Department of Geology | 1542415550 | Kent State University

Department of Geology

The greenhouse effect is one of the most widely known causes of global climate change. It is currently caused by an excess of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere due to burning of fossil fuels. Some natural processes can help slow climate change by removing CO2 from the atmosphere. For example, plants filter CO2 out of air and transfer carbon into soil where it can be sequestered for decades to centuries.

Beth Herndon

Kent State Geologist Wins Grant to Study Climate Change Factors & Inspire Young Scientists
The Greenhouse Effect is one of the most widely-known causes of global climate change. It is currently caused by an excess of carbon-dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere due to burning of fossil fuels. Some natural processes can help slow climate change by removing CO2 from the atmosphere.
One of these factors is the focus of a new study by Dr. Elizabeth Herndon, Assistant Professor of Geology in Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences.

You have likely seen one at an aquarium. It is the friendly creature with the oversized head that swims up to the glass with what looks like a smile on its face. Beluga whales are extremely social mammals that are often called sea canaries because of their high-pitched chatter, or melonheads for the enlarged and flexible area above their eyes that creates facial expressions. These distinguishing features of the beluga whale make up just some of its unique characteristics.

The discovery of fossilized dinosaur feces has scientists rethinking the eating habits of certain dinosaurs.

The conditions in Lake Erie continue to pose several health risks to Ohioans in coastal communities, making it difficult to maintain good water quality for citizens, state and local policymakers.

Associate Geology Professor Anne Jefferson voices concern over proposed cuts to environmental research.

Kent State Professor Anne Jefferson expresses concern over losing valuable scientific data following proposed budget cuts.

Photo of Cynthia BarnettThe fourth annual Water and Land Symposium at Kent State University will be held Oct. 5-6 at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center in downtown Kent, Ohio. This year, the symposium is co-sponsored by Kent State’s College of Arts and Sciences and the Cleveland Water Alliance.

Thanks to a $100,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, two Kent State University professors are researching climate change in Alaska. Elizabeth Herndon, Ph.D., and Lauren Kinsman-Costello, Ph.D., assistant professors from Kent State’s College of Arts and Sciences, spent a week in Fairbanks, Alaska, in June studying how climate change affects the availability of plant nutrients in arctic and sub-arctic ecosystems.

The grant teams up two of Kent State’s newest researchers.

Pages