Clare Stacey

Clare Stacey

Sociology
Undergraduate Coordinator (Sociology) and Associate Professor and
Campus:
Kent
Contact Information
Phone:
330-672-2044
Fax:
330-672-4724
Personal Website:

Biography

As a medical sociologist, Dr. Stacey’s work centers on the provision of long-term and end of life care in the United States.  She has written extensively on the emotional labor associated with the paid carework of home care aides (The Caring Self, Cornell University Press 2011) and recently completed an edited volume on paid carework with Mignon Duffy and Amy Armenia (Caring on the Clock, Rutgers University Press, 2015).  Dr. Stacey’s current research explores the growing hospice and palliative care movement in the US and documents the barriers patients and providers continue to face as they pursue quality end of life care.

Teaching and Research Interests:

  • End of Life
  • Palliative Care
  • Medical Sociology
  • Social Inequality

Education

Ph.D. University of California Davis, 2004

Expertise

Medical and Mental Health, End of life, Palliative care, Medical Sociology, Social Inequality, Care-giving, End-of-Life Care, death and dying

Publications

  • Duffy, Mignon, Amy Armenia and Clare L. Stacey. (2015) Caring on the Clock: The Complexities and Contradictions of Paid Care Work. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.
  • Stacey, Clare L. and Lindsey Ayers. (2012). “Caught Between Love and Money: The Meaning of Work for Paid Family Caregivers.” Qualitative Sociology 35(1): 47-64.
  • Erickson, Rebecca and Clare L. Stacey. (2012). “Nurturing Mind and Body: Emotion Management in the Context of Caring Work,” in Emotional Labor In the 21st Century: Diverse Perspectives on Emotional Regulation at Work, Alicia Grandey, James Diefendorff a
  • Stacey, Clare L. (2011). The Caring Self: The Work Experiences of Home Care Aides. Ithaca: ILR/Cornell University Press. Winner of 2012 Recent Contribution Award, American Sociological Association Emotions Section

Documents

Research Institutes and Initiatives

Healthy Communities Research Initiative