College of Arts and Sciences

Photo of Eric ShookResearchers at Kent State University have received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study what social media activity on Twitter reveals about perceptions of last October’s Ebola scare and how perceptions influenced behavior. What the researchers learn will help inform public health officials in responding to future threats.

Brianna Ali Arko uses princess magic to turn frowns upside down for children battling cancer.

Ali Arko is in the pre-medicine program in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University. She volunteers for a non-profit group called, A Special Wish Foundation Inc., Cleveland Chapter.

WKYC TV followed Ali Arko as she visited University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospitals in Cleveland.

John DunloskyKent State University Psychology Professor John Dunlosky will participate in the White House Workshop on Bridging Neuroscience and Learning on Friday, Jan. 23, in Washington D.C.

Dunlosky will provide expert input about the current state of research relevant to neuroscience-based interventions for improving education.

Kent State University student Andrew Wyatt’s research evolved from flipping through pages of scholarly writing in Kent, Ohio, to viewing the walls of historic museums and libraries in Trieste, Italy. 

With the help of his participation in Kent State’s annual Undergraduate Research Symposium, Wyatt, a senior English major and Italian minor, was given the chance to enhance his research on author Italo Svevo with a study abroad experience in Italy. Svevo was an Italian modernist author whose works take place and involved the city of Trieste. 

James L. Blank, Ph.D., interim dean of Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences, has been named the new dean of the college. The announcement was made by Todd Diacon, Kent State’s senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. Blank, who has been serving as interim dean since Nov. 1, 2012, becomes the permanent dean of the college effective Jan. 1, 2015.

Unlike in mathematics, it is rare to have exact solutions to physics problems.

“When they do present themselves, they are an opportunity to test the approximation schemes (algorithms) that are used to make progress in modern physics,” said Michael Strickland, Ph.D., associate professor of physics at Kent State University. 

While most can agree that STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) experiences outside of school can be exciting and engaging for young people, there is much that isn’t known about its impact on short-term and long-term learning. How can it best be connected to what students are learning in school? How can young people have equitable opportunities to access quality informal science education? How do you measure this kind of learning?

The documentary film May 4th Voices: Kent State, 1970, created by two Kent State University collaborators, is a recipient of the 2014 Oral History Association’s Oral History in a Nonprint Format Award. The Oral History Association is an organization that seeks to bring together all people interested in oral history as a way of collecting and interpreting human memories to foster knowledge and human dignity.

For Robert Twieg, Ph.D., a professor in Kent State University’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, the recent news of his longtime collaborator William E. Moerner winning the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry was actually no surprise at all. In fact, he believes that “he’s deserved it for a while.”

Scholar of the Month
Christopher P. Banks
Associate Professor of Political Science
College of Arts and Sciences
2006-present

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