Department of Geology

Decorative "K" fixture on the Kent campus. Jessie Maisano graduated in 1994 from Kent State University’s Honors College with her bachelor’s degree in Geology.   Maisano started her time at Kent State University as a Fashion Merchandising major, but once she met Honors College professor, Don Palmer, she was inspired to change her major to Geology and...

Division of Research & Sponsored Programs

Research ship in the Arctic One of Kent State University’s newest faculty members in the Department of Geology has already made her mark with the recent publication of her and her colleagues’ work to better understand the effects of global warming as it relates to the arctic ocean. Allyson Tessin, Ph.D., assistant professor, specializes...

Environmental Science and Design Research Initiative

Research ship in the Arctic What was even more of a departure than taking classes remotely? Many summer research experiences were moved online this year as well. Fortunately, with creativity and an open mind, there are lots of opportunities to do important scientific research using online tools and data. In summer 2020, the Environmental Science and Design Research...

Eunice Foote Most would agree that the main goal of science is to work toward better understanding by sorting out competing hypotheses to find the underlying theories. So, isn’t it ironic that the history of science is sometimes quite messy, for a variety of reasons? When you add decades of systemic oppression of women scientists to the mix, getting at the...

Tsunami wave hitting Ao Nang in Krabi Province, Thailand. Photo by David Rydevik (email: david.rydevikgmail.com), Stockholm, Sweden, December 26, 2004. Dr. Joseph D. Ortiz, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Geology at Kent State University, was part of an international team of researchers that co-authored an article about a deadly tsunami that occurred about 1,000 years ago in Tanzania. The study suggests that the tsunami risk in East Africa could be higher than...

A rift along the Larsen C ice shelf from the vantage point of NASA Scientists report that nearly 14,600 years ago marine-based regions of the Eurasian Ice Sheet melted rapidly, contributing to a major sea-level rise. Does this rapid collapse of massive ice give us clues as to the vulnerability of Earth’s remaining ice sheets? Joseph D. Ortiz, Ph.D., professor and assistant chair in the College of Arts and...

Tsunami wave hitting Ao Nang in Krabi Province, Thailand. Photo by David Rydevik (email: david.rydevikgmail.com), Stockholm, Sweden, December 26, 2004. Dr. Joseph D. Ortiz, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Geology at Kent State University, was part of an international team of researchers that co-authored an article about a deadly tsunami that occurred about 1,000 years ago in Tanzania. The study suggests that the tsunami risk in East Africa could be higher than...

A rift along the Larsen C ice shelf from the vantage point of NASA Scientists report that nearly 14,600 years ago marine-based regions of the Eurasian Ice Sheet melted rapidly, contributing to a major sea-level rise. Does this rapid collapse of massive ice give us clues as to the vulnerability of Earth’s remaining ice sheets? Joseph D. Ortiz, Ph.D., professor and assistant chair in the College of Arts and...

Kent State geology undergraduate student Nicolle Di Domenico positions an ASD Field Spec HH2Pro spectroradiometer over the side of the commercial fishing vessel Reel Deal, the research platform at the Toledo Harbor Lighthouse. After years of remote sensing work, Joseph Ortiz, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Geology in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, and his research team recently shared their development of new cost-efficient methodologies that may lead to much safer drinking water for people in Ohio and other municipalities affected by...

Kent State Department of Geology graduate student Kortney Cole shows Schumacher Elementary School sixth grader students how to collect soil samples. Studies suggest that the most effective way to demonstrate the value of science is putting it to work in local communities in a way that has an immediate and obvious impact. Bridget Mulvey, Ph.D., associate professor of science education in the College of Education, Health and Human Services; and David Singer, Ph.D., associate professor in the...