College of Arts and Sciences

Photo of Gemma Casadesus Smith (center) with graduate students in her labGemma Casadesus Smith describes herself as a scientist who likes to investigate ideas that run counter to prevailing thought.

The Kent State University Jewish Studies program, in the College of Arts and Sciences, will host a presentation by Gary Phillips, Ph.D., the Edgar H. Evans Professor of Religion at Wabash College, on March 2 at 7 p.m. in Satterfield Hall, Room 121, on the Kent Campus.

Kent State University chemistry senior Caitlin Crosier combined creativity and science for her yearlong project on circadian rhythms and will present those findings at the university’s Undergraduate Research Symposium on March 11.

“The main goal of my research is to validate this method as a way to look at the circadian rhythm structure of an entire population because most current human circadian research is conducted on very small populations and controlled environments,” Crosier said.

Kent State University researchers will launch three new studies of harmful algal blooms (HAB) in Lake Erie this spring as part of an overall $2 million water quality initiative by the Ohio Board of Regents. 

Harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie can produce toxins that make water hazardous to drink and force cities to use additional treatment steps to remove the toxins. In August, nearly 500,000 of the city of Toledo’s customers were without safe tap water over a weekend due to the HAB in Lake Erie. 

State Representative Kathleen Clyde, who represents Central and Southern Portage County in Ohio’s 75th District, met with 30 of Kent State University’s Choose Ohio First scholarship students on Friday (February 13) in the Kent Student Center to discuss a wide range of issues.

After a brief presentation focused on the need for more State support for affordable higher education, more clean energy jobs, and the need for young people to vote and testify in the Statehouse, she took several questions from students. 

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded the Kent State University Scholarships for Broadening Participation in the Sciences Program with funding to annually provide 21 scholarships of $5,000 each for undergraduate students.

Karen Cunningham, associate professor with the Center for Applied Conflict Management at Kent State University, was recently asked by YES! Magazine to write an article for their online issue on a creative assignment she gave to her Applied Conflict Management students.

Link to full article: 

Scholar of the Month
Mark Bracher
Professor of English
College of Arts and Sciences
1985-present

Photo of Declan KeaneTwo Kent State University faculty members in the College of Arts and Sciences have been named 2014 fellows of the American Physical Society (APS) for their “exceptional contributions to the physics enterprise.” Fellowship in the APS is a distinct honor signifying recognition by one’s professional peers and is limited to no more than one-half of 1 percent of APS membership for a given year.

Photo of Eric ShookHow well does Twitter represent public perceptions and behavior in a public health crisis? 

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