Touchstone Award, “with its rigorous judging by accomplished and renowned industry veterans – represents the pinnacle of achievement for evidence-based design by practitioners, firms and teams.”

Bayramzadeh’s team submitted an entry for an evidence-based design project for a Level l trauma room.

Image
Sara Bayramzadeh and Team wokrking on efficient trauma room design

“We are looking to design safer and more efficient trauma rooms,” she said.

While working on the project, Bayramzadeh adopted an evidence-based design approach, meaning design decisions were based on credible evidence to achieve the best possible outcomes. This included multiple stages of research.

Bayramzadeh worked with an interdisciplinary team, including healthcare professionals from Cleveland Clinic, faculty from Kent State University and Master of Healthcare Design students.

“It was an educational process for the whole team,” Bayramzadeh said.

Trauma rooms play a pivotal role in saving lives because accidents occur at any time and place and the space needs to be responsive to the needs of the patients.

“It’s an unpredictable environment,” Bayramzadeh said. “They need to be providing that maximum level of care and ensure they’re equipped to be able to treat patients and help them stay alive.”

Bayramzadeh and her team began working on the project in fall 2019.

When designing a trauma room, Bayramzadeh said there was a focus on four areas: workflow, interruptions/disruptions, technology integration and sensory stimulation.

Image
Trauma Room Design

“We conducted literature reviews, case studies and design thinking sessions with clinicians,” she said.

 A full-scale mockup of the design was built with cardboard. 

“Six or seven people from Cleveland Clinic came in and role-played scenarios to get an impression of the environmental experience and evaluate the design,” Bayramzadeh said.  

In October 2021, another set of simulations were done using augmented reality. Bayramzadeh said they were able to visualize some other design alternatives before submitting the final project to the center. 

“This is a very prestigious and competitive award in the field of healthcare design,” Bayramzadeh said. “So, I'm very honored to have been selected for this.”

This project was funded under grant number R18 HS 27261-01 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The authors are solely responsible for this document’s contents, findings, and conclusions, which do not necessarily represent the views of AHRQ. Readers should not interpret any statement in this report as an official position of AHRQ or of HHS. None of the authors has any affiliation or financial involvement that conflicts with the material presented in this report.

To learn more about the Touchstone Award, visit www.healthdesign.org/certification-outreach/awards-recognition/touchstone-awards.

To learn more about the project, visit www.kent.edu/caed/toward-model-safety-and-care-trauma-room-design.

Sara Bayramzadeh's Health Care Design Concept
Monday, September 26, 2022

A substantial amount of time and effort goes into the design of health care environments. In an emergency department, you need optimal conditions to save lives. Researchers at Kent State University are being recognized for their work in creating designs that offer a top level of care.

The Center for Health and Design has awarded Sara Bayramzadeh, Ph.D., assistant professor and Elliot Professor in Health Care Design, the Touchstone Award – Gold Category for conceptual design.

According to the center, the Touchstone Award, “with its rigorous judging by accomplished and renowned industry veterans – represents the pinnacle of achievement for evidence-based design by practitioners, firms and teams.”

Bayramzadeh’s team submitted an entry for an evidence-based design project for a Level l trauma room.

Image
Sara Bayramzadeh and Team wokrking on efficient trauma room design

“We are looking to design safer and more efficient trauma rooms,” she said.

While working on the project, Bayramzadeh adopted an evidence-based design approach, meaning design decisions were based on credible evidence to achieve the best possible outcomes. This included multiple stages of research.

Bayramzadeh worked with an interdisciplinary team, including healthcare professionals from Cleveland Clinic, faculty from Kent State University and Master of Healthcare Design students.

“It was an educational process for the whole team,” Bayramzadeh said.

Trauma rooms play a pivotal role in saving lives because accidents occur at any time and place and the space needs to be responsive to the needs of the patients.

“It’s an unpredictable environment,” Bayramzadeh said. “They need to be providing that maximum level of care and ensure they’re equipped to be able to treat patients and help them stay alive.”

Bayramzadeh and her team began working on the project in fall 2019.

When designing a trauma room, Bayramzadeh said there was a focus on four areas: workflow, interruptions/disruptions, technology integration and sensory stimulation.

Image
Trauma Room Design

“We conducted literature reviews, case studies and design thinking sessions with clinicians,” she said.

 A full-scale mockup of the design was built with cardboard. 

“Six or seven people from Cleveland Clinic came in and role-played scenarios to get an impression of the environmental experience and evaluate the design,” Bayramzadeh said.  

In October 2021, another set of simulations were done using augmented reality. Bayramzadeh said they were able to visualize some other design alternatives before submitting the final project to the center. 

“This is a very prestigious and competitive award in the field of healthcare design,” Bayramzadeh said. “So, I'm very honored to have been selected for this.”

This project was funded under grant number R18 HS 27261-01 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The authors are solely responsible for this document’s contents, findings, and conclusions, which do not necessarily represent the views of AHRQ. Readers should not interpret any statement in this report as an official position of AHRQ or of HHS. None of the authors has any affiliation or financial involvement that conflicts with the material presented in this report.

To learn more about the Touchstone Award, visit www.healthdesign.org/certification-outreach/awards-recognition/touchstone-awards.

To learn more about the project, visit www.kent.edu/caed/toward-model-safety-and-care-trauma-room-design.

Sara Bayramzadeh's Health Care Design Concept
Monday, September 26, 2022

A substantial amount of time and effort goes into the design of health care environments. In an emergency department, you need optimal conditions to save lives. Researchers at Kent State University are being recognized for their work in creating designs that offer a top level of care.

The Center for Health and Design has awarded Sara Bayramzadeh, Ph.D., assistant professor and Elliot Professor in Health Care Design, the Touchstone Award – Gold Category for conceptual design.

According to the center, the Touchstone Award, “with its rigorous judging by accomplished and renowned industry veterans – represents the pinnacle of achievement for evidence-based design by practitioners, firms and teams.”

Bayramzadeh’s team submitted an entry for an evidence-based design project for a Level l trauma room.

Image
Sara Bayramzadeh and Team wokrking on efficient trauma room design

“We are looking to design safer and more efficient trauma rooms,” she said.

While working on the project, Bayramzadeh adopted an evidence-based design approach, meaning design decisions were based on credible evidence to achieve the best possible outcomes. This included multiple stages of research.

Bayramzadeh worked with an interdisciplinary team, including healthcare professionals from Cleveland Clinic, faculty from Kent State University and Master of Healthcare Design students.

“It was an educational process for the whole team,” Bayramzadeh said.

Trauma rooms play a pivotal role in saving lives because accidents occur at any time and place and the space needs to be responsive to the needs of the patients.

“It’s an unpredictable environment,” Bayramzadeh said. “They need to be providing that maximum level of care and ensure they’re equipped to be able to treat patients and help them stay alive.”

Bayramzadeh and her team began working on the project in fall 2019.

When designing a trauma room, Bayramzadeh said there was a focus on four areas: workflow, interruptions/disruptions, technology integration and sensory stimulation.

Image
Trauma Room Design

“We conducted literature reviews, case studies and design thinking sessions with clinicians,” she said.

 A full-scale mockup of the design was built with cardboard. 

“Six or seven people from Cleveland Clinic came in and role-played scenarios to get an impression of the environmental experience and evaluate the design,” Bayramzadeh said.  

In October 2021, another set of simulations were done using augmented reality. Bayramzadeh said they were able to visualize some other design alternatives before submitting the final project to the center. 

“This is a very prestigious and competitive award in the field of healthcare design,” Bayramzadeh said. “So, I'm very honored to have been selected for this.”

This project was funded under grant number R18 HS 27261-01 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The authors are solely responsible for this document’s contents, findings, and conclusions, which do not necessarily represent the views of AHRQ. Readers should not interpret any statement in this report as an official position of AHRQ or of HHS. None of the authors has any affiliation or financial involvement that conflicts with the material presented in this report.

To learn more about the Touchstone Award, visit www.healthdesign.org/certification-outreach/awards-recognition/touchstone-awards.

To learn more about the project, visit www.kent.edu/caed/toward-model-safety-and-care-trauma-room-design.

Students Sydney Marksberry and Austin Brewster at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships
Thursday, September 22, 2022

Image
Sydney Marksberry at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships
This past summer, two Kent State University students were awarded medals in the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships in Richfield, Minnesota.

The U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships are sanctioned by U.S. Figure Skating, the national governing body for the sport of figure skating in the country. It is the highest level at which figure skating takes place at the college level.

Sydney Marksberry, a senior studying biological anthropology and president of Kent State Club Figure Skating, earned the silver medal in excel junior women.

“It was a fun competition and we were really happy to go away with some medals to showcase and represent Kent State,” Marksberry said.

She has been skating for 18 years and she appreciates the opportunities Kent State has provided.

“I wanted to go to Kent State because our team is such an inclusive community,” Marksberry said. “It's great to be able to go there, skate, and have fun with it within that community.”

Austin Brewster, a senior in international relations and secretary of Kent State Club Figure Skating, scored the pewter medal in excel pre-juvenile women.

Brewster has been skating for four years, but didn’t start competing until last year. This was her first year going to nationals. 

“It was crazy,” Brewster said. “It was such a different experience because usually our competitions were only with Midwestern schools. At this one, it was everyone from around the country.”

Image
Austin Brewster at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships

Brewster is thankful for the support from other team members and their director, Jim Underwood, at the ice arena. 

“He has been really, really supportive of the individual skaters and the skating team as a whole,” Brewster said. “He honestly is there for us whenever we need him.”

Marksberry is also thankful for the support she receives from those at the ice arena. 

“I really have to give a lot of thanks to recreational services and Jim Underwood who is the rink manager,” Marksberry said. “He saw our team as an opportunity for something to grow, which is what we've wanted to do for a long time.”

For more information about Kent State Club Figure Skating, visit www.kent.edu/csi/kent-state-club-figure-skating

For more information about collegiate skating, visit www.usfigureskating.org/skate/skating-opportunities/collegiate-skating.

Students Sydney Marksberry and Austin Brewster at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships
Thursday, September 22, 2022

Image
Sydney Marksberry at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships
This past summer, two Kent State University students were awarded medals in the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships in Richfield, Minnesota.

The U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships are sanctioned by U.S. Figure Skating, the national governing body for the sport of figure skating in the country. It is the highest level at which figure skating takes place at the college level.

Sydney Marksberry, a senior studying biological anthropology and president of Kent State Club Figure Skating, earned the silver medal in excel junior women.

“It was a fun competition and we were really happy to go away with some medals to showcase and represent Kent State,” Marksberry said.

She has been skating for 18 years and she appreciates the opportunities Kent State has provided.

“I wanted to go to Kent State because our team is such an inclusive community,” Marksberry said. “It's great to be able to go there, skate, and have fun with it within that community.”

Austin Brewster, a senior in international relations and secretary of Kent State Club Figure Skating, scored the pewter medal in excel pre-juvenile women.

Brewster has been skating for four years, but didn’t start competing until last year. This was her first year going to nationals. 

“It was crazy,” Brewster said. “It was such a different experience because usually our competitions were only with Midwestern schools. At this one, it was everyone from around the country.”

Image
Austin Brewster at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships

Brewster is thankful for the support from other team members and their director, Jim Underwood, at the ice arena. 

“He has been really, really supportive of the individual skaters and the skating team as a whole,” Brewster said. “He honestly is there for us whenever we need him.”

Marksberry is also thankful for the support she receives from those at the ice arena. 

“I really have to give a lot of thanks to recreational services and Jim Underwood who is the rink manager,” Marksberry said. “He saw our team as an opportunity for something to grow, which is what we've wanted to do for a long time.”

For more information about Kent State Club Figure Skating, visit www.kent.edu/csi/kent-state-club-figure-skating

For more information about collegiate skating, visit www.usfigureskating.org/skate/skating-opportunities/collegiate-skating.

Students Sydney Marksberry and Austin Brewster at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships
Thursday, September 22, 2022

Image
Sydney Marksberry at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships
This past summer, two Kent State University students were awarded medals in the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships in Richfield, Minnesota.

The U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships are sanctioned by U.S. Figure Skating, the national governing body for the sport of figure skating in the country. It is the highest level at which figure skating takes place at the college level.

Sydney Marksberry, a senior studying biological anthropology and president of Kent State Club Figure Skating, earned the silver medal in excel junior women.

“It was a fun competition and we were really happy to go away with some medals to showcase and represent Kent State,” Marksberry said.

She has been skating for 18 years and she appreciates the opportunities Kent State has provided.

“I wanted to go to Kent State because our team is such an inclusive community,” Marksberry said. “It's great to be able to go there, skate, and have fun with it within that community.”

Austin Brewster, a senior in international relations and secretary of Kent State Club Figure Skating, scored the pewter medal in excel pre-juvenile women.

Brewster has been skating for four years, but didn’t start competing until last year. This was her first year going to nationals. 

“It was crazy,” Brewster said. “It was such a different experience because usually our competitions were only with Midwestern schools. At this one, it was everyone from around the country.”

Image
Austin Brewster at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships

Brewster is thankful for the support from other team members and their director, Jim Underwood, at the ice arena. 

“He has been really, really supportive of the individual skaters and the skating team as a whole,” Brewster said. “He honestly is there for us whenever we need him.”

Marksberry is also thankful for the support she receives from those at the ice arena. 

“I really have to give a lot of thanks to recreational services and Jim Underwood who is the rink manager,” Marksberry said. “He saw our team as an opportunity for something to grow, which is what we've wanted to do for a long time.”

For more information about Kent State Club Figure Skating, visit www.kent.edu/csi/kent-state-club-figure-skating

For more information about collegiate skating, visit www.usfigureskating.org/skate/skating-opportunities/collegiate-skating.

Students Sydney Marksberry and Austin Brewster at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships
Thursday, September 22, 2022

Image
Sydney Marksberry at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships
This past summer, two Kent State University students were awarded medals in the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships in Richfield, Minnesota.

The U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships are sanctioned by U.S. Figure Skating, the national governing body for the sport of figure skating in the country. It is the highest level at which figure skating takes place at the college level.

Sydney Marksberry, a senior studying biological anthropology and president of Kent State Club Figure Skating, earned the silver medal in excel junior women.

“It was a fun competition and we were really happy to go away with some medals to showcase and represent Kent State,” Marksberry said.

She has been skating for 18 years and she appreciates the opportunities Kent State has provided.

“I wanted to go to Kent State because our team is such an inclusive community,” Marksberry said. “It's great to be able to go there, skate, and have fun with it within that community.”

Austin Brewster, a senior in international relations and secretary of Kent State Club Figure Skating, scored the pewter medal in excel pre-juvenile women.

Brewster has been skating for four years, but didn’t start competing until last year. This was her first year going to nationals. 

“It was crazy,” Brewster said. “It was such a different experience because usually our competitions were only with Midwestern schools. At this one, it was everyone from around the country.”

Image
Austin Brewster at the U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships

Brewster is thankful for the support from other team members and their director, Jim Underwood, at the ice arena. 

“He has been really, really supportive of the individual skaters and the skating team as a whole,” Brewster said. “He honestly is there for us whenever we need him.”

Marksberry is also thankful for the support she receives from those at the ice arena. 

“I really have to give a lot of thanks to recreational services and Jim Underwood who is the rink manager,” Marksberry said. “He saw our team as an opportunity for something to grow, which is what we've wanted to do for a long time.”

For more information about Kent State Club Figure Skating, visit www.kent.edu/csi/kent-state-club-figure-skating

For more information about collegiate skating, visit www.usfigureskating.org/skate/skating-opportunities/collegiate-skating.

Students cheering at Convocation 2022
Friday, September 09, 2022

The 2022 Fall Semester is officially underway, and no new school year would be complete without KSU Kickoff. Residence halls move-in corresponded with KSU Kickoff check-in, which was followed by three days of activities on and off campus. 

 

Organized by Student Success Programs within Kent State’s University College, here’s a look at a few highlights of the events from Convocation to Blastoff!

 

 

 

Students cheering at Convocation 2022
Friday, September 09, 2022

The 2022 Fall Semester is officially underway, and no new school year would be complete without KSU Kickoff. Residence halls move-in corresponded with KSU Kickoff check-in, which was followed by three days of activities on and off campus. 

 

Organized by Student Success Programs within Kent State’s University College, here’s a look at a few highlights of the events from Convocation to Blastoff!

 

 

 

Students cheering at Convocation 2022
Friday, September 09, 2022

The 2022 Fall Semester is officially underway, and no new school year would be complete without KSU Kickoff. Residence halls move-in corresponded with KSU Kickoff check-in, which was followed by three days of activities on and off campus. 

 

Organized by Student Success Programs within Kent State’s University College, here’s a look at a few highlights of the events from Convocation to Blastoff!

 

 

 

Meet Kent State Police Department’s newest K-9 officer, Salem, three-month-old Labrador Retriever and Sgt. Anne Spahr.
Friday, September 02, 2022
@kentstateu Newest K-9 officer in training! 🐶 #KentState #KentStateUniversity #BlackLabrador ♬ Here Comes The Sun - Greysound

 

Meet Kent State Police Department’s newest K-9 officer, Salem! Still in training, this 4-month-old Labrador Retriever will be partnered with Sgt. Anne Spahr. The pair recently visited the University Communications and Marketing office so university photographers could snap a few photos of them. Salem’s cuteness has been featured on all the Kent State social media accounts, and he’s already stealing many hearts!

Meet Kent State Police Department’s newest K-9 officer, Salem, three-month-old Labrador Retriever and Sgt. Anne Spahr.
Friday, September 02, 2022
@kentstateu Newest K-9 officer in training! 🐶 #KentState #KentStateUniversity #BlackLabrador ♬ Here Comes The Sun - Greysound

 

Meet Kent State Police Department’s newest K-9 officer, Salem! Still in training, this 4-month-old Labrador Retriever will be partnered with Sgt. Anne Spahr. The pair recently visited the University Communications and Marketing office so university photographers could snap a few photos of them. Salem’s cuteness has been featured on all the Kent State social media accounts, and he’s already stealing many hearts!

Meet Kent State Police Department’s newest K-9 officer, Salem, three-month-old Labrador Retriever and Sgt. Anne Spahr.
Friday, September 02, 2022
@kentstateu Newest K-9 officer in training! 🐶 #KentState #KentStateUniversity #BlackLabrador ♬ Here Comes The Sun - Greysound

 

Meet Kent State Police Department’s newest K-9 officer, Salem! Still in training, this 4-month-old Labrador Retriever will be partnered with Sgt. Anne Spahr. The pair recently visited the University Communications and Marketing office so university photographers could snap a few photos of them. Salem’s cuteness has been featured on all the Kent State social media accounts, and he’s already stealing many hearts!

Meet Kent State Police Department’s newest K-9 officer, Salem, three-month-old Labrador Retriever and Sgt. Anne Spahr.
Friday, September 02, 2022
@kentstateu Newest K-9 officer in training! 🐶 #KentState #KentStateUniversity #BlackLabrador ♬ Here Comes The Sun - Greysound

 

Meet Kent State Police Department’s newest K-9 officer, Salem! Still in training, this 4-month-old Labrador Retriever will be partnered with Sgt. Anne Spahr. The pair recently visited the University Communications and Marketing office so university photographers could snap a few photos of them. Salem’s cuteness has been featured on all the Kent State social media accounts, and he’s already stealing many hearts!

Meet Kent State Police Department’s newest K-9 officer, Salem, three-month-old Labrador Retriever and Sgt. Anne Spahr.
Friday, September 02, 2022
@kentstateu Newest K-9 officer in training! 🐶 #KentState #KentStateUniversity #BlackLabrador ♬ Here Comes The Sun - Greysound

 

Meet Kent State Police Department’s newest K-9 officer, Salem! Still in training, this 4-month-old Labrador Retriever will be partnered with Sgt. Anne Spahr. The pair recently visited the University Communications and Marketing office so university photographers could snap a few photos of them. Salem’s cuteness has been featured on all the Kent State social media accounts, and he’s already stealing many hearts!

Members of the Class of 2026 Light Up Convocation at the MAC Center , Senior Vice President Mark Polatajko Fires Up the Crowd at Convocation 2022
Tuesday, August 23, 2022

"We are all part of one community now. A big, wonderful Kent State community."

With a backdrop of strobe lights, rock music and excitement, Kent State President Todd Diacon kicked off the start of the 2022 Fall Semester by encouraging new students to lean on one another during the university's traditional convocation ceremony. 

Image
Kent State President Todd Diacon Speaks at Convocation

New students packed the Memorial Athletic and Convocation (MAC) Center for the event that included speakers and giveaways ahead of the first full day of classes on Aug. 25. 

Diacon encouraged students to engage not just with each other but also with university leaders. 

"When you see me out on campus, please say hello and I'll do the same," Diacon said. 

Image
Thousands of Incoming Students Cheer at Convocation

The Class of 2026 also enjoyed an opportunity to take part in an annual tradition, forming a block K outside the MAC Center.

Additional festivisties were planned to help new students get excited about the beginning of their college journey. This includes Blastoff!, sponsored by Student Success Programs and the Center for Student Involvement, which invites students to meet student organizations, play games, enter to win some cool prizes and meet new friends.

 

Image
Provost Melody Tankersley Fires Up the Class of 2026 at Convocation

 

Members of the Class of 2026 Light Up Convocation at the MAC Center , Senior Vice President Mark Polatajko Fires Up the Crowd at Convocation 2022
Tuesday, August 23, 2022

"We are all part of one community now. A big, wonderful Kent State community."

With a backdrop of strobe lights, rock music and excitement, Kent State President Todd Diacon kicked off the start of the 2022 Fall Semester by encouraging new students to lean on one another during the university's traditional convocation ceremony. 

Image
Kent State President Todd Diacon Speaks at Convocation

New students packed the Memorial Athletic and Convocation (MAC) Center for the event that included speakers and giveaways ahead of the first full day of classes on Aug. 25. 

Diacon encouraged students to engage not just with each other but also with university leaders. 

"When you see me out on campus, please say hello and I'll do the same," Diacon said. 

Image
Thousands of Incoming Students Cheer at Convocation

The Class of 2026 also enjoyed an opportunity to take part in an annual tradition, forming a block K outside the MAC Center.

Additional festivisties were planned to help new students get excited about the beginning of their college journey. This includes Blastoff!, sponsored by Student Success Programs and the Center for Student Involvement, which invites students to meet student organizations, play games, enter to win some cool prizes and meet new friends.

 

Image
Provost Melody Tankersley Fires Up the Class of 2026 at Convocation

 

Members of the Class of 2026 Light Up Convocation at the MAC Center , Senior Vice President Mark Polatajko Fires Up the Crowd at Convocation 2022
Tuesday, August 23, 2022

"We are all part of one community now. A big, wonderful Kent State community."

With a backdrop of strobe lights, rock music and excitement, Kent State President Todd Diacon kicked off the start of the 2022 Fall Semester by encouraging new students to lean on one another during the university's traditional convocation ceremony. 

Image
Kent State President Todd Diacon Speaks at Convocation

New students packed the Memorial Athletic and Convocation (MAC) Center for the event that included speakers and giveaways ahead of the first full day of classes on Aug. 25. 

Diacon encouraged students to engage not just with each other but also with university leaders. 

"When you see me out on campus, please say hello and I'll do the same," Diacon said. 

Image
Thousands of Incoming Students Cheer at Convocation

The Class of 2026 also enjoyed an opportunity to take part in an annual tradition, forming a block K outside the MAC Center.

Additional festivisties were planned to help new students get excited about the beginning of their college journey. This includes Blastoff!, sponsored by Student Success Programs and the Center for Student Involvement, which invites students to meet student organizations, play games, enter to win some cool prizes and meet new friends.

 

Image
Provost Melody Tankersley Fires Up the Class of 2026 at Convocation

 

Members of the Class of 2026 Light Up Convocation at the MAC Center , Senior Vice President Mark Polatajko Fires Up the Crowd at Convocation 2022
Tuesday, August 23, 2022

"We are all part of one community now. A big, wonderful Kent State community."

With a backdrop of strobe lights, rock music and excitement, Kent State President Todd Diacon kicked off the start of the 2022 Fall Semester by encouraging new students to lean on one another during the university's traditional convocation ceremony. 

Image
Kent State President Todd Diacon Speaks at Convocation

New students packed the Memorial Athletic and Convocation (MAC) Center for the event that included speakers and giveaways ahead of the first full day of classes on Aug. 25. 

Diacon encouraged students to engage not just with each other but also with university leaders. 

"When you see me out on campus, please say hello and I'll do the same," Diacon said. 

Image
Thousands of Incoming Students Cheer at Convocation

The Class of 2026 also enjoyed an opportunity to take part in an annual tradition, forming a block K outside the MAC Center.

Additional festivisties were planned to help new students get excited about the beginning of their college journey. This includes Blastoff!, sponsored by Student Success Programs and the Center for Student Involvement, which invites students to meet student organizations, play games, enter to win some cool prizes and meet new friends.

 

Image
Provost Melody Tankersley Fires Up the Class of 2026 at Convocation

 

Grind2Energy System
Thursday, April 28, 2022

The central component of the Grind2Energy systems at Kent State University are larger versions of the in-sink garbage disposals found in many homes. The difference is that at Kent State, these units aren’t disposing of food waste, but processing it with a purpose - as the first part of a highly sustainable innovation that creates energy and high-grade fertilizer.

There are currently two Grind2Energy systems on the Kent Campus. One that was built into the Design Innovation Hub as it was being constructed, and another that was more recently added to the Eastway Dining Facility through a grant from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

 

 

How Grind2Energy works

Casey Crane, the assistant director of sustainability and purchasing for University Culinary Services, said the Grind2Energy system helps capture and divert food waste at every point in the food-serving process.

“When we are producing food and preparing food, any sort of scraps like carrot tops, potato peels and things like that are placed into a bin to go into the system,” Crane said. After the students eat, “any leftovers they have, they bring back to the dish return and our staff goes through the process of sorting out the organic food waste material, which also goes into a Grind2Energy bin.”

Throughout the day, staff members take the material from the bins to the Grind2Energy table. It’s sorted again, to remove any inorganic waste, mixed with water and run through the Grind2Energy machine. “It’s essentially a really giant disposal system, like you would have in your home, except this one is commercial grade,” said Crane. “So you can put a giant bone in there if you need to. As long as it’s organic material, it will grind it up.”

Next stop, the storage tank

Once the food waste goes through the grinder, it’s transferred into a massive storage vessel as a dense slurry. The material stays there until the vessel is full. “We have to make sure that they’re all completely full before we call the hauler out, because we don’t want to bring trucks unnecessarily onto campus and increase our carbon footprint,” Crane said.

The hauler, from the Quasar Energy Group, empties the storage vessels into a large tank truck and takes their contents to their facility for a process called “anaerobic digestion.”

Creating valuable products from food waste

Melanie Knowles, Kent State’s sustainability manager, explained the results of the process. “The products of anaerobic digestion are two things, basically. It’s natural gas that either goes into a natural gas fueling station for vehicles, or it goes into electricity creation … that goes into the grid. The other product is a fertilizer that goes into farm fields in Ohio, so it’s returning nutrients from our uneaten food into nutrients that restore the soil.”

Crane added, “This is nutrient-rich fertilizer that can then be used to supplement soil to grow additional produce or help fix nitrogen that might be missing in soil. Nitrogen is very expensive and if you’re doing mono-crop farming, it’s one of the first nutrients that you lose out of your soil. It can be really difficult to rebuild and if you lose too much nitrogen along with other nutrients and minerals, the land can become unusable.”

The products from the system have multiple impacts – and impressive, measurable results, from a sustainability perspective. “In the course of about a semester, based on our usage, this system can generate energy that would be equivalent to powering about six homes for one month,” Crane said. “It generates approximately 1.8 tons of nutrient-rich fertilizer, and it reduces our carbon impact in a way that’s equivalent to about 50,000 miles NOT driven in a vehicle.”

“Kent State is essentially the size of a small city. So when you think about the amount of food waste that can be generated by a small city, at multiple points, it’s pretty significant," Crane said. "If we want to be more sustainable, focusing on reducing our food waste reduces our carbon footprint, reduces our energy usage and it’s generally better for the environment as well as social and financial environments.”

Sustainability is a smart choice

“We’re always trying to reduce waste on campus,” Knowles said. “So that means producing less waste to begin with, recycling things that are recyclable. Before this system all of that food waste was going into a landfill. Since each of these systems have been implemented, together, they’ve already diverted over 80 tons of food waste away from a landfill.”

Knowles said there are a lot of choices you can make every day to be more sustainable. Things like looking at your own waste stream to see what you can avoid using, to reduce, and then looking at ways to reuse and recycle. “Looking at how they’re using energy and how they can save energy by, say, unplugging things when they’re not in use, unplugging even chargers when they’re not in use to avoid drawing the little bit of energy that comes from that,” Knowles said. “When we collectively take these small actions, we have a very large impact.”

Sustainability is a highly collaborative initiative and Kent State’s sustainability representatives freely share best practices with other institutions. “When it comes to the Grind2Energy system, we are the only school I know of in the area that’s using this system,” Knowles said. “We share our wins with other schools, they share their wins with us, and we all try to become more sustainable together.”

Kent State’s sustainable future

The university’s plans for its sustainable future are holistic, enterprise-wide and departmental. Kent State is putting together sustainability plans that are value-driven with both long-term and short-term, measurable goals. Crane’s plans for Dining Services in the immediate future include rolling out a reusable container system, increasing plant-based menu options and reducing Kent State’s carbon footprint through menu choices. Looking ahead, her plans are more sweeping.

“Long term, I’d really love to get some sort of campus farm or garden going, some culinary demo program so that we can increase education and engagement around culinary aspects of food waste and how people can help mitigate that,” Crane said. “Of course, a long-term dream goal is a full-blown campus farm that students, faculty and staff, as well as the entire community, can contribute to and help build a more fortified local food system and increase that grower-community connection.”

 

Image
Grind2Energy System statistics

Grind2Energy System
Thursday, April 28, 2022

The central component of the Grind2Energy systems at Kent State University are larger versions of the in-sink garbage disposals found in many homes. The difference is that at Kent State, these units aren’t disposing of food waste, but processing it with a purpose - as the first part of a highly sustainable innovation that creates energy and high-grade fertilizer.

There are currently two Grind2Energy systems on the Kent Campus. One that was built into the Design Innovation Hub as it was being constructed, and another that was more recently added to the Eastway Dining Facility through a grant from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

 

 

How Grind2Energy works

Casey Crane, the assistant director of sustainability and purchasing for University Culinary Services, said the Grind2Energy system helps capture and divert food waste at every point in the food-serving process.

“When we are producing food and preparing food, any sort of scraps like carrot tops, potato peels and things like that are placed into a bin to go into the system,” Crane said. After the students eat, “any leftovers they have, they bring back to the dish return and our staff goes through the process of sorting out the organic food waste material, which also goes into a Grind2Energy bin.”

Throughout the day, staff members take the material from the bins to the Grind2Energy table. It’s sorted again, to remove any inorganic waste, mixed with water and run through the Grind2Energy machine. “It’s essentially a really giant disposal system, like you would have in your home, except this one is commercial grade,” said Crane. “So you can put a giant bone in there if you need to. As long as it’s organic material, it will grind it up.”

Next stop, the storage tank

Once the food waste goes through the grinder, it’s transferred into a massive storage vessel as a dense slurry. The material stays there until the vessel is full. “We have to make sure that they’re all completely full before we call the hauler out, because we don’t want to bring trucks unnecessarily onto campus and increase our carbon footprint,” Crane said.

The hauler, from the Quasar Energy Group, empties the storage vessels into a large tank truck and takes their contents to their facility for a process called “anaerobic digestion.”

Creating valuable products from food waste

Melanie Knowles, Kent State’s sustainability manager, explained the results of the process. “The products of anaerobic digestion are two things, basically. It’s natural gas that either goes into a natural gas fueling station for vehicles, or it goes into electricity creation … that goes into the grid. The other product is a fertilizer that goes into farm fields in Ohio, so it’s returning nutrients from our uneaten food into nutrients that restore the soil.”

Crane added, “This is nutrient-rich fertilizer that can then be used to supplement soil to grow additional produce or help fix nitrogen that might be missing in soil. Nitrogen is very expensive and if you’re doing mono-crop farming, it’s one of the first nutrients that you lose out of your soil. It can be really difficult to rebuild and if you lose too much nitrogen along with other nutrients and minerals, the land can become unusable.”

The products from the system have multiple impacts – and impressive, measurable results, from a sustainability perspective. “In the course of about a semester, based on our usage, this system can generate energy that would be equivalent to powering about six homes for one month,” Crane said. “It generates approximately 1.8 tons of nutrient-rich fertilizer, and it reduces our carbon impact in a way that’s equivalent to about 50,000 miles NOT driven in a vehicle.”

“Kent State is essentially the size of a small city. So when you think about the amount of food waste that can be generated by a small city, at multiple points, it’s pretty significant," Crane said. "If we want to be more sustainable, focusing on reducing our food waste reduces our carbon footprint, reduces our energy usage and it’s generally better for the environment as well as social and financial environments.”

Sustainability is a smart choice

“We’re always trying to reduce waste on campus,” Knowles said. “So that means producing less waste to begin with, recycling things that are recyclable. Before this system all of that food waste was going into a landfill. Since each of these systems have been implemented, together, they’ve already diverted over 80 tons of food waste away from a landfill.”

Knowles said there are a lot of choices you can make every day to be more sustainable. Things like looking at your own waste stream to see what you can avoid using, to reduce, and then looking at ways to reuse and recycle. “Looking at how they’re using energy and how they can save energy by, say, unplugging things when they’re not in use, unplugging even chargers when they’re not in use to avoid drawing the little bit of energy that comes from that,” Knowles said. “When we collectively take these small actions, we have a very large impact.”

Sustainability is a highly collaborative initiative and Kent State’s sustainability representatives freely share best practices with other institutions. “When it comes to the Grind2Energy system, we are the only school I know of in the area that’s using this system,” Knowles said. “We share our wins with other schools, they share their wins with us, and we all try to become more sustainable together.”

Kent State’s sustainable future

The university’s plans for its sustainable future are holistic, enterprise-wide and departmental. Kent State is putting together sustainability plans that are value-driven with both long-term and short-term, measurable goals. Crane’s plans for Dining Services in the immediate future include rolling out a reusable container system, increasing plant-based menu options and reducing Kent State’s carbon footprint through menu choices. Looking ahead, her plans are more sweeping.

“Long term, I’d really love to get some sort of campus farm or garden going, some culinary demo program so that we can increase education and engagement around culinary aspects of food waste and how people can help mitigate that,” Crane said. “Of course, a long-term dream goal is a full-blown campus farm that students, faculty and staff, as well as the entire community, can contribute to and help build a more fortified local food system and increase that grower-community connection.”

 

Image
Grind2Energy System statistics

Grind2Energy System
Thursday, April 28, 2022

The central component of the Grind2Energy systems at Kent State University are larger versions of the in-sink garbage disposals found in many homes. The difference is that at Kent State, these units aren’t disposing of food waste, but processing it with a purpose - as the first part of a highly sustainable innovation that creates energy and high-grade fertilizer.

There are currently two Grind2Energy systems on the Kent Campus. One that was built into the Design Innovation Hub as it was being constructed, and another that was more recently added to the Eastway Dining Facility through a grant from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

 

 

How Grind2Energy works

Casey Crane, the assistant director of sustainability and purchasing for University Culinary Services, said the Grind2Energy system helps capture and divert food waste at every point in the food-serving process.

“When we are producing food and preparing food, any sort of scraps like carrot tops, potato peels and things like that are placed into a bin to go into the system,” Crane said. After the students eat, “any leftovers they have, they bring back to the dish return and our staff goes through the process of sorting out the organic food waste material, which also goes into a Grind2Energy bin.”

Throughout the day, staff members take the material from the bins to the Grind2Energy table. It’s sorted again, to remove any inorganic waste, mixed with water and run through the Grind2Energy machine. “It’s essentially a really giant disposal system, like you would have in your home, except this one is commercial grade,” said Crane. “So you can put a giant bone in there if you need to. As long as it’s organic material, it will grind it up.”

Next stop, the storage tank

Once the food waste goes through the grinder, it’s transferred into a massive storage vessel as a dense slurry. The material stays there until the vessel is full. “We have to make sure that they’re all completely full before we call the hauler out, because we don’t want to bring trucks unnecessarily onto campus and increase our carbon footprint,” Crane said.

The hauler, from the Quasar Energy Group, empties the storage vessels into a large tank truck and takes their contents to their facility for a process called “anaerobic digestion.”

Creating valuable products from food waste

Melanie Knowles, Kent State’s sustainability manager, explained the results of the process. “The products of anaerobic digestion are two things, basically. It’s natural gas that either goes into a natural gas fueling station for vehicles, or it goes into electricity creation … that goes into the grid. The other product is a fertilizer that goes into farm fields in Ohio, so it’s returning nutrients from our uneaten food into nutrients that restore the soil.”

Crane added, “This is nutrient-rich fertilizer that can then be used to supplement soil to grow additional produce or help fix nitrogen that might be missing in soil. Nitrogen is very expensive and if you’re doing mono-crop farming, it’s one of the first nutrients that you lose out of your soil. It can be really difficult to rebuild and if you lose too much nitrogen along with other nutrients and minerals, the land can become unusable.”

The products from the system have multiple impacts – and impressive, measurable results, from a sustainability perspective. “In the course of about a semester, based on our usage, this system can generate energy that would be equivalent to powering about six homes for one month,” Crane said. “It generates approximately 1.8 tons of nutrient-rich fertilizer, and it reduces our carbon impact in a way that’s equivalent to about 50,000 miles NOT driven in a vehicle.”

“Kent State is essentially the size of a small city. So when you think about the amount of food waste that can be generated by a small city, at multiple points, it’s pretty significant," Crane said. "If we want to be more sustainable, focusing on reducing our food waste reduces our carbon footprint, reduces our energy usage and it’s generally better for the environment as well as social and financial environments.”

Sustainability is a smart choice

“We’re always trying to reduce waste on campus,” Knowles said. “So that means producing less waste to begin with, recycling things that are recyclable. Before this system all of that food waste was going into a landfill. Since each of these systems have been implemented, together, they’ve already diverted over 80 tons of food waste away from a landfill.”

Knowles said there are a lot of choices you can make every day to be more sustainable. Things like looking at your own waste stream to see what you can avoid using, to reduce, and then looking at ways to reuse and recycle. “Looking at how they’re using energy and how they can save energy by, say, unplugging things when they’re not in use, unplugging even chargers when they’re not in use to avoid drawing the little bit of energy that comes from that,” Knowles said. “When we collectively take these small actions, we have a very large impact.”

Sustainability is a highly collaborative initiative and Kent State’s sustainability representatives freely share best practices with other institutions. “When it comes to the Grind2Energy system, we are the only school I know of in the area that’s using this system,” Knowles said. “We share our wins with other schools, they share their wins with us, and we all try to become more sustainable together.”

Kent State’s sustainable future

The university’s plans for its sustainable future are holistic, enterprise-wide and departmental. Kent State is putting together sustainability plans that are value-driven with both long-term and short-term, measurable goals. Crane’s plans for Dining Services in the immediate future include rolling out a reusable container system, increasing plant-based menu options and reducing Kent State’s carbon footprint through menu choices. Looking ahead, her plans are more sweeping.

“Long term, I’d really love to get some sort of campus farm or garden going, some culinary demo program so that we can increase education and engagement around culinary aspects of food waste and how people can help mitigate that,” Crane said. “Of course, a long-term dream goal is a full-blown campus farm that students, faculty and staff, as well as the entire community, can contribute to and help build a more fortified local food system and increase that grower-community connection.”

 

Image
Grind2Energy System statistics

Grind2Energy System
Thursday, April 28, 2022

The central component of the Grind2Energy systems at Kent State University are larger versions of the in-sink garbage disposals found in many homes. The difference is that at Kent State, these units aren’t disposing of food waste, but processing it with a purpose - as the first part of a highly sustainable innovation that creates energy and high-grade fertilizer.

There are currently two Grind2Energy systems on the Kent Campus. One that was built into the Design Innovation Hub as it was being constructed, and another that was more recently added to the Eastway Dining Facility through a grant from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

 

 

How Grind2Energy works

Casey Crane, the assistant director of sustainability and purchasing for University Culinary Services, said the Grind2Energy system helps capture and divert food waste at every point in the food-serving process.

“When we are producing food and preparing food, any sort of scraps like carrot tops, potato peels and things like that are placed into a bin to go into the system,” Crane said. After the students eat, “any leftovers they have, they bring back to the dish return and our staff goes through the process of sorting out the organic food waste material, which also goes into a Grind2Energy bin.”

Throughout the day, staff members take the material from the bins to the Grind2Energy table. It’s sorted again, to remove any inorganic waste, mixed with water and run through the Grind2Energy machine. “It’s essentially a really giant disposal system, like you would have in your home, except this one is commercial grade,” said Crane. “So you can put a giant bone in there if you need to. As long as it’s organic material, it will grind it up.”

Next stop, the storage tank

Once the food waste goes through the grinder, it’s transferred into a massive storage vessel as a dense slurry. The material stays there until the vessel is full. “We have to make sure that they’re all completely full before we call the hauler out, because we don’t want to bring trucks unnecessarily onto campus and increase our carbon footprint,” Crane said.

The hauler, from the Quasar Energy Group, empties the storage vessels into a large tank truck and takes their contents to their facility for a process called “anaerobic digestion.”

Creating valuable products from food waste

Melanie Knowles, Kent State’s sustainability manager, explained the results of the process. “The products of anaerobic digestion are two things, basically. It’s natural gas that either goes into a natural gas fueling station for vehicles, or it goes into electricity creation … that goes into the grid. The other product is a fertilizer that goes into farm fields in Ohio, so it’s returning nutrients from our uneaten food into nutrients that restore the soil.”

Crane added, “This is nutrient-rich fertilizer that can then be used to supplement soil to grow additional produce or help fix nitrogen that might be missing in soil. Nitrogen is very expensive and if you’re doing mono-crop farming, it’s one of the first nutrients that you lose out of your soil. It can be really difficult to rebuild and if you lose too much nitrogen along with other nutrients and minerals, the land can become unusable.”

The products from the system have multiple impacts – and impressive, measurable results, from a sustainability perspective. “In the course of about a semester, based on our usage, this system can generate energy that would be equivalent to powering about six homes for one month,” Crane said. “It generates approximately 1.8 tons of nutrient-rich fertilizer, and it reduces our carbon impact in a way that’s equivalent to about 50,000 miles NOT driven in a vehicle.”

“Kent State is essentially the size of a small city. So when you think about the amount of food waste that can be generated by a small city, at multiple points, it’s pretty significant," Crane said. "If we want to be more sustainable, focusing on reducing our food waste reduces our carbon footprint, reduces our energy usage and it’s generally better for the environment as well as social and financial environments.”

Sustainability is a smart choice

“We’re always trying to reduce waste on campus,” Knowles said. “So that means producing less waste to begin with, recycling things that are recyclable. Before this system all of that food waste was going into a landfill. Since each of these systems have been implemented, together, they’ve already diverted over 80 tons of food waste away from a landfill.”

Knowles said there are a lot of choices you can make every day to be more sustainable. Things like looking at your own waste stream to see what you can avoid using, to reduce, and then looking at ways to reuse and recycle. “Looking at how they’re using energy and how they can save energy by, say, unplugging things when they’re not in use, unplugging even chargers when they’re not in use to avoid drawing the little bit of energy that comes from that,” Knowles said. “When we collectively take these small actions, we have a very large impact.”

Sustainability is a highly collaborative initiative and Kent State’s sustainability representatives freely share best practices with other institutions. “When it comes to the Grind2Energy system, we are the only school I know of in the area that’s using this system,” Knowles said. “We share our wins with other schools, they share their wins with us, and we all try to become more sustainable together.”

Kent State’s sustainable future

The university’s plans for its sustainable future are holistic, enterprise-wide and departmental. Kent State is putting together sustainability plans that are value-driven with both long-term and short-term, measurable goals. Crane’s plans for Dining Services in the immediate future include rolling out a reusable container system, increasing plant-based menu options and reducing Kent State’s carbon footprint through menu choices. Looking ahead, her plans are more sweeping.

“Long term, I’d really love to get some sort of campus farm or garden going, some culinary demo program so that we can increase education and engagement around culinary aspects of food waste and how people can help mitigate that,” Crane said. “Of course, a long-term dream goal is a full-blown campus farm that students, faculty and staff, as well as the entire community, can contribute to and help build a more fortified local food system and increase that grower-community connection.”

 

Image
Grind2Energy System statistics

Grind2Energy System
Thursday, April 28, 2022

The central component of the Grind2Energy systems at Kent State University are larger versions of the in-sink garbage disposals found in many homes. The difference is that at Kent State, these units aren’t disposing of food waste, but processing it with a purpose - as the first part of a highly sustainable innovation that creates energy and high-grade fertilizer.

There are currently two Grind2Energy systems on the Kent Campus. One that was built into the Design Innovation Hub as it was being constructed, and another that was more recently added to the Eastway Dining Facility through a grant from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

 

 

How Grind2Energy works

Casey Crane, the assistant director of sustainability and purchasing for University Culinary Services, said the Grind2Energy system helps capture and divert food waste at every point in the food-serving process.

“When we are producing food and preparing food, any sort of scraps like carrot tops, potato peels and things like that are placed into a bin to go into the system,” Crane said. After the students eat, “any leftovers they have, they bring back to the dish return and our staff goes through the process of sorting out the organic food waste material, which also goes into a Grind2Energy bin.”

Throughout the day, staff members take the material from the bins to the Grind2Energy table. It’s sorted again, to remove any inorganic waste, mixed with water and run through the Grind2Energy machine. “It’s essentially a really giant disposal system, like you would have in your home, except this one is commercial grade,” said Crane. “So you can put a giant bone in there if you need to. As long as it’s organic material, it will grind it up.”

Next stop, the storage tank

Once the food waste goes through the grinder, it’s transferred into a massive storage vessel as a dense slurry. The material stays there until the vessel is full. “We have to make sure that they’re all completely full before we call the hauler out, because we don’t want to bring trucks unnecessarily onto campus and increase our carbon footprint,” Crane said.

The hauler, from the Quasar Energy Group, empties the storage vessels into a large tank truck and takes their contents to their facility for a process called “anaerobic digestion.”

Creating valuable products from food waste

Melanie Knowles, Kent State’s sustainability manager, explained the results of the process. “The products of anaerobic digestion are two things, basically. It’s natural gas that either goes into a natural gas fueling station for vehicles, or it goes into electricity creation … that goes into the grid. The other product is a fertilizer that goes into farm fields in Ohio, so it’s returning nutrients from our uneaten food into nutrients that restore the soil.”

Crane added, “This is nutrient-rich fertilizer that can then be used to supplement soil to grow additional produce or help fix nitrogen that might be missing in soil. Nitrogen is very expensive and if you’re doing mono-crop farming, it’s one of the first nutrients that you lose out of your soil. It can be really difficult to rebuild and if you lose too much nitrogen along with other nutrients and minerals, the land can become unusable.”

The products from the system have multiple impacts – and impressive, measurable results, from a sustainability perspective. “In the course of about a semester, based on our usage, this system can generate energy that would be equivalent to powering about six homes for one month,” Crane said. “It generates approximately 1.8 tons of nutrient-rich fertilizer, and it reduces our carbon impact in a way that’s equivalent to about 50,000 miles NOT driven in a vehicle.”

“Kent State is essentially the size of a small city. So when you think about the amount of food waste that can be generated by a small city, at multiple points, it’s pretty significant," Crane said. "If we want to be more sustainable, focusing on reducing our food waste reduces our carbon footprint, reduces our energy usage and it’s generally better for the environment as well as social and financial environments.”

Sustainability is a smart choice

“We’re always trying to reduce waste on campus,” Knowles said. “So that means producing less waste to begin with, recycling things that are recyclable. Before this system all of that food waste was going into a landfill. Since each of these systems have been implemented, together, they’ve already diverted over 80 tons of food waste away from a landfill.”

Knowles said there are a lot of choices you can make every day to be more sustainable. Things like looking at your own waste stream to see what you can avoid using, to reduce, and then looking at ways to reuse and recycle. “Looking at how they’re using energy and how they can save energy by, say, unplugging things when they’re not in use, unplugging even chargers when they’re not in use to avoid drawing the little bit of energy that comes from that,” Knowles said. “When we collectively take these small actions, we have a very large impact.”

Sustainability is a highly collaborative initiative and Kent State’s sustainability representatives freely share best practices with other institutions. “When it comes to the Grind2Energy system, we are the only school I know of in the area that’s using this system,” Knowles said. “We share our wins with other schools, they share their wins with us, and we all try to become more sustainable together.”

Kent State’s sustainable future

The university’s plans for its sustainable future are holistic, enterprise-wide and departmental. Kent State is putting together sustainability plans that are value-driven with both long-term and short-term, measurable goals. Crane’s plans for Dining Services in the immediate future include rolling out a reusable container system, increasing plant-based menu options and reducing Kent State’s carbon footprint through menu choices. Looking ahead, her plans are more sweeping.

“Long term, I’d really love to get some sort of campus farm or garden going, some culinary demo program so that we can increase education and engagement around culinary aspects of food waste and how people can help mitigate that,” Crane said. “Of course, a long-term dream goal is a full-blown campus farm that students, faculty and staff, as well as the entire community, can contribute to and help build a more fortified local food system and increase that grower-community connection.”

 

Image
Grind2Energy System statistics

Grind2Energy System
Thursday, April 28, 2022

The central component of the Grind2Energy systems at Kent State University are larger versions of the in-sink garbage disposals found in many homes. The difference is that at Kent State, these units aren’t disposing of food waste, but processing it with a purpose - as the first part of a highly sustainable innovation that creates energy and high-grade fertilizer.

There are currently two Grind2Energy systems on the Kent Campus. One that was built into the Design Innovation Hub as it was being constructed, and another that was more recently added to the Eastway Dining Facility through a grant from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

 

 

How Grind2Energy works

Casey Crane, the assistant director of sustainability and purchasing for University Culinary Services, said the Grind2Energy system helps capture and divert food waste at every point in the food-serving process.

“When we are producing food and preparing food, any sort of scraps like carrot tops, potato peels and things like that are placed into a bin to go into the system,” Crane said. After the students eat, “any leftovers they have, they bring back to the dish return and our staff goes through the process of sorting out the organic food waste material, which also goes into a Grind2Energy bin.”

Throughout the day, staff members take the material from the bins to the Grind2Energy table. It’s sorted again, to remove any inorganic waste, mixed with water and run through the Grind2Energy machine. “It’s essentially a really giant disposal system, like you would have in your home, except this one is commercial grade,” said Crane. “So you can put a giant bone in there if you need to. As long as it’s organic material, it will grind it up.”

Next stop, the storage tank

Once the food waste goes through the grinder, it’s transferred into a massive storage vessel as a dense slurry. The material stays there until the vessel is full. “We have to make sure that they’re all completely full before we call the hauler out, because we don’t want to bring trucks unnecessarily onto campus and increase our carbon footprint,” Crane said.

The hauler, from the Quasar Energy Group, empties the storage vessels into a large tank truck and takes their contents to their facility for a process called “anaerobic digestion.”

Creating valuable products from food waste

Melanie Knowles, Kent State’s sustainability manager, explained the results of the process. “The products of anaerobic digestion are two things, basically. It’s natural gas that either goes into a natural gas fueling station for vehicles, or it goes into electricity creation … that goes into the grid. The other product is a fertilizer that goes into farm fields in Ohio, so it’s returning nutrients from our uneaten food into nutrients that restore the soil.”

Crane added, “This is nutrient-rich fertilizer that can then be used to supplement soil to grow additional produce or help fix nitrogen that might be missing in soil. Nitrogen is very expensive and if you’re doing mono-crop farming, it’s one of the first nutrients that you lose out of your soil. It can be really difficult to rebuild and if you lose too much nitrogen along with other nutrients and minerals, the land can become unusable.”

The products from the system have multiple impacts – and impressive, measurable results, from a sustainability perspective. “In the course of about a semester, based on our usage, this system can generate energy that would be equivalent to powering about six homes for one month,” Crane said. “It generates approximately 1.8 tons of nutrient-rich fertilizer, and it reduces our carbon impact in a way that’s equivalent to about 50,000 miles NOT driven in a vehicle.”

“Kent State is essentially the size of a small city. So when you think about the amount of food waste that can be generated by a small city, at multiple points, it’s pretty significant," Crane said. "If we want to be more sustainable, focusing on reducing our food waste reduces our carbon footprint, reduces our energy usage and it’s generally better for the environment as well as social and financial environments.”

Sustainability is a smart choice

“We’re always trying to reduce waste on campus,” Knowles said. “So that means producing less waste to begin with, recycling things that are recyclable. Before this system all of that food waste was going into a landfill. Since each of these systems have been implemented, together, they’ve already diverted over 80 tons of food waste away from a landfill.”

Knowles said there are a lot of choices you can make every day to be more sustainable. Things like looking at your own waste stream to see what you can avoid using, to reduce, and then looking at ways to reuse and recycle. “Looking at how they’re using energy and how they can save energy by, say, unplugging things when they’re not in use, unplugging even chargers when they’re not in use to avoid drawing the little bit of energy that comes from that,” Knowles said. “When we collectively take these small actions, we have a very large impact.”

Sustainability is a highly collaborative initiative and Kent State’s sustainability representatives freely share best practices with other institutions. “When it comes to the Grind2Energy system, we are the only school I know of in the area that’s using this system,” Knowles said. “We share our wins with other schools, they share their wins with us, and we all try to become more sustainable together.”

Kent State’s sustainable future

The university’s plans for its sustainable future are holistic, enterprise-wide and departmental. Kent State is putting together sustainability plans that are value-driven with both long-term and short-term, measurable goals. Crane’s plans for Dining Services in the immediate future include rolling out a reusable container system, increasing plant-based menu options and reducing Kent State’s carbon footprint through menu choices. Looking ahead, her plans are more sweeping.

“Long term, I’d really love to get some sort of campus farm or garden going, some culinary demo program so that we can increase education and engagement around culinary aspects of food waste and how people can help mitigate that,” Crane said. “Of course, a long-term dream goal is a full-blown campus farm that students, faculty and staff, as well as the entire community, can contribute to and help build a more fortified local food system and increase that grower-community connection.”

 

Image
Grind2Energy System statistics

Students learn in Kent State University laboratories
Friday, March 18, 2022

Kent State University is a new charter member of SEA Change, an initiative of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in which universities commit to their systemic transformation into more diverse, equitable and inclusive spaces where a full range of talent can succeed in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM).

Kent State joins along with the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Southern Mississippi.

 

 

SEA Change, which stands for STEMM Equity Achievement – was started in 2018 to support institutions as they undertake an in-depth self-assessment process to identify barriers to diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) for their students, faculty and staff members.

Kent State is a new member of SEA Change, an initiative of AAAS.

The institutions then create individualized action plans to break down those barriers for those excluded or marginalized based on gender, race, ethnicity, disability status or any other aspect of their personal identity that has been a source of bia

Dr. Amoaba Gooden, Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
s in STEMM.

In contrast to other programs that emphasize diversity, equity and inclusion, SEA Change puts the onus on the institutions to promote these goals rather than on the people who have faced discrimination or marginalization.

Amoaba Gooden, Ph.D., vice president for the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, said there are benefits to making institutions of higher education more diverse and welcoming.

“Research indicates that the more for example diverse the faculty body, the better the impact on student learning,” she noted.

Read more about the organization and learn more about how Gooden believes the new membership will better Kent State.

Students learn in Kent State University laboratories
Friday, March 18, 2022

Kent State University is a new charter member of SEA Change, an initiative of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in which universities commit to their systemic transformation into more diverse, equitable and inclusive spaces where a full range of talent can succeed in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM).

Kent State joins along with the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Southern Mississippi.

 

 

SEA Change, which stands for STEMM Equity Achievement – was started in 2018 to support institutions as they undertake an in-depth self-assessment process to identify barriers to diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) for their students, faculty and staff members.

Kent State is a new member of SEA Change, an initiative of AAAS.

The institutions then create individualized action plans to break down those barriers for those excluded or marginalized based on gender, race, ethnicity, disability status or any other aspect of their personal identity that has been a source of bia

Dr. Amoaba Gooden, Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
s in STEMM.

In contrast to other programs that emphasize diversity, equity and inclusion, SEA Change puts the onus on the institutions to promote these goals rather than on the people who have faced discrimination or marginalization.

Amoaba Gooden, Ph.D., vice president for the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, said there are benefits to making institutions of higher education more diverse and welcoming.

“Research indicates that the more for example diverse the faculty body, the better the impact on student learning,” she noted.

Read more about the organization and learn more about how Gooden believes the new membership will better Kent State.

Students learn in Kent State University laboratories
Friday, March 18, 2022

Kent State University is a new charter member of SEA Change, an initiative of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in which universities commit to their systemic transformation into more diverse, equitable and inclusive spaces where a full range of talent can succeed in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM).

Kent State joins along with the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Southern Mississippi.

 

 

SEA Change, which stands for STEMM Equity Achievement – was started in 2018 to support institutions as they undertake an in-depth self-assessment process to identify barriers to diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) for their students, faculty and staff members.

Kent State is a new member of SEA Change, an initiative of AAAS.

The institutions then create individualized action plans to break down those barriers for those excluded or marginalized based on gender, race, ethnicity, disability status or any other aspect of their personal identity that has been a source of bia

Dr. Amoaba Gooden, Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
s in STEMM.

In contrast to other programs that emphasize diversity, equity and inclusion, SEA Change puts the onus on the institutions to promote these goals rather than on the people who have faced discrimination or marginalization.

Amoaba Gooden, Ph.D., vice president for the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, said there are benefits to making institutions of higher education more diverse and welcoming.

“Research indicates that the more for example diverse the faculty body, the better the impact on student learning,” she noted.

Read more about the organization and learn more about how Gooden believes the new membership will better Kent State.

Students learn in Kent State University laboratories
Friday, March 18, 2022

Kent State University is a new charter member of SEA Change, an initiative of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in which universities commit to their systemic transformation into more diverse, equitable and inclusive spaces where a full range of talent can succeed in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM).

Kent State joins along with the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Southern Mississippi.

 

 

SEA Change, which stands for STEMM Equity Achievement – was started in 2018 to support institutions as they undertake an in-depth self-assessment process to identify barriers to diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) for their students, faculty and staff members.

Kent State is a new member of SEA Change, an initiative of AAAS.

The institutions then create individualized action plans to break down those barriers for those excluded or marginalized based on gender, race, ethnicity, disability status or any other aspect of their personal identity that has been a source of bia

Dr. Amoaba Gooden, Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
s in STEMM.

In contrast to other programs that emphasize diversity, equity and inclusion, SEA Change puts the onus on the institutions to promote these goals rather than on the people who have faced discrimination or marginalization.

Amoaba Gooden, Ph.D., vice president for the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, said there are benefits to making institutions of higher education more diverse and welcoming.

“Research indicates that the more for example diverse the faculty body, the better the impact on student learning,” she noted.

Read more about the organization and learn more about how Gooden believes the new membership will better Kent State.

Officer using MILO training system
Friday, March 18, 2022

Kent State University Professor Will Kalkhoff, Ph.D.,  is studying the brain waves and heart rates of police officers during training exercises to help to improve police performance and increase safety.

Kalkhoff is a professor of sociology at Kent State. He is also the executive director of the Electrophysiological Neuroscience Laboratory of Kent and an executive committee member of Kent State’s Brain Health Research Institute. He recently conducted a study for the Kent City Police Department to see how a police officer’s performance is impacted by wearing a body camera.

This study used an electroencephalogram (EEG) cap and an electrocardiogram (EKG) monitor to observe the brain waves and heart rates of an officer as she participated in simulated training exercises. The MILO (Multiple Interactive Training Objectives) training system is used to prepare first responders and military personnel for situations they may encounter in the course of their duties.

“When we measure your brain waves, we can see if you’re relaxed, if you’re alert and we can see whenever you’re feeling more anxiety and a little more stress,” Kalkhoff said. “We also measured through the EKG, which is heart monitoring. You know when they would get a big jump in anxiety and they were stressed.”

Kalkhoff said the goal of this study for both the university and the police department is to save lives.

“This has probably been, hands down, the most rewarding experience of my career so far,” Kalkoff said. “It’s rewarding because of that feeling of being a part of a team – of making a positive difference in the world through research and education and applications.”

For more information, visit www.kent.edu/sociology.

Watch the video here:

 

Officer using MILO training system
Friday, March 18, 2022

Kent State University Professor Will Kalkhoff, Ph.D.,  is studying the brain waves and heart rates of police officers during training exercises to help to improve police performance and increase safety.

Kalkhoff is a professor of sociology at Kent State. He is also the executive director of the Electrophysiological Neuroscience Laboratory of Kent and an executive committee member of Kent State’s Brain Health Research Institute. He recently conducted a study for the Kent City Police Department to see how a police officer’s performance is impacted by wearing a body camera.

This study used an electroencephalogram (EEG) cap and an electrocardiogram (EKG) monitor to observe the brain waves and heart rates of an officer as she participated in simulated training exercises. The MILO (Multiple Interactive Training Objectives) training system is used to prepare first responders and military personnel for situations they may encounter in the course of their duties.

“When we measure your brain waves, we can see if you’re relaxed, if you’re alert and we can see whenever you’re feeling more anxiety and a little more stress,” Kalkhoff said. “We also measured through the EKG, which is heart monitoring. You know when they would get a big jump in anxiety and they were stressed.”

Kalkhoff said the goal of this study for both the university and the police department is to save lives.

“This has probably been, hands down, the most rewarding experience of my career so far,” Kalkoff said. “It’s rewarding because of that feeling of being a part of a team – of making a positive difference in the world through research and education and applications.”

For more information, visit www.kent.edu/sociology.

Watch the video here:

 

Officer using MILO training system
Friday, March 18, 2022

Kent State University Professor Will Kalkhoff, Ph.D.,  is studying the brain waves and heart rates of police officers during training exercises to help to improve police performance and increase safety.

Kalkhoff is a professor of sociology at Kent State. He is also the executive director of the Electrophysiological Neuroscience Laboratory of Kent and an executive committee member of Kent State’s Brain Health Research Institute. He recently conducted a study for the Kent City Police Department to see how a police officer’s performance is impacted by wearing a body camera.

This study used an electroencephalogram (EEG) cap and an electrocardiogram (EKG) monitor to observe the brain waves and heart rates of an officer as she participated in simulated training exercises. The MILO (Multiple Interactive Training Objectives) training system is used to prepare first responders and military personnel for situations they may encounter in the course of their duties.

“When we measure your brain waves, we can see if you’re relaxed, if you’re alert and we can see whenever you’re feeling more anxiety and a little more stress,” Kalkhoff said. “We also measured through the EKG, which is heart monitoring. You know when they would get a big jump in anxiety and they were stressed.”

Kalkhoff said the goal of this study for both the university and the police department is to save lives.

“This has probably been, hands down, the most rewarding experience of my career so far,” Kalkoff said. “It’s rewarding because of that feeling of being a part of a team – of making a positive difference in the world through research and education and applications.”

For more information, visit www.kent.edu/sociology.

Watch the video here:

 

Officer using MILO training system
Friday, March 18, 2022

Kent State University Professor Will Kalkhoff, Ph.D.,  is studying the brain waves and heart rates of police officers during training exercises to help to improve police performance and increase safety.

Kalkhoff is a professor of sociology at Kent State. He is also the executive director of the Electrophysiological Neuroscience Laboratory of Kent and an executive committee member of Kent State’s Brain Health Research Institute. He recently conducted a study for the Kent City Police Department to see how a police officer’s performance is impacted by wearing a body camera.

This study used an electroencephalogram (EEG) cap and an electrocardiogram (EKG) monitor to observe the brain waves and heart rates of an officer as she participated in simulated training exercises. The MILO (Multiple Interactive Training Objectives) training system is used to prepare first responders and military personnel for situations they may encounter in the course of their duties.

“When we measure your brain waves, we can see if you’re relaxed, if you’re alert and we can see whenever you’re feeling more anxiety and a little more stress,” Kalkhoff said. “We also measured through the EKG, which is heart monitoring. You know when they would get a big jump in anxiety and they were stressed.”

Kalkhoff said the goal of this study for both the university and the police department is to save lives.

“This has probably been, hands down, the most rewarding experience of my career so far,” Kalkoff said. “It’s rewarding because of that feeling of being a part of a team – of making a positive difference in the world through research and education and applications.”

For more information, visit www.kent.edu/sociology.

Watch the video here:

 

Kent State University celebrates its international students during halftime of the Feb. 18 men’s basketball game at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.
Tuesday, February 22, 2022

Kent State University is the sole university in the U.S. to receive the prestigious 2022 Senator Paul Simon Award for Comprehensive Internationalization from NAFSA: Association of International Educators. The honor recognizes Kent State for overall excellence in integrating international education throughout all facets of the university and its campuses. 

Named after the late Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois, the NAFSA Simon Awards recognize outstanding innovation and accomplishment in campus internationalization, defined by NAFSA as “a conscious effort to integrate and infuse international, intercultural and global dimensions into the ethos and outcomes of their students’ education.” 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award is our nation’s top prize for excellence in global education,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “It is a richly deserved award that highlights our excellent education-abroad programs and our ongoing success in enrolling and graduating international students.”

Kent State’s global reach has been expansive, with educational centers in Florence, Italy, and Curitiba, Brazil, along with boasting more than 200 education-abroad programs. Along with globe-spanning international partnerships, it has outreach centers in China and India.

Kent State’s long history of international collaboration includes being among the first to exchange students with the Soviet Union during the Cold War and hosting Iranian students prior to Iran’s revolution in 1978-1979. Hosting international students and scholars has always been a priority for Kent State as demonstrated by its continued standing among the top 100 destinations for international students, according to Open Doors, a comprehensive information resource on international students and scholars studying or teaching at higher education institutions in the United States, and U.S. students studying abroad for academic credit at their home colleges or universities. 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award recognizes the internationalization efforts of our university and showcases how important it is for the development of students to have international experiences,” said Melody Tankersley, Ph.D., Kent State’s senior vice president and provost. “The award also recognizes the diversity of our university and brings global recognition to Kent State. 

“I would like to thank Vice President for Global Education Marcello Fantoni for his visionary leadership to help us get to where we are – to the point where we could win this impressive award,” Tankersley continued.

Kent State’s commitment to internationalization is embedded in its mission and strategic plan and is entrenched in the university’s identity through competitive research, comprehensive education-abroad programs, international curriculum and robust international student and scholar programs.

“At Kent State University, we are committed to granting access to students from all around the world and to make the whole world available for our students,” said Marcello Fantoni, Ph.D., Kent State’s vice president for global education. “We want to graduate students ready for the global world as active participants in a democratic society.”

Kent State’s student body includes 1,370 international students from nearly 100 countries. In 2019-2020, Kent State sent nearly 1,500 students abroad. Since resuming its international programming in July 2021, Kent State has returned to its full operations abroad and is already projected to surpass its previous record-setting enrollment in education-abroad programs by fall 2022.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the annual awards program. Serving more than 10,000 members and international educators worldwide, NAFSA is the largest nonprofit association dedicated to international education and exchange. Kent State will be featured in NAFSA’s report, “Internationalizing the Campus: Profiles of Success at Colleges and Universities,” that will be published this fall. The university also will be honored during the virtual and in-person programming as part of NAFSA’s 2022 Annual Conference and Expo this spring. To learn more about NAFSA’s Senator Paul Simon Awards, visit www.nafsa.org/SimonAward.

For more information about Kent State’s Office of Global Education, visit www.kent.edu/globaleducation.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University celebrates its international students during halftime of the Feb. 18 men’s basketball game at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.
Tuesday, February 22, 2022

Kent State University is the sole university in the U.S. to receive the prestigious 2022 Senator Paul Simon Award for Comprehensive Internationalization from NAFSA: Association of International Educators. The honor recognizes Kent State for overall excellence in integrating international education throughout all facets of the university and its campuses. 

Named after the late Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois, the NAFSA Simon Awards recognize outstanding innovation and accomplishment in campus internationalization, defined by NAFSA as “a conscious effort to integrate and infuse international, intercultural and global dimensions into the ethos and outcomes of their students’ education.” 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award is our nation’s top prize for excellence in global education,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “It is a richly deserved award that highlights our excellent education-abroad programs and our ongoing success in enrolling and graduating international students.”

Kent State’s global reach has been expansive, with educational centers in Florence, Italy, and Curitiba, Brazil, along with boasting more than 200 education-abroad programs. Along with globe-spanning international partnerships, it has outreach centers in China and India.

Kent State’s long history of international collaboration includes being among the first to exchange students with the Soviet Union during the Cold War and hosting Iranian students prior to Iran’s revolution in 1978-1979. Hosting international students and scholars has always been a priority for Kent State as demonstrated by its continued standing among the top 100 destinations for international students, according to Open Doors, a comprehensive information resource on international students and scholars studying or teaching at higher education institutions in the United States, and U.S. students studying abroad for academic credit at their home colleges or universities. 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award recognizes the internationalization efforts of our university and showcases how important it is for the development of students to have international experiences,” said Melody Tankersley, Ph.D., Kent State’s senior vice president and provost. “The award also recognizes the diversity of our university and brings global recognition to Kent State. 

“I would like to thank Vice President for Global Education Marcello Fantoni for his visionary leadership to help us get to where we are – to the point where we could win this impressive award,” Tankersley continued.

Kent State’s commitment to internationalization is embedded in its mission and strategic plan and is entrenched in the university’s identity through competitive research, comprehensive education-abroad programs, international curriculum and robust international student and scholar programs.

“At Kent State University, we are committed to granting access to students from all around the world and to make the whole world available for our students,” said Marcello Fantoni, Ph.D., Kent State’s vice president for global education. “We want to graduate students ready for the global world as active participants in a democratic society.”

Kent State’s student body includes 1,370 international students from nearly 100 countries. In 2019-2020, Kent State sent nearly 1,500 students abroad. Since resuming its international programming in July 2021, Kent State has returned to its full operations abroad and is already projected to surpass its previous record-setting enrollment in education-abroad programs by fall 2022.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the annual awards program. Serving more than 10,000 members and international educators worldwide, NAFSA is the largest nonprofit association dedicated to international education and exchange. Kent State will be featured in NAFSA’s report, “Internationalizing the Campus: Profiles of Success at Colleges and Universities,” that will be published this fall. The university also will be honored during the virtual and in-person programming as part of NAFSA’s 2022 Annual Conference and Expo this spring. To learn more about NAFSA’s Senator Paul Simon Awards, visit www.nafsa.org/SimonAward.

For more information about Kent State’s Office of Global Education, visit www.kent.edu/globaleducation.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University celebrates its international students during halftime of the Feb. 18 men’s basketball game at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.
Tuesday, February 22, 2022

Kent State University is the sole university in the U.S. to receive the prestigious 2022 Senator Paul Simon Award for Comprehensive Internationalization from NAFSA: Association of International Educators. The honor recognizes Kent State for overall excellence in integrating international education throughout all facets of the university and its campuses. 

Named after the late Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois, the NAFSA Simon Awards recognize outstanding innovation and accomplishment in campus internationalization, defined by NAFSA as “a conscious effort to integrate and infuse international, intercultural and global dimensions into the ethos and outcomes of their students’ education.” 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award is our nation’s top prize for excellence in global education,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “It is a richly deserved award that highlights our excellent education-abroad programs and our ongoing success in enrolling and graduating international students.”

Kent State’s global reach has been expansive, with educational centers in Florence, Italy, and Curitiba, Brazil, along with boasting more than 200 education-abroad programs. Along with globe-spanning international partnerships, it has outreach centers in China and India.

Kent State’s long history of international collaboration includes being among the first to exchange students with the Soviet Union during the Cold War and hosting Iranian students prior to Iran’s revolution in 1978-1979. Hosting international students and scholars has always been a priority for Kent State as demonstrated by its continued standing among the top 100 destinations for international students, according to Open Doors, a comprehensive information resource on international students and scholars studying or teaching at higher education institutions in the United States, and U.S. students studying abroad for academic credit at their home colleges or universities. 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award recognizes the internationalization efforts of our university and showcases how important it is for the development of students to have international experiences,” said Melody Tankersley, Ph.D., Kent State’s senior vice president and provost. “The award also recognizes the diversity of our university and brings global recognition to Kent State. 

“I would like to thank Vice President for Global Education Marcello Fantoni for his visionary leadership to help us get to where we are – to the point where we could win this impressive award,” Tankersley continued.

Kent State’s commitment to internationalization is embedded in its mission and strategic plan and is entrenched in the university’s identity through competitive research, comprehensive education-abroad programs, international curriculum and robust international student and scholar programs.

“At Kent State University, we are committed to granting access to students from all around the world and to make the whole world available for our students,” said Marcello Fantoni, Ph.D., Kent State’s vice president for global education. “We want to graduate students ready for the global world as active participants in a democratic society.”

Kent State’s student body includes 1,370 international students from nearly 100 countries. In 2019-2020, Kent State sent nearly 1,500 students abroad. Since resuming its international programming in July 2021, Kent State has returned to its full operations abroad and is already projected to surpass its previous record-setting enrollment in education-abroad programs by fall 2022.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the annual awards program. Serving more than 10,000 members and international educators worldwide, NAFSA is the largest nonprofit association dedicated to international education and exchange. Kent State will be featured in NAFSA’s report, “Internationalizing the Campus: Profiles of Success at Colleges and Universities,” that will be published this fall. The university also will be honored during the virtual and in-person programming as part of NAFSA’s 2022 Annual Conference and Expo this spring. To learn more about NAFSA’s Senator Paul Simon Awards, visit www.nafsa.org/SimonAward.

For more information about Kent State’s Office of Global Education, visit www.kent.edu/globaleducation.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University celebrates its international students during halftime of the Feb. 18 men’s basketball game at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.
Tuesday, February 22, 2022

Kent State University is the sole university in the U.S. to receive the prestigious 2022 Senator Paul Simon Award for Comprehensive Internationalization from NAFSA: Association of International Educators. The honor recognizes Kent State for overall excellence in integrating international education throughout all facets of the university and its campuses. 

Named after the late Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois, the NAFSA Simon Awards recognize outstanding innovation and accomplishment in campus internationalization, defined by NAFSA as “a conscious effort to integrate and infuse international, intercultural and global dimensions into the ethos and outcomes of their students’ education.” 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award is our nation’s top prize for excellence in global education,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “It is a richly deserved award that highlights our excellent education-abroad programs and our ongoing success in enrolling and graduating international students.”

Kent State’s global reach has been expansive, with educational centers in Florence, Italy, and Curitiba, Brazil, along with boasting more than 200 education-abroad programs. Along with globe-spanning international partnerships, it has outreach centers in China and India.

Kent State’s long history of international collaboration includes being among the first to exchange students with the Soviet Union during the Cold War and hosting Iranian students prior to Iran’s revolution in 1978-1979. Hosting international students and scholars has always been a priority for Kent State as demonstrated by its continued standing among the top 100 destinations for international students, according to Open Doors, a comprehensive information resource on international students and scholars studying or teaching at higher education institutions in the United States, and U.S. students studying abroad for academic credit at their home colleges or universities. 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award recognizes the internationalization efforts of our university and showcases how important it is for the development of students to have international experiences,” said Melody Tankersley, Ph.D., Kent State’s senior vice president and provost. “The award also recognizes the diversity of our university and brings global recognition to Kent State. 

“I would like to thank Vice President for Global Education Marcello Fantoni for his visionary leadership to help us get to where we are – to the point where we could win this impressive award,” Tankersley continued.

Kent State’s commitment to internationalization is embedded in its mission and strategic plan and is entrenched in the university’s identity through competitive research, comprehensive education-abroad programs, international curriculum and robust international student and scholar programs.

“At Kent State University, we are committed to granting access to students from all around the world and to make the whole world available for our students,” said Marcello Fantoni, Ph.D., Kent State’s vice president for global education. “We want to graduate students ready for the global world as active participants in a democratic society.”

Kent State’s student body includes 1,370 international students from nearly 100 countries. In 2019-2020, Kent State sent nearly 1,500 students abroad. Since resuming its international programming in July 2021, Kent State has returned to its full operations abroad and is already projected to surpass its previous record-setting enrollment in education-abroad programs by fall 2022.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the annual awards program. Serving more than 10,000 members and international educators worldwide, NAFSA is the largest nonprofit association dedicated to international education and exchange. Kent State will be featured in NAFSA’s report, “Internationalizing the Campus: Profiles of Success at Colleges and Universities,” that will be published this fall. The university also will be honored during the virtual and in-person programming as part of NAFSA’s 2022 Annual Conference and Expo this spring. To learn more about NAFSA’s Senator Paul Simon Awards, visit www.nafsa.org/SimonAward.

For more information about Kent State’s Office of Global Education, visit www.kent.edu/globaleducation.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University celebrates its international students during halftime of the Feb. 18 men’s basketball game at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.
Tuesday, February 22, 2022

Kent State University is the sole university in the U.S. to receive the prestigious 2022 Senator Paul Simon Award for Comprehensive Internationalization from NAFSA: Association of International Educators. The honor recognizes Kent State for overall excellence in integrating international education throughout all facets of the university and its campuses. 

Named after the late Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois, the NAFSA Simon Awards recognize outstanding innovation and accomplishment in campus internationalization, defined by NAFSA as “a conscious effort to integrate and infuse international, intercultural and global dimensions into the ethos and outcomes of their students’ education.” 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award is our nation’s top prize for excellence in global education,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “It is a richly deserved award that highlights our excellent education-abroad programs and our ongoing success in enrolling and graduating international students.”

Kent State’s global reach has been expansive, with educational centers in Florence, Italy, and Curitiba, Brazil, along with boasting more than 200 education-abroad programs. Along with globe-spanning international partnerships, it has outreach centers in China and India.

Kent State’s long history of international collaboration includes being among the first to exchange students with the Soviet Union during the Cold War and hosting Iranian students prior to Iran’s revolution in 1978-1979. Hosting international students and scholars has always been a priority for Kent State as demonstrated by its continued standing among the top 100 destinations for international students, according to Open Doors, a comprehensive information resource on international students and scholars studying or teaching at higher education institutions in the United States, and U.S. students studying abroad for academic credit at their home colleges or universities. 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award recognizes the internationalization efforts of our university and showcases how important it is for the development of students to have international experiences,” said Melody Tankersley, Ph.D., Kent State’s senior vice president and provost. “The award also recognizes the diversity of our university and brings global recognition to Kent State. 

“I would like to thank Vice President for Global Education Marcello Fantoni for his visionary leadership to help us get to where we are – to the point where we could win this impressive award,” Tankersley continued.

Kent State’s commitment to internationalization is embedded in its mission and strategic plan and is entrenched in the university’s identity through competitive research, comprehensive education-abroad programs, international curriculum and robust international student and scholar programs.

“At Kent State University, we are committed to granting access to students from all around the world and to make the whole world available for our students,” said Marcello Fantoni, Ph.D., Kent State’s vice president for global education. “We want to graduate students ready for the global world as active participants in a democratic society.”

Kent State’s student body includes 1,370 international students from nearly 100 countries. In 2019-2020, Kent State sent nearly 1,500 students abroad. Since resuming its international programming in July 2021, Kent State has returned to its full operations abroad and is already projected to surpass its previous record-setting enrollment in education-abroad programs by fall 2022.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the annual awards program. Serving more than 10,000 members and international educators worldwide, NAFSA is the largest nonprofit association dedicated to international education and exchange. Kent State will be featured in NAFSA’s report, “Internationalizing the Campus: Profiles of Success at Colleges and Universities,” that will be published this fall. The university also will be honored during the virtual and in-person programming as part of NAFSA’s 2022 Annual Conference and Expo this spring. To learn more about NAFSA’s Senator Paul Simon Awards, visit www.nafsa.org/SimonAward.

For more information about Kent State’s Office of Global Education, visit www.kent.edu/globaleducation.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University celebrates its international students during halftime of the Feb. 18 men’s basketball game at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.
Tuesday, February 22, 2022

Kent State University is the sole university in the U.S. to receive the prestigious 2022 Senator Paul Simon Award for Comprehensive Internationalization from NAFSA: Association of International Educators. The honor recognizes Kent State for overall excellence in integrating international education throughout all facets of the university and its campuses. 

Named after the late Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois, the NAFSA Simon Awards recognize outstanding innovation and accomplishment in campus internationalization, defined by NAFSA as “a conscious effort to integrate and infuse international, intercultural and global dimensions into the ethos and outcomes of their students’ education.” 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award is our nation’s top prize for excellence in global education,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “It is a richly deserved award that highlights our excellent education-abroad programs and our ongoing success in enrolling and graduating international students.”

Kent State’s global reach has been expansive, with educational centers in Florence, Italy, and Curitiba, Brazil, along with boasting more than 200 education-abroad programs. Along with globe-spanning international partnerships, it has outreach centers in China and India.

Kent State’s long history of international collaboration includes being among the first to exchange students with the Soviet Union during the Cold War and hosting Iranian students prior to Iran’s revolution in 1978-1979. Hosting international students and scholars has always been a priority for Kent State as demonstrated by its continued standing among the top 100 destinations for international students, according to Open Doors, a comprehensive information resource on international students and scholars studying or teaching at higher education institutions in the United States, and U.S. students studying abroad for academic credit at their home colleges or universities. 

“The Senator Paul Simon Award recognizes the internationalization efforts of our university and showcases how important it is for the development of students to have international experiences,” said Melody Tankersley, Ph.D., Kent State’s senior vice president and provost. “The award also recognizes the diversity of our university and brings global recognition to Kent State. 

“I would like to thank Vice President for Global Education Marcello Fantoni for his visionary leadership to help us get to where we are – to the point where we could win this impressive award,” Tankersley continued.

Kent State’s commitment to internationalization is embedded in its mission and strategic plan and is entrenched in the university’s identity through competitive research, comprehensive education-abroad programs, international curriculum and robust international student and scholar programs.

“At Kent State University, we are committed to granting access to students from all around the world and to make the whole world available for our students,” said Marcello Fantoni, Ph.D., Kent State’s vice president for global education. “We want to graduate students ready for the global world as active participants in a democratic society.”

Kent State’s student body includes 1,370 international students from nearly 100 countries. In 2019-2020, Kent State sent nearly 1,500 students abroad. Since resuming its international programming in July 2021, Kent State has returned to its full operations abroad and is already projected to surpass its previous record-setting enrollment in education-abroad programs by fall 2022.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the annual awards program. Serving more than 10,000 members and international educators worldwide, NAFSA is the largest nonprofit association dedicated to international education and exchange. Kent State will be featured in NAFSA’s report, “Internationalizing the Campus: Profiles of Success at Colleges and Universities,” that will be published this fall. The university also will be honored during the virtual and in-person programming as part of NAFSA’s 2022 Annual Conference and Expo this spring. To learn more about NAFSA’s Senator Paul Simon Awards, visit www.nafsa.org/SimonAward.

For more information about Kent State’s Office of Global Education, visit www.kent.edu/globaleducation.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Thursday, February 10, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Thursday, February 10, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Thursday, February 10, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Thursday, February 10, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Thursday, February 10, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Thursday, February 10, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Monday, February 07, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Monday, February 07, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Monday, February 07, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Monday, February 07, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Monday, February 07, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A Kent State University faculty researcher (right) in the Department of Anthropology works with a student (left) in a laboratory in Lowry Hall.
Monday, February 07, 2022

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has awarded Kent State University the esteemed R1 status for research, which is the highest recognition that doctoral universities can receive. The prestigious designation affirms Kent State’s place as an elite research institution and puts the university in the company of universities such as Yale, Harvard and the University of California-Berkeley. 

Kent State becomes one of five universities in Ohio to be designated R1, joining Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University and Ohio University. Institutions with the R1 designation are considered to have “very high research activity.” Only 146 universities in the nation have R1 status. Kent State, Ohio University and the University at Buffalo are the only Mid-American Conference schools to carry this coveted and esteemed designation.

“This recognition underscores the excellence and the breadth of research and scholarship at Kent State,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the hard work of our faculty, staff and leadership at Kent State. It is, along with attaining a record-high graduation rate on the Kent Campus and the growing diversification of our student body, one of three signature achievements of the last decade.”

The R1 classification is based on several data points, including the amount of research funding, the number of faculty members, the number of postdoctoral researchers and non-faculty researchers, and the number of doctoral degrees awarded in four main areas.

Over the past five years, Kent State has established five research institutes charged with continuing to build Kent State’s grant funding in areas of particular research strength. These investments combined with a focus on mentoring junior faculty and growing interdisciplinary, collaborative projects have resulted in continued growth in federal funding.

“The R1 designation brings added prestige to Kent State, making the university more attractive to faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and students,” said Doug Delahanty, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for research and sponsored programs. “It also opens up other funding avenues.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades. Beginning in 1970, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Classifications are updated every three years. For more information about the Carnegie Classification, visit https://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Photo from the Ashtabula Nursing program
Tuesday, February 01, 2022

Intravenous (IV) needle insertion is a practice that many medical professionals learn and need to master. A new project in the works at Kent State will help nursing students improve their skills with cutting-edge technology. 

Photo of Kwangtaek Kim, PhD
Jeremy Jarzembak

Kwangtaek Kim, Ph.D., professor of computer science and principal investigator of the project, Jeremy Jarzembak, MSN, senior lecturer in the College of Nursing and co-principal investigator of the project, and Robert Clements, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and co-principal investigator of the project, John Dunlonsky, Ph.D., professor of psychology, Jennifer Shanoltzer, MSN, and Ann James, MSN, senior lecturers in the College of Nursing, are joining forces to develop technology using haptics and mixed reality to let students practice inserting needles in a controlled environment and investigate whether controlled variability in practice (disuse theory) improves needle insertion skills.

Kim’s work focuses on the haptics portion of this project, Clements’ involves the mixed reality portion and Jarzembak provides the nursing expertise, having worked for over 17 years as an RN in the intensive care unit he now teaches nursing students. 

James and Shanoltzer will support Jarzembak in providing nursing experience. Meanwhile, Dunlonsky, expert in learning science, will provide knowledge to understand the causes of improved learning in hand-eye skills as well as new insight into effective learning technology, which may be used to improve learning in similar settings or be transformative to other fields. 

Robert Clements Photograph

“That is what is interesting to me, as far as this particular project’s goals, is the multidisciplinary nature,” Clements said. “I think to get people with these ideas together is what interests me because you are allowing us to think of something from different viewpoints.”

Haptics, or the technological capability that allows for the user to experience touch and motion, is an important factor being implemented throughout this research project. 

“Haptics focuses on the sense of touch, and the device interface allows you to touch anything you want,” Kim said.“Meanwhile, mixed reality is the visually oriented interface, and you see virtual content through that device, along with what you are looking at.”

“My role in the development of the project is to basically generate an infrastructure where we can use what Kim has developed in haptics on many different devices to kind of make it usable on a cell phone or other devices for visualization,” Clements said.

This grant-funded project has great potential to turn the haptics and mixed-reality into a seamless experience that will allow nursing students to see and feel the synthetic arm that they are practicing IV needle insertion on. 

Also, the technology has the potential to allow for practicing on different skin types, tattoos, dehydrated patients and more. These scenarios would allow nursing students to better prepare for hurdles they may face in the field. 

“It will offer students different types of variabilities that they might come across in the field, but they get to practice it in a safe environment over and over again until they achieve mastery,” Jarzembak said.

This technology could change the way IV insertion is taught.

“We are hoping this product is going to revolutionize the way that we actually teach and train students, and hopefully it will produce better outcomes for patients because our students will be more proficient in this skill,”  Jarzembak said.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation and will last for three years, starting in September 2021 and continuing through August 2024. 

Learn more about the Kent State College of Nursing.

Learn more about the Computer Science Department.

Learn more about the Department of Biological Sciences

Flashes Fighting Hunger Mobile Food Pantry
Tuesday, January 25, 2022

Community Engaged Learning (CEL) recently celebrated 10 years of fighting hunger, promoting food security, and reducing food waste by kicking off Flashes Fighting Hunger, an initiative dedicated to continuing that tradition with new tools and programming.

The new Flashes Fighting Hunger initiative takes the last 10 years to a new level, going beyond a kitchen that provides meals by becoming a program that prevents food waste, promotes food recovery and hosts multiple food pantries each week to serve the region.

Image
volunteers filling boxes with canned goods

A 10-year anniversary celebration was held on Nov. 18, 2021, at the Center for Undergraduate Excellence (CUE), featuring University College Dean Eboni Pringle and Amanda Woodyard, director of Community Engaged Learning.

During the kick-off event, students, staff, faculty and guests celebrated 10 great years of providing to those in need.

“Kent State has made a huge impact on fighting hunger and food insecurity for the last decade,” Woodyard said. “This new initiative is going to allow us to spread awareness, speak more of who we are and what we do.”

In addition to announcing the new initiative, CEL launched the new Mobile Food Pantry, a truck donated by Culinary Services, that will expand food access to pockets of the Portage County community that face challenges to utilizing current resources such as lack of transportation or residing in food deserts.         

“The mobile pantry allows us to reach vulnerable populations that may not have the means to travel to on-campus or off-campus pantries that are happening around the area,” Woodyard said. “We really want this mobile unit to be the kind of lifeline for some families that live in areas that might not have access to transportation.”

Attendees at the event worked together to box up perishable and non-perishable items and load the new mobile food pantry for its maiden voyage. CEL wants everyone to know opportunities exist for anyone with an interest.

“There is always a place for everyone whether it’s in the kitchen cooking, marketing or doing social media for us,” Woodyard said, “We have many roles available and we want students to know that no matter your passion, your skills, your abilities, we could always use help with Flashes Fighting Hunger.”

The organization recognizes it's providing help to the community by also helping Kent State students.

“I think the most important takeaway is how powerful our students can be when they recognize the needs and work together to determine how to meet them,” Pringle said. “I love the thought of us being able to bring students and the community together and see the power that happens.”

For more information on Flashes Fighting Hunger, visit www.kent.edu/community/flashes-fighting-hunger.

To give to Flashes Fighting Hunger, donate at www.flashes.givetokent.org/campaign/campus-kitchen/c326482.

To find opportunities to volunteer visit www.app.helperhelper.com/inst/192/opportunities?forg=6013.

Flashes Fighting Hunger Mobile Food Pantry
Tuesday, January 25, 2022

Community Engaged Learning (CEL) recently celebrated 10 years of fighting hunger, promoting food security, and reducing food waste by kicking off Flashes Fighting Hunger, an initiative dedicated to continuing that tradition with new tools and programming.

The new Flashes Fighting Hunger initiative takes the last 10 years to a new level, going beyond a kitchen that provides meals by becoming a program that prevents food waste, promotes food recovery and hosts multiple food pantries each week to serve the region.

Image
volunteers filling boxes with canned goods

A 10-year anniversary celebration was held on Nov. 18, 2021, at the Center for Undergraduate Excellence (CUE), featuring University College Dean Eboni Pringle and Amanda Woodyard, director of Community Engaged Learning.

During the kick-off event, students, staff, faculty and guests celebrated 10 great years of providing to those in need.

“Kent State has made a huge impact on fighting hunger and food insecurity for the last decade,” Woodyard said. “This new initiative is going to allow us to spread awareness, speak more of who we are and what we do.”

In addition to announcing the new initiative, CEL launched the new Mobile Food Pantry, a truck donated by Culinary Services, that will expand food access to pockets of the Portage County community that face challenges to utilizing current resources such as lack of transportation or residing in food deserts.         

“The mobile pantry allows us to reach vulnerable populations that may not have the means to travel to on-campus or off-campus pantries that are happening around the area,” Woodyard said. “We really want this mobile unit to be the kind of lifeline for some families that live in areas that might not have access to transportation.”

Attendees at the event worked together to box up perishable and non-perishable items and load the new mobile food pantry for its maiden voyage. CEL wants everyone to know opportunities exist for anyone with an interest.

“There is always a place for everyone whether it’s in the kitchen cooking, marketing or doing social media for us,” Woodyard said, “We have many roles available and we want students to know that no matter your passion, your skills, your abilities, we could always use help with Flashes Fighting Hunger.”

The organization recognizes it's providing help to the community by also helping Kent State students.

“I think the most important takeaway is how powerful our students can be when they recognize the needs and work together to determine how to meet them,” Pringle said. “I love the thought of us being able to bring students and the community together and see the power that happens.”

For more information on Flashes Fighting Hunger, visit www.kent.edu/community/flashes-fighting-hunger.

To give to Flashes Fighting Hunger, donate at www.flashes.givetokent.org/campaign/campus-kitchen/c326482.

To find opportunities to volunteer visit www.app.helperhelper.com/inst/192/opportunities?forg=6013.

Flashes Fighting Hunger Mobile Food Pantry
Tuesday, January 25, 2022

Community Engaged Learning (CEL) recently celebrated 10 years of fighting hunger, promoting food security, and reducing food waste by kicking off Flashes Fighting Hunger, an initiative dedicated to continuing that tradition with new tools and programming.

The new Flashes Fighting Hunger initiative takes the last 10 years to a new level, going beyond a kitchen that provides meals by becoming a program that prevents food waste, promotes food recovery and hosts multiple food pantries each week to serve the region.

Image
volunteers filling boxes with canned goods

A 10-year anniversary celebration was held on Nov. 18, 2021, at the Center for Undergraduate Excellence (CUE), featuring University College Dean Eboni Pringle and Amanda Woodyard, director of Community Engaged Learning.

During the kick-off event, students, staff, faculty and guests celebrated 10 great years of providing to those in need.

“Kent State has made a huge impact on fighting hunger and food insecurity for the last decade,” Woodyard said. “This new initiative is going to allow us to spread awareness, speak more of who we are and what we do.”

In addition to announcing the new initiative, CEL launched the new Mobile Food Pantry, a truck donated by Culinary Services, that will expand food access to pockets of the Portage County community that face challenges to utilizing current resources such as lack of transportation or residing in food deserts.         

“The mobile pantry allows us to reach vulnerable populations that may not have the means to travel to on-campus or off-campus pantries that are happening around the area,” Woodyard said. “We really want this mobile unit to be the kind of lifeline for some families that live in areas that might not have access to transportation.”

Attendees at the event worked together to box up perishable and non-perishable items and load the new mobile food pantry for its maiden voyage. CEL wants everyone to know opportunities exist for anyone with an interest.

“There is always a place for everyone whether it’s in the kitchen cooking, marketing or doing social media for us,” Woodyard said, “We have many roles available and we want students to know that no matter your passion, your skills, your abilities, we could always use help with Flashes Fighting Hunger.”

The organization recognizes it's providing help to the community by also helping Kent State students.

“I think the most important takeaway is how powerful our students can be when they recognize the needs and work together to determine how to meet them,” Pringle said. “I love the thought of us being able to bring students and the community together and see the power that happens.”

For more information on Flashes Fighting Hunger, visit www.kent.edu/community/flashes-fighting-hunger.

To give to Flashes Fighting Hunger, donate at www.flashes.givetokent.org/campaign/campus-kitchen/c326482.

To find opportunities to volunteer visit www.app.helperhelper.com/inst/192/opportunities?forg=6013.

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Professional-in-Residence
Wednesday, December 01, 2021

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., is a Professional-in-Residence at Kent State University in the School of Media and Journalism, part of the College of Communication and Information. Prior to teaching at Kent State, Canfora served as the chief communications officer for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District and taught high school journalism and speech. Canfora was also a student at Kent State, starting in 1968, and is a survivor of the May 4, 1970, shootings at Kent State. She earned her doctorate in educational administration, her master’s in journalism and public relations, and her bachelor’s in English/speech. She is heavily involved in activism as well.

Learn more about Canfora as she answers these 10 questions.

Q. How do you describe your current position as a Professional-in-Residence?

The opportunity to serve Kent State as a Professional-in-Residence enables me to return to the place where I trained for my career and to give back to my students. My experience in the world of public relations and news reporting was very different from what I expected. There were many times that I thought there was nothing in my textbooks from my college experience that prepared me for the real world. So the opportunity to return to Kent State in an official position means I can actually share those experiences as part of the curriculum. I’m no longer a guest speaker, but I’m actually on the staff and bringing that experience directly into the classroom.

Q. How does it feel going from a student here to a professor?

Kent State was the place where I became aware of the world around me. When I was an undergraduate in 1968, I was largely unaware of what was happening, and it was here that I learned to see the world as a much bigger place than my own small sphere. It’s where I learned to see injustice and not only care about it, but to act on my conscience and take a stand on issues. So as a professor now, I just hope every student can find time to be a student of life and to be what I think all college students should be – the conscience of America.

Q. As a student who survived the shootings at Kent State more than 50 years ago, what is the most significant change you’ve witnessed at Kent State?

Kent State has arrived at a place I never thought I would see in my lifetime. The current administration has shown a commitment to continued education and commemoration of May 4, one of the most pivotal events in American history. This shift from previous efforts to distance the university from its legacy gives me and other survivors comfort that when we are gone, the truth will live on.

Q. What do you want to accomplish in working with the Office of the President and the May 4 Presidential Advisory Committee?

May 4 was a defining moment in my life. It remains a galvanizing influence on what I teach and how I teach. It can’t just be something that we do in May every year. It must be something that we do throughout the school year. My generation used our voices and our numbers to stop a war in 1970. The current generation can use their voices and their numbers to effect even greater change. So when we teach about May 4, we teach about injustice, about the world in which we live in and how to make it a more fair, just and good place for all. That should be embedded as part of the curriculum. What happened to us at Kent State should be something that we learn about and care enough about and to act on issues of importance in our lives.

Q. What would you like to develop for May 4 initiatives in the future?

It's my hope that the May 4 Task Force will continue to play a role not only with a seat at the table of the advisory committee, but also in the ongoing education efforts in making sure that, from August through May, we are teaching the lessons of May 4 and how they apply to emerging movements today. I'm hoping that, as a member of the faculty, I can be part of planning for yearlong, campus-wide programming.

Q. What is your advice to student activists?

There is strength in numbers. But many students today don’t have time to be on campus, to engage with other students, to pay attention to what’s going on and to do the research necessary to know what’s true and what’s not. So my strongest advice is always to find that time. You won’t be given that time, but you have to make that time to engage in dialogue about the issues of the day, to check your facts and to check your sources. Decide what is worth knowing and what you care enough to act on, because if you value truth and you care about human rights, your conscience won’t let you ignore social injustice or economic disparity.

Q. What are your hopes for your current students?

My students inspire me. This generation is emerging as a very bright, thoughtful and committed group. I’m hoping that they will register in large numbers to vote because we didn’t have the right to vote when I was their age. I see this new generation of bright, young people who if they focus on the issues that unite them rather than those that divide them, they can make the world better.

Q. What is your favorite part about working at Kent State?

Just being with students. They energize me. My favorite part of my job is seeing the resiliency of faculty and students, especially living through a pandemic. Every day, I have an opportunity to see people finding new and creative ways to function in a world that isn’t optimal.

Q. What is a motto you live by?

Listen to your heart above all other voices. I talk a lot about the shift in philosophy during the transcendental period when Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau challenged Americans to follow their heart and their gut, because within us is always the answer to do what is right.

Q. What is a fun fact about you that not many people know?

I’m a professional musician. I fell in love with the harp in 1972, moved to New York just to learn it and studied for several years without even owning a harp. Now I play weddings just about every weekend. I never planned to play professionally. I just wanted to learn to play. But over the years, I’ve created a business out of something that is one of my greatest sources of joy.

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Professional-in-Residence
Wednesday, December 01, 2021

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., is a Professional-in-Residence at Kent State University in the School of Media and Journalism, part of the College of Communication and Information. Prior to teaching at Kent State, Canfora served as the chief communications officer for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District and taught high school journalism and speech. Canfora was also a student at Kent State, starting in 1968, and is a survivor of the May 4, 1970, shootings at Kent State. She earned her doctorate in educational administration, her master’s in journalism and public relations, and her bachelor’s in English/speech. She is heavily involved in activism as well.

Learn more about Canfora as she answers these 10 questions.

Q. How do you describe your current position as a Professional-in-Residence?

The opportunity to serve Kent State as a Professional-in-Residence enables me to return to the place where I trained for my career and to give back to my students. My experience in the world of public relations and news reporting was very different from what I expected. There were many times that I thought there was nothing in my textbooks from my college experience that prepared me for the real world. So the opportunity to return to Kent State in an official position means I can actually share those experiences as part of the curriculum. I’m no longer a guest speaker, but I’m actually on the staff and bringing that experience directly into the classroom.

Q. How does it feel going from a student here to a professor?

Kent State was the place where I became aware of the world around me. When I was an undergraduate in 1968, I was largely unaware of what was happening, and it was here that I learned to see the world as a much bigger place than my own small sphere. It’s where I learned to see injustice and not only care about it, but to act on my conscience and take a stand on issues. So as a professor now, I just hope every student can find time to be a student of life and to be what I think all college students should be – the conscience of America.

Q. As a student who survived the shootings at Kent State more than 50 years ago, what is the most significant change you’ve witnessed at Kent State?

Kent State has arrived at a place I never thought I would see in my lifetime. The current administration has shown a commitment to continued education and commemoration of May 4, one of the most pivotal events in American history. This shift from previous efforts to distance the university from its legacy gives me and other survivors comfort that when we are gone, the truth will live on.

Q. What do you want to accomplish in working with the Office of the President and the May 4 Presidential Advisory Committee?

May 4 was a defining moment in my life. It remains a galvanizing influence on what I teach and how I teach. It can’t just be something that we do in May every year. It must be something that we do throughout the school year. My generation used our voices and our numbers to stop a war in 1970. The current generation can use their voices and their numbers to effect even greater change. So when we teach about May 4, we teach about injustice, about the world in which we live in and how to make it a more fair, just and good place for all. That should be embedded as part of the curriculum. What happened to us at Kent State should be something that we learn about and care enough about and to act on issues of importance in our lives.

Q. What would you like to develop for May 4 initiatives in the future?

It's my hope that the May 4 Task Force will continue to play a role not only with a seat at the table of the advisory committee, but also in the ongoing education efforts in making sure that, from August through May, we are teaching the lessons of May 4 and how they apply to emerging movements today. I'm hoping that, as a member of the faculty, I can be part of planning for yearlong, campus-wide programming.

Q. What is your advice to student activists?

There is strength in numbers. But many students today don’t have time to be on campus, to engage with other students, to pay attention to what’s going on and to do the research necessary to know what’s true and what’s not. So my strongest advice is always to find that time. You won’t be given that time, but you have to make that time to engage in dialogue about the issues of the day, to check your facts and to check your sources. Decide what is worth knowing and what you care enough to act on, because if you value truth and you care about human rights, your conscience won’t let you ignore social injustice or economic disparity.

Q. What are your hopes for your current students?

My students inspire me. This generation is emerging as a very bright, thoughtful and committed group. I’m hoping that they will register in large numbers to vote because we didn’t have the right to vote when I was their age. I see this new generation of bright, young people who if they focus on the issues that unite them rather than those that divide them, they can make the world better.

Q. What is your favorite part about working at Kent State?

Just being with students. They energize me. My favorite part of my job is seeing the resiliency of faculty and students, especially living through a pandemic. Every day, I have an opportunity to see people finding new and creative ways to function in a world that isn’t optimal.

Q. What is a motto you live by?

Listen to your heart above all other voices. I talk a lot about the shift in philosophy during the transcendental period when Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau challenged Americans to follow their heart and their gut, because within us is always the answer to do what is right.

Q. What is a fun fact about you that not many people know?

I’m a professional musician. I fell in love with the harp in 1972, moved to New York just to learn it and studied for several years without even owning a harp. Now I play weddings just about every weekend. I never planned to play professionally. I just wanted to learn to play. But over the years, I’ve created a business out of something that is one of my greatest sources of joy.

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Professional-in-Residence
Wednesday, December 01, 2021

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., is a Professional-in-Residence at Kent State University in the School of Media and Journalism, part of the College of Communication and Information. Prior to teaching at Kent State, Canfora served as the chief communications officer for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District and taught high school journalism and speech. Canfora was also a student at Kent State, starting in 1968, and is a survivor of the May 4, 1970, shootings at Kent State. She earned her doctorate in educational administration, her master’s in journalism and public relations, and her bachelor’s in English/speech. She is heavily involved in activism as well.

Learn more about Canfora as she answers these 10 questions.

Q. How do you describe your current position as a Professional-in-Residence?

The opportunity to serve Kent State as a Professional-in-Residence enables me to return to the place where I trained for my career and to give back to my students. My experience in the world of public relations and news reporting was very different from what I expected. There were many times that I thought there was nothing in my textbooks from my college experience that prepared me for the real world. So the opportunity to return to Kent State in an official position means I can actually share those experiences as part of the curriculum. I’m no longer a guest speaker, but I’m actually on the staff and bringing that experience directly into the classroom.

Q. How does it feel going from a student here to a professor?

Kent State was the place where I became aware of the world around me. When I was an undergraduate in 1968, I was largely unaware of what was happening, and it was here that I learned to see the world as a much bigger place than my own small sphere. It’s where I learned to see injustice and not only care about it, but to act on my conscience and take a stand on issues. So as a professor now, I just hope every student can find time to be a student of life and to be what I think all college students should be – the conscience of America.

Q. As a student who survived the shootings at Kent State more than 50 years ago, what is the most significant change you’ve witnessed at Kent State?

Kent State has arrived at a place I never thought I would see in my lifetime. The current administration has shown a commitment to continued education and commemoration of May 4, one of the most pivotal events in American history. This shift from previous efforts to distance the university from its legacy gives me and other survivors comfort that when we are gone, the truth will live on.

Q. What do you want to accomplish in working with the Office of the President and the May 4 Presidential Advisory Committee?

May 4 was a defining moment in my life. It remains a galvanizing influence on what I teach and how I teach. It can’t just be something that we do in May every year. It must be something that we do throughout the school year. My generation used our voices and our numbers to stop a war in 1970. The current generation can use their voices and their numbers to effect even greater change. So when we teach about May 4, we teach about injustice, about the world in which we live in and how to make it a more fair, just and good place for all. That should be embedded as part of the curriculum. What happened to us at Kent State should be something that we learn about and care enough about and to act on issues of importance in our lives.

Q. What would you like to develop for May 4 initiatives in the future?

It's my hope that the May 4 Task Force will continue to play a role not only with a seat at the table of the advisory committee, but also in the ongoing education efforts in making sure that, from August through May, we are teaching the lessons of May 4 and how they apply to emerging movements today. I'm hoping that, as a member of the faculty, I can be part of planning for yearlong, campus-wide programming.

Q. What is your advice to student activists?

There is strength in numbers. But many students today don’t have time to be on campus, to engage with other students, to pay attention to what’s going on and to do the research necessary to know what’s true and what’s not. So my strongest advice is always to find that time. You won’t be given that time, but you have to make that time to engage in dialogue about the issues of the day, to check your facts and to check your sources. Decide what is worth knowing and what you care enough to act on, because if you value truth and you care about human rights, your conscience won’t let you ignore social injustice or economic disparity.

Q. What are your hopes for your current students?

My students inspire me. This generation is emerging as a very bright, thoughtful and committed group. I’m hoping that they will register in large numbers to vote because we didn’t have the right to vote when I was their age. I see this new generation of bright, young people who if they focus on the issues that unite them rather than those that divide them, they can make the world better.

Q. What is your favorite part about working at Kent State?

Just being with students. They energize me. My favorite part of my job is seeing the resiliency of faculty and students, especially living through a pandemic. Every day, I have an opportunity to see people finding new and creative ways to function in a world that isn’t optimal.

Q. What is a motto you live by?

Listen to your heart above all other voices. I talk a lot about the shift in philosophy during the transcendental period when Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau challenged Americans to follow their heart and their gut, because within us is always the answer to do what is right.

Q. What is a fun fact about you that not many people know?

I’m a professional musician. I fell in love with the harp in 1972, moved to New York just to learn it and studied for several years without even owning a harp. Now I play weddings just about every weekend. I never planned to play professionally. I just wanted to learn to play. But over the years, I’ve created a business out of something that is one of my greatest sources of joy.

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Professional-in-Residence
Wednesday, December 01, 2021

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., is a Professional-in-Residence at Kent State University in the School of Media and Journalism, part of the College of Communication and Information. Prior to teaching at Kent State, Canfora served as the chief communications officer for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District and taught high school journalism and speech. Canfora was also a student at Kent State, starting in 1968, and is a survivor of the May 4, 1970, shootings at Kent State. She earned her doctorate in educational administration, her master’s in journalism and public relations, and her bachelor’s in English/speech. She is heavily involved in activism as well.

Learn more about Canfora as she answers these 10 questions.

Q. How do you describe your current position as a Professional-in-Residence?

The opportunity to serve Kent State as a Professional-in-Residence enables me to return to the place where I trained for my career and to give back to my students. My experience in the world of public relations and news reporting was very different from what I expected. There were many times that I thought there was nothing in my textbooks from my college experience that prepared me for the real world. So the opportunity to return to Kent State in an official position means I can actually share those experiences as part of the curriculum. I’m no longer a guest speaker, but I’m actually on the staff and bringing that experience directly into the classroom.

Q. How does it feel going from a student here to a professor?

Kent State was the place where I became aware of the world around me. When I was an undergraduate in 1968, I was largely unaware of what was happening, and it was here that I learned to see the world as a much bigger place than my own small sphere. It’s where I learned to see injustice and not only care about it, but to act on my conscience and take a stand on issues. So as a professor now, I just hope every student can find time to be a student of life and to be what I think all college students should be – the conscience of America.

Q. As a student who survived the shootings at Kent State more than 50 years ago, what is the most significant change you’ve witnessed at Kent State?

Kent State has arrived at a place I never thought I would see in my lifetime. The current administration has shown a commitment to continued education and commemoration of May 4, one of the most pivotal events in American history. This shift from previous efforts to distance the university from its legacy gives me and other survivors comfort that when we are gone, the truth will live on.

Q. What do you want to accomplish in working with the Office of the President and the May 4 Presidential Advisory Committee?

May 4 was a defining moment in my life. It remains a galvanizing influence on what I teach and how I teach. It can’t just be something that we do in May every year. It must be something that we do throughout the school year. My generation used our voices and our numbers to stop a war in 1970. The current generation can use their voices and their numbers to effect even greater change. So when we teach about May 4, we teach about injustice, about the world in which we live in and how to make it a more fair, just and good place for all. That should be embedded as part of the curriculum. What happened to us at Kent State should be something that we learn about and care enough about and to act on issues of importance in our lives.

Q. What would you like to develop for May 4 initiatives in the future?

It's my hope that the May 4 Task Force will continue to play a role not only with a seat at the table of the advisory committee, but also in the ongoing education efforts in making sure that, from August through May, we are teaching the lessons of May 4 and how they apply to emerging movements today. I'm hoping that, as a member of the faculty, I can be part of planning for yearlong, campus-wide programming.

Q. What is your advice to student activists?

There is strength in numbers. But many students today don’t have time to be on campus, to engage with other students, to pay attention to what’s going on and to do the research necessary to know what’s true and what’s not. So my strongest advice is always to find that time. You won’t be given that time, but you have to make that time to engage in dialogue about the issues of the day, to check your facts and to check your sources. Decide what is worth knowing and what you care enough to act on, because if you value truth and you care about human rights, your conscience won’t let you ignore social injustice or economic disparity.

Q. What are your hopes for your current students?

My students inspire me. This generation is emerging as a very bright, thoughtful and committed group. I’m hoping that they will register in large numbers to vote because we didn’t have the right to vote when I was their age. I see this new generation of bright, young people who if they focus on the issues that unite them rather than those that divide them, they can make the world better.

Q. What is your favorite part about working at Kent State?

Just being with students. They energize me. My favorite part of my job is seeing the resiliency of faculty and students, especially living through a pandemic. Every day, I have an opportunity to see people finding new and creative ways to function in a world that isn’t optimal.

Q. What is a motto you live by?

Listen to your heart above all other voices. I talk a lot about the shift in philosophy during the transcendental period when Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau challenged Americans to follow their heart and their gut, because within us is always the answer to do what is right.

Q. What is a fun fact about you that not many people know?

I’m a professional musician. I fell in love with the harp in 1972, moved to New York just to learn it and studied for several years without even owning a harp. Now I play weddings just about every weekend. I never planned to play professionally. I just wanted to learn to play. But over the years, I’ve created a business out of something that is one of my greatest sources of joy.

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Professional-in-Residence
Wednesday, December 01, 2021

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., is a Professional-in-Residence at Kent State University in the School of Media and Journalism, part of the College of Communication and Information. Prior to teaching at Kent State, Canfora served as the chief communications officer for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District and taught high school journalism and speech. Canfora was also a student at Kent State, starting in 1968, and is a survivor of the May 4, 1970, shootings at Kent State. She earned her doctorate in educational administration, her master’s in journalism and public relations, and her bachelor’s in English/speech. She is heavily involved in activism as well.

Learn more about Canfora as she answers these 10 questions.

Q. How do you describe your current position as a Professional-in-Residence?

The opportunity to serve Kent State as a Professional-in-Residence enables me to return to the place where I trained for my career and to give back to my students. My experience in the world of public relations and news reporting was very different from what I expected. There were many times that I thought there was nothing in my textbooks from my college experience that prepared me for the real world. So the opportunity to return to Kent State in an official position means I can actually share those experiences as part of the curriculum. I’m no longer a guest speaker, but I’m actually on the staff and bringing that experience directly into the classroom.

Q. How does it feel going from a student here to a professor?

Kent State was the place where I became aware of the world around me. When I was an undergraduate in 1968, I was largely unaware of what was happening, and it was here that I learned to see the world as a much bigger place than my own small sphere. It’s where I learned to see injustice and not only care about it, but to act on my conscience and take a stand on issues. So as a professor now, I just hope every student can find time to be a student of life and to be what I think all college students should be – the conscience of America.

Q. As a student who survived the shootings at Kent State more than 50 years ago, what is the most significant change you’ve witnessed at Kent State?

Kent State has arrived at a place I never thought I would see in my lifetime. The current administration has shown a commitment to continued education and commemoration of May 4, one of the most pivotal events in American history. This shift from previous efforts to distance the university from its legacy gives me and other survivors comfort that when we are gone, the truth will live on.

Q. What do you want to accomplish in working with the Office of the President and the May 4 Presidential Advisory Committee?

May 4 was a defining moment in my life. It remains a galvanizing influence on what I teach and how I teach. It can’t just be something that we do in May every year. It must be something that we do throughout the school year. My generation used our voices and our numbers to stop a war in 1970. The current generation can use their voices and their numbers to effect even greater change. So when we teach about May 4, we teach about injustice, about the world in which we live in and how to make it a more fair, just and good place for all. That should be embedded as part of the curriculum. What happened to us at Kent State should be something that we learn about and care enough about and to act on issues of importance in our lives.

Q. What would you like to develop for May 4 initiatives in the future?

It's my hope that the May 4 Task Force will continue to play a role not only with a seat at the table of the advisory committee, but also in the ongoing education efforts in making sure that, from August through May, we are teaching the lessons of May 4 and how they apply to emerging movements today. I'm hoping that, as a member of the faculty, I can be part of planning for yearlong, campus-wide programming.

Q. What is your advice to student activists?

There is strength in numbers. But many students today don’t have time to be on campus, to engage with other students, to pay attention to what’s going on and to do the research necessary to know what’s true and what’s not. So my strongest advice is always to find that time. You won’t be given that time, but you have to make that time to engage in dialogue about the issues of the day, to check your facts and to check your sources. Decide what is worth knowing and what you care enough to act on, because if you value truth and you care about human rights, your conscience won’t let you ignore social injustice or economic disparity.

Q. What are your hopes for your current students?

My students inspire me. This generation is emerging as a very bright, thoughtful and committed group. I’m hoping that they will register in large numbers to vote because we didn’t have the right to vote when I was their age. I see this new generation of bright, young people who if they focus on the issues that unite them rather than those that divide them, they can make the world better.

Q. What is your favorite part about working at Kent State?

Just being with students. They energize me. My favorite part of my job is seeing the resiliency of faculty and students, especially living through a pandemic. Every day, I have an opportunity to see people finding new and creative ways to function in a world that isn’t optimal.

Q. What is a motto you live by?

Listen to your heart above all other voices. I talk a lot about the shift in philosophy during the transcendental period when Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau challenged Americans to follow their heart and their gut, because within us is always the answer to do what is right.

Q. What is a fun fact about you that not many people know?

I’m a professional musician. I fell in love with the harp in 1972, moved to New York just to learn it and studied for several years without even owning a harp. Now I play weddings just about every weekend. I never planned to play professionally. I just wanted to learn to play. But over the years, I’ve created a business out of something that is one of my greatest sources of joy.

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Professional-in-Residence
Wednesday, December 01, 2021

Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., is a Professional-in-Residence at Kent State University in the School of Media and Journalism, part of the College of Communication and Information. Prior to teaching at Kent State, Canfora served as the chief communications officer for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District and taught high school journalism and speech. Canfora was also a student at Kent State, starting in 1968, and is a survivor of the May 4, 1970, shootings at Kent State. She earned her doctorate in educational administration, her master’s in journalism and public relations, and her bachelor’s in English/speech. She is heavily involved in activism as well.

Learn more about Canfora as she answers these 10 questions.

Q. How do you describe your current position as a Professional-in-Residence?

The opportunity to serve Kent State as a Professional-in-Residence enables me to return to the place where I trained for my career and to give back to my students. My experience in the world of public relations and news reporting was very different from what I expected. There were many times that I thought there was nothing in my textbooks from my college experience that prepared me for the real world. So the opportunity to return to Kent State in an official position means I can actually share those experiences as part of the curriculum. I’m no longer a guest speaker, but I’m actually on the staff and bringing that experience directly into the classroom.

Q. How does it feel going from a student here to a professor?

Kent State was the place where I became aware of the world around me. When I was an undergraduate in 1968, I was largely unaware of what was happening, and it was here that I learned to see the world as a much bigger place than my own small sphere. It’s where I learned to see injustice and not only care about it, but to act on my conscience and take a stand on issues. So as a professor now, I just hope every student can find time to be a student of life and to be what I think all college students should be – the conscience of America.

Q. As a student who survived the shootings at Kent State more than 50 years ago, what is the most significant change you’ve witnessed at Kent State?

Kent State has arrived at a place I never thought I would see in my lifetime. The current administration has shown a commitment to continued education and commemoration of May 4, one of the most pivotal events in American history. This shift from previous efforts to distance the university from its legacy gives me and other survivors comfort that when we are gone, the truth will live on.

Q. What do you want to accomplish in working with the Office of the President and the May 4 Presidential Advisory Committee?

May 4 was a defining moment in my life. It remains a galvanizing influence on what I teach and how I teach. It can’t just be something that we do in May every year. It must be something that we do throughout the school year. My generation used our voices and our numbers to stop a war in 1970. The current generation can use their voices and their numbers to effect even greater change. So when we teach about May 4, we teach about injustice, about the world in which we live in and how to make it a more fair, just and good place for all. That should be embedded as part of the curriculum. What happened to us at Kent State should be something that we learn about and care enough about and to act on issues of importance in our lives.

Q. What would you like to develop for May 4 initiatives in the future?

It's my hope that the May 4 Task Force will continue to play a role not only with a seat at the table of the advisory committee, but also in the ongoing education efforts in making sure that, from August through May, we are teaching the lessons of May 4 and how they apply to emerging movements today. I'm hoping that, as a member of the faculty, I can be part of planning for yearlong, campus-wide programming.

Q. What is your advice to student activists?

There is strength in numbers. But many students today don’t have time to be on campus, to engage with other students, to pay attention to what’s going on and to do the research necessary to know what’s true and what’s not. So my strongest advice is always to find that time. You won’t be given that time, but you have to make that time to engage in dialogue about the issues of the day, to check your facts and to check your sources. Decide what is worth knowing and what you care enough to act on, because if you value truth and you care about human rights, your conscience won’t let you ignore social injustice or economic disparity.

Q. What are your hopes for your current students?

My students inspire me. This generation is emerging as a very bright, thoughtful and committed group. I’m hoping that they will register in large numbers to vote because we didn’t have the right to vote when I was their age. I see this new generation of bright, young people who if they focus on the issues that unite them rather than those that divide them, they can make the world better.

Q. What is your favorite part about working at Kent State?

Just being with students. They energize me. My favorite part of my job is seeing the resiliency of faculty and students, especially living through a pandemic. Every day, I have an opportunity to see people finding new and creative ways to function in a world that isn’t optimal.

Q. What is a motto you live by?

Listen to your heart above all other voices. I talk a lot about the shift in philosophy during the transcendental period when Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau challenged Americans to follow their heart and their gut, because within us is always the answer to do what is right.

Q. What is a fun fact about you that not many people know?

I’m a professional musician. I fell in love with the harp in 1972, moved to New York just to learn it and studied for several years without even owning a harp. Now I play weddings just about every weekend. I never planned to play professionally. I just wanted to learn to play. But over the years, I’ve created a business out of something that is one of my greatest sources of joy.

SURE banner
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

As once stated by educational Pioneer and famous American Philosopher John Dewey, all that we learn is derived from experience. Kent State University continues to foster innovation and promote the development of hands-on learning through various collaborative efforts focused on building experience and training. 

Among the opportunities offered through the university, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program provides undergraduate students with the chance to engage in an intensive research project during the summer break.

“SURE students are able to engage one-on-one with a dedicated faculty member. This gives them the opportunity to really experience creating information via the research process rather than just limiting learning to the classroom setting,” said Ann Gosky, director of the Office of Student Research in the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs. 

Conducting in-depth analysis, managing time effectively and gaining professional experience are among a few of the skill sets acquired within this paid eight-week internship. 

“This is an extremely invaluable and hands-on form of education for undergraduate students who are looking to build their professional portfolio, whatever their future endeavors may be,” Gosky said. 

Despite the pandemic, the 2021 SURE Program was an enormous success with 70 undergraduate students participating in very diverse fields of research.

Colleen Novak, Ph.D., Christina Watts and Jordan Smith - College of Public Health: Muscle Thermogenesis

Larry Osher, Ph.D., and Jermaine Gordon - College of Podiatric Medicine: Metatarsus Adductus

Jason Lorenzon, Ph.D., and Diana Semillia - College of Aeronautics and Engineering: Stress and Mental Health in Aeronautics Professionals

SURE banner
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

As once stated by educational Pioneer and famous American Philosopher John Dewey, all that we learn is derived from experience. Kent State University continues to foster innovation and promote the development of hands-on learning through various collaborative efforts focused on building experience and training. 

Among the opportunities offered through the university, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program provides undergraduate students with the chance to engage in an intensive research project during the summer break.

“SURE students are able to engage one-on-one with a dedicated faculty member. This gives them the opportunity to really experience creating information via the research process rather than just limiting learning to the classroom setting,” said Ann Gosky, director of the Office of Student Research in the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs. 

Conducting in-depth analysis, managing time effectively and gaining professional experience are among a few of the skill sets acquired within this paid eight-week internship. 

“This is an extremely invaluable and hands-on form of education for undergraduate students who are looking to build their professional portfolio, whatever their future endeavors may be,” Gosky said. 

Despite the pandemic, the 2021 SURE Program was an enormous success with 70 undergraduate students participating in very diverse fields of research.

Colleen Novak, Ph.D., Christina Watts and Jordan Smith - College of Public Health: Muscle Thermogenesis

Larry Osher, Ph.D., and Jermaine Gordon - College of Podiatric Medicine: Metatarsus Adductus

Jason Lorenzon, Ph.D., and Diana Semillia - College of Aeronautics and Engineering: Stress and Mental Health in Aeronautics Professionals

SURE banner
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

As once stated by educational Pioneer and famous American Philosopher John Dewey, all that we learn is derived from experience. Kent State University continues to foster innovation and promote the development of hands-on learning through various collaborative efforts focused on building experience and training. 

Among the opportunities offered through the university, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program provides undergraduate students with the chance to engage in an intensive research project during the summer break.

“SURE students are able to engage one-on-one with a dedicated faculty member. This gives them the opportunity to really experience creating information via the research process rather than just limiting learning to the classroom setting,” said Ann Gosky, director of the Office of Student Research in the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs. 

Conducting in-depth analysis, managing time effectively and gaining professional experience are among a few of the skill sets acquired within this paid eight-week internship. 

“This is an extremely invaluable and hands-on form of education for undergraduate students who are looking to build their professional portfolio, whatever their future endeavors may be,” Gosky said. 

Despite the pandemic, the 2021 SURE Program was an enormous success with 70 undergraduate students participating in very diverse fields of research.

Colleen Novak, Ph.D., Christina Watts and Jordan Smith - College of Public Health: Muscle Thermogenesis

Larry Osher, Ph.D., and Jermaine Gordon - College of Podiatric Medicine: Metatarsus Adductus

Jason Lorenzon, Ph.D., and Diana Semillia - College of Aeronautics and Engineering: Stress and Mental Health in Aeronautics Professionals

SURE banner
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

As once stated by educational Pioneer and famous American Philosopher John Dewey, all that we learn is derived from experience. Kent State University continues to foster innovation and promote the development of hands-on learning through various collaborative efforts focused on building experience and training. 

Among the opportunities offered through the university, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program provides undergraduate students with the chance to engage in an intensive research project during the summer break.

“SURE students are able to engage one-on-one with a dedicated faculty member. This gives them the opportunity to really experience creating information via the research process rather than just limiting learning to the classroom setting,” said Ann Gosky, director of the Office of Student Research in the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs. 

Conducting in-depth analysis, managing time effectively and gaining professional experience are among a few of the skill sets acquired within this paid eight-week internship. 

“This is an extremely invaluable and hands-on form of education for undergraduate students who are looking to build their professional portfolio, whatever their future endeavors may be,” Gosky said. 

Despite the pandemic, the 2021 SURE Program was an enormous success with 70 undergraduate students participating in very diverse fields of research.

Colleen Novak, Ph.D., Christina Watts and Jordan Smith - College of Public Health: Muscle Thermogenesis

Larry Osher, Ph.D., and Jermaine Gordon - College of Podiatric Medicine: Metatarsus Adductus

Jason Lorenzon, Ph.D., and Diana Semillia - College of Aeronautics and Engineering: Stress and Mental Health in Aeronautics Professionals

SURE banner
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

As once stated by educational Pioneer and famous American Philosopher John Dewey, all that we learn is derived from experience. Kent State University continues to foster innovation and promote the development of hands-on learning through various collaborative efforts focused on building experience and training. 

Among the opportunities offered through the university, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program provides undergraduate students with the chance to engage in an intensive research project during the summer break.

“SURE students are able to engage one-on-one with a dedicated faculty member. This gives them the opportunity to really experience creating information via the research process rather than just limiting learning to the classroom setting,” said Ann Gosky, director of the Office of Student Research in the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs. 

Conducting in-depth analysis, managing time effectively and gaining professional experience are among a few of the skill sets acquired within this paid eight-week internship. 

“This is an extremely invaluable and hands-on form of education for undergraduate students who are looking to build their professional portfolio, whatever their future endeavors may be,” Gosky said. 

Despite the pandemic, the 2021 SURE Program was an enormous success with 70 undergraduate students participating in very diverse fields of research.

Colleen Novak, Ph.D., Christina Watts and Jordan Smith - College of Public Health: Muscle Thermogenesis

Larry Osher, Ph.D., and Jermaine Gordon - College of Podiatric Medicine: Metatarsus Adductus

Jason Lorenzon, Ph.D., and Diana Semillia - College of Aeronautics and Engineering: Stress and Mental Health in Aeronautics Professionals

SURE banner
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

As once stated by educational Pioneer and famous American Philosopher John Dewey, all that we learn is derived from experience. Kent State University continues to foster innovation and promote the development of hands-on learning through various collaborative efforts focused on building experience and training. 

Among the opportunities offered through the university, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program provides undergraduate students with the chance to engage in an intensive research project during the summer break.

“SURE students are able to engage one-on-one with a dedicated faculty member. This gives them the opportunity to really experience creating information via the research process rather than just limiting learning to the classroom setting,” said Ann Gosky, director of the Office of Student Research in the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs. 

Conducting in-depth analysis, managing time effectively and gaining professional experience are among a few of the skill sets acquired within this paid eight-week internship. 

“This is an extremely invaluable and hands-on form of education for undergraduate students who are looking to build their professional portfolio, whatever their future endeavors may be,” Gosky said. 

Despite the pandemic, the 2021 SURE Program was an enormous success with 70 undergraduate students participating in very diverse fields of research.

Colleen Novak, Ph.D., Christina Watts and Jordan Smith - College of Public Health: Muscle Thermogenesis

Larry Osher, Ph.D., and Jermaine Gordon - College of Podiatric Medicine: Metatarsus Adductus

Jason Lorenzon, Ph.D., and Diana Semillia - College of Aeronautics and Engineering: Stress and Mental Health in Aeronautics Professionals

SURE banner
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

As once stated by educational Pioneer and famous American Philosopher John Dewey, all that we learn is derived from experience. Kent State University continues to foster innovation and promote the development of hands-on learning through various collaborative efforts focused on building experience and training. 

Among the opportunities offered through the university, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program provides undergraduate students with the chance to engage in an intensive research project during the summer break.

“SURE students are able to engage one-on-one with a dedicated faculty member. This gives them the opportunity to really experience creating information via the research process rather than just limiting learning to the classroom setting,” said Ann Gosky, director of the Office of Student Research in the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs. 

Conducting in-depth analysis, managing time effectively and gaining professional experience are among a few of the skill sets acquired within this paid eight-week internship. 

“This is an extremely invaluable and hands-on form of education for undergraduate students who are looking to build their professional portfolio, whatever their future endeavors may be,” Gosky said. 

Despite the pandemic, the 2021 SURE Program was an enormous success with 70 undergraduate students participating in very diverse fields of research.

Colleen Novak, Ph.D., Christina Watts and Jordan Smith - College of Public Health: Muscle Thermogenesis

Larry Osher, Ph.D., and Jermaine Gordon - College of Podiatric Medicine: Metatarsus Adductus

Jason Lorenzon, Ph.D., and Diana Semillia - College of Aeronautics and Engineering: Stress and Mental Health in Aeronautics Professionals

SURE banner
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

As once stated by educational Pioneer and famous American Philosopher John Dewey, all that we learn is derived from experience. Kent State University continues to foster innovation and promote the development of hands-on learning through various collaborative efforts focused on building experience and training. 

Among the opportunities offered through the university, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program provides undergraduate students with the chance to engage in an intensive research project during the summer break.

“SURE students are able to engage one-on-one with a dedicated faculty member. This gives them the opportunity to really experience creating information via the research process rather than just limiting learning to the classroom setting,” said Ann Gosky, director of the Office of Student Research in the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs. 

Conducting in-depth analysis, managing time effectively and gaining professional experience are among a few of the skill sets acquired within this paid eight-week internship. 

“This is an extremely invaluable and hands-on form of education for undergraduate students who are looking to build their professional portfolio, whatever their future endeavors may be,” Gosky said. 

Despite the pandemic, the 2021 SURE Program was an enormous success with 70 undergraduate students participating in very diverse fields of research.

Colleen Novak, Ph.D., Christina Watts and Jordan Smith - College of Public Health: Muscle Thermogenesis

Larry Osher, Ph.D., and Jermaine Gordon - College of Podiatric Medicine: Metatarsus Adductus

Jason Lorenzon, Ph.D., and Diana Semillia - College of Aeronautics and Engineering: Stress and Mental Health in Aeronautics Professionals

SURE banner
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

As once stated by educational Pioneer and famous American Philosopher John Dewey, all that we learn is derived from experience. Kent State University continues to foster innovation and promote the development of hands-on learning through various collaborative efforts focused on building experience and training. 

Among the opportunities offered through the university, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program provides undergraduate students with the chance to engage in an intensive research project during the summer break.

“SURE students are able to engage one-on-one with a dedicated faculty member. This gives them the opportunity to really experience creating information via the research process rather than just limiting learning to the classroom setting,” said Ann Gosky, director of the Office of Student Research in the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs. 

Conducting in-depth analysis, managing time effectively and gaining professional experience are among a few of the skill sets acquired within this paid eight-week internship. 

“This is an extremely invaluable and hands-on form of education for undergraduate students who are looking to build their professional portfolio, whatever their future endeavors may be,” Gosky said. 

Despite the pandemic, the 2021 SURE Program was an enormous success with 70 undergraduate students participating in very diverse fields of research.

Colleen Novak, Ph.D., Christina Watts and Jordan Smith - College of Public Health: Muscle Thermogenesis

Larry Osher, Ph.D., and Jermaine Gordon - College of Podiatric Medicine: Metatarsus Adductus

Jason Lorenzon, Ph.D., and Diana Semillia - College of Aeronautics and Engineering: Stress and Mental Health in Aeronautics Professionals

NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio Celebrate Joy Harjo
Thursday, October 07, 2021

Kent State University will host the kickoff event for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Big Read Northeast Ohio, a community reading program celebrating “An American Sunrise” by Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, the first Native American poet laureate of the United States. The kickoff event will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 12, beginning promptly at 7 p.m. in the Kiva, located in the Student Center, 800 E. Summit Street, Kent, Ohio. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is appreciated. A live stream of this event will be offered to virtual viewers who will receive a link upon registering. Register for the NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio kickoff event at: https://bit.ly/BigReadKickoff.

The NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio kickoff event will feature a keynote address by Cynthia Connolly of the Lake Erie Native American Council. Selected Harjo poems will be read by poet and author Kimberlee Medicine Horn Jackson. The event will also introduce the Traveling Stanzas interactive project, inviting individuals to contribute to a community poem inspired by “An American Sunrise.” Harjo’s literary work returns to her family’s ancestral homeland from which they were forcibly removed more than 200 years ago and opens a dialogue with tribal history, the land and her memories.

In June 2021, Kent State was one of 61 organizations nationwide to be awarded a 2021-22 NEA Big Read grant. NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. The $20,000 grant supports the program, events and activities offered in many Northeast Ohio locations through May 2022. Numerous partners, ranging from Kent State departments to local organizations, are collaborating to engage more than 3,000 community members, encouraging a broader understanding of Indigenous themes, voices and perspectives through Harjo’s award-winning book of poems.

There are many planned events for the NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio including public appearances by Harjo, lectures by scientist Robin Wall Kimmerer, author of “Braiding Sweet Grass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teaching of Plants,” and American historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of “An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States.” The programming will also include book discussions, film screenings, art/book making workshops and outreach projects for K-12 educators and students. Information about events, projects and further details of the program are available at https://library.kent.edu/NEABigRead. Kent State University is pleased to collaborate with the Massillon Museum to present parallel NEA Big Read projects. We encourage participation in programs offered by both institutions and their community partners.

NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio is supported by Kent State departments and regional partners. Kent State departments include: University Libraries, Wick Poetry Center, College of the Arts, College of the Arts and Sciences, School of Theatre and Dance, School of Biological Sciences, Schoo­l of Art, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ­Department of Africana Studies, Department of History; Kent State Ashtabula, Kent State Geauga and the Anti-Racism and Equity Institute. External partners include: Lake Erie Native American Council, Kent Free Library, Stow/Monroe Falls Library, Holden Forests & Gardens, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Akron-Summit County Public Library, Cuyahoga County Libraries, Ashtabula County District Library and Akron Museum of Art. Program partners also include several local high schools, such as Bio-Med Science Academy and Chagrin Falls Middle School.

Since 2006, the NEA has funded more than 1,700 Big Read programs in every congressional district in the country, providing more than $23 million to 40,000+ community organizations nationwide. More than 5.7 million Americans have attended a Big Read event and more than 90,000 local-level volunteers have partnered with grantees to present Big Read activities. For more information about the NEA Big Read, including books and author information, podcasts and videos, visit www.arts.gov/neabigread.

NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio Celebrate Joy Harjo
Thursday, October 07, 2021

Kent State University will host the kickoff event for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Big Read Northeast Ohio, a community reading program celebrating “An American Sunrise” by Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, the first Native American poet laureate of the United States. The kickoff event will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 12, beginning promptly at 7 p.m. in the Kiva, located in the Student Center, 800 E. Summit Street, Kent, Ohio. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is appreciated. A live stream of this event will be offered to virtual viewers who will receive a link upon registering. Register for the NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio kickoff event at: https://bit.ly/BigReadKickoff.

The NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio kickoff event will feature a keynote address by Cynthia Connolly of the Lake Erie Native American Council. Selected Harjo poems will be read by poet and author Kimberlee Medicine Horn Jackson. The event will also introduce the Traveling Stanzas interactive project, inviting individuals to contribute to a community poem inspired by “An American Sunrise.” Harjo’s literary work returns to her family’s ancestral homeland from which they were forcibly removed more than 200 years ago and opens a dialogue with tribal history, the land and her memories.

In June 2021, Kent State was one of 61 organizations nationwide to be awarded a 2021-22 NEA Big Read grant. NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. The $20,000 grant supports the program, events and activities offered in many Northeast Ohio locations through May 2022. Numerous partners, ranging from Kent State departments to local organizations, are collaborating to engage more than 3,000 community members, encouraging a broader understanding of Indigenous themes, voices and perspectives through Harjo’s award-winning book of poems.

There are many planned events for the NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio including public appearances by Harjo, lectures by scientist Robin Wall Kimmerer, author of “Braiding Sweet Grass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teaching of Plants,” and American historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of “An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States.” The programming will also include book discussions, film screenings, art/book making workshops and outreach projects for K-12 educators and students. Information about events, projects and further details of the program are available at https://library.kent.edu/NEABigRead. Kent State University is pleased to collaborate with the Massillon Museum to present parallel NEA Big Read projects. We encourage participation in programs offered by both institutions and their community partners.

NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio is supported by Kent State departments and regional partners. Kent State departments include: University Libraries, Wick Poetry Center, College of the Arts, College of the Arts and Sciences, School of Theatre and Dance, School of Biological Sciences, Schoo­l of Art, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ­Department of Africana Studies, Department of History; Kent State Ashtabula, Kent State Geauga and the Anti-Racism and Equity Institute. External partners include: Lake Erie Native American Council, Kent Free Library, Stow/Monroe Falls Library, Holden Forests & Gardens, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Akron-Summit County Public Library, Cuyahoga County Libraries, Ashtabula County District Library and Akron Museum of Art. Program partners also include several local high schools, such as Bio-Med Science Academy and Chagrin Falls Middle School.

Since 2006, the NEA has funded more than 1,700 Big Read programs in every congressional district in the country, providing more than $23 million to 40,000+ community organizations nationwide. More than 5.7 million Americans have attended a Big Read event and more than 90,000 local-level volunteers have partnered with grantees to present Big Read activities. For more information about the NEA Big Read, including books and author information, podcasts and videos, visit www.arts.gov/neabigread.

NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio Celebrate Joy Harjo
Thursday, October 07, 2021

Kent State University will host the kickoff event for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Big Read Northeast Ohio, a community reading program celebrating “An American Sunrise” by Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, the first Native American poet laureate of the United States. The kickoff event will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 12, beginning promptly at 7 p.m. in the Kiva, located in the Student Center, 800 E. Summit Street, Kent, Ohio. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is appreciated. A live stream of this event will be offered to virtual viewers who will receive a link upon registering. Register for the NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio kickoff event at: https://bit.ly/BigReadKickoff.

The NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio kickoff event will feature a keynote address by Cynthia Connolly of the Lake Erie Native American Council. Selected Harjo poems will be read by poet and author Kimberlee Medicine Horn Jackson. The event will also introduce the Traveling Stanzas interactive project, inviting individuals to contribute to a community poem inspired by “An American Sunrise.” Harjo’s literary work returns to her family’s ancestral homeland from which they were forcibly removed more than 200 years ago and opens a dialogue with tribal history, the land and her memories.

In June 2021, Kent State was one of 61 organizations nationwide to be awarded a 2021-22 NEA Big Read grant. NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. The $20,000 grant supports the program, events and activities offered in many Northeast Ohio locations through May 2022. Numerous partners, ranging from Kent State departments to local organizations, are collaborating to engage more than 3,000 community members, encouraging a broader understanding of Indigenous themes, voices and perspectives through Harjo’s award-winning book of poems.

There are many planned events for the NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio including public appearances by Harjo, lectures by scientist Robin Wall Kimmerer, author of “Braiding Sweet Grass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teaching of Plants,” and American historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of “An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States.” The programming will also include book discussions, film screenings, art/book making workshops and outreach projects for K-12 educators and students. Information about events, projects and further details of the program are available at https://library.kent.edu/NEABigRead. Kent State University is pleased to collaborate with the Massillon Museum to present parallel NEA Big Read projects. We encourage participation in programs offered by both institutions and their community partners.

NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio is supported by Kent State departments and regional partners. Kent State departments include: University Libraries, Wick Poetry Center, College of the Arts, College of the Arts and Sciences, School of Theatre and Dance, School of Biological Sciences, Schoo­l of Art, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ­Department of Africana Studies, Department of History; Kent State Ashtabula, Kent State Geauga and the Anti-Racism and Equity Institute. External partners include: Lake Erie Native American Council, Kent Free Library, Stow/Monroe Falls Library, Holden Forests & Gardens, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Akron-Summit County Public Library, Cuyahoga County Libraries, Ashtabula County District Library and Akron Museum of Art. Program partners also include several local high schools, such as Bio-Med Science Academy and Chagrin Falls Middle School.

Since 2006, the NEA has funded more than 1,700 Big Read programs in every congressional district in the country, providing more than $23 million to 40,000+ community organizations nationwide. More than 5.7 million Americans have attended a Big Read event and more than 90,000 local-level volunteers have partnered with grantees to present Big Read activities. For more information about the NEA Big Read, including books and author information, podcasts and videos, visit www.arts.gov/neabigread.

NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio Celebrate Joy Harjo
Thursday, October 07, 2021

Kent State University will host the kickoff event for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Big Read Northeast Ohio, a community reading program celebrating “An American Sunrise” by Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, the first Native American poet laureate of the United States. The kickoff event will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 12, beginning promptly at 7 p.m. in the Kiva, located in the Student Center, 800 E. Summit Street, Kent, Ohio. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is appreciated. A live stream of this event will be offered to virtual viewers who will receive a link upon registering. Register for the NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio kickoff event at: https://bit.ly/BigReadKickoff.

The NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio kickoff event will feature a keynote address by Cynthia Connolly of the Lake Erie Native American Council. Selected Harjo poems will be read by poet and author Kimberlee Medicine Horn Jackson. The event will also introduce the Traveling Stanzas interactive project, inviting individuals to contribute to a community poem inspired by “An American Sunrise.” Harjo’s literary work returns to her family’s ancestral homeland from which they were forcibly removed more than 200 years ago and opens a dialogue with tribal history, the land and her memories.

In June 2021, Kent State was one of 61 organizations nationwide to be awarded a 2021-22 NEA Big Read grant. NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. The $20,000 grant supports the program, events and activities offered in many Northeast Ohio locations through May 2022. Numerous partners, ranging from Kent State departments to local organizations, are collaborating to engage more than 3,000 community members, encouraging a broader understanding of Indigenous themes, voices and perspectives through Harjo’s award-winning book of poems.

There are many planned events for the NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio including public appearances by Harjo, lectures by scientist Robin Wall Kimmerer, author of “Braiding Sweet Grass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teaching of Plants,” and American historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of “An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States.” The programming will also include book discussions, film screenings, art/book making workshops and outreach projects for K-12 educators and students. Information about events, projects and further details of the program are available at https://library.kent.edu/NEABigRead. Kent State University is pleased to collaborate with the Massillon Museum to present parallel NEA Big Read projects. We encourage participation in programs offered by both institutions and their community partners.

NEA Big Read Northeast Ohio is supported by Kent State departments and regional partners. Kent State departments include: University Libraries, Wick Poetry Center, College of the Arts, College of the Arts and Sciences, School of Theatre and Dance, School of Biological Sciences, Schoo­l of Art, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ­Department of Africana Studies, Department of History; Kent State Ashtabula, Kent State Geauga and the Anti-Racism and Equity Institute. External partners include: Lake Erie Native American Council, Kent Free Library, Stow/Monroe Falls Library, Holden Forests & Gardens, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Akron-Summit County Public Library, Cuyahoga County Libraries, Ashtabula County District Library and Akron Museum of Art. Program partners also include several local high schools, such as Bio-Med Science Academy and Chagrin Falls Middle School.

Since 2006, the NEA has funded more than 1,700 Big Read programs in every congressional district in the country, providing more than $23 million to 40,000+ community organizations nationwide. More than 5.7 million Americans have attended a Big Read event and more than 90,000 local-level volunteers have partnered with grantees to present Big Read activities. For more information about the NEA Big Read, including books and author information, podcasts and videos, visit www.arts.gov/neabigread.

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 form a K on campus.
Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 arrives with a strong record of classroom success, boasting an all-time high GPA of 3.5. These newest Golden Flashes arrive 3,982 strong, an increase of more than 4% from a year ago.

“I would like to thank our entire enrollment team led by Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management Sean Broghammer for their yearlong efforts to enroll these future Kent State graduates,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “These students are now part of the Golden Flashes family, and they’ve already begun to make this campus their home as they prepare for their futures.”

Nearly one in three (32%) is a first-generation student, and one in six (a record 17.75%) is underserved, which includes African American, Hispanic, Native American and multiracial students as a percent of the total undergraduate student population. As a class, these freshmen have arrived from 38 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and 22 countries.

Diacon has made helping Kent State’s students complete a degree a priority, and the university continues to make tremendous progress. Kent State’s commitment to graduating students shows in the Kent Campus’ graduation rate that has now reached a record high of 67.5%, a rise of 1.9 percentage points from last year. 

Academically, the class stands out with a record 14% of freshmen admitted to the Honors College.

“Our freshman class arrives with a track record of academic success, and they’re well-prepared to succeed in the classroom,” said Sean Broghammer, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for enrollment management. “As the pandemic continues, we have worked hard to help match students with scholarship awards and other aid to help them and their families make college affordable. We’ve also worked diligently to meet the needs of returning students and assist them with staying on track to graduation.” 
 
All Kent State students have begun their fall 2021 classes, and official enrollment figures include many highlights.
 
Kent State’s strong retention (80.5%) of returning students to the Kent Campus can be credited in part to the university’s award-winning student support services designed to help students every step of the way – from their first day on campus through graduation. Kent Campus enrollment is 25,630 and includes 1,370 international students, an increase of 7.3%.
 
For the 2020-2021 academic year, Kent State students earned an impressive 8,963 degrees and certificates.

Kent State achieved a strong fall 2021 enrollment despite continued challenges faced by the COVID-19 pandemic. The university’s commitment to making college affordable for all families allows many to continue the pursuit of a degree. Overall, the university reported 34,761 students enrolled in its eight-campus system, a 4.1% decrease compared to last year.  
 
Kent State’s eight campuses are located in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.
 
For more information about Kent State, visit www.kent.edu.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 form a K on campus.
Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 arrives with a strong record of classroom success, boasting an all-time high GPA of 3.5. These newest Golden Flashes arrive 3,982 strong, an increase of more than 4% from a year ago.

“I would like to thank our entire enrollment team led by Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management Sean Broghammer for their yearlong efforts to enroll these future Kent State graduates,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “These students are now part of the Golden Flashes family, and they’ve already begun to make this campus their home as they prepare for their futures.”

Nearly one in three (32%) is a first-generation student, and one in six (a record 17.75%) is underserved, which includes African American, Hispanic, Native American and multiracial students as a percent of the total undergraduate student population. As a class, these freshmen have arrived from 38 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and 22 countries.

Diacon has made helping Kent State’s students complete a degree a priority, and the university continues to make tremendous progress. Kent State’s commitment to graduating students shows in the Kent Campus’ graduation rate that has now reached a record high of 67.5%, a rise of 1.9 percentage points from last year. 

Academically, the class stands out with a record 14% of freshmen admitted to the Honors College.

“Our freshman class arrives with a track record of academic success, and they’re well-prepared to succeed in the classroom,” said Sean Broghammer, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for enrollment management. “As the pandemic continues, we have worked hard to help match students with scholarship awards and other aid to help them and their families make college affordable. We’ve also worked diligently to meet the needs of returning students and assist them with staying on track to graduation.” 
 
All Kent State students have begun their fall 2021 classes, and official enrollment figures include many highlights.
 
Kent State’s strong retention (80.5%) of returning students to the Kent Campus can be credited in part to the university’s award-winning student support services designed to help students every step of the way – from their first day on campus through graduation. Kent Campus enrollment is 25,630 and includes 1,370 international students, an increase of 7.3%.
 
For the 2020-2021 academic year, Kent State students earned an impressive 8,963 degrees and certificates.

Kent State achieved a strong fall 2021 enrollment despite continued challenges faced by the COVID-19 pandemic. The university’s commitment to making college affordable for all families allows many to continue the pursuit of a degree. Overall, the university reported 34,761 students enrolled in its eight-campus system, a 4.1% decrease compared to last year.  
 
Kent State’s eight campuses are located in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.
 
For more information about Kent State, visit www.kent.edu.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 form a K on campus.
Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 arrives with a strong record of classroom success, boasting an all-time high GPA of 3.5. These newest Golden Flashes arrive 3,982 strong, an increase of more than 4% from a year ago.

“I would like to thank our entire enrollment team led by Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management Sean Broghammer for their yearlong efforts to enroll these future Kent State graduates,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “These students are now part of the Golden Flashes family, and they’ve already begun to make this campus their home as they prepare for their futures.”

Nearly one in three (32%) is a first-generation student, and one in six (a record 17.75%) is underserved, which includes African American, Hispanic, Native American and multiracial students as a percent of the total undergraduate student population. As a class, these freshmen have arrived from 38 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and 22 countries.

Diacon has made helping Kent State’s students complete a degree a priority, and the university continues to make tremendous progress. Kent State’s commitment to graduating students shows in the Kent Campus’ graduation rate that has now reached a record high of 67.5%, a rise of 1.9 percentage points from last year. 

Academically, the class stands out with a record 14% of freshmen admitted to the Honors College.

“Our freshman class arrives with a track record of academic success, and they’re well-prepared to succeed in the classroom,” said Sean Broghammer, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for enrollment management. “As the pandemic continues, we have worked hard to help match students with scholarship awards and other aid to help them and their families make college affordable. We’ve also worked diligently to meet the needs of returning students and assist them with staying on track to graduation.” 
 
All Kent State students have begun their fall 2021 classes, and official enrollment figures include many highlights.
 
Kent State’s strong retention (80.5%) of returning students to the Kent Campus can be credited in part to the university’s award-winning student support services designed to help students every step of the way – from their first day on campus through graduation. Kent Campus enrollment is 25,630 and includes 1,370 international students, an increase of 7.3%.
 
For the 2020-2021 academic year, Kent State students earned an impressive 8,963 degrees and certificates.

Kent State achieved a strong fall 2021 enrollment despite continued challenges faced by the COVID-19 pandemic. The university’s commitment to making college affordable for all families allows many to continue the pursuit of a degree. Overall, the university reported 34,761 students enrolled in its eight-campus system, a 4.1% decrease compared to last year.  
 
Kent State’s eight campuses are located in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.
 
For more information about Kent State, visit www.kent.edu.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 form a K on campus.
Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 arrives with a strong record of classroom success, boasting an all-time high GPA of 3.5. These newest Golden Flashes arrive 3,982 strong, an increase of more than 4% from a year ago.

“I would like to thank our entire enrollment team led by Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management Sean Broghammer for their yearlong efforts to enroll these future Kent State graduates,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “These students are now part of the Golden Flashes family, and they’ve already begun to make this campus their home as they prepare for their futures.”

Nearly one in three (32%) is a first-generation student, and one in six (a record 17.75%) is underserved, which includes African American, Hispanic, Native American and multiracial students as a percent of the total undergraduate student population. As a class, these freshmen have arrived from 38 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and 22 countries.

Diacon has made helping Kent State’s students complete a degree a priority, and the university continues to make tremendous progress. Kent State’s commitment to graduating students shows in the Kent Campus’ graduation rate that has now reached a record high of 67.5%, a rise of 1.9 percentage points from last year. 

Academically, the class stands out with a record 14% of freshmen admitted to the Honors College.

“Our freshman class arrives with a track record of academic success, and they’re well-prepared to succeed in the classroom,” said Sean Broghammer, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for enrollment management. “As the pandemic continues, we have worked hard to help match students with scholarship awards and other aid to help them and their families make college affordable. We’ve also worked diligently to meet the needs of returning students and assist them with staying on track to graduation.” 
 
All Kent State students have begun their fall 2021 classes, and official enrollment figures include many highlights.
 
Kent State’s strong retention (80.5%) of returning students to the Kent Campus can be credited in part to the university’s award-winning student support services designed to help students every step of the way – from their first day on campus through graduation. Kent Campus enrollment is 25,630 and includes 1,370 international students, an increase of 7.3%.
 
For the 2020-2021 academic year, Kent State students earned an impressive 8,963 degrees and certificates.

Kent State achieved a strong fall 2021 enrollment despite continued challenges faced by the COVID-19 pandemic. The university’s commitment to making college affordable for all families allows many to continue the pursuit of a degree. Overall, the university reported 34,761 students enrolled in its eight-campus system, a 4.1% decrease compared to last year.  
 
Kent State’s eight campuses are located in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.
 
For more information about Kent State, visit www.kent.edu.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 form a K on campus.
Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 arrives with a strong record of classroom success, boasting an all-time high GPA of 3.5. These newest Golden Flashes arrive 3,982 strong, an increase of more than 4% from a year ago.

“I would like to thank our entire enrollment team led by Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management Sean Broghammer for their yearlong efforts to enroll these future Kent State graduates,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “These students are now part of the Golden Flashes family, and they’ve already begun to make this campus their home as they prepare for their futures.”

Nearly one in three (32%) is a first-generation student, and one in six (a record 17.75%) is underserved, which includes African American, Hispanic, Native American and multiracial students as a percent of the total undergraduate student population. As a class, these freshmen have arrived from 38 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and 22 countries.

Diacon has made helping Kent State’s students complete a degree a priority, and the university continues to make tremendous progress. Kent State’s commitment to graduating students shows in the Kent Campus’ graduation rate that has now reached a record high of 67.5%, a rise of 1.9 percentage points from last year. 

Academically, the class stands out with a record 14% of freshmen admitted to the Honors College.

“Our freshman class arrives with a track record of academic success, and they’re well-prepared to succeed in the classroom,” said Sean Broghammer, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for enrollment management. “As the pandemic continues, we have worked hard to help match students with scholarship awards and other aid to help them and their families make college affordable. We’ve also worked diligently to meet the needs of returning students and assist them with staying on track to graduation.” 
 
All Kent State students have begun their fall 2021 classes, and official enrollment figures include many highlights.
 
Kent State’s strong retention (80.5%) of returning students to the Kent Campus can be credited in part to the university’s award-winning student support services designed to help students every step of the way – from their first day on campus through graduation. Kent Campus enrollment is 25,630 and includes 1,370 international students, an increase of 7.3%.
 
For the 2020-2021 academic year, Kent State students earned an impressive 8,963 degrees and certificates.

Kent State achieved a strong fall 2021 enrollment despite continued challenges faced by the COVID-19 pandemic. The university’s commitment to making college affordable for all families allows many to continue the pursuit of a degree. Overall, the university reported 34,761 students enrolled in its eight-campus system, a 4.1% decrease compared to last year.  
 
Kent State’s eight campuses are located in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.
 
For more information about Kent State, visit www.kent.edu.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 form a K on campus.
Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Kent State University’s Class of 2025 arrives with a strong record of classroom success, boasting an all-time high GPA of 3.5. These newest Golden Flashes arrive 3,982 strong, an increase of more than 4% from a year ago.

“I would like to thank our entire enrollment team led by Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management Sean Broghammer for their yearlong efforts to enroll these future Kent State graduates,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “These students are now part of the Golden Flashes family, and they’ve already begun to make this campus their home as they prepare for their futures.”

Nearly one in three (32%) is a first-generation student, and one in six (a record 17.75%) is underserved, which includes African American, Hispanic, Native American and multiracial students as a percent of the total undergraduate student population. As a class, these freshmen have arrived from 38 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and 22 countries.

Diacon has made helping Kent State’s students complete a degree a priority, and the university continues to make tremendous progress. Kent State’s commitment to graduating students shows in the Kent Campus’ graduation rate that has now reached a record high of 67.5%, a rise of 1.9 percentage points from last year. 

Academically, the class stands out with a record 14% of freshmen admitted to the Honors College.

“Our freshman class arrives with a track record of academic success, and they’re well-prepared to succeed in the classroom,” said Sean Broghammer, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim vice president for enrollment management. “As the pandemic continues, we have worked hard to help match students with scholarship awards and other aid to help them and their families make college affordable. We’ve also worked diligently to meet the needs of returning students and assist them with staying on track to graduation.” 
 
All Kent State students have begun their fall 2021 classes, and official enrollment figures include many highlights.
 
Kent State’s strong retention (80.5%) of returning students to the Kent Campus can be credited in part to the university’s award-winning student support services designed to help students every step of the way – from their first day on campus through graduation. Kent Campus enrollment is 25,630 and includes 1,370 international students, an increase of 7.3%.
 
For the 2020-2021 academic year, Kent State students earned an impressive 8,963 degrees and certificates.

Kent State achieved a strong fall 2021 enrollment despite continued challenges faced by the COVID-19 pandemic. The university’s commitment to making college affordable for all families allows many to continue the pursuit of a degree. Overall, the university reported 34,761 students enrolled in its eight-campus system, a 4.1% decrease compared to last year.  
 
Kent State’s eight campuses are located in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.
 
For more information about Kent State, visit www.kent.edu.

# # #

Media Contact:
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Alan Canfora (left), one of the nine Kent State University students wounded on May 4, 1970, gives a tour of the historic May 4 site. Thomas Grace (right), who also was a student wounded on May 4, looks on while Canfora talks.
Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Members of the Kent State University community and people around the world will gather virtually for the 51st Commemoration of May 4, 1970, the day the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, this year’s May 4 Commemoration events will again be virtual.
 
To honor and remember the events that occurred on that tragic day, virtual programming hosted by Kent State students, faculty and staff is scheduled from April 30 through May 4 and will feature virtual screenings of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” panel discussions with special guest speakers, PeaceJam keynote speaker and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum, and a presentation from the student leaders of the May 4 Task Force.
 
View the full schedule of events on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The May 4 Candlelight Walk and Vigil first occurred in 1971 and are a cornerstone of the May 4 Commemoration. This year, the university will honor these traditions virtually. Details regarding the virtual May 4 Candlelight Vigil can be found on the May 4 Commemoration website.
 
The virtual May 4 Commemoration will be a special video tribute premiering at noon Tuesday, May 4, on the May 4 51st Commemoration site. The video will focus on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video features nine new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site indicating where each of the wounded students was located when hit by gunfire.
 
The markers for the nine wounded students join the four markers installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. Other physical markers on the May 4 site include the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker, the May 4 Memorial, the Ohio Historical Marker, the May 4 Visitors Center, the May 4 Walking Tour, the National Register of Historic Places plaque and the National Historic Landmark plaque.
 
“Today we unveil markers for students wounded on May 4, 1970,” Kent State President Todd Diacon said. “These markers represent the latest addition to the National Historic Landmark site and provide greater insight to the events that happened on May 4, 1970.”
 
Roseann “Chic” Canfora, Ph.D., a May 4 witness, also expressed the importance of the new markers.
 
“One of the residual effects of being a shooting survivor is the re-emergence of the sights, sounds and memories of our traumatic experience when we gather for vigils or memorials,” said Chic Canfora, whose brother, Alan, was one of the nine wounded students. “Our annual commemorations on May 4 have served as a path to healing for many of us, and milestone markers on the shooting site have enabled us to set in stone and to manage the heartbreak we will carry for a lifetime.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Alan Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created. (Read about the inaugural recipients of the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship.)
 
“This year will be the most difficult for me personally, and I imagine it will be for Tom Grace and many others, because it will be our first commemoration without Alan,” Chic Canfora said. “More than anyone, my brother made sure we gathered every year to commemorate and educate the world about May 4. He embodied and modeled for us the strength it takes to turn our pain into purpose.”
 
The virtual commemoration will also include a special recognition of gratitude to the faculty marshals – Seymour Baron, Stan Christensen, G. Dennis Cooke, Norman Duffy, Glenn Frank, John Hubbell, Harold Kitner, Jerry Lewis, Myron Lunine, Milton Manes, Carl Moore, Raymond Myers, Steven Sharoff and other faculty members – whose heroic efforts prevented more bloodshed on May 4, 1970.
 
For more information about May 4, 1970, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 
For more information about the virtual May 4 Commemoration events, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970/51st-commemoration.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

American Academy Students Show Off the Winning T-Shirt Design
Thursday, April 01, 2021

What do friendship, academics and T-shirts have in common? For the students at the American Academy, Kent State University and the PUCPR’s undergraduate program in Brazil, a student-led T-shirt design contest created that missing piece of camaraderie during the pandemic between students and their two schools.

The American Academy is a dual-enrollment program offered jointly by Kent State and the Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná (PUCPR), located in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, that allows students in Brazil to complete a two-year degree without traveling to America for college. Following their completion of an Associate of Science degree, students have the opportunity to come to Kent campus to earn their bachelor’s degree.

The T-shirt design concept competition began as a way to help American Academy students identify with Kent State by giving each student a Kent State shirt from the bookstore. Leslie Bowser, senior global programs advisor in the Office of Global Education and coordinator of the American Academy program, found that getting this T-shirt made the freshmen feel connected right from the start.

“When we started the tradition of giving all of the freshmen a T-shirt, we used the same T-shirt design for the next three fall semesters,” Bowser said. “Now that there are enough students, the students proposed to do it as a contest and have a unique T-shirt for each incoming class.”

Since the American Academy program’s launch in fall 2018, the student body has grown from 15 students to more than 100 students.

“It was kind of a student-led initiative,” Bowser said of the contest. “I loved the creativity of it and the enthusiasm they had for it. Giving the students a Kent State T-shirt was great, but they wanted a T-shirt that represented the dual program, so the concept required that students come up with a design that represented both universities and the joining of the two.”

By creating a T-shirt that blended aspects of both universities, American Academy students gained a new identity as Kent State students at the start of their program, even though they attend school in Brazil. They are fully enrolled in both universities as a dual enrollment program.

Bob Louis, assistant vice president of new media communications at University Communications and Marketing, served as one of the judges for the contest.

“I was very impressed with the effort the students put forth,” Louis said. “They put a lot into their presentations, and it was very evident they truly enjoyed working on the project.”

This semester’s finalists were Micaela Marigliano, Barbara Talah and Arthur Zablonsky. The students were asked to come up with a design concept and then deliver a short presentation to a panel of marketing professionals. In the end, Marigliano’s concept was chosen to be the fall 2021 T-shirt design.

Image
Micaela Marigliano
“I chose the phrase Transição Suave because it means ‘Smooth Transition,’ which is the opportunity that the American Academy gives us to be able to study outside Brazil,” Margliano said. “The transition from one university to the other was a smooth transition.”

Louis expressed the difficulty in deciding a winner among the many impressive designs presented.

“All the designs had merit, and it really came down to which one we all could agree on,” Louis said. “Any one of the designs would have been a great choice.”

COVID-19 has changed how this semester will operate, but has not affected the feeling of community for the students.

“Because the students are studying remotely, the T-shirts were mailed to the homes of all American Academy freshmen, along with much affection from their peers who organized the activity,” Bowser said.

Students submitted photos of themselves wearing the shirts to show their school spirit. On the first day of classes, students were encouraged to wear them during virtual classes.

Marigliano is appreciative of the American Academy and Kent State for offering her the ability to share her design concept and is proud to help freshmen feel connected to Kent State through her shirt.

“Having my idea come true makes me happy and proud of myself,” Marigliano said. “I hope everyone who wears this shirt feels the same way as I do: happy and grateful.”
To learn more about the American Academy dual enrollment program, visit https://www.kent.edu/KSU/AA.

American Academy Students Show Off the Winning T-Shirt Design
Thursday, April 01, 2021

What do friendship, academics and T-shirts have in common? For the students at the American Academy, Kent State University and the PUCPR’s undergraduate program in Brazil, a student-led T-shirt design contest created that missing piece of camaraderie during the pandemic between students and their two schools.

The American Academy is a dual-enrollment program offered jointly by Kent State and the Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná (PUCPR), located in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, that allows students in Brazil to complete a two-year degree without traveling to America for college. Following their completion of an Associate of Science degree, students have the opportunity to come to Kent campus to earn their bachelor’s degree.

The T-shirt design concept competition began as a way to help American Academy students identify with Kent State by giving each student a Kent State shirt from the bookstore. Leslie Bowser, senior global programs advisor in the Office of Global Education and coordinator of the American Academy program, found that getting this T-shirt made the freshmen feel connected right from the start.

“When we started the tradition of giving all of the freshmen a T-shirt, we used the same T-shirt design for the next three fall semesters,” Bowser said. “Now that there are enough students, the students proposed to do it as a contest and have a unique T-shirt for each incoming class.”

Since the American Academy program’s launch in fall 2018, the student body has grown from 15 students to more than 100 students.

“It was kind of a student-led initiative,” Bowser said of the contest. “I loved the creativity of it and the enthusiasm they had for it. Giving the students a Kent State T-shirt was great, but they wanted a T-shirt that represented the dual program, so the concept required that students come up with a design that represented both universities and the joining of the two.”

By creating a T-shirt that blended aspects of both universities, American Academy students gained a new identity as Kent State students at the start of their program, even though they attend school in Brazil. They are fully enrolled in both universities as a dual enrollment program.

Bob Louis, assistant vice president of new media communications at University Communications and Marketing, served as one of the judges for the contest.

“I was very impressed with the effort the students put forth,” Louis said. “They put a lot into their presentations, and it was very evident they truly enjoyed working on the project.”

This semester’s finalists were Micaela Marigliano, Barbara Talah and Arthur Zablonsky. The students were asked to come up with a design concept and then deliver a short presentation to a panel of marketing professionals. In the end, Marigliano’s concept was chosen to be the fall 2021 T-shirt design.

Image
Micaela Marigliano
“I chose the phrase Transição Suave because it means ‘Smooth Transition,’ which is the opportunity that the American Academy gives us to be able to study outside Brazil,” Margliano said. “The transition from one university to the other was a smooth transition.”

Louis expressed the difficulty in deciding a winner among the many impressive designs presented.

“All the designs had merit, and it really came down to which one we all could agree on,” Louis said. “Any one of the designs would have been a great choice.”

COVID-19 has changed how this semester will operate, but has not affected the feeling of community for the students.

“Because the students are studying remotely, the T-shirts were mailed to the homes of all American Academy freshmen, along with much affection from their peers who organized the activity,” Bowser said.

Students submitted photos of themselves wearing the shirts to show their school spirit. On the first day of classes, students were encouraged to wear them during virtual classes.

Marigliano is appreciative of the American Academy and Kent State for offering her the ability to share her design concept and is proud to help freshmen feel connected to Kent State through her shirt.

“Having my idea come true makes me happy and proud of myself,” Marigliano said. “I hope everyone who wears this shirt feels the same way as I do: happy and grateful.”
To learn more about the American Academy dual enrollment program, visit https://www.kent.edu/KSU/AA.

American Academy Students Show Off the Winning T-Shirt Design
Thursday, April 01, 2021

What do friendship, academics and T-shirts have in common? For the students at the American Academy, Kent State University and the PUCPR’s undergraduate program in Brazil, a student-led T-shirt design contest created that missing piece of camaraderie during the pandemic between students and their two schools.

The American Academy is a dual-enrollment program offered jointly by Kent State and the Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná (PUCPR), located in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, that allows students in Brazil to complete a two-year degree without traveling to America for college. Following their completion of an Associate of Science degree, students have the opportunity to come to Kent campus to earn their bachelor’s degree.

The T-shirt design concept competition began as a way to help American Academy students identify with Kent State by giving each student a Kent State shirt from the bookstore. Leslie Bowser, senior global programs advisor in the Office of Global Education and coordinator of the American Academy program, found that getting this T-shirt made the freshmen feel connected right from the start.

“When we started the tradition of giving all of the freshmen a T-shirt, we used the same T-shirt design for the next three fall semesters,” Bowser said. “Now that there are enough students, the students proposed to do it as a contest and have a unique T-shirt for each incoming class.”

Since the American Academy program’s launch in fall 2018, the student body has grown from 15 students to more than 100 students.

“It was kind of a student-led initiative,” Bowser said of the contest. “I loved the creativity of it and the enthusiasm they had for it. Giving the students a Kent State T-shirt was great, but they wanted a T-shirt that represented the dual program, so the concept required that students come up with a design that represented both universities and the joining of the two.”

By creating a T-shirt that blended aspects of both universities, American Academy students gained a new identity as Kent State students at the start of their program, even though they attend school in Brazil. They are fully enrolled in both universities as a dual enrollment program.

Bob Louis, assistant vice president of new media communications at University Communications and Marketing, served as one of the judges for the contest.

“I was very impressed with the effort the students put forth,” Louis said. “They put a lot into their presentations, and it was very evident they truly enjoyed working on the project.”

This semester’s finalists were Micaela Marigliano, Barbara Talah and Arthur Zablonsky. The students were asked to come up with a design concept and then deliver a short presentation to a panel of marketing professionals. In the end, Marigliano’s concept was chosen to be the fall 2021 T-shirt design.

Image
Micaela Marigliano
“I chose the phrase Transição Suave because it means ‘Smooth Transition,’ which is the opportunity that the American Academy gives us to be able to study outside Brazil,” Margliano said. “The transition from one university to the other was a smooth transition.”

Louis expressed the difficulty in deciding a winner among the many impressive designs presented.

“All the designs had merit, and it really came down to which one we all could agree on,” Louis said. “Any one of the designs would have been a great choice.”

COVID-19 has changed how this semester will operate, but has not affected the feeling of community for the students.

“Because the students are studying remotely, the T-shirts were mailed to the homes of all American Academy freshmen, along with much affection from their peers who organized the activity,” Bowser said.

Students submitted photos of themselves wearing the shirts to show their school spirit. On the first day of classes, students were encouraged to wear them during virtual classes.

Marigliano is appreciative of the American Academy and Kent State for offering her the ability to share her design concept and is proud to help freshmen feel connected to Kent State through her shirt.

“Having my idea come true makes me happy and proud of myself,” Marigliano said. “I hope everyone who wears this shirt feels the same way as I do: happy and grateful.”
To learn more about the American Academy dual enrollment program, visit https://www.kent.edu/KSU/AA.

American Academy Students Show Off the Winning T-Shirt Design
Thursday, April 01, 2021

What do friendship, academics and T-shirts have in common? For the students at the American Academy, Kent State University and the PUCPR’s undergraduate program in Brazil, a student-led T-shirt design contest created that missing piece of camaraderie during the pandemic between students and their two schools.

The American Academy is a dual-enrollment program offered jointly by Kent State and the Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná (PUCPR), located in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, that allows students in Brazil to complete a two-year degree without traveling to America for college. Following their completion of an Associate of Science degree, students have the opportunity to come to Kent campus to earn their bachelor’s degree.

The T-shirt design concept competition began as a way to help American Academy students identify with Kent State by giving each student a Kent State shirt from the bookstore. Leslie Bowser, senior global programs advisor in the Office of Global Education and coordinator of the American Academy program, found that getting this T-shirt made the freshmen feel connected right from the start.

“When we started the tradition of giving all of the freshmen a T-shirt, we used the same T-shirt design for the next three fall semesters,” Bowser said. “Now that there are enough students, the students proposed to do it as a contest and have a unique T-shirt for each incoming class.”

Since the American Academy program’s launch in fall 2018, the student body has grown from 15 students to more than 100 students.

“It was kind of a student-led initiative,” Bowser said of the contest. “I loved the creativity of it and the enthusiasm they had for it. Giving the students a Kent State T-shirt was great, but they wanted a T-shirt that represented the dual program, so the concept required that students come up with a design that represented both universities and the joining of the two.”

By creating a T-shirt that blended aspects of both universities, American Academy students gained a new identity as Kent State students at the start of their program, even though they attend school in Brazil. They are fully enrolled in both universities as a dual enrollment program.

Bob Louis, assistant vice president of new media communications at University Communications and Marketing, served as one of the judges for the contest.

“I was very impressed with the effort the students put forth,” Louis said. “They put a lot into their presentations, and it was very evident they truly enjoyed working on the project.”

This semester’s finalists were Micaela Marigliano, Barbara Talah and Arthur Zablonsky. The students were asked to come up with a design concept and then deliver a short presentation to a panel of marketing professionals. In the end, Marigliano’s concept was chosen to be the fall 2021 T-shirt design.

Image
Micaela Marigliano
“I chose the phrase Transição Suave because it means ‘Smooth Transition,’ which is the opportunity that the American Academy gives us to be able to study outside Brazil,” Margliano said. “The transition from one university to the other was a smooth transition.”

Louis expressed the difficulty in deciding a winner among the many impressive designs presented.

“All the designs had merit, and it really came down to which one we all could agree on,” Louis said. “Any one of the designs would have been a great choice.”

COVID-19 has changed how this semester will operate, but has not affected the feeling of community for the students.

“Because the students are studying remotely, the T-shirts were mailed to the homes of all American Academy freshmen, along with much affection from their peers who organized the activity,” Bowser said.

Students submitted photos of themselves wearing the shirts to show their school spirit. On the first day of classes, students were encouraged to wear them during virtual classes.

Marigliano is appreciative of the American Academy and Kent State for offering her the ability to share her design concept and is proud to help freshmen feel connected to Kent State through her shirt.

“Having my idea come true makes me happy and proud of myself,” Marigliano said. “I hope everyone who wears this shirt feels the same way as I do: happy and grateful.”
To learn more about the American Academy dual enrollment program, visit https://www.kent.edu/KSU/AA.

A graduating Kent State University student smiles in her cap and gown at Risman Plaza in spring 2020.
Thursday, March 18, 2021

Kent State University will hold in-person commencement ceremonies in May for the Spring Class of 2021 and will welcome back all 2020 alumni for an in-person graduation ceremony during Homecoming Weekend this fall.
 
Kent State President Todd Diacon shared with the Class of 2021 that outdoor ceremonies for all colleges and degrees will be held during the week of May 10 at the Centennial Court Green, which is located on Midway Drive south of the Centennial Court Residence Halls. There also will be a virtual commencement for all colleges and degrees on May 15. All of the commencement ceremonies will be livestreamed.
 
Ceremonies will adhere to safety measures from the Flashes Safe Eight, such as physical distancing and the wearing of face coverings. To participate in the in-person commencement, graduating students are being asked to complete their ceremony RSVP by April 8. There will be four tickets per student for guests to attend their student’s commencement ceremony.

Students graduating from a Regional Campus will receive an announcement about their ceremony from the campus dean. As always, Regional Campus graduates are welcome to participate in the ceremonies on the Kent Campus as well.
 
“Congratulations for your perseverance in completing your studies during such an overwhelming time in history,” Diacon said. “This is an awesome accomplishment, especially in light of the challenges that you faced. We are extremely proud of you.”
 
Diacon has also shared with alumni who graduated during 2020 that as promised, they may return for an in-person commencement ceremony as part of Homecoming Weekend 2021. More specific details will be forthcoming.
 
Kent State will also host the College of Podiatric Medicine’s commencement ceremony on Friday, May 21, at the Kent Campus Student Green. Karamu Ya Wahitimu/Celebración de los Graduados and Lavender Graduation ceremonies will again be virtual this year. More information regarding these ceremonies is forthcoming.
 
For more information about the 2021 in-person commencement ceremonies, visit www.kent.edu/commencement.  

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A graduating Kent State University student smiles in her cap and gown at Risman Plaza in spring 2020.
Thursday, March 18, 2021

Kent State University will hold in-person commencement ceremonies in May for the Spring Class of 2021 and will welcome back all 2020 alumni for an in-person graduation ceremony during Homecoming Weekend this fall.
 
Kent State President Todd Diacon shared with the Class of 2021 that outdoor ceremonies for all colleges and degrees will be held during the week of May 10 at the Centennial Court Green, which is located on Midway Drive south of the Centennial Court Residence Halls. There also will be a virtual commencement for all colleges and degrees on May 15. All of the commencement ceremonies will be livestreamed.
 
Ceremonies will adhere to safety measures from the Flashes Safe Eight, such as physical distancing and the wearing of face coverings. To participate in the in-person commencement, graduating students are being asked to complete their ceremony RSVP by April 8. There will be four tickets per student for guests to attend their student’s commencement ceremony.

Students graduating from a Regional Campus will receive an announcement about their ceremony from the campus dean. As always, Regional Campus graduates are welcome to participate in the ceremonies on the Kent Campus as well.
 
“Congratulations for your perseverance in completing your studies during such an overwhelming time in history,” Diacon said. “This is an awesome accomplishment, especially in light of the challenges that you faced. We are extremely proud of you.”
 
Diacon has also shared with alumni who graduated during 2020 that as promised, they may return for an in-person commencement ceremony as part of Homecoming Weekend 2021. More specific details will be forthcoming.
 
Kent State will also host the College of Podiatric Medicine’s commencement ceremony on Friday, May 21, at the Kent Campus Student Green. Karamu Ya Wahitimu/Celebración de los Graduados and Lavender Graduation ceremonies will again be virtual this year. More information regarding these ceremonies is forthcoming.
 
For more information about the 2021 in-person commencement ceremonies, visit www.kent.edu/commencement.  

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A graduating Kent State University student smiles in her cap and gown at Risman Plaza in spring 2020.
Thursday, March 18, 2021

Kent State University will hold in-person commencement ceremonies in May for the Spring Class of 2021 and will welcome back all 2020 alumni for an in-person graduation ceremony during Homecoming Weekend this fall.
 
Kent State President Todd Diacon shared with the Class of 2021 that outdoor ceremonies for all colleges and degrees will be held during the week of May 10 at the Centennial Court Green, which is located on Midway Drive south of the Centennial Court Residence Halls. There also will be a virtual commencement for all colleges and degrees on May 15. All of the commencement ceremonies will be livestreamed.
 
Ceremonies will adhere to safety measures from the Flashes Safe Eight, such as physical distancing and the wearing of face coverings. To participate in the in-person commencement, graduating students are being asked to complete their ceremony RSVP by April 8. There will be four tickets per student for guests to attend their student’s commencement ceremony.

Students graduating from a Regional Campus will receive an announcement about their ceremony from the campus dean. As always, Regional Campus graduates are welcome to participate in the ceremonies on the Kent Campus as well.
 
“Congratulations for your perseverance in completing your studies during such an overwhelming time in history,” Diacon said. “This is an awesome accomplishment, especially in light of the challenges that you faced. We are extremely proud of you.”
 
Diacon has also shared with alumni who graduated during 2020 that as promised, they may return for an in-person commencement ceremony as part of Homecoming Weekend 2021. More specific details will be forthcoming.
 
Kent State will also host the College of Podiatric Medicine’s commencement ceremony on Friday, May 21, at the Kent Campus Student Green. Karamu Ya Wahitimu/Celebración de los Graduados and Lavender Graduation ceremonies will again be virtual this year. More information regarding these ceremonies is forthcoming.
 
For more information about the 2021 in-person commencement ceremonies, visit www.kent.edu/commencement.  

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A graduating Kent State University student smiles in her cap and gown at Risman Plaza in spring 2020.
Thursday, March 18, 2021

Kent State University will hold in-person commencement ceremonies in May for the Spring Class of 2021 and will welcome back all 2020 alumni for an in-person graduation ceremony during Homecoming Weekend this fall.
 
Kent State President Todd Diacon shared with the Class of 2021 that outdoor ceremonies for all colleges and degrees will be held during the week of May 10 at the Centennial Court Green, which is located on Midway Drive south of the Centennial Court Residence Halls. There also will be a virtual commencement for all colleges and degrees on May 15. All of the commencement ceremonies will be livestreamed.
 
Ceremonies will adhere to safety measures from the Flashes Safe Eight, such as physical distancing and the wearing of face coverings. To participate in the in-person commencement, graduating students are being asked to complete their ceremony RSVP by April 8. There will be four tickets per student for guests to attend their student’s commencement ceremony.

Students graduating from a Regional Campus will receive an announcement about their ceremony from the campus dean. As always, Regional Campus graduates are welcome to participate in the ceremonies on the Kent Campus as well.
 
“Congratulations for your perseverance in completing your studies during such an overwhelming time in history,” Diacon said. “This is an awesome accomplishment, especially in light of the challenges that you faced. We are extremely proud of you.”
 
Diacon has also shared with alumni who graduated during 2020 that as promised, they may return for an in-person commencement ceremony as part of Homecoming Weekend 2021. More specific details will be forthcoming.
 
Kent State will also host the College of Podiatric Medicine’s commencement ceremony on Friday, May 21, at the Kent Campus Student Green. Karamu Ya Wahitimu/Celebración de los Graduados and Lavender Graduation ceremonies will again be virtual this year. More information regarding these ceremonies is forthcoming.
 
For more information about the 2021 in-person commencement ceremonies, visit www.kent.edu/commencement.  

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A graduating Kent State University student smiles in her cap and gown at Risman Plaza in spring 2020.
Thursday, March 18, 2021

Kent State University will hold in-person commencement ceremonies in May for the Spring Class of 2021 and will welcome back all 2020 alumni for an in-person graduation ceremony during Homecoming Weekend this fall.
 
Kent State President Todd Diacon shared with the Class of 2021 that outdoor ceremonies for all colleges and degrees will be held during the week of May 10 at the Centennial Court Green, which is located on Midway Drive south of the Centennial Court Residence Halls. There also will be a virtual commencement for all colleges and degrees on May 15. All of the commencement ceremonies will be livestreamed.
 
Ceremonies will adhere to safety measures from the Flashes Safe Eight, such as physical distancing and the wearing of face coverings. To participate in the in-person commencement, graduating students are being asked to complete their ceremony RSVP by April 8. There will be four tickets per student for guests to attend their student’s commencement ceremony.

Students graduating from a Regional Campus will receive an announcement about their ceremony from the campus dean. As always, Regional Campus graduates are welcome to participate in the ceremonies on the Kent Campus as well.
 
“Congratulations for your perseverance in completing your studies during such an overwhelming time in history,” Diacon said. “This is an awesome accomplishment, especially in light of the challenges that you faced. We are extremely proud of you.”
 
Diacon has also shared with alumni who graduated during 2020 that as promised, they may return for an in-person commencement ceremony as part of Homecoming Weekend 2021. More specific details will be forthcoming.
 
Kent State will also host the College of Podiatric Medicine’s commencement ceremony on Friday, May 21, at the Kent Campus Student Green. Karamu Ya Wahitimu/Celebración de los Graduados and Lavender Graduation ceremonies will again be virtual this year. More information regarding these ceremonies is forthcoming.
 
For more information about the 2021 in-person commencement ceremonies, visit www.kent.edu/commencement.  

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

A graduating Kent State University student smiles in her cap and gown at Risman Plaza in spring 2020.
Thursday, March 18, 2021

Kent State University will hold in-person commencement ceremonies in May for the Spring Class of 2021 and will welcome back all 2020 alumni for an in-person graduation ceremony during Homecoming Weekend this fall.
 
Kent State President Todd Diacon shared with the Class of 2021 that outdoor ceremonies for all colleges and degrees will be held during the week of May 10 at the Centennial Court Green, which is located on Midway Drive south of the Centennial Court Residence Halls. There also will be a virtual commencement for all colleges and degrees on May 15. All of the commencement ceremonies will be livestreamed.
 
Ceremonies will adhere to safety measures from the Flashes Safe Eight, such as physical distancing and the wearing of face coverings. To participate in the in-person commencement, graduating students are being asked to complete their ceremony RSVP by April 8. There will be four tickets per student for guests to attend their student’s commencement ceremony.

Students graduating from a Regional Campus will receive an announcement about their ceremony from the campus dean. As always, Regional Campus graduates are welcome to participate in the ceremonies on the Kent Campus as well.
 
“Congratulations for your perseverance in completing your studies during such an overwhelming time in history,” Diacon said. “This is an awesome accomplishment, especially in light of the challenges that you faced. We are extremely proud of you.”
 
Diacon has also shared with alumni who graduated during 2020 that as promised, they may return for an in-person commencement ceremony as part of Homecoming Weekend 2021. More specific details will be forthcoming.
 
Kent State will also host the College of Podiatric Medicine’s commencement ceremony on Friday, May 21, at the Kent Campus Student Green. Karamu Ya Wahitimu/Celebración de los Graduados and Lavender Graduation ceremonies will again be virtual this year. More information regarding these ceremonies is forthcoming.
 
For more information about the 2021 in-person commencement ceremonies, visit www.kent.edu/commencement.  

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of B'nai B'rith Hillel Marker on May 4 site , Daffodils bloom on May 4 site
Monday, March 15, 2021

In keeping with the commitment to honor and remember the events of May 4, 1970, Kent State University will hold a virtual May 4 51st Commemoration this year. On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, the May 4 Commemoration and Candlelight Vigil will again be virtual.

Logo for May 4
The virtual commemoration will feature a video premiering at noon on Tuesday, May 4, that focuses on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video will feature the new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site to indicate where wounded students were located when hit by gunfire.
 
These new markers join the existing four markers that were installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. The new markers for the wounded students display the names of the students and their distance from the Ohio National Guard.
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created.
 
“We are committed to the legacy of May 4, 1970, sharing the lessons learned and the importance of this date in history,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “We remember and honor those who were lost and those whose lives were never the same. The impact of May 4 reverberates beyond our campus, reaching those across the country and around the world.”

At 7 p.m. on Monday, April 5, the university will host a special virtual screening of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” a film by Daniel Miller. The screening will be followed by a virtual panel discussion with Chic Canfora, a May 4 witness; Tiera Moore, student body president for Kent State’s Undergraduate Student Government; and Ethan Lower, director of governmental affairs for Undergraduate Student Government. The virtual screening event is open to all Kent State students, faculty and staff, and attendees can preregister at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_E30nx9n5SHmRtmIPzElpDQ

To watch the virtual commemoration, learn more about the candlelight vigil and find future updates on additional programming for this year’s commemoration, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of B'nai B'rith Hillel Marker on May 4 site , Daffodils bloom on May 4 site
Monday, March 15, 2021

In keeping with the commitment to honor and remember the events of May 4, 1970, Kent State University will hold a virtual May 4 51st Commemoration this year. On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, the May 4 Commemoration and Candlelight Vigil will again be virtual.

Logo for May 4
The virtual commemoration will feature a video premiering at noon on Tuesday, May 4, that focuses on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video will feature the new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site to indicate where wounded students were located when hit by gunfire.
 
These new markers join the existing four markers that were installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. The new markers for the wounded students display the names of the students and their distance from the Ohio National Guard.
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created.
 
“We are committed to the legacy of May 4, 1970, sharing the lessons learned and the importance of this date in history,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “We remember and honor those who were lost and those whose lives were never the same. The impact of May 4 reverberates beyond our campus, reaching those across the country and around the world.”

At 7 p.m. on Monday, April 5, the university will host a special virtual screening of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” a film by Daniel Miller. The screening will be followed by a virtual panel discussion with Chic Canfora, a May 4 witness; Tiera Moore, student body president for Kent State’s Undergraduate Student Government; and Ethan Lower, director of governmental affairs for Undergraduate Student Government. The virtual screening event is open to all Kent State students, faculty and staff, and attendees can preregister at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_E30nx9n5SHmRtmIPzElpDQ

To watch the virtual commemoration, learn more about the candlelight vigil and find future updates on additional programming for this year’s commemoration, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of B'nai B'rith Hillel Marker on May 4 site , Daffodils bloom on May 4 site
Monday, March 15, 2021

In keeping with the commitment to honor and remember the events of May 4, 1970, Kent State University will hold a virtual May 4 51st Commemoration this year. On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, the May 4 Commemoration and Candlelight Vigil will again be virtual.

Logo for May 4
The virtual commemoration will feature a video premiering at noon on Tuesday, May 4, that focuses on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video will feature the new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site to indicate where wounded students were located when hit by gunfire.
 
These new markers join the existing four markers that were installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. The new markers for the wounded students display the names of the students and their distance from the Ohio National Guard.
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created.
 
“We are committed to the legacy of May 4, 1970, sharing the lessons learned and the importance of this date in history,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “We remember and honor those who were lost and those whose lives were never the same. The impact of May 4 reverberates beyond our campus, reaching those across the country and around the world.”

At 7 p.m. on Monday, April 5, the university will host a special virtual screening of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” a film by Daniel Miller. The screening will be followed by a virtual panel discussion with Chic Canfora, a May 4 witness; Tiera Moore, student body president for Kent State’s Undergraduate Student Government; and Ethan Lower, director of governmental affairs for Undergraduate Student Government. The virtual screening event is open to all Kent State students, faculty and staff, and attendees can preregister at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_E30nx9n5SHmRtmIPzElpDQ

To watch the virtual commemoration, learn more about the candlelight vigil and find future updates on additional programming for this year’s commemoration, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of B'nai B'rith Hillel Marker on May 4 site , Daffodils bloom on May 4 site
Monday, March 15, 2021

In keeping with the commitment to honor and remember the events of May 4, 1970, Kent State University will hold a virtual May 4 51st Commemoration this year. On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, the May 4 Commemoration and Candlelight Vigil will again be virtual.

Logo for May 4
The virtual commemoration will feature a video premiering at noon on Tuesday, May 4, that focuses on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video will feature the new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site to indicate where wounded students were located when hit by gunfire.
 
These new markers join the existing four markers that were installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. The new markers for the wounded students display the names of the students and their distance from the Ohio National Guard.
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created.
 
“We are committed to the legacy of May 4, 1970, sharing the lessons learned and the importance of this date in history,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “We remember and honor those who were lost and those whose lives were never the same. The impact of May 4 reverberates beyond our campus, reaching those across the country and around the world.”

At 7 p.m. on Monday, April 5, the university will host a special virtual screening of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” a film by Daniel Miller. The screening will be followed by a virtual panel discussion with Chic Canfora, a May 4 witness; Tiera Moore, student body president for Kent State’s Undergraduate Student Government; and Ethan Lower, director of governmental affairs for Undergraduate Student Government. The virtual screening event is open to all Kent State students, faculty and staff, and attendees can preregister at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_E30nx9n5SHmRtmIPzElpDQ

To watch the virtual commemoration, learn more about the candlelight vigil and find future updates on additional programming for this year’s commemoration, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of B'nai B'rith Hillel Marker on May 4 site , Daffodils bloom on May 4 site
Monday, March 15, 2021

In keeping with the commitment to honor and remember the events of May 4, 1970, Kent State University will hold a virtual May 4 51st Commemoration this year. On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, the May 4 Commemoration and Candlelight Vigil will again be virtual.

Logo for May 4
The virtual commemoration will feature a video premiering at noon on Tuesday, May 4, that focuses on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video will feature the new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site to indicate where wounded students were located when hit by gunfire.
 
These new markers join the existing four markers that were installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. The new markers for the wounded students display the names of the students and their distance from the Ohio National Guard.
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created.
 
“We are committed to the legacy of May 4, 1970, sharing the lessons learned and the importance of this date in history,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “We remember and honor those who were lost and those whose lives were never the same. The impact of May 4 reverberates beyond our campus, reaching those across the country and around the world.”

At 7 p.m. on Monday, April 5, the university will host a special virtual screening of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” a film by Daniel Miller. The screening will be followed by a virtual panel discussion with Chic Canfora, a May 4 witness; Tiera Moore, student body president for Kent State’s Undergraduate Student Government; and Ethan Lower, director of governmental affairs for Undergraduate Student Government. The virtual screening event is open to all Kent State students, faculty and staff, and attendees can preregister at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_E30nx9n5SHmRtmIPzElpDQ

To watch the virtual commemoration, learn more about the candlelight vigil and find future updates on additional programming for this year’s commemoration, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of B'nai B'rith Hillel Marker on May 4 site , Daffodils bloom on May 4 site
Monday, March 15, 2021

In keeping with the commitment to honor and remember the events of May 4, 1970, Kent State University will hold a virtual May 4 51st Commemoration this year. On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard fired on Kent State students during an anti-war protest, killing four students and wounding nine other students. Due to the global pandemic, the May 4 Commemoration and Candlelight Vigil will again be virtual.

Logo for May 4
The virtual commemoration will feature a video premiering at noon on Tuesday, May 4, that focuses on the nine wounded students: Alan Canfora, John Cleary, Thomas Grace, Dean Kahler, Joseph Lewis, Donald Mackenzie, James Russell, Robert Stamps and Douglas Wrentmore. The video will feature the new markers that have been installed on the May 4 site to indicate where wounded students were located when hit by gunfire.
 
These new markers join the existing four markers that were installed in 1999 in remembrance of Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder, the four students killed on May 4, 1970. The new markers for the wounded students display the names of the students and their distance from the Ohio National Guard.
 
The virtual commemoration will also remember and recognize Alan Canfora, who died in December 2020 at the age of 71. Over the past 50 years, Canfora was the primary voice of May 4, never allowing the shootings and the four killed to be forgotten. To honor his life and legacy, the Alan Canfora Activism Scholarship has been created.
 
“We are committed to the legacy of May 4, 1970, sharing the lessons learned and the importance of this date in history,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “We remember and honor those who were lost and those whose lives were never the same. The impact of May 4 reverberates beyond our campus, reaching those across the country and around the world.”

At 7 p.m. on Monday, April 5, the university will host a special virtual screening of “Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4 and Student Protest in America,” a film by Daniel Miller. The screening will be followed by a virtual panel discussion with Chic Canfora, a May 4 witness; Tiera Moore, student body president for Kent State’s Undergraduate Student Government; and Ethan Lower, director of governmental affairs for Undergraduate Student Government. The virtual screening event is open to all Kent State students, faculty and staff, and attendees can preregister at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_E30nx9n5SHmRtmIPzElpDQ

To watch the virtual commemoration, learn more about the candlelight vigil and find future updates on additional programming for this year’s commemoration, visit www.kent.edu/may-4-1970.
 

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

CT Scan Rendering of a Komodo Dragon Head
Thursday, January 28, 2021

Honors College alumna Jessica Maisano, ’94, B.A., started her career at Kent State as a fashion merchandising student before realizing her passion for dinosaurs and dirt was a viable career option. One Kent State professor would show Maisano that childhood dreams are actually within reach.

In her junior year, Maisano wrote a term paper about what killed the dinosaurs for her earth history course taught by Don Palmer, now Professor Emeritus of Geology.

Image
Jessica Maisano
“I always wanted to be a paleontologist, like every child in the world,” Maisano said. “Most people outgrow that, and those of us who are paleontologists never outgrew it. I prefaced the whole paper with, when I was little, I wanted to be a paleontologist, but then I realized I would be poor all my life digging in the dirt and never find anything.”

Palmer rebutted her comment in her grading and instead presented Maisano with opportunities in the field. In her senior year, Maisano changed her career path to vertebrate paleontology.

“I just decided to go for it,” Maisano said. “I mean, I liked fashion, but at that point, I was feeling bored and not challenged, so Dr. Palmer helped me switch that fall semester into geology. I didn't know anything about the geology department when I switched, and I just happened to fall into a wonderful, small but warm and inviting and supportive department that I think is a real asset to the university.”

While many of her fashion courses did not transfer to vertebrate paleontology, Maisano was grateful to have taken a variety of courses.

“A lot of those classes still benefited me tremendously,” Maisano said. “Like public speaking; you wouldn't believe how many scientists don't know how to speak in public at talks and meetings.”

Maisano also took economics classes and accounting, which she found applicable in the course of her career. 

In the late ’90s, CT scanners were introduced to the world of natural history. The University of Texas received a grant to build an online library of vertebrates based on CT scans. With no prior knowledge of CT scanning, Maisano helped to establish CT scanning in her field.

“At the time, nobody was really trained in it,” Maisano said. “It's something you would just learn by doing. It really was the beginning of this technology in the field.”

Now, Maisano manages a research lab with industrial-strength CT scanners. Unlike medical CT scanners, Maisano’s lab scans “everything but people.” 

“We scan meteorites, fossils, Apollo moon rocks – anything and everything that a scientist would want to look inside of non-destructively,” Maisano said.

Maisano has most recently scanned and analyzed volcanic rocks, manufactured foams, an iPhone battery and a mouse embryo. Her team has 75 years of experience between them.

“Knowing what kind of energy you want to use, how long it's going to take to get the data, what scanner to use ... all of those things are based on experience,” Maisano said. “You get really good at looking through the data and understanding what it is you're seeing, and then helping the client understand what it is they're seeing.”

Maisano’s favorite part of her job comes from helping other scientists reach their research objectives.

“Every time we scan something, what we're seeing inside is new, so it's a real learning experience,” Maisano said. “It's interesting all the time, and I really enjoy being in this kind of environment, working with other scientists and helping them get the data that they need.”

Maisano advises current college students to stay flexible and be open to new opportunities as they present themselves.

For more information about majors available in the Department of Geology, visit www.kent.edu/geology.

CT Scan Rendering of a Komodo Dragon Head
Thursday, January 28, 2021

Honors College alumna Jessica Maisano, ’94, B.A., started her career at Kent State as a fashion merchandising student before realizing her passion for dinosaurs and dirt was a viable career option. One Kent State professor would show Maisano that childhood dreams are actually within reach.

In her junior year, Maisano wrote a term paper about what killed the dinosaurs for her earth history course taught by Don Palmer, now Professor Emeritus of Geology.

Image
Jessica Maisano
“I always wanted to be a paleontologist, like every child in the world,” Maisano said. “Most people outgrow that, and those of us who are paleontologists never outgrew it. I prefaced the whole paper with, when I was little, I wanted to be a paleontologist, but then I realized I would be poor all my life digging in the dirt and never find anything.”

Palmer rebutted her comment in her grading and instead presented Maisano with opportunities in the field. In her senior year, Maisano changed her career path to vertebrate paleontology.

“I just decided to go for it,” Maisano said. “I mean, I liked fashion, but at that point, I was feeling bored and not challenged, so Dr. Palmer helped me switch that fall semester into geology. I didn't know anything about the geology department when I switched, and I just happened to fall into a wonderful, small but warm and inviting and supportive department that I think is a real asset to the university.”

While many of her fashion courses did not transfer to vertebrate paleontology, Maisano was grateful to have taken a variety of courses.

“A lot of those classes still benefited me tremendously,” Maisano said. “Like public speaking; you wouldn't believe how many scientists don't know how to speak in public at talks and meetings.”

Maisano also took economics classes and accounting, which she found applicable in the course of her career. 

In the late ’90s, CT scanners were introduced to the world of natural history. The University of Texas received a grant to build an online library of vertebrates based on CT scans. With no prior knowledge of CT scanning, Maisano helped to establish CT scanning in her field.

“At the time, nobody was really trained in it,” Maisano said. “It's something you would just learn by doing. It really was the beginning of this technology in the field.”

Now, Maisano manages a research lab with industrial-strength CT scanners. Unlike medical CT scanners, Maisano’s lab scans “everything but people.” 

“We scan meteorites, fossils, Apollo moon rocks – anything and everything that a scientist would want to look inside of non-destructively,” Maisano said.

Maisano has most recently scanned and analyzed volcanic rocks, manufactured foams, an iPhone battery and a mouse embryo. Her team has 75 years of experience between them.

“Knowing what kind of energy you want to use, how long it's going to take to get the data, what scanner to use ... all of those things are based on experience,” Maisano said. “You get really good at looking through the data and understanding what it is you're seeing, and then helping the client understand what it is they're seeing.”

Maisano’s favorite part of her job comes from helping other scientists reach their research objectives.

“Every time we scan something, what we're seeing inside is new, so it's a real learning experience,” Maisano said. “It's interesting all the time, and I really enjoy being in this kind of environment, working with other scientists and helping them get the data that they need.”

Maisano advises current college students to stay flexible and be open to new opportunities as they present themselves.

For more information about majors available in the Department of Geology, visit www.kent.edu/geology.

CT Scan Rendering of a Komodo Dragon Head
Thursday, January 28, 2021

Honors College alumna Jessica Maisano, ’94, B.A., started her career at Kent State as a fashion merchandising student before realizing her passion for dinosaurs and dirt was a viable career option. One Kent State professor would show Maisano that childhood dreams are actually within reach.

In her junior year, Maisano wrote a term paper about what killed the dinosaurs for her earth history course taught by Don Palmer, now Professor Emeritus of Geology.

Image
Jessica Maisano
“I always wanted to be a paleontologist, like every child in the world,” Maisano said. “Most people outgrow that, and those of us who are paleontologists never outgrew it. I prefaced the whole paper with, when I was little, I wanted to be a paleontologist, but then I realized I would be poor all my life digging in the dirt and never find anything.”

Palmer rebutted her comment in her grading and instead presented Maisano with opportunities in the field. In her senior year, Maisano changed her career path to vertebrate paleontology.

“I just decided to go for it,” Maisano said. “I mean, I liked fashion, but at that point, I was feeling bored and not challenged, so Dr. Palmer helped me switch that fall semester into geology. I didn't know anything about the geology department when I switched, and I just happened to fall into a wonderful, small but warm and inviting and supportive department that I think is a real asset to the university.”

While many of her fashion courses did not transfer to vertebrate paleontology, Maisano was grateful to have taken a variety of courses.

“A lot of those classes still benefited me tremendously,” Maisano said. “Like public speaking; you wouldn't believe how many scientists don't know how to speak in public at talks and meetings.”

Maisano also took economics classes and accounting, which she found applicable in the course of her career. 

In the late ’90s, CT scanners were introduced to the world of natural history. The University of Texas received a grant to build an online library of vertebrates based on CT scans. With no prior knowledge of CT scanning, Maisano helped to establish CT scanning in her field.

“At the time, nobody was really trained in it,” Maisano said. “It's something you would just learn by doing. It really was the beginning of this technology in the field.”

Now, Maisano manages a research lab with industrial-strength CT scanners. Unlike medical CT scanners, Maisano’s lab scans “everything but people.” 

“We scan meteorites, fossils, Apollo moon rocks – anything and everything that a scientist would want to look inside of non-destructively,” Maisano said.

Maisano has most recently scanned and analyzed volcanic rocks, manufactured foams, an iPhone battery and a mouse embryo. Her team has 75 years of experience between them.

“Knowing what kind of energy you want to use, how long it's going to take to get the data, what scanner to use ... all of those things are based on experience,” Maisano said. “You get really good at looking through the data and understanding what it is you're seeing, and then helping the client understand what it is they're seeing.”

Maisano’s favorite part of her job comes from helping other scientists reach their research objectives.

“Every time we scan something, what we're seeing inside is new, so it's a real learning experience,” Maisano said. “It's interesting all the time, and I really enjoy being in this kind of environment, working with other scientists and helping them get the data that they need.”

Maisano advises current college students to stay flexible and be open to new opportunities as they present themselves.

For more information about majors available in the Department of Geology, visit www.kent.edu/geology.

Photo of Kent State University campus by Franklin Hall
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

U.S. News & World Report has named four Kent State University programs as U.S. News Best Online Programs for 2021. Kent State is recognized in the Best Online Master’s in Nursing Programs, Best Online MBA Programs, Best Online MBA – Business Analytics Programs and Best Online Graduate Education Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics program ranks No. 25 in the nation, and its online master’s in nursing program ranks in the top 100 in the country in the latest rankings released by U.S. News on Tuesday, Jan. 26.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program, offered by the College of Nursing, is ranked in the top 100 in the country by U.S. News. The program improved its ranking to No. 92, up from last year’s ranking of No. 109. Among public institutions, Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program jumps to No. 66.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program prepares registered nurses for roles in advanced practice, education and healthcare administration. Students in this program develop a foundation for further postgraduate and doctoral-level study in nursing. Nurses beyond Northeast Ohio are able to take advantage of the College of Nursing’s excellent program.

“I am so proud of our graduate faculty, led by our Associate Dean of Nursing Graduate Programs, Dr. Wendy Umberger, who continue to work diligently to provide a rigorous curriculum and join with the staff to support our students,” said Denice Sheehan, Ph.D., interim dean and Henderson Memorial Endowed Chair of Kent State’s College of Nursing. “It is especially gratifying to see the ranking of our graduate nursing programs improve in 2021 through the collaborative work of many to achieve this high honor. I am also grateful to our graduate students who work hard to earn their degrees.” 

Kent State’s Online MBA program, offered by the College of Business Administration, boasts two placements in the Best Online Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics ranked No. 25 in the nation in the U.S. News 2021 Online MBA specialty ranking, and the overall Online MBA program ranks No. 126 in the country among all higher education institutions.
 
This is the first time that Kent State’s College of Business Administration has received a specialty ranking from U.S. News, and Kent State is the only Ohio institution to be ranked in the business analytics concentration category. 

“We worked with industry leaders to develop this concentration to help prepare Online MBA students for in-demand roles in business analytics,” said Deborah F. Spake, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Business Administration. “We are delighted to be recognized for these efforts as we do our part to meet this industry need.” 
 
Online MBA students who select the business analytics concentration are required to take three business analytics courses. After completing a fourth business analytics course, students can also receive a graduate certificate in business analytics. The College of Business Administration also offers a Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) program with both in-person and online options. This provides students the opportunity to earn an MBA and MSBA with some overlapping coursework.
 
In addition to the No. 25 ranking, Kent State’s Online MBA is ranked among the Best Online MBA Programs in the 2021 rankings. Among the public universities, Kent State’s Online MBA program ranks in the top 100. It is also the highest-ranked online MBA program in northern Ohio. This is the third year Kent State’s Online MBA, which was launched in fall 2017, has been ranked by U.S. News.
 
The Online MBA program provides students access to world-renowned faculty and strategically designed courses in a flexible format. Kent State’s College of Business Administration recently reached Quality Matters (QM) certification for all core courses in the Online MBA program. In addition to the U.S. News ranking, the college recently ranked No. 26 in The Princeton Review’s Top 50 Online MBA Programs for 2021

Kent State’s online graduate education programs have again been recognized as the highest ranked at a public university in Northeast Ohio by U.S. News on its 2021 Best Online Graduate Education Programs list. This list compiles the rankings of online programs offering master’s degrees in education. Kent State’s online graduate education programs moved up to No. 132 on the list, compared to last year’s ranking of No. 140. Among public universities, the Kent State online graduate education programs rank at No. 103. This is the fourth year Kent State’s online graduate education programs have been ranked by U.S. News.
 
Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services offers online master’s degrees in education in four program areas: Educational Psychology, Educational Technology, Evaluation and Measurement and Special Education.
 
“We are proud to once again be recognized as the U.S. News & World Report leading provider of online graduate education in Northeast Ohio at a public university,” said James C. Hannon, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services. “Our ranking is an indication of the creative, engaging and high-quality online programs offered in our college at the master’s level.”

The U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings assess master’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees administered mostly through distance education. The 2021 edition ranks the most online degree offerings in U.S. News Best Online Programs history, assessing 1,641 online degree programs. U.S. News ranked the online programs using five categories: engagement, expert opinion, faculty credentials and training, services and technologies, and student excellence. This is the 10th year U.S. News has collected data from distance education master’s and bachelor’s degree completion programs. For more information about the U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings, visit www.usnews.com/education/online-education.

For more information about the Kent State College of Nursing’s online master’s in nursing program, visit www.kent.edu/nursing/programs/masters.

For more information about the Kent State College of Business Administration’s Online MBA program, including the Business Analytics concentration, visit www.kent.edu/business/onlinemba

For more information about the Kent State College of Education, Health and Human Services’ online graduate education programs, visit www.kent.edu/ehhs/online-programs

# # #

Media Contacts:
Mariah Gibbons, College of Nursing, mgibbon2@kent.edu, 330-672-8756
Joni Bowen, College of Business Administration, jbowen1@kent.edu, 330-672-1279
Kedron Trapp, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ktaylo57@kent.edu, 330-672-3697
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of Kent State University campus by Franklin Hall
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

U.S. News & World Report has named four Kent State University programs as U.S. News Best Online Programs for 2021. Kent State is recognized in the Best Online Master’s in Nursing Programs, Best Online MBA Programs, Best Online MBA – Business Analytics Programs and Best Online Graduate Education Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics program ranks No. 25 in the nation, and its online master’s in nursing program ranks in the top 100 in the country in the latest rankings released by U.S. News on Tuesday, Jan. 26.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program, offered by the College of Nursing, is ranked in the top 100 in the country by U.S. News. The program improved its ranking to No. 92, up from last year’s ranking of No. 109. Among public institutions, Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program jumps to No. 66.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program prepares registered nurses for roles in advanced practice, education and healthcare administration. Students in this program develop a foundation for further postgraduate and doctoral-level study in nursing. Nurses beyond Northeast Ohio are able to take advantage of the College of Nursing’s excellent program.

“I am so proud of our graduate faculty, led by our Associate Dean of Nursing Graduate Programs, Dr. Wendy Umberger, who continue to work diligently to provide a rigorous curriculum and join with the staff to support our students,” said Denice Sheehan, Ph.D., interim dean and Henderson Memorial Endowed Chair of Kent State’s College of Nursing. “It is especially gratifying to see the ranking of our graduate nursing programs improve in 2021 through the collaborative work of many to achieve this high honor. I am also grateful to our graduate students who work hard to earn their degrees.” 

Kent State’s Online MBA program, offered by the College of Business Administration, boasts two placements in the Best Online Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics ranked No. 25 in the nation in the U.S. News 2021 Online MBA specialty ranking, and the overall Online MBA program ranks No. 126 in the country among all higher education institutions.
 
This is the first time that Kent State’s College of Business Administration has received a specialty ranking from U.S. News, and Kent State is the only Ohio institution to be ranked in the business analytics concentration category. 

“We worked with industry leaders to develop this concentration to help prepare Online MBA students for in-demand roles in business analytics,” said Deborah F. Spake, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Business Administration. “We are delighted to be recognized for these efforts as we do our part to meet this industry need.” 
 
Online MBA students who select the business analytics concentration are required to take three business analytics courses. After completing a fourth business analytics course, students can also receive a graduate certificate in business analytics. The College of Business Administration also offers a Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) program with both in-person and online options. This provides students the opportunity to earn an MBA and MSBA with some overlapping coursework.
 
In addition to the No. 25 ranking, Kent State’s Online MBA is ranked among the Best Online MBA Programs in the 2021 rankings. Among the public universities, Kent State’s Online MBA program ranks in the top 100. It is also the highest-ranked online MBA program in northern Ohio. This is the third year Kent State’s Online MBA, which was launched in fall 2017, has been ranked by U.S. News.
 
The Online MBA program provides students access to world-renowned faculty and strategically designed courses in a flexible format. Kent State’s College of Business Administration recently reached Quality Matters (QM) certification for all core courses in the Online MBA program. In addition to the U.S. News ranking, the college recently ranked No. 26 in The Princeton Review’s Top 50 Online MBA Programs for 2021

Kent State’s online graduate education programs have again been recognized as the highest ranked at a public university in Northeast Ohio by U.S. News on its 2021 Best Online Graduate Education Programs list. This list compiles the rankings of online programs offering master’s degrees in education. Kent State’s online graduate education programs moved up to No. 132 on the list, compared to last year’s ranking of No. 140. Among public universities, the Kent State online graduate education programs rank at No. 103. This is the fourth year Kent State’s online graduate education programs have been ranked by U.S. News.
 
Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services offers online master’s degrees in education in four program areas: Educational Psychology, Educational Technology, Evaluation and Measurement and Special Education.
 
“We are proud to once again be recognized as the U.S. News & World Report leading provider of online graduate education in Northeast Ohio at a public university,” said James C. Hannon, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services. “Our ranking is an indication of the creative, engaging and high-quality online programs offered in our college at the master’s level.”

The U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings assess master’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees administered mostly through distance education. The 2021 edition ranks the most online degree offerings in U.S. News Best Online Programs history, assessing 1,641 online degree programs. U.S. News ranked the online programs using five categories: engagement, expert opinion, faculty credentials and training, services and technologies, and student excellence. This is the 10th year U.S. News has collected data from distance education master’s and bachelor’s degree completion programs. For more information about the U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings, visit www.usnews.com/education/online-education.

For more information about the Kent State College of Nursing’s online master’s in nursing program, visit www.kent.edu/nursing/programs/masters.

For more information about the Kent State College of Business Administration’s Online MBA program, including the Business Analytics concentration, visit www.kent.edu/business/onlinemba

For more information about the Kent State College of Education, Health and Human Services’ online graduate education programs, visit www.kent.edu/ehhs/online-programs

# # #

Media Contacts:
Mariah Gibbons, College of Nursing, mgibbon2@kent.edu, 330-672-8756
Joni Bowen, College of Business Administration, jbowen1@kent.edu, 330-672-1279
Kedron Trapp, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ktaylo57@kent.edu, 330-672-3697
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of Kent State University campus by Franklin Hall
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

U.S. News & World Report has named four Kent State University programs as U.S. News Best Online Programs for 2021. Kent State is recognized in the Best Online Master’s in Nursing Programs, Best Online MBA Programs, Best Online MBA – Business Analytics Programs and Best Online Graduate Education Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics program ranks No. 25 in the nation, and its online master’s in nursing program ranks in the top 100 in the country in the latest rankings released by U.S. News on Tuesday, Jan. 26.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program, offered by the College of Nursing, is ranked in the top 100 in the country by U.S. News. The program improved its ranking to No. 92, up from last year’s ranking of No. 109. Among public institutions, Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program jumps to No. 66.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program prepares registered nurses for roles in advanced practice, education and healthcare administration. Students in this program develop a foundation for further postgraduate and doctoral-level study in nursing. Nurses beyond Northeast Ohio are able to take advantage of the College of Nursing’s excellent program.

“I am so proud of our graduate faculty, led by our Associate Dean of Nursing Graduate Programs, Dr. Wendy Umberger, who continue to work diligently to provide a rigorous curriculum and join with the staff to support our students,” said Denice Sheehan, Ph.D., interim dean and Henderson Memorial Endowed Chair of Kent State’s College of Nursing. “It is especially gratifying to see the ranking of our graduate nursing programs improve in 2021 through the collaborative work of many to achieve this high honor. I am also grateful to our graduate students who work hard to earn their degrees.” 

Kent State’s Online MBA program, offered by the College of Business Administration, boasts two placements in the Best Online Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics ranked No. 25 in the nation in the U.S. News 2021 Online MBA specialty ranking, and the overall Online MBA program ranks No. 126 in the country among all higher education institutions.
 
This is the first time that Kent State’s College of Business Administration has received a specialty ranking from U.S. News, and Kent State is the only Ohio institution to be ranked in the business analytics concentration category. 

“We worked with industry leaders to develop this concentration to help prepare Online MBA students for in-demand roles in business analytics,” said Deborah F. Spake, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Business Administration. “We are delighted to be recognized for these efforts as we do our part to meet this industry need.” 
 
Online MBA students who select the business analytics concentration are required to take three business analytics courses. After completing a fourth business analytics course, students can also receive a graduate certificate in business analytics. The College of Business Administration also offers a Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) program with both in-person and online options. This provides students the opportunity to earn an MBA and MSBA with some overlapping coursework.
 
In addition to the No. 25 ranking, Kent State’s Online MBA is ranked among the Best Online MBA Programs in the 2021 rankings. Among the public universities, Kent State’s Online MBA program ranks in the top 100. It is also the highest-ranked online MBA program in northern Ohio. This is the third year Kent State’s Online MBA, which was launched in fall 2017, has been ranked by U.S. News.
 
The Online MBA program provides students access to world-renowned faculty and strategically designed courses in a flexible format. Kent State’s College of Business Administration recently reached Quality Matters (QM) certification for all core courses in the Online MBA program. In addition to the U.S. News ranking, the college recently ranked No. 26 in The Princeton Review’s Top 50 Online MBA Programs for 2021

Kent State’s online graduate education programs have again been recognized as the highest ranked at a public university in Northeast Ohio by U.S. News on its 2021 Best Online Graduate Education Programs list. This list compiles the rankings of online programs offering master’s degrees in education. Kent State’s online graduate education programs moved up to No. 132 on the list, compared to last year’s ranking of No. 140. Among public universities, the Kent State online graduate education programs rank at No. 103. This is the fourth year Kent State’s online graduate education programs have been ranked by U.S. News.
 
Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services offers online master’s degrees in education in four program areas: Educational Psychology, Educational Technology, Evaluation and Measurement and Special Education.
 
“We are proud to once again be recognized as the U.S. News & World Report leading provider of online graduate education in Northeast Ohio at a public university,” said James C. Hannon, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services. “Our ranking is an indication of the creative, engaging and high-quality online programs offered in our college at the master’s level.”

The U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings assess master’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees administered mostly through distance education. The 2021 edition ranks the most online degree offerings in U.S. News Best Online Programs history, assessing 1,641 online degree programs. U.S. News ranked the online programs using five categories: engagement, expert opinion, faculty credentials and training, services and technologies, and student excellence. This is the 10th year U.S. News has collected data from distance education master’s and bachelor’s degree completion programs. For more information about the U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings, visit www.usnews.com/education/online-education.

For more information about the Kent State College of Nursing’s online master’s in nursing program, visit www.kent.edu/nursing/programs/masters.

For more information about the Kent State College of Business Administration’s Online MBA program, including the Business Analytics concentration, visit www.kent.edu/business/onlinemba

For more information about the Kent State College of Education, Health and Human Services’ online graduate education programs, visit www.kent.edu/ehhs/online-programs

# # #

Media Contacts:
Mariah Gibbons, College of Nursing, mgibbon2@kent.edu, 330-672-8756
Joni Bowen, College of Business Administration, jbowen1@kent.edu, 330-672-1279
Kedron Trapp, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ktaylo57@kent.edu, 330-672-3697
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of Kent State University campus by Franklin Hall
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

U.S. News & World Report has named four Kent State University programs as U.S. News Best Online Programs for 2021. Kent State is recognized in the Best Online Master’s in Nursing Programs, Best Online MBA Programs, Best Online MBA – Business Analytics Programs and Best Online Graduate Education Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics program ranks No. 25 in the nation, and its online master’s in nursing program ranks in the top 100 in the country in the latest rankings released by U.S. News on Tuesday, Jan. 26.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program, offered by the College of Nursing, is ranked in the top 100 in the country by U.S. News. The program improved its ranking to No. 92, up from last year’s ranking of No. 109. Among public institutions, Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program jumps to No. 66.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program prepares registered nurses for roles in advanced practice, education and healthcare administration. Students in this program develop a foundation for further postgraduate and doctoral-level study in nursing. Nurses beyond Northeast Ohio are able to take advantage of the College of Nursing’s excellent program.

“I am so proud of our graduate faculty, led by our Associate Dean of Nursing Graduate Programs, Dr. Wendy Umberger, who continue to work diligently to provide a rigorous curriculum and join with the staff to support our students,” said Denice Sheehan, Ph.D., interim dean and Henderson Memorial Endowed Chair of Kent State’s College of Nursing. “It is especially gratifying to see the ranking of our graduate nursing programs improve in 2021 through the collaborative work of many to achieve this high honor. I am also grateful to our graduate students who work hard to earn their degrees.” 

Kent State’s Online MBA program, offered by the College of Business Administration, boasts two placements in the Best Online Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics ranked No. 25 in the nation in the U.S. News 2021 Online MBA specialty ranking, and the overall Online MBA program ranks No. 126 in the country among all higher education institutions.
 
This is the first time that Kent State’s College of Business Administration has received a specialty ranking from U.S. News, and Kent State is the only Ohio institution to be ranked in the business analytics concentration category. 

“We worked with industry leaders to develop this concentration to help prepare Online MBA students for in-demand roles in business analytics,” said Deborah F. Spake, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Business Administration. “We are delighted to be recognized for these efforts as we do our part to meet this industry need.” 
 
Online MBA students who select the business analytics concentration are required to take three business analytics courses. After completing a fourth business analytics course, students can also receive a graduate certificate in business analytics. The College of Business Administration also offers a Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) program with both in-person and online options. This provides students the opportunity to earn an MBA and MSBA with some overlapping coursework.
 
In addition to the No. 25 ranking, Kent State’s Online MBA is ranked among the Best Online MBA Programs in the 2021 rankings. Among the public universities, Kent State’s Online MBA program ranks in the top 100. It is also the highest-ranked online MBA program in northern Ohio. This is the third year Kent State’s Online MBA, which was launched in fall 2017, has been ranked by U.S. News.
 
The Online MBA program provides students access to world-renowned faculty and strategically designed courses in a flexible format. Kent State’s College of Business Administration recently reached Quality Matters (QM) certification for all core courses in the Online MBA program. In addition to the U.S. News ranking, the college recently ranked No. 26 in The Princeton Review’s Top 50 Online MBA Programs for 2021

Kent State’s online graduate education programs have again been recognized as the highest ranked at a public university in Northeast Ohio by U.S. News on its 2021 Best Online Graduate Education Programs list. This list compiles the rankings of online programs offering master’s degrees in education. Kent State’s online graduate education programs moved up to No. 132 on the list, compared to last year’s ranking of No. 140. Among public universities, the Kent State online graduate education programs rank at No. 103. This is the fourth year Kent State’s online graduate education programs have been ranked by U.S. News.
 
Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services offers online master’s degrees in education in four program areas: Educational Psychology, Educational Technology, Evaluation and Measurement and Special Education.
 
“We are proud to once again be recognized as the U.S. News & World Report leading provider of online graduate education in Northeast Ohio at a public university,” said James C. Hannon, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services. “Our ranking is an indication of the creative, engaging and high-quality online programs offered in our college at the master’s level.”

The U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings assess master’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees administered mostly through distance education. The 2021 edition ranks the most online degree offerings in U.S. News Best Online Programs history, assessing 1,641 online degree programs. U.S. News ranked the online programs using five categories: engagement, expert opinion, faculty credentials and training, services and technologies, and student excellence. This is the 10th year U.S. News has collected data from distance education master’s and bachelor’s degree completion programs. For more information about the U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings, visit www.usnews.com/education/online-education.

For more information about the Kent State College of Nursing’s online master’s in nursing program, visit www.kent.edu/nursing/programs/masters.

For more information about the Kent State College of Business Administration’s Online MBA program, including the Business Analytics concentration, visit www.kent.edu/business/onlinemba

For more information about the Kent State College of Education, Health and Human Services’ online graduate education programs, visit www.kent.edu/ehhs/online-programs

# # #

Media Contacts:
Mariah Gibbons, College of Nursing, mgibbon2@kent.edu, 330-672-8756
Joni Bowen, College of Business Administration, jbowen1@kent.edu, 330-672-1279
Kedron Trapp, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ktaylo57@kent.edu, 330-672-3697
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of Kent State University campus by Franklin Hall
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

U.S. News & World Report has named four Kent State University programs as U.S. News Best Online Programs for 2021. Kent State is recognized in the Best Online Master’s in Nursing Programs, Best Online MBA Programs, Best Online MBA – Business Analytics Programs and Best Online Graduate Education Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics program ranks No. 25 in the nation, and its online master’s in nursing program ranks in the top 100 in the country in the latest rankings released by U.S. News on Tuesday, Jan. 26.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program, offered by the College of Nursing, is ranked in the top 100 in the country by U.S. News. The program improved its ranking to No. 92, up from last year’s ranking of No. 109. Among public institutions, Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program jumps to No. 66.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program prepares registered nurses for roles in advanced practice, education and healthcare administration. Students in this program develop a foundation for further postgraduate and doctoral-level study in nursing. Nurses beyond Northeast Ohio are able to take advantage of the College of Nursing’s excellent program.

“I am so proud of our graduate faculty, led by our Associate Dean of Nursing Graduate Programs, Dr. Wendy Umberger, who continue to work diligently to provide a rigorous curriculum and join with the staff to support our students,” said Denice Sheehan, Ph.D., interim dean and Henderson Memorial Endowed Chair of Kent State’s College of Nursing. “It is especially gratifying to see the ranking of our graduate nursing programs improve in 2021 through the collaborative work of many to achieve this high honor. I am also grateful to our graduate students who work hard to earn their degrees.” 

Kent State’s Online MBA program, offered by the College of Business Administration, boasts two placements in the Best Online Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics ranked No. 25 in the nation in the U.S. News 2021 Online MBA specialty ranking, and the overall Online MBA program ranks No. 126 in the country among all higher education institutions.
 
This is the first time that Kent State’s College of Business Administration has received a specialty ranking from U.S. News, and Kent State is the only Ohio institution to be ranked in the business analytics concentration category. 

“We worked with industry leaders to develop this concentration to help prepare Online MBA students for in-demand roles in business analytics,” said Deborah F. Spake, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Business Administration. “We are delighted to be recognized for these efforts as we do our part to meet this industry need.” 
 
Online MBA students who select the business analytics concentration are required to take three business analytics courses. After completing a fourth business analytics course, students can also receive a graduate certificate in business analytics. The College of Business Administration also offers a Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) program with both in-person and online options. This provides students the opportunity to earn an MBA and MSBA with some overlapping coursework.
 
In addition to the No. 25 ranking, Kent State’s Online MBA is ranked among the Best Online MBA Programs in the 2021 rankings. Among the public universities, Kent State’s Online MBA program ranks in the top 100. It is also the highest-ranked online MBA program in northern Ohio. This is the third year Kent State’s Online MBA, which was launched in fall 2017, has been ranked by U.S. News.
 
The Online MBA program provides students access to world-renowned faculty and strategically designed courses in a flexible format. Kent State’s College of Business Administration recently reached Quality Matters (QM) certification for all core courses in the Online MBA program. In addition to the U.S. News ranking, the college recently ranked No. 26 in The Princeton Review’s Top 50 Online MBA Programs for 2021

Kent State’s online graduate education programs have again been recognized as the highest ranked at a public university in Northeast Ohio by U.S. News on its 2021 Best Online Graduate Education Programs list. This list compiles the rankings of online programs offering master’s degrees in education. Kent State’s online graduate education programs moved up to No. 132 on the list, compared to last year’s ranking of No. 140. Among public universities, the Kent State online graduate education programs rank at No. 103. This is the fourth year Kent State’s online graduate education programs have been ranked by U.S. News.
 
Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services offers online master’s degrees in education in four program areas: Educational Psychology, Educational Technology, Evaluation and Measurement and Special Education.
 
“We are proud to once again be recognized as the U.S. News & World Report leading provider of online graduate education in Northeast Ohio at a public university,” said James C. Hannon, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services. “Our ranking is an indication of the creative, engaging and high-quality online programs offered in our college at the master’s level.”

The U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings assess master’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees administered mostly through distance education. The 2021 edition ranks the most online degree offerings in U.S. News Best Online Programs history, assessing 1,641 online degree programs. U.S. News ranked the online programs using five categories: engagement, expert opinion, faculty credentials and training, services and technologies, and student excellence. This is the 10th year U.S. News has collected data from distance education master’s and bachelor’s degree completion programs. For more information about the U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings, visit www.usnews.com/education/online-education.

For more information about the Kent State College of Nursing’s online master’s in nursing program, visit www.kent.edu/nursing/programs/masters.

For more information about the Kent State College of Business Administration’s Online MBA program, including the Business Analytics concentration, visit www.kent.edu/business/onlinemba

For more information about the Kent State College of Education, Health and Human Services’ online graduate education programs, visit www.kent.edu/ehhs/online-programs

# # #

Media Contacts:
Mariah Gibbons, College of Nursing, mgibbon2@kent.edu, 330-672-8756
Joni Bowen, College of Business Administration, jbowen1@kent.edu, 330-672-1279
Kedron Trapp, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ktaylo57@kent.edu, 330-672-3697
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of Kent State University campus by Franklin Hall
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

U.S. News & World Report has named four Kent State University programs as U.S. News Best Online Programs for 2021. Kent State is recognized in the Best Online Master’s in Nursing Programs, Best Online MBA Programs, Best Online MBA – Business Analytics Programs and Best Online Graduate Education Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics program ranks No. 25 in the nation, and its online master’s in nursing program ranks in the top 100 in the country in the latest rankings released by U.S. News on Tuesday, Jan. 26.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program, offered by the College of Nursing, is ranked in the top 100 in the country by U.S. News. The program improved its ranking to No. 92, up from last year’s ranking of No. 109. Among public institutions, Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program jumps to No. 66.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program prepares registered nurses for roles in advanced practice, education and healthcare administration. Students in this program develop a foundation for further postgraduate and doctoral-level study in nursing. Nurses beyond Northeast Ohio are able to take advantage of the College of Nursing’s excellent program.

“I am so proud of our graduate faculty, led by our Associate Dean of Nursing Graduate Programs, Dr. Wendy Umberger, who continue to work diligently to provide a rigorous curriculum and join with the staff to support our students,” said Denice Sheehan, Ph.D., interim dean and Henderson Memorial Endowed Chair of Kent State’s College of Nursing. “It is especially gratifying to see the ranking of our graduate nursing programs improve in 2021 through the collaborative work of many to achieve this high honor. I am also grateful to our graduate students who work hard to earn their degrees.” 

Kent State’s Online MBA program, offered by the College of Business Administration, boasts two placements in the Best Online Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics ranked No. 25 in the nation in the U.S. News 2021 Online MBA specialty ranking, and the overall Online MBA program ranks No. 126 in the country among all higher education institutions.
 
This is the first time that Kent State’s College of Business Administration has received a specialty ranking from U.S. News, and Kent State is the only Ohio institution to be ranked in the business analytics concentration category. 

“We worked with industry leaders to develop this concentration to help prepare Online MBA students for in-demand roles in business analytics,” said Deborah F. Spake, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Business Administration. “We are delighted to be recognized for these efforts as we do our part to meet this industry need.” 
 
Online MBA students who select the business analytics concentration are required to take three business analytics courses. After completing a fourth business analytics course, students can also receive a graduate certificate in business analytics. The College of Business Administration also offers a Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) program with both in-person and online options. This provides students the opportunity to earn an MBA and MSBA with some overlapping coursework.
 
In addition to the No. 25 ranking, Kent State’s Online MBA is ranked among the Best Online MBA Programs in the 2021 rankings. Among the public universities, Kent State’s Online MBA program ranks in the top 100. It is also the highest-ranked online MBA program in northern Ohio. This is the third year Kent State’s Online MBA, which was launched in fall 2017, has been ranked by U.S. News.
 
The Online MBA program provides students access to world-renowned faculty and strategically designed courses in a flexible format. Kent State’s College of Business Administration recently reached Quality Matters (QM) certification for all core courses in the Online MBA program. In addition to the U.S. News ranking, the college recently ranked No. 26 in The Princeton Review’s Top 50 Online MBA Programs for 2021

Kent State’s online graduate education programs have again been recognized as the highest ranked at a public university in Northeast Ohio by U.S. News on its 2021 Best Online Graduate Education Programs list. This list compiles the rankings of online programs offering master’s degrees in education. Kent State’s online graduate education programs moved up to No. 132 on the list, compared to last year’s ranking of No. 140. Among public universities, the Kent State online graduate education programs rank at No. 103. This is the fourth year Kent State’s online graduate education programs have been ranked by U.S. News.
 
Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services offers online master’s degrees in education in four program areas: Educational Psychology, Educational Technology, Evaluation and Measurement and Special Education.
 
“We are proud to once again be recognized as the U.S. News & World Report leading provider of online graduate education in Northeast Ohio at a public university,” said James C. Hannon, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services. “Our ranking is an indication of the creative, engaging and high-quality online programs offered in our college at the master’s level.”

The U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings assess master’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees administered mostly through distance education. The 2021 edition ranks the most online degree offerings in U.S. News Best Online Programs history, assessing 1,641 online degree programs. U.S. News ranked the online programs using five categories: engagement, expert opinion, faculty credentials and training, services and technologies, and student excellence. This is the 10th year U.S. News has collected data from distance education master’s and bachelor’s degree completion programs. For more information about the U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings, visit www.usnews.com/education/online-education.

For more information about the Kent State College of Nursing’s online master’s in nursing program, visit www.kent.edu/nursing/programs/masters.

For more information about the Kent State College of Business Administration’s Online MBA program, including the Business Analytics concentration, visit www.kent.edu/business/onlinemba

For more information about the Kent State College of Education, Health and Human Services’ online graduate education programs, visit www.kent.edu/ehhs/online-programs

# # #

Media Contacts:
Mariah Gibbons, College of Nursing, mgibbon2@kent.edu, 330-672-8756
Joni Bowen, College of Business Administration, jbowen1@kent.edu, 330-672-1279
Kedron Trapp, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ktaylo57@kent.edu, 330-672-3697
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of Kent State University campus by Franklin Hall
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

U.S. News & World Report has named four Kent State University programs as U.S. News Best Online Programs for 2021. Kent State is recognized in the Best Online Master’s in Nursing Programs, Best Online MBA Programs, Best Online MBA – Business Analytics Programs and Best Online Graduate Education Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics program ranks No. 25 in the nation, and its online master’s in nursing program ranks in the top 100 in the country in the latest rankings released by U.S. News on Tuesday, Jan. 26.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program, offered by the College of Nursing, is ranked in the top 100 in the country by U.S. News. The program improved its ranking to No. 92, up from last year’s ranking of No. 109. Among public institutions, Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program jumps to No. 66.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program prepares registered nurses for roles in advanced practice, education and healthcare administration. Students in this program develop a foundation for further postgraduate and doctoral-level study in nursing. Nurses beyond Northeast Ohio are able to take advantage of the College of Nursing’s excellent program.

“I am so proud of our graduate faculty, led by our Associate Dean of Nursing Graduate Programs, Dr. Wendy Umberger, who continue to work diligently to provide a rigorous curriculum and join with the staff to support our students,” said Denice Sheehan, Ph.D., interim dean and Henderson Memorial Endowed Chair of Kent State’s College of Nursing. “It is especially gratifying to see the ranking of our graduate nursing programs improve in 2021 through the collaborative work of many to achieve this high honor. I am also grateful to our graduate students who work hard to earn their degrees.” 

Kent State’s Online MBA program, offered by the College of Business Administration, boasts two placements in the Best Online Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics ranked No. 25 in the nation in the U.S. News 2021 Online MBA specialty ranking, and the overall Online MBA program ranks No. 126 in the country among all higher education institutions.
 
This is the first time that Kent State’s College of Business Administration has received a specialty ranking from U.S. News, and Kent State is the only Ohio institution to be ranked in the business analytics concentration category. 

“We worked with industry leaders to develop this concentration to help prepare Online MBA students for in-demand roles in business analytics,” said Deborah F. Spake, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Business Administration. “We are delighted to be recognized for these efforts as we do our part to meet this industry need.” 
 
Online MBA students who select the business analytics concentration are required to take three business analytics courses. After completing a fourth business analytics course, students can also receive a graduate certificate in business analytics. The College of Business Administration also offers a Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) program with both in-person and online options. This provides students the opportunity to earn an MBA and MSBA with some overlapping coursework.
 
In addition to the No. 25 ranking, Kent State’s Online MBA is ranked among the Best Online MBA Programs in the 2021 rankings. Among the public universities, Kent State’s Online MBA program ranks in the top 100. It is also the highest-ranked online MBA program in northern Ohio. This is the third year Kent State’s Online MBA, which was launched in fall 2017, has been ranked by U.S. News.
 
The Online MBA program provides students access to world-renowned faculty and strategically designed courses in a flexible format. Kent State’s College of Business Administration recently reached Quality Matters (QM) certification for all core courses in the Online MBA program. In addition to the U.S. News ranking, the college recently ranked No. 26 in The Princeton Review’s Top 50 Online MBA Programs for 2021

Kent State’s online graduate education programs have again been recognized as the highest ranked at a public university in Northeast Ohio by U.S. News on its 2021 Best Online Graduate Education Programs list. This list compiles the rankings of online programs offering master’s degrees in education. Kent State’s online graduate education programs moved up to No. 132 on the list, compared to last year’s ranking of No. 140. Among public universities, the Kent State online graduate education programs rank at No. 103. This is the fourth year Kent State’s online graduate education programs have been ranked by U.S. News.
 
Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services offers online master’s degrees in education in four program areas: Educational Psychology, Educational Technology, Evaluation and Measurement and Special Education.
 
“We are proud to once again be recognized as the U.S. News & World Report leading provider of online graduate education in Northeast Ohio at a public university,” said James C. Hannon, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services. “Our ranking is an indication of the creative, engaging and high-quality online programs offered in our college at the master’s level.”

The U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings assess master’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees administered mostly through distance education. The 2021 edition ranks the most online degree offerings in U.S. News Best Online Programs history, assessing 1,641 online degree programs. U.S. News ranked the online programs using five categories: engagement, expert opinion, faculty credentials and training, services and technologies, and student excellence. This is the 10th year U.S. News has collected data from distance education master’s and bachelor’s degree completion programs. For more information about the U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings, visit www.usnews.com/education/online-education.

For more information about the Kent State College of Nursing’s online master’s in nursing program, visit www.kent.edu/nursing/programs/masters.

For more information about the Kent State College of Business Administration’s Online MBA program, including the Business Analytics concentration, visit www.kent.edu/business/onlinemba

For more information about the Kent State College of Education, Health and Human Services’ online graduate education programs, visit www.kent.edu/ehhs/online-programs

# # #

Media Contacts:
Mariah Gibbons, College of Nursing, mgibbon2@kent.edu, 330-672-8756
Joni Bowen, College of Business Administration, jbowen1@kent.edu, 330-672-1279
Kedron Trapp, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ktaylo57@kent.edu, 330-672-3697
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Photo of Kent State University campus by Franklin Hall
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

U.S. News & World Report has named four Kent State University programs as U.S. News Best Online Programs for 2021. Kent State is recognized in the Best Online Master’s in Nursing Programs, Best Online MBA Programs, Best Online MBA – Business Analytics Programs and Best Online Graduate Education Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics program ranks No. 25 in the nation, and its online master’s in nursing program ranks in the top 100 in the country in the latest rankings released by U.S. News on Tuesday, Jan. 26.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program, offered by the College of Nursing, is ranked in the top 100 in the country by U.S. News. The program improved its ranking to No. 92, up from last year’s ranking of No. 109. Among public institutions, Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program jumps to No. 66.

Kent State’s online master’s in nursing program prepares registered nurses for roles in advanced practice, education and healthcare administration. Students in this program develop a foundation for further postgraduate and doctoral-level study in nursing. Nurses beyond Northeast Ohio are able to take advantage of the College of Nursing’s excellent program.

“I am so proud of our graduate faculty, led by our Associate Dean of Nursing Graduate Programs, Dr. Wendy Umberger, who continue to work diligently to provide a rigorous curriculum and join with the staff to support our students,” said Denice Sheehan, Ph.D., interim dean and Henderson Memorial Endowed Chair of Kent State’s College of Nursing. “It is especially gratifying to see the ranking of our graduate nursing programs improve in 2021 through the collaborative work of many to achieve this high honor. I am also grateful to our graduate students who work hard to earn their degrees.” 

Kent State’s Online MBA program, offered by the College of Business Administration, boasts two placements in the Best Online Programs rankings. Kent State’s Online MBA with a concentration in business analytics ranked No. 25 in the nation in the U.S. News 2021 Online MBA specialty ranking, and the overall Online MBA program ranks No. 126 in the country among all higher education institutions.
 
This is the first time that Kent State’s College of Business Administration has received a specialty ranking from U.S. News, and Kent State is the only Ohio institution to be ranked in the business analytics concentration category. 

“We worked with industry leaders to develop this concentration to help prepare Online MBA students for in-demand roles in business analytics,” said Deborah F. Spake, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Business Administration. “We are delighted to be recognized for these efforts as we do our part to meet this industry need.” 
 
Online MBA students who select the business analytics concentration are required to take three business analytics courses. After completing a fourth business analytics course, students can also receive a graduate certificate in business analytics. The College of Business Administration also offers a Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) program with both in-person and online options. This provides students the opportunity to earn an MBA and MSBA with some overlapping coursework.
 
In addition to the No. 25 ranking, Kent State’s Online MBA is ranked among the Best Online MBA Programs in the 2021 rankings. Among the public universities, Kent State’s Online MBA program ranks in the top 100. It is also the highest-ranked online MBA program in northern Ohio. This is the third year Kent State’s Online MBA, which was launched in fall 2017, has been ranked by U.S. News.
 
The Online MBA program provides students access to world-renowned faculty and strategically designed courses in a flexible format. Kent State’s College of Business Administration recently reached Quality Matters (QM) certification for all core courses in the Online MBA program. In addition to the U.S. News ranking, the college recently ranked No. 26 in The Princeton Review’s Top 50 Online MBA Programs for 2021

Kent State’s online graduate education programs have again been recognized as the highest ranked at a public university in Northeast Ohio by U.S. News on its 2021 Best Online Graduate Education Programs list. This list compiles the rankings of online programs offering master’s degrees in education. Kent State’s online graduate education programs moved up to No. 132 on the list, compared to last year’s ranking of No. 140. Among public universities, the Kent State online graduate education programs rank at No. 103. This is the fourth year Kent State’s online graduate education programs have been ranked by U.S. News.
 
Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services offers online master’s degrees in education in four program areas: Educational Psychology, Educational Technology, Evaluation and Measurement and Special Education.
 
“We are proud to once again be recognized as the U.S. News & World Report leading provider of online graduate education in Northeast Ohio at a public university,” said James C. Hannon, Ph.D., dean of Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services. “Our ranking is an indication of the creative, engaging and high-quality online programs offered in our college at the master’s level.”

The U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings assess master’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees administered mostly through distance education. The 2021 edition ranks the most online degree offerings in U.S. News Best Online Programs history, assessing 1,641 online degree programs. U.S. News ranked the online programs using five categories: engagement, expert opinion, faculty credentials and training, services and technologies, and student excellence. This is the 10th year U.S. News has collected data from distance education master’s and bachelor’s degree completion programs. For more information about the U.S. News 2021 Best Online Programs rankings, visit www.usnews.com/education/online-education.

For more information about the Kent State College of Nursing’s online master’s in nursing program, visit www.kent.edu/nursing/programs/masters.

For more information about the Kent State College of Business Administration’s Online MBA program, including the Business Analytics concentration, visit www.kent.edu/business/onlinemba

For more information about the Kent State College of Education, Health and Human Services’ online graduate education programs, visit www.kent.edu/ehhs/online-programs

# # #

Media Contacts:
Mariah Gibbons, College of Nursing, mgibbon2@kent.edu, 330-672-8756
Joni Bowen, College of Business Administration, jbowen1@kent.edu, 330-672-1279
Kedron Trapp, College of Education, Health and Human Services, ktaylo57@kent.edu, 330-672-3697
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

An image of an exhibit from the TEXTURES exhibition
Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Black lives and Black cultures have been underrepresented and discriminated against for many years. "TEXTURES: The History and Art of Black Hair" is an exhibition coming to the Kent State University Museum with significant sponsorship from corporate and federal funding that focuses on celebrating and empowering these lives and cultures.

Professor Tameka Ellington

The "TEXTURES" exhibition is a project dedicated to giving the Black community a voice. It is an interdisciplinary project that focuses on cultures from all over the world. Curators Tameka Ellington, Ph.D., an associate professor at the School of Fashion and interim assistant dean for the College of the Arts, and Joseph Underwood, Ph.D., an assistant professor of art history, have been working on this exhibition for three years, and it has generated impressive results.

“'TEXTURES' is the most ambitious exhibition in scope that the museum has ever done,” said Sarah Rogers, the director of the museum. “It was so important to find funds to support the passion and idea Tameka and Joseph had.” 

The "TEXTURES" exhibition has received more than $100,000 in sponsorships and awards, including support from Proctor and Gamble ($25,000), Bank of America ($25,000) and L’Oréal ($10,000). The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) awarded the TEXTURES exhibition $35,000.

The NEA funding is a significant achievement and elevates the museum and the "TEXTURES" exhibition to the level of more established institutions in New York City and Chicago, said Underwood. NEA is the only federal funding that supports cultural endeavors and funding is highly competitive.

Joseph Underwood

Ellington expressed her gratitude toward Terry Robinson, corporate relations officer and interim director of corporate relations at Kent State, for his significant fundraising efforts.

The show was originally scheduled to debut fall 2020; however, due to the pandemic, the exhibition is now set for fall 2021 and will continually produce programmatic events throughout its run. 

Ellington and Underwood have devised three categories to focus on for the exhibition: Black Joy, Hair Politics, and Community and Memory. They have curated 250 objects from more than 50 artists to showcase the largest exhibition on Black Hair. 

Ellington explained how Black people have dealt with and continue to deal with stereotypes about their hair texture. Some of these stereotypes categorize their hair texture or hairstyle as “unprofessional,” “unkept,” or “too African.” 

“I was 19 years old and working at an amusement park when I first realized the people were trying to regulate me on how I should wear my hair,” Ellington said. “Some people like me choose not to be ashamed of their hair, and I could not have done this project without Dr. Underwood and my team.”

Some pieces people can look forward to seeing in this exhibition include work from Kehinde Wiley, known for his paint portrait of former President Barack Obama; Mary Sibande, a South African artist known for her life-size sculptures; and Lorna Simpson, a photographer and multimedia artist known for her pioneering work in conceptual photography.

For those unable to attend the exhibition in person, Ellington and Underwood have partnered to create a book called “TEXTURES: The History and Art of Black Hair” to encapsulate the entire exhibition on paper. The book also includes six essays on various topics of Black hair. The book is available for purchase now.

For more information about the "TEXTURES" exhibition, visit www.kent.edu/museum/event/textures-history-and-art-black-hair

To learn more about Ellington and Underwood’s book “TEXTURES: the History and Art of Black Hair,” visit www.hirmerverlag.de/uk/titel-88-3/textures-2066/.

An image of an exhibit from the TEXTURES exhibition
Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Black lives and Black cultures have been underrepresented and discriminated against for many years. "TEXTURES: The History and Art of Black Hair" is an exhibition coming to the Kent State University Museum with significant sponsorship from corporate and federal funding that focuses on celebrating and empowering these lives and cultures.

Professor Tameka Ellington

The "TEXTURES" exhibition is a project dedicated to giving the Black community a voice. It is an interdisciplinary project that focuses on cultures from all over the world. Curators Tameka Ellington, Ph.D., an associate professor at the School of Fashion and interim assistant dean for the College of the Arts, and Joseph Underwood, Ph.D., an assistant professor of art history, have been working on this exhibition for three years, and it has generated impressive results.

“'TEXTURES' is the most ambitious exhibition in scope that the museum has ever done,” said Sarah Rogers, the director of the museum. “It was so important to find funds to support the passion and idea Tameka and Joseph had.” 

The "TEXTURES" exhibition has received more than $100,000 in sponsorships and awards, including support from Proctor and Gamble ($25,000), Bank of America ($25,000) and L’Oréal ($10,000). The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) awarded the TEXTURES exhibition $35,000.

The NEA funding is a significant achievement and elevates the museum and the "TEXTURES" exhibition to the level of more established institutions in New York City and Chicago, said Underwood. NEA is the only federal funding that supports cultural endeavors and funding is highly competitive.

Joseph Underwood

Ellington expressed her gratitude toward Terry Robinson, corporate relations officer and interim director of corporate relations at Kent State, for his significant fundraising efforts.

The show was originally scheduled to debut fall 2020; however, due to the pandemic, the exhibition is now set for fall 2021 and will continually produce programmatic events throughout its run. 

Ellington and Underwood have devised three categories to focus on for the exhibition: Black Joy, Hair Politics, and Community and Memory. They have curated 250 objects from more than 50 artists to showcase the largest exhibition on Black Hair. 

Ellington explained how Black people have dealt with and continue to deal with stereotypes about their hair texture. Some of these stereotypes categorize their hair texture or hairstyle as “unprofessional,” “unkept,” or “too African.” 

“I was 19 years old and working at an amusement park when I first realized the people were trying to regulate me on how I should wear my hair,” Ellington said. “Some people like me choose not to be ashamed of their hair, and I could not have done this project without Dr. Underwood and my team.”

Some pieces people can look forward to seeing in this exhibition include work from Kehinde Wiley, known for his paint portrait of former President Barack Obama; Mary Sibande, a South African artist known for her life-size sculptures; and Lorna Simpson, a photographer and multimedia artist known for her pioneering work in conceptual photography.

For those unable to attend the exhibition in person, Ellington and Underwood have partnered to create a book called “TEXTURES: The History and Art of Black Hair” to encapsulate the entire exhibition on paper. The book also includes six essays on various topics of Black hair. The book is available for purchase now.

For more information about the "TEXTURES" exhibition, visit www.kent.edu/museum/event/textures-history-and-art-black-hair

To learn more about Ellington and Underwood’s book “TEXTURES: the History and Art of Black Hair,” visit www.hirmerverlag.de/uk/titel-88-3/textures-2066/.

An image of an exhibit from the TEXTURES exhibition
Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Black lives and Black cultures have been underrepresented and discriminated against for many years. "TEXTURES: The History and Art of Black Hair" is an exhibition coming to the Kent State University Museum with significant sponsorship from corporate and federal funding that focuses on celebrating and empowering these lives and cultures.

Professor Tameka Ellington

The "TEXTURES" exhibition is a project dedicated to giving the Black community a voice. It is an interdisciplinary project that focuses on cultures from all over the world. Curators Tameka Ellington, Ph.D., an associate professor at the School of Fashion and interim assistant dean for the College of the Arts, and Joseph Underwood, Ph.D., an assistant professor of art history, have been working on this exhibition for three years, and it has generated impressive results.

“'TEXTURES' is the most ambitious exhibition in scope that the museum has ever done,” said Sarah Rogers, the director of the museum. “It was so important to find funds to support the passion and idea Tameka and Joseph had.” 

The "TEXTURES" exhibition has received more than $100,000 in sponsorships and awards, including support from Proctor and Gamble ($25,000), Bank of America ($25,000) and L’Oréal ($10,000). The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) awarded the TEXTURES exhibition $35,000.

The NEA funding is a significant achievement and elevates the museum and the "TEXTURES" exhibition to the level of more established institutions in New York City and Chicago, said Underwood. NEA is the only federal funding that supports cultural endeavors and funding is highly competitive.

Joseph Underwood

Ellington expressed her gratitude toward Terry Robinson, corporate relations officer and interim director of corporate relations at Kent State, for his significant fundraising efforts.

The show was originally scheduled to debut fall 2020; however, due to the pandemic, the exhibition is now set for fall 2021 and will continually produce programmatic events throughout its run. 

Ellington and Underwood have devised three categories to focus on for the exhibition: Black Joy, Hair Politics, and Community and Memory. They have curated 250 objects from more than 50 artists to showcase the largest exhibition on Black Hair. 

Ellington explained how Black people have dealt with and continue to deal with stereotypes about their hair texture. Some of these stereotypes categorize their hair texture or hairstyle as “unprofessional,” “unkept,” or “too African.” 

“I was 19 years old and working at an amusement park when I first realized the people were trying to regulate me on how I should wear my hair,” Ellington said. “Some people like me choose not to be ashamed of their hair, and I could not have done this project without Dr. Underwood and my team.”

Some pieces people can look forward to seeing in this exhibition include work from Kehinde Wiley, known for his paint portrait of former President Barack Obama; Mary Sibande, a South African artist known for her life-size sculptures; and Lorna Simpson, a photographer and multimedia artist known for her pioneering work in conceptual photography.

For those unable to attend the exhibition in person, Ellington and Underwood have partnered to create a book called “TEXTURES: The History and Art of Black Hair” to encapsulate the entire exhibition on paper. The book also includes six essays on various topics of Black hair. The book is available for purchase now.

For more information about the "TEXTURES" exhibition, visit www.kent.edu/museum/event/textures-history-and-art-black-hair

To learn more about Ellington and Underwood’s book “TEXTURES: the History and Art of Black Hair,” visit www.hirmerverlag.de/uk/titel-88-3/textures-2066/.

GFAM at the New York Stock Exchange and Ritts poses with her team’s first place trophy at the Quinnipiac G.A.M.E Forum.
Monday, October 05, 2020

Senior finance student Anne Ritts has built an outstanding resume during her time at Kent State University, but with a full-time job already lined up for her after graduation, she will not have to worry about updating it any time soon.

In her first three years at Kent State, Ritts has maintained membership in multiple finance organizations and a sorority, studied abroad, changed her major, and held multiple internships. Ritts’ next adventure will begin this summer in her career with PNC Bank in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Kent State’s education program is what initially drew Ritts to the university. She spent a year studying integrated mathematics, planning to teach math after graduation, but her path took a turn when she became inspired by her grandfather’s passion for the stock market, which grew within her, and Ritts decided to switch her major.

“If I hadn’t made the switch to finance, I definitely wouldn’t be where I am today,” Ritts said. “I’ve had so many amazing experiences as soon as I switched my major.”

Once she made the change, Ritts received an email from the finance department chair with all opportunities available to finance majors within the College of Business Administration. The initial encouragement inspired her to attend meetings where she discovered she was one of the only women within her major and the student finance organizations.

“I loved the atmosphere, all of the people involved were talking about important things and they were the kind of people I wanted to surround myself with,” Ritts said.  “Being in finance and being the only girl many times, it felt like I was always just walking into a room of guys. Because I’ve had all of these experiences at Kent State, I’m able to be more confident.”

Through her involvement in Golden Flash Asset Management Group (GFAM), Ritts has had the opportunity to participate in the Certified Financial Analyst (CFA) research challenge, visit the New York Stock Exchange, and go to the Cayman Islands to study money laundering and tax havens.  

Steven Dennis, Ph.D., Firestone Chair of Corporate Finance at Kent State, leads GFAM as co-advisor. Dennis has worked alongside Ritts for three years within the fund and has been an integral part of her success.

Within GFAM, students handle real money and create portfolios of investments they manage and enter into competitions. “Students are now managing over a million dollars in the fund,” Dennis explained.  “We use a top-down management style where we look at how the economy is doing, which sectors ought to do well, and then look within those sectors to determine which stocks we should own within that sector.”

In 2019, Ritts’ team brought home first place for their Fixed Income portfolio at the Quinnipiac Global Asset Management Education Forum, which is the largest student finance competition in the country. Looking back, Ritts recalls this accomplishment as one of her best memories in GFAM and at Kent State.

“Going to New York City and getting to represent Golden Flash Asset Management was something I’ll always remember,” Ritts said. “It meant a lot knowing we had put so much time and effort into this portfolio, and I got that opportunity because I put myself out there.”

Although Ritts was one of the only women when she initially switched to a finance major, her accomplishments have inspired more women to study finance at Kent State and be involved in GFAM.

“Anne was one of the early people in the fund, and she’s attracted more women into it, which has been such a great thing for us.” Dennis said. “Most of our senior officers now are women, and a lot of that had to do with Anne’s leadership and being willing to come in early on and be a part of what we do.”

While Ritts says she never intended to study abroad in college, her connections through GFAM and her dedication to her major allowed her the opportunity to study abroad not once but twice during her time at Kent State. Ritts first went on her winter break trip with GFAM to the Cayman Islands, and then spent a semester abroad in Switzerland.

In Switzerland, Ritts studied finance while maintaining an internship in Tech 4.0 venture capital researching agriculture technology.

“I researched companies that used artificial intelligence, robotics and more to improve the agriculture sector,” Ritts explained. “We wanted to focus on investing in companies that are working to make things more sustainable and make the earth better while making humans better.”

Last year, Ritts was invited to the PNC Women in Business Summit where she interviewed for and was hired as a private wealth management intern for summer 2020. Although her internship was completed remotely, Ritts was able to live in Palm Beach, Florida, over the summer for her placement. After completing an extremely successful internship, PNC offered Ritts a full-time career post-grad in private wealth management.

“It’s a three-year program where I will essentially be able to shadow each role within PNC wealth management,” Ritts explained. “I will get to pick three financial advisor roles that I want to learn more about, and at the end of the program I’ll end up in one of those roles where I will actually get my own clients.”

Though Ritts’ time at Kent State will soon come to an end, she is grateful for the many opportunities and memories Kent State has given her, and she is excited to see where the future goes.

“Looking back, I don’t think I could have picked a better school,” Ritts reflected. “If you’re willing to put in the work and put yourself out there, people want to help you. If it weren’t for my professors in finance supporting me and spending extra time with me, I really wouldn’t be where I am today.”

To learn more about the College of Business Administration and the Golden Flash Asset Management Group, visit www.kent.edu/business and www.kent.edu/business/golden-flash-asset-management-team.

Banner Photo:

Left: Members of GFAM had the opportunity to visit the New York Stock Exchange during their trip to New York City for the Quinnipiac G.A.M.E Forum.
Right: Ritts poses with her team’s first place trophy at the Quinnipiac G.A.M.E Forum. Photos courtesy of Anne Ritts

 

GFAM at the New York Stock Exchange and Ritts poses with her team’s first place trophy at the Quinnipiac G.A.M.E Forum.
Monday, October 05, 2020

Senior finance student Anne Ritts has built an outstanding resume during her time at Kent State University, but with a full-time job already lined up for her after graduation, she will not have to worry about updating it any time soon.

In her first three years at Kent State, Ritts has maintained membership in multiple finance organizations and a sorority, studied abroad, changed her major, and held multiple internships. Ritts’ next adventure will begin this summer in her career with PNC Bank in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Kent State’s education program is what initially drew Ritts to the university. She spent a year studying integrated mathematics, planning to teach math after graduation, but her path took a turn when she became inspired by her grandfather’s passion for the stock market, which grew within her, and Ritts decided to switch her major.

“If I hadn’t made the switch to finance, I definitely wouldn’t be where I am today,” Ritts said. “I’ve had so many amazing experiences as soon as I switched my major.”

Once she made the change, Ritts received an email from the finance department chair with all opportunities available to finance majors within the College of Business Administration. The initial encouragement inspired her to attend meetings where she discovered she was one of the only women within her major and the student finance organizations.

“I loved the atmosphere, all of the people involved were talking about important things and they were the kind of people I wanted to surround myself with,” Ritts said.  “Being in finance and being the only girl many times, it felt like I was always just walking into a room of guys. Because I’ve had all of these experiences at Kent State, I’m able to be more confident.”

Through her involvement in Golden Flash Asset Management Group (GFAM), Ritts has had the opportunity to participate in the Certified Financial Analyst (CFA) research challenge, visit the New York Stock Exchange, and go to the Cayman Islands to study money laundering and tax havens.  

Steven Dennis, Ph.D., Firestone Chair of Corporate Finance at Kent State, leads GFAM as co-advisor. Dennis has worked alongside Ritts for three years within the fund and has been an integral part of her success.

Within GFAM, students handle real money and create portfolios of investments they manage and enter into competitions. “Students are now managing over a million dollars in the fund,” Dennis explained.  “We use a top-down management style where we look at how the economy is doing, which sectors ought to do well, and then look within those sectors to determine which stocks we should own within that sector.”

In 2019, Ritts’ team brought home first place for their Fixed Income portfolio at the Quinnipiac Global Asset Management Education Forum, which is the largest student finance competition in the country. Looking back, Ritts recalls this accomplishment as one of her best memories in GFAM and at Kent State.

“Going to New York City and getting to represent Golden Flash Asset Management was something I’ll always remember,” Ritts said. “It meant a lot knowing we had put so much time and effort into this portfolio, and I got that opportunity because I put myself out there.”

Although Ritts was one of the only women when she initially switched to a finance major, her accomplishments have inspired more women to study finance at Kent State and be involved in GFAM.

“Anne was one of the early people in the fund, and she’s attracted more women into it, which has been such a great thing for us.” Dennis said. “Most of our senior officers now are women, and a lot of that had to do with Anne’s leadership and being willing to come in early on and be a part of what we do.”

While Ritts says she never intended to study abroad in college, her connections through GFAM and her dedication to her major allowed her the opportunity to study abroad not once but twice during her time at Kent State. Ritts first went on her winter break trip with GFAM to the Cayman Islands, and then spent a semester abroad in Switzerland.

In Switzerland, Ritts studied finance while maintaining an internship in Tech 4.0 venture capital researching agriculture technology.

“I researched companies that used artificial intelligence, robotics and more to improve the agriculture sector,” Ritts explained. “We wanted to focus on investing in companies that are working to make things more sustainable and make the earth better while making humans better.”

Last year, Ritts was invited to the PNC Women in Business Summit where she interviewed for and was hired as a private wealth management intern for summer 2020. Although her internship was completed remotely, Ritts was able to live in Palm Beach, Florida, over the summer for her placement. After completing an extremely successful internship, PNC offered Ritts a full-time career post-grad in private wealth management.

“It’s a three-year program where I will essentially be able to shadow each role within PNC wealth management,” Ritts explained. “I will get to pick three financial advisor roles that I want to learn more about, and at the end of the program I’ll end up in one of those roles where I will actually get my own clients.”

Though Ritts’ time at Kent State will soon come to an end, she is grateful for the many opportunities and memories Kent State has given her, and she is excited to see where the future goes.

“Looking back, I don’t think I could have picked a better school,” Ritts reflected. “If you’re willing to put in the work and put yourself out there, people want to help you. If it weren’t for my professors in finance supporting me and spending extra time with me, I really wouldn’t be where I am today.”

To learn more about the College of Business Administration and the Golden Flash Asset Management Group, visit www.kent.edu/business and www.kent.edu/business/golden-flash-asset-management-team.

Banner Photo:

Left: Members of GFAM had the opportunity to visit the New York Stock Exchange during their trip to New York City for the Quinnipiac G.A.M.E Forum.
Right: Ritts poses with her team’s first place trophy at the Quinnipiac G.A.M.E Forum. Photos courtesy of Anne Ritts

 

Three Kent State University students work together in a study group.
Friday, August 28, 2020

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Kent State University a $2.6 million, five-year TRIO Student Support Services program grant. The program serves students from first-generation and low-income backgrounds and students with diverse learning and physical abilities.

Kent State’s Student Support Services (SSS) program, housed in University College, serves 300 students annually through a holistic community approach offering peer mentoring, tutoring, academic, cultural, personal, professional and leadership development experiences. The program has a proven track record of helping students stay in school and continue to graduation. 

“For more than 40 years, the Student Support Services program has been making a difference in the lives of students who have the most difficult time navigating the university system,” said N.J. Akbar, Ph.D., Kent State’s assistant dean of University College, who oversees the program and led the grant writing and submission. “Student Support Services has modeled the way for removing barriers to graduation and increasing students’ sense of belonging; it has literally changed families and futures.” 

In a recent statement, U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan said, “Kent State University will be able to provide necessary services and support to ensure that students can attend and graduate … no matter their financial situation.” Ryan went on to say, “We need to continue removing the barriers to a college education for everyone who wants to get one,” which is at the heart of the program’s mission.

“As the first in my family to graduate from college, I know how confusing and overwhelming the college experience can be,” said Adam B. Cinderich, director of the Student Support Services program at Kent State. “Our program’s main goal is to support our students as they embark on and navigate their academic journey. When students join our program, they are gaining much more than a support system. They become part of our TRIO family.”

When asked about what had the greatest impact on them this year, a current Kent State student responded, “SSS is my home. Without them, I honestly am not sure where I could have gone in my college journey. They have changed my life, and I am so grateful for everything they do.”

Founded as part of the Educational Opportunity Act of 1964 and created as part of former President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty, federal TRIO programs were the first national college access and success programs created to combat social, socioeconomic and cultural barriers to education in the United States. Kent State’s Student Support Services has been helping students realize their dreams of graduating from college since receiving its first grant in 1978.

The program builds a community to support student success. This occurs through peer tutoring, peer mentoring, personal and professional development workshops, leadership development, financial literacy, and assistance navigating students’ college transition and the university system. The program also offers unique immersive learning experiences, including annual leadership retreats, graduate school visits and alternative spring break trips.

Student Support Services will receive $527,601, or 73%, of its annual funding from the U.S. Department of Education and $195,473, or 27%, from Kent State.

For more information about Kent State’s TRIO Student Support Services program, visit www.kent.edu/studentsupportservices.

# # #

Media Contacts:
N.J. Akbar, nakbar@kent.edu, 330-672-1865
Adam B. Cinderich, acinderi@kent.edu, 330-672-8689
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Three Kent State University students work together in a study group.
Friday, August 28, 2020

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Kent State University a $2.6 million, five-year TRIO Student Support Services program grant. The program serves students from first-generation and low-income backgrounds and students with diverse learning and physical abilities.

Kent State’s Student Support Services (SSS) program, housed in University College, serves 300 students annually through a holistic community approach offering peer mentoring, tutoring, academic, cultural, personal, professional and leadership development experiences. The program has a proven track record of helping students stay in school and continue to graduation. 

“For more than 40 years, the Student Support Services program has been making a difference in the lives of students who have the most difficult time navigating the university system,” said N.J. Akbar, Ph.D., Kent State’s assistant dean of University College, who oversees the program and led the grant writing and submission. “Student Support Services has modeled the way for removing barriers to graduation and increasing students’ sense of belonging; it has literally changed families and futures.” 

In a recent statement, U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan said, “Kent State University will be able to provide necessary services and support to ensure that students can attend and graduate … no matter their financial situation.” Ryan went on to say, “We need to continue removing the barriers to a college education for everyone who wants to get one,” which is at the heart of the program’s mission.

“As the first in my family to graduate from college, I know how confusing and overwhelming the college experience can be,” said Adam B. Cinderich, director of the Student Support Services program at Kent State. “Our program’s main goal is to support our students as they embark on and navigate their academic journey. When students join our program, they are gaining much more than a support system. They become part of our TRIO family.”

When asked about what had the greatest impact on them this year, a current Kent State student responded, “SSS is my home. Without them, I honestly am not sure where I could have gone in my college journey. They have changed my life, and I am so grateful for everything they do.”

Founded as part of the Educational Opportunity Act of 1964 and created as part of former President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty, federal TRIO programs were the first national college access and success programs created to combat social, socioeconomic and cultural barriers to education in the United States. Kent State’s Student Support Services has been helping students realize their dreams of graduating from college since receiving its first grant in 1978.

The program builds a community to support student success. This occurs through peer tutoring, peer mentoring, personal and professional development workshops, leadership development, financial literacy, and assistance navigating students’ college transition and the university system. The program also offers unique immersive learning experiences, including annual leadership retreats, graduate school visits and alternative spring break trips.

Student Support Services will receive $527,601, or 73%, of its annual funding from the U.S. Department of Education and $195,473, or 27%, from Kent State.

For more information about Kent State’s TRIO Student Support Services program, visit www.kent.edu/studentsupportservices.

# # #

Media Contacts:
N.J. Akbar, nakbar@kent.edu, 330-672-1865
Adam B. Cinderich, acinderi@kent.edu, 330-672-8689
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Three Kent State University students work together in a study group.
Friday, August 28, 2020

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Kent State University a $2.6 million, five-year TRIO Student Support Services program grant. The program serves students from first-generation and low-income backgrounds and students with diverse learning and physical abilities.

Kent State’s Student Support Services (SSS) program, housed in University College, serves 300 students annually through a holistic community approach offering peer mentoring, tutoring, academic, cultural, personal, professional and leadership development experiences. The program has a proven track record of helping students stay in school and continue to graduation. 

“For more than 40 years, the Student Support Services program has been making a difference in the lives of students who have the most difficult time navigating the university system,” said N.J. Akbar, Ph.D., Kent State’s assistant dean of University College, who oversees the program and led the grant writing and submission. “Student Support Services has modeled the way for removing barriers to graduation and increasing students’ sense of belonging; it has literally changed families and futures.” 

In a recent statement, U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan said, “Kent State University will be able to provide necessary services and support to ensure that students can attend and graduate … no matter their financial situation.” Ryan went on to say, “We need to continue removing the barriers to a college education for everyone who wants to get one,” which is at the heart of the program’s mission.

“As the first in my family to graduate from college, I know how confusing and overwhelming the college experience can be,” said Adam B. Cinderich, director of the Student Support Services program at Kent State. “Our program’s main goal is to support our students as they embark on and navigate their academic journey. When students join our program, they are gaining much more than a support system. They become part of our TRIO family.”

When asked about what had the greatest impact on them this year, a current Kent State student responded, “SSS is my home. Without them, I honestly am not sure where I could have gone in my college journey. They have changed my life, and I am so grateful for everything they do.”

Founded as part of the Educational Opportunity Act of 1964 and created as part of former President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty, federal TRIO programs were the first national college access and success programs created to combat social, socioeconomic and cultural barriers to education in the United States. Kent State’s Student Support Services has been helping students realize their dreams of graduating from college since receiving its first grant in 1978.

The program builds a community to support student success. This occurs through peer tutoring, peer mentoring, personal and professional development workshops, leadership development, financial literacy, and assistance navigating students’ college transition and the university system. The program also offers unique immersive learning experiences, including annual leadership retreats, graduate school visits and alternative spring break trips.

Student Support Services will receive $527,601, or 73%, of its annual funding from the U.S. Department of Education and $195,473, or 27%, from Kent State.

For more information about Kent State’s TRIO Student Support Services program, visit www.kent.edu/studentsupportservices.

# # #

Media Contacts:
N.J. Akbar, nakbar@kent.edu, 330-672-1865
Adam B. Cinderich, acinderi@kent.edu, 330-672-8689
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Three Kent State University students work together in a study group.
Friday, August 28, 2020

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Kent State University a $2.6 million, five-year TRIO Student Support Services program grant. The program serves students from first-generation and low-income backgrounds and students with diverse learning and physical abilities.

Kent State’s Student Support Services (SSS) program, housed in University College, serves 300 students annually through a holistic community approach offering peer mentoring, tutoring, academic, cultural, personal, professional and leadership development experiences. The program has a proven track record of helping students stay in school and continue to graduation. 

“For more than 40 years, the Student Support Services program has been making a difference in the lives of students who have the most difficult time navigating the university system,” said N.J. Akbar, Ph.D., Kent State’s assistant dean of University College, who oversees the program and led the grant writing and submission. “Student Support Services has modeled the way for removing barriers to graduation and increasing students’ sense of belonging; it has literally changed families and futures.” 

In a recent statement, U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan said, “Kent State University will be able to provide necessary services and support to ensure that students can attend and graduate … no matter their financial situation.” Ryan went on to say, “We need to continue removing the barriers to a college education for everyone who wants to get one,” which is at the heart of the program’s mission.

“As the first in my family to graduate from college, I know how confusing and overwhelming the college experience can be,” said Adam B. Cinderich, director of the Student Support Services program at Kent State. “Our program’s main goal is to support our students as they embark on and navigate their academic journey. When students join our program, they are gaining much more than a support system. They become part of our TRIO family.”

When asked about what had the greatest impact on them this year, a current Kent State student responded, “SSS is my home. Without them, I honestly am not sure where I could have gone in my college journey. They have changed my life, and I am so grateful for everything they do.”

Founded as part of the Educational Opportunity Act of 1964 and created as part of former President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty, federal TRIO programs were the first national college access and success programs created to combat social, socioeconomic and cultural barriers to education in the United States. Kent State’s Student Support Services has been helping students realize their dreams of graduating from college since receiving its first grant in 1978.

The program builds a community to support student success. This occurs through peer tutoring, peer mentoring, personal and professional development workshops, leadership development, financial literacy, and assistance navigating students’ college transition and the university system. The program also offers unique immersive learning experiences, including annual leadership retreats, graduate school visits and alternative spring break trips.

Student Support Services will receive $527,601, or 73%, of its annual funding from the U.S. Department of Education and $195,473, or 27%, from Kent State.

For more information about Kent State’s TRIO Student Support Services program, visit www.kent.edu/studentsupportservices.

# # #

Media Contacts:
N.J. Akbar, nakbar@kent.edu, 330-672-1865
Adam B. Cinderich, acinderi@kent.edu, 330-672-8689
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Three Kent State University students work together in a study group.
Friday, August 28, 2020

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Kent State University a $2.6 million, five-year TRIO Student Support Services program grant. The program serves students from first-generation and low-income backgrounds and students with diverse learning and physical abilities.

Kent State’s Student Support Services (SSS) program, housed in University College, serves 300 students annually through a holistic community approach offering peer mentoring, tutoring, academic, cultural, personal, professional and leadership development experiences. The program has a proven track record of helping students stay in school and continue to graduation. 

“For more than 40 years, the Student Support Services program has been making a difference in the lives of students who have the most difficult time navigating the university system,” said N.J. Akbar, Ph.D., Kent State’s assistant dean of University College, who oversees the program and led the grant writing and submission. “Student Support Services has modeled the way for removing barriers to graduation and increasing students’ sense of belonging; it has literally changed families and futures.” 

In a recent statement, U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan said, “Kent State University will be able to provide necessary services and support to ensure that students can attend and graduate … no matter their financial situation.” Ryan went on to say, “We need to continue removing the barriers to a college education for everyone who wants to get one,” which is at the heart of the program’s mission.

“As the first in my family to graduate from college, I know how confusing and overwhelming the college experience can be,” said Adam B. Cinderich, director of the Student Support Services program at Kent State. “Our program’s main goal is to support our students as they embark on and navigate their academic journey. When students join our program, they are gaining much more than a support system. They become part of our TRIO family.”

When asked about what had the greatest impact on them this year, a current Kent State student responded, “SSS is my home. Without them, I honestly am not sure where I could have gone in my college journey. They have changed my life, and I am so grateful for everything they do.”

Founded as part of the Educational Opportunity Act of 1964 and created as part of former President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty, federal TRIO programs were the first national college access and success programs created to combat social, socioeconomic and cultural barriers to education in the United States. Kent State’s Student Support Services has been helping students realize their dreams of graduating from college since receiving its first grant in 1978.

The program builds a community to support student success. This occurs through peer tutoring, peer mentoring, personal and professional development workshops, leadership development, financial literacy, and assistance navigating students’ college transition and the university system. The program also offers unique immersive learning experiences, including annual leadership retreats, graduate school visits and alternative spring break trips.

Student Support Services will receive $527,601, or 73%, of its annual funding from the U.S. Department of Education and $195,473, or 27%, from Kent State.

For more information about Kent State’s TRIO Student Support Services program, visit www.kent.edu/studentsupportservices.

# # #

Media Contacts:
N.J. Akbar, nakbar@kent.edu, 330-672-1865
Adam B. Cinderich, acinderi@kent.edu, 330-672-8689
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Three Kent State University students work together in a study group.
Friday, August 28, 2020

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Kent State University a $2.6 million, five-year TRIO Student Support Services program grant. The program serves students from first-generation and low-income backgrounds and students with diverse learning and physical abilities.

Kent State’s Student Support Services (SSS) program, housed in University College, serves 300 students annually through a holistic community approach offering peer mentoring, tutoring, academic, cultural, personal, professional and leadership development experiences. The program has a proven track record of helping students stay in school and continue to graduation. 

“For more than 40 years, the Student Support Services program has been making a difference in the lives of students who have the most difficult time navigating the university system,” said N.J. Akbar, Ph.D., Kent State’s assistant dean of University College, who oversees the program and led the grant writing and submission. “Student Support Services has modeled the way for removing barriers to graduation and increasing students’ sense of belonging; it has literally changed families and futures.” 

In a recent statement, U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan said, “Kent State University will be able to provide necessary services and support to ensure that students can attend and graduate … no matter their financial situation.” Ryan went on to say, “We need to continue removing the barriers to a college education for everyone who wants to get one,” which is at the heart of the program’s mission.

“As the first in my family to graduate from college, I know how confusing and overwhelming the college experience can be,” said Adam B. Cinderich, director of the Student Support Services program at Kent State. “Our program’s main goal is to support our students as they embark on and navigate their academic journey. When students join our program, they are gaining much more than a support system. They become part of our TRIO family.”

When asked about what had the greatest impact on them this year, a current Kent State student responded, “SSS is my home. Without them, I honestly am not sure where I could have gone in my college journey. They have changed my life, and I am so grateful for everything they do.”

Founded as part of the Educational Opportunity Act of 1964 and created as part of former President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty, federal TRIO programs were the first national college access and success programs created to combat social, socioeconomic and cultural barriers to education in the United States. Kent State’s Student Support Services has been helping students realize their dreams of graduating from college since receiving its first grant in 1978.

The program builds a community to support student success. This occurs through peer tutoring, peer mentoring, personal and professional development workshops, leadership development, financial literacy, and assistance navigating students’ college transition and the university system. The program also offers unique immersive learning experiences, including annual leadership retreats, graduate school visits and alternative spring break trips.

Student Support Services will receive $527,601, or 73%, of its annual funding from the U.S. Department of Education and $195,473, or 27%, from Kent State.

For more information about Kent State’s TRIO Student Support Services program, visit www.kent.edu/studentsupportservices.

# # #

Media Contacts:
N.J. Akbar, nakbar@kent.edu, 330-672-1865
Adam B. Cinderich, acinderi@kent.edu, 330-672-8689
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Three Kent State University students work together in a study group.
Friday, August 28, 2020

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Kent State University a $2.6 million, five-year TRIO Student Support Services program grant. The program serves students from first-generation and low-income backgrounds and students with diverse learning and physical abilities.

Kent State’s Student Support Services (SSS) program, housed in University College, serves 300 students annually through a holistic community approach offering peer mentoring, tutoring, academic, cultural, personal, professional and leadership development experiences. The program has a proven track record of helping students stay in school and continue to graduation. 

“For more than 40 years, the Student Support Services program has been making a difference in the lives of students who have the most difficult time navigating the university system,” said N.J. Akbar, Ph.D., Kent State’s assistant dean of University College, who oversees the program and led the grant writing and submission. “Student Support Services has modeled the way for removing barriers to graduation and increasing students’ sense of belonging; it has literally changed families and futures.” 

In a recent statement, U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan said, “Kent State University will be able to provide necessary services and support to ensure that students can attend and graduate … no matter their financial situation.” Ryan went on to say, “We need to continue removing the barriers to a college education for everyone who wants to get one,” which is at the heart of the program’s mission.

“As the first in my family to graduate from college, I know how confusing and overwhelming the college experience can be,” said Adam B. Cinderich, director of the Student Support Services program at Kent State. “Our program’s main goal is to support our students as they embark on and navigate their academic journey. When students join our program, they are gaining much more than a support system. They become part of our TRIO family.”

When asked about what had the greatest impact on them this year, a current Kent State student responded, “SSS is my home. Without them, I honestly am not sure where I could have gone in my college journey. They have changed my life, and I am so grateful for everything they do.”

Founded as part of the Educational Opportunity Act of 1964 and created as part of former President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty, federal TRIO programs were the first national college access and success programs created to combat social, socioeconomic and cultural barriers to education in the United States. Kent State’s Student Support Services has been helping students realize their dreams of graduating from college since receiving its first grant in 1978.

The program builds a community to support student success. This occurs through peer tutoring, peer mentoring, personal and professional development workshops, leadership development, financial literacy, and assistance navigating students’ college transition and the university system. The program also offers unique immersive learning experiences, including annual leadership retreats, graduate school visits and alternative spring break trips.

Student Support Services will receive $527,601, or 73%, of its annual funding from the U.S. Department of Education and $195,473, or 27%, from Kent State.

For more information about Kent State’s TRIO Student Support Services program, visit www.kent.edu/studentsupportservices.

# # #

Media Contacts:
N.J. Akbar, nakbar@kent.edu, 330-672-1865
Adam B. Cinderich, acinderi@kent.edu, 330-672-8689
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

Kent State students begin moving into residence halls on Aug. 19, 2020.
Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Kent State University students began moving into residence halls on the Kent Campus on Aug. 19, as part of a phased-in process that will continue over five days.

Move-in typically takes place over three days, but the university has extended the time this year to lower the density of people on campus due to safety concerns from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jill Jenkins,

Jill Jenkins, executive director of Residence Services
executive director of Residence Services, said move-in had been much slower and with much less fanfare than the typical first day of move-in when as many as 3,000 students arrived on one day.

“This year it’s very paced,” Jenkins said, noting that about 650 students will move in each day. “It’s been very smooth, and there are plenty of places to park.

“We’ve had a lot of comments that everyone is following the Flashes Safe Seven,” she said, referring to the university’s seven safety principles established to guide students, faculty and staff during the pandemic. They include frequent hand washing, wearing face coverings, maintaining safe distances and monitoring one’s health.

Those safety precautions were welcome news for sophomore Quintin Cooks, 19, a communication studies major from Cincinnati, Ohio, who spent part of the summer recovering from COVID-19.

“I would not wish it upon anyone,” Cooks said, describing the illness that swept through his family.

Cooks said his father contracted the virus in late June, he believes, at work, and soon the entire family was diagnosed, including Cooks, his mother and two brothers, both of whom have autism and are immunocompromised.

Cooks said he was very ill for four days running high fevers and experiencing chills and a sore throat. While his brothers remained asymptomatic, Cooks parents were more severely ill than he was, with his father requiring hospitalization and his mother having severe breathing problems.

“My dad was in the hospital,” Cooks said. “It really attacked his lungs. Today, he’s still on oxygen, but he’s so much better now. I’ve just very thankful.”

Kent State sophomore Quintin Cooks

As he unpacked his belongings into his room in Centennial Court A, Cooks said he preferred the move-in that wasn’t as hectic as last year.

“Even with the COVID regulations, to me it was relatively easy,” he said.

Cooks said he was a nervous about the school year, particularly when he sees how rapidly the virus is spreading on some college campuses, but he is committed to following strict safety precautions to do his part so that the virus spread won’t happen at Kent State.

“I definitely feel like I need to translate everything I was doing at home here,” he said. “If not, the worst will definitely happen. I’m going to do my part and engage my friends to do the same.”

Cooks said he received numerous emails from the university over the summer with plenty of safety reminders, which he appreciated. 

“A lot of my friends’ colleges are not being as proactive as Kent has been,” he said. “Yes, it was another email, but it showed me they care, so that makes me smile at least.”

While his classes are all remote this semester, Cooks, a member of the track team, said he returned to campus to begin practice and training in September for the team’s winter and spring seasons. His roommate is a fellow track team member, with whom he roomed last year.

Jenkins said residence halls are at 66.5% capacity, with many students opting to stay home when they learned their classes would be held remotely. About 3,800 students have chosen to live in residence halls for fall semester.

Image
Kent State freshman Kaylee Clements
Kaylee Clements, 18, from Avon, Ohio, moved into her room in Allyn Hall on Aug. 19, and said she arrived to start her freshman year with a cautiously positive attitude.

“I have the best hopes that we will get to stay here, but I am going into this very open-minded and not expecting anything and really not getting my hopes up,” she said.

After losing much of the fun and celebrations of her senior year of high school to the pandemic, Clements said she debated whether to live on campus when she found out all of her classes would be held remotely.

“I debated it a lot at first,” she said. “We got all of our senior year taken away, and I am really hoping for the whole freshman experience. I figured I would come and try to make the best of it and I could still be a part of that freshman experience.”

Clements, who is majoring in middle childhood education and who hopes to one day teach middle school math, said she felt very safe during the move-in. 

“I did feel safe,” she said. “It was not overwhelming at all. I was very relaxed, and everything went very smoothly.”

Clements said there were residence hall staff at every door, welcoming students and helping to make the day easy.

Jenkins also praised her staff for their dedication this year.

“I’m really happy with the staff in Residence Services,” Jenkins said. “There has been a lot of uncertainty in their work, and they have been amazing. I’m really proud of them.’”

Clements said she met her roommate, Lillian Groff of Dalton, Ohio, on Kent State’s Class of 2024 Facebook page and has gotten to know her over the past several months and knows that they share the same point of view on safety and the pandemic. 

“I think that if I take as best care of myself as I can, at that point it’s just God’s will,” she said. “There’re not much more that I can do if I am doing everything that I am supposed to do. I’m just very excited for some sort of normalcy in my life again and getting back into some sort of routine and schedule.” 

Students maintain a safe distance on campus.

Classes for Kent State students begin Aug. 27.

 

 

Kent State students begin moving into residence halls on Aug. 19, 2020.
Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Kent State University students began moving into residence halls on the Kent Campus on Aug. 19, as part of a phased-in process that will continue over five days.

Move-in typically takes place over three days, but the university has extended the time this year to lower the density of people on campus due to safety concerns from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jill Jenkins,

Jill Jenkins, executive director of Residence Services
executive director of Residence Services, said move-in had been much slower and with much less fanfare than the typical first day of move-in when as many as 3,000 students arrived on one day.

“This year it’s very paced,” Jenkins said, noting that about 650 students will move in each day. “It’s been very smooth, and there are plenty of places to park.

“We’ve had a lot of comments that everyone is following the Flashes Safe Seven,” she said, referring to the university’s seven safety principles established to guide students, faculty and staff during the pandemic. They include frequent hand washing, wearing face coverings, maintaining safe distances and monitoring one’s health.

Those safety precautions were welcome news for sophomore Quintin Cooks, 19, a communication studies major from Cincinnati, Ohio, who spent part of the summer re