College of Arts and Sciences

 

The following experts from Kent State University are available to media covering the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Their areas of expertise and topics they can discuss are provided, as well as links to additional information and contact information. Areas of expertise include religion and politics, U.S. relations to Europe, issues around branding and the candidates, security at large-scale, urban events, political advertising and more.

A group of researchers in Kent State University's College of Arts and Sciences have published a breakthrough article on new properties of liquid crystals in the May 27 issue of Physical Review Letters. The article, which describes some recent surprising results involving nematic liquid crystals induced by a high magnetic field, is currently featured on the American Physical Society website as an “Editors’ Suggestion.”

For decades, biologists researching a cure for Alzheimer’s disease have remained in the dark almost as much as the ailment’s victims.

A Kent State University professor, however, is looking to stop the disease before it starts.

Gemma Casadesus-Smith, Ph.D., an associate biology professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, studies Alzheimer’s through the lens of the aging process.

“In my lab, we’re trying to understand how age-related events can cause Alzheimer’s disease,” she said. “My work is not in treating existing illness but in preventing it.”

Photo of Carly EvansGov. John Kasich has appointed Carly Evans to a two-year term as an undergraduate student trustee of the Kent State University Board of Trustees. Evans’ term concludes on May 16, 2018.

Two Kent State University students are competing for the coveted title of Miss Ohio 2016.

Veronica Garey, a junior in Kent State’s College of Communication and Information, and Erin Simonek, a freshman in Kent State’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication, are among 20 contestants in this year’s pageant.  

Kent State University held its 46th annual commemoration of May 4, 1970, with events taking place April 26 through May 4. The annual commemoration, hosted by the May 4 Task Force, provided an opportunity for the university community to gather and remember those who were lost and injured during the tragedy and also reflect on what May 4 means today.

Photo from Kent State's May 4 Commemoration in 2015Kent State University holds its 46th annual commemoration of May 4, 1970, with events taking place April 26 through May 4. The annual commemoration, hosted by the May 4 Task Force, provides an opportunity for the university community to gather and remember those who were lost and injured during the tragedy and also reflect on what May 4 means today.

 

The College of Arts and Sciences held its annual awards banquet to recognize and honor its distinguished student leaders, teachers and advisors on April 21. James Blank, Ph.D., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences gave the welcome and closing remarks and presented the awards, along with Matthew Minichillo, assistant dean of Academic and Student Services, to the award recipients.  George Newkome, Ph.D., who received his B.S. and Ph.D. in Chemistry from Kent State, gave the keynote speech.

Survivors of Cambodian Genocide during Khmer Rouge regime to speak

The Kent State University May 4 Visitors Center kicks-off the 46th Annual May 4 Commemoration by hosting a series of events on state violence with the theme “Cambodia After Kent State,” with a focus on the aftermath of the Cambodian Genocide during the Khmer Rouge regime. These programs, held on April 26, 27 and 28 on the Kent Campus, are free and open to the public. The series is generously supported by Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences.

Kent State University alumnus Chad Meyers, who graduated in 1992 with a degree in Peace & Conflict Studies (now offered as Applied Conflict Management through the Center for Applied Conflict Management), was mentioned in a recent article for being an inspiration to his own students.

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