College of Arts and Sciences

The National Science Foundation has awarded a three-year, $914,000 grant to Kent State University to lead a collaborative research project to study how and at what rate the geographically most widespread native conifer in the eastern United States, the Eastern Red Cedar tree species (Juniperus virginiana), spreads across the landscape.

Mary Ann Raghanti, Ph.D., anthropology professor and chair in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, is involved in a collaborative research project to examine heart disease in gorillas.

Many students in the Middle East learn basic English, but applying their language skills to professional life can be challenging. A grant from the U.S. Department of State will allow some Palestinian students to take their English to the next level with the help of Kent State University professors.

Emmaleigh Given recently spent three summers and two winters in a remote biological reserve in the middle of the rainforest in the Alajuela Province of Costa Rica, where she has and will spend several months conducting research on community ecology, and she has one more trip planned. Being hunted by unseen predators isn’t the way most researchers conduct their work. But for some, it’s just part of the day.

Gracen Gerbig and Hayley Shasteen, both Kent State University students in the College of Arts and Sciences, recently received the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship, considered the nation’s premier undergraduate award in the natural sciences, math and engineering. They were recognized by President Beverly Warren at the Kent State Board of Trustees meeting on May 9.

Two Kent State University undergraduate students have been awarded prestigious 2019 Goldwater Scholarships from the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation. The foundation awards the scholarships annually to students studying mathematics, natural science or engineering.

Imagine being a 17-year-old high school student, and in your first semester of a geology research internship, your professor asks you to identify an extinct 300-million-year-old, tiny and unknown crustacean specimen. Megan Schinker, then an ambitious Stow-Munroe Falls High School junior, jumped right in. 

As if graduating with your Ph.D., starting a National Research Council (NRC) postdoctoral fellowship, getting married in Nepal and organizing an international research seminar wasn’t already a full plate for Kent State University doctoral student Greta Babakhanova, how about a little dessert?

Pages