You are here

College of Arts and Sciences

At the inaugural March for Science, a global demonstration centered in Washington, D.C., a special edition of the Wick Poetry Center's Traveling Stanzas titled Science Stanzas will provide an opportunity for participants to discover the intersection of expressive writing and scientific inquiry.

Kent State's Gemma Casadesus Smith is studying why women are more likely to develop Alzheimer's. 

Kent State University’s Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) will host the 31st Annual Ohio Employee Ownership Conference on Friday, April 28, 2017, at the Hilton West in Fairlawn, Ohio.

GoodCall talked with professors around the country about the use of liberal arts degrees and the skills that students use as a springboard to the next step in their education and career path.

Approximately 13,500 years after nomadic Clovis hunters crossed the frozen land bridge from Asia to North America, researchers are still asking questions and putting together clues as to how they not only survived in a new landscape with unique new challenges but adapted with stone tools and weapons to thrive for thousands of years. 

Weighing in at barely 100 pounds, Brooke Mullins summoned every ounce of strength she had, and even more she didn’t. Her muscles were shaking; her mind – exhausted. The Kent State University junior had one last shot at overcoming the most grueling portion of a physical exam. If she could pass it, Mullins would follow in her father and brother’s footsteps as a certified volunteer firefighter.

Kent State University researchers use geospatial technology to study youth violence in Akron, Ohio.

According to the American Cancer Society, there will be an estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases diagnosed and 600,920 cancer deaths in the U.S. in 2017.

These numbers are stark and sobering, and worse yet, we still do not know exactly why cancer develops in its victims or how to stop it.

An online publication in Nature Nanotechnology this week by Kent State University researchers and their colleagues at Kyoto University in Japan, however, may offer new understanding about what turns good cells bad.

Kent State University researchers use geospatial technology to study youth violence in Akron, Ohio.

CACM Director Patrick Coy has published a chapter in a new book focused on constructive conflict management. Coy’s chapter, “Communication, Constructiveness, and Asymmetry in Nonviolent Action Theory and Practice,” is chapter two in Perspectives in Waging Conflicts ConstructivelyCases, Concepts and Practice, Bruce Dayton and Louis Kriesberg, editors, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2017. Here is a link to reviews: 

Pages