Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry | 1542317350 | Kent State University

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Famed science fiction writer and biochemistry professor Isaac Asimov once said, “The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the only one that heralds new discoveries, is not ‘Eureka!’ but rather, ‘Hmm ... that’s funny.’”

Members of Kent State University’s scientific community gathered to celebrate the grand opening of its new, state-of-the-art Integrated Sciences Building on Sept. 15, and they are hoping to hear many more “Hmm … that’s funny” comments coming from their labs, classrooms and hallways for decades to come.

Famed science fiction writer and biochemistry professor Isaac Asimov once said, “The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the only one that heralds new discoveries, is not ‘Eureka!’ but rather, ‘Hmm ... that’s funny.’”

As members of Kent State University’s scientific community gather to celebrate the grand opening of its new, state-of-the-art Integrated Sciences Building on Sept. 15, they’re hoping to hear many more “Hmm … that’s funny” comments coming from their labs, classrooms and hallways for decades to come.

Several Kent State University professors in the College of Arts and Sciences have been selected to receive Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF). REU grants are designed to provide faculty with funding to create research positions and experiences specifically for undergraduate students. These students typically come from two- or four-year institutions that may not provide access to many research opportunities.

According to the American Cancer Society, there will be an estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases diagnosed and 600,920 cancer deaths in the U.S. in 2017. These numbers are stark and sobering, and worse yet, we still do not know exactly why cancer develops in its victims or how to stop it. An online publication in Nature Nanotechnology this week by Kent State University researchers and their colleagues at Kyoto University in Japan, however, may offer new understanding about what turns good cells bad.

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry will host its annual Honors Week plenary lecture on Thursday, April 13 at 3:00 p.m. in the Kiva.  This year's speaker is Dr. W. E. Moerner, Nobel Laureate, from Stanford University.  Dr. Moerner's talk is titled, "What Can You Learn from Watching Single Molecules?

According to the American Cancer Society, there will be an estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases diagnosed and 600,920 cancer deaths in the U.S. in 2017.

These numbers are stark and sobering, and worse yet, we still do not know exactly why cancer develops in its victims or how to stop it.

An online publication in Nature Nanotechnology this week by Kent State University researchers and their colleagues at Kyoto University in Japan, however, may offer new understanding about what turns good cells bad.

We invite high school students and their parents and siblings to visit the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry for Explore Kent Chemistry Day on Saturday, February 11, 2017.

Mietek Jaroniec, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, was recently awarded the Medal of Marie Sklodowska-Curie by the Polish Chemical Society for his scientific achievements. 

Mietek Jaroniec, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, was recently awarded the Medal of Marie Sklodowska-Curie by the Polish Chemical Society for his scientific achievements. 

Are you a problem-solver who would enjoy working in a fast-paced academic laboratory facility?  Consider joining our team!  The Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry is currently looking for an Academic Laboratory Manager.

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