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Research

The School of Communication Studies has announced the line-up of its 2017 spring colloquium speaker series.

The colloquia will be held from 4 to 5 p.m. in Rm. 109 of the Art Building. Each colloquium will include a presentation of research followed by a Q&A session with the audience. Refreshments will be served to those attending.

The demand for clinical research associates is high, and the field continues to grow. In 2013, clinical research associates ranked ninth in CNNMoney/Payscale’s 100 Best Jobs in America, which lists the top 100 careers with big growth, great pay and satisfying work. In addition, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects employer demand for clinical research associates will rise by 22 percent through 2022. To help meet this need, Kent State University’s College of Public Health is now offering a new Clinical Trials Research concentration in its Bachelor of Science in Public Health.

Erie Hack

Erie Hack

Presented by Cleveland Water Alliance, Kent State University, and the Gaspé Beaubien Foundation. For more information contact Bryan Stubbs, Executive Director, Cleveland Water Alliance, 216-592-2490, bstubbs@clewa.org.

Research Colloquium

The School of Communication Studies Research Colloquium Series provides an opportunity for faculty members and students to foster intellectual and collaborative discussions and to stay informed about current research efforts.

For more information about the School of Communication Studies, visit http://www.kent.edu/comm. For questions or consideration for future colloquia, contact COMM Assistant Professor Aaron Bacue, Ph.D., at abacue@kent.edu.

The School of Communication Studies will host the first research colloquium in its Spring 2017 series at 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3, in Rm. 109 of the Art Building.

The session, entitled “Identity and caregiving: Negotiating what it means to be a cancer caregiver,” will be presented by Nichole Egbert, Ph.D., a professor and graduate coordinator in the School of Communication Studies (COMM).

Kent State University scholar Melissa Zullo, Ph.D., is all heart, an academic who lives and breathes research, almost literally. Zullo, an associate professor of epidemiology in Kent State’s College of Public Health, has spent a significant portion of her professional and academic career studying the best practices for helping cardiac and respiratory patients heal.

Kent State University’s Scholar of the Month for December would prefer that you read this standing up, or even doing some calisthenics. Go on, get moving.

Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., is an associate professor of exercise science in Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services. During his 10 years with Kent State, he has earned a name for himself as a scholar who wants to get people thinking about how they move, and moving better so they can think better.

Kent State University’s Scholar of the Month for December would prefer that you read this standing up, or even doing some calisthenics. Go on, get moving.

Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., is an associate professor of exercise science in Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services. During his 10 years with Kent State, he has earned a name for himself as a scholar who wants to get people thinking about how they move, and moving better so they can think better.

Scholar of the Month
Jessica Barness
Assistant Professor of Visual Communication Design
College of Communication and Information
2012-present

The word “communication” likely makes you think of language, but November’s Scholar of the Month has spent her entire career researching design as a language of its own.

Across various media, Jessica Barness, an assistant professor in Kent State University’s School of Visual Communication Design, creates her own design-based research model that merges the making of artifacts with critical inquiry.

READ MORE ABOUT JESSICA

VIEW PRIOR MONTHS' SCHOLARS

University partners with i-Health and Stow-Glen Retirement Village

Kent State University, in partnership with the Stow-Glen Retirement Village in Stow, Ohio, recently received an industry-funded grant of $430,000 from i-Health Inc., a subsidiary of DSM Nutritional Products, to examine whether taking a probiotic dietary supplement, commonly sold over the counter, can improve the mood and memory of middle-aged and older adults.

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