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College of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Lauren Kinsman-Costello recently shared her expertise on water quality and the impacts of road salt with local media. Check out her interview with WKYC in Cleveland.

https://youtu.be/BbsIp87ceM4?fbclid=IwAR2SvERmfoviXydVxQfamE3TGD5AbhuD0JDS88nLXWGBHDJ7Fx-V1ok21qY

If you want to learn more about Dr. Kinsman-Costello's research, visit https://laurenkinsmancostello.weebly.com/.

It is with heavy and reverent hearts that we share news that Emeritus English Professor Dr. Dolores Noll, trailblazer and pioneer for LGBTQ+ rights and people, passed away at the age of 88 on January 8th. Dolores’s impact is seen today at Kent State University.

The work of 153 ecological researchers from 40 countries, including Kent State University Assistant Professor Dave Costello, Ph.D., from the Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, has revealed new findings on the effect of climatic factors on river-based ecosystems. The findings are published in the latest issue of the journal Science Advances.

The work of 153 ecological researchers from 40 countries, including Kent State University Assistant Professor Dave Costello, Ph.D., from the Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, has revealed new findings on the effect of climatic factors on river-based ecosystems.

A team of Kent State students took first place in the seventh annual Mission: Life international competition on November 12, which took place at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas.

Ecosystems in today's world are responding to a wide variety of environmental changes. What happens when these changes interact? That was the topic of a recent paper published by David Ward, Ph.D., the Art and Margaret Herrick Endowed Professor of Plant Biology in Kent State University's Department of Biological Sciences, and international colleagues and graduate students in the journal Scientific Reports.

Ecosystems in today's world are responding to a wide variety of environmental changes. What happens when these changes interact? That was the topic of a recent paper published by Dr. David Ward and international colleagues and graduate students in the journal Scientific Reports.

People who suffer trauma will, with few exceptions, never forget what happened to them, but a Kent State University researcher may be able to offer them the hope of living without constant fear and anxiety.

What first gained attention in Hollywood has now spread to a classroom at Kent State University, where an English professor is turning the #MeToo movement into curriculum.

Heather Caldwell, Ph.D., a professor in Kent State University’s Department of Biological Sciences, recently received a $450,000 grant to study the role that oxytocin plays in the developing brain.

Labeled by some as “the bonding hormone,” oxytocin is well known for helping pregnant mothers with uterine contraction while in labor, milk letdown while breastfeeding and a feeling of euphoria when cuddling with their infants. But, there is still much that researchers do not know about how this hormone works in the brains of children.

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