Research

Oindrila Roy, who recently defended her dissertation and will begin a TT position in the Department of Political Science in the Fall, just received an acceptance notice for an article out of her dissertation!

"Religious Roots of War Attitudes in the United States: Insights from Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Persian Gulf," Foreign Policy Analysis, forthcoming. The article examines how American citizens' religious affiliation affects their views on US military action in recent conflicts.

Congratulations, Oindrila!

What do sleep quality, post-traumatic stress disorder and smoking have in common?

That’s the question on which Celeste Weise, a Kent State University senior psychology and sociology major, presented her research at the university’s second annual Undergraduate Research Symposium held March 11.

Have too much stress? There is an app for that.

Researchers from Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences worked together to develop an app that not only measures stress levels in teenagers, but also teaches them how to manage anxiety.

The app gathers data in real time using two teen favorites: technology and music.

 

 

Photo of Kent State students in libraryA new Kent State study finds more links between high smartphone use and low GPA

Kent State University researchers have collected more data to explain the negative relationship between smartphone use and academic performance in college students.  

Scholar of the Month
Gregory Smith
Professor of Human Development and Family Studies
College of Education, Health and Human Services
2001-present

Photo of Gemma Casadesus Smith (center) with graduate students in her labGemma Casadesus Smith describes herself as a scientist who likes to investigate ideas that run counter to prevailing thought.

The series will feature monthly discussions that will showcase many various research areas conducted by faculty at Kent State. Suzy D’Enbeau, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Communication Studies, will introduce the series.

Kent State University chemistry senior Caitlin Crosier combined creativity and science for her yearlong project on circadian rhythms and will present those findings at the university’s Undergraduate Research Symposium on March 11.

“The main goal of my research is to validate this method as a way to look at the circadian rhythm structure of an entire population because most current human circadian research is conducted on very small populations and controlled environments,” Crosier said.

Kent State University researchers will launch three new studies of harmful algal blooms (HAB) in Lake Erie this spring as part of an overall $2 million water quality initiative by the Ohio Board of Regents. 

Harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie can produce toxins that make water hazardous to drink and force cities to use additional treatment steps to remove the toxins. In August, nearly 500,000 of the city of Toledo’s customers were without safe tap water over a weekend due to the HAB in Lake Erie. 

Scholar of the Month
Mark Bracher
Professor of English
College of Arts and Sciences
1985-present

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