Department of Biological Sciences

Photo of Min-Ho KimThe National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded Kent State University’s Min-Ho Kim, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, a $1,842,350 five-year grant. The grant from the NIH’s National Institute of Nursing Research is to develop “nanobombs,” a nanotechnology-based therapeutic platform that can treat biofilm infection in chronic wounds. 

Photo of Gemma Casadesus Smith (center) with graduate students in her labGemma Casadesus Smith describes herself as a scientist who likes to investigate ideas that run counter to prevailing thought.

Kent State University chemistry senior Caitlin Crosier combined creativity and science for her yearlong project on circadian rhythms and will present those findings at the university’s Undergraduate Research Symposium on March 11.

“The main goal of my research is to validate this method as a way to look at the circadian rhythm structure of an entire population because most current human circadian research is conducted on very small populations and controlled environments,” Crosier said.

Kent State University researchers will launch three new studies of harmful algal blooms (HAB) in Lake Erie this spring as part of an overall $2 million water quality initiative by the Ohio Board of Regents. 

Harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie can produce toxins that make water hazardous to drink and force cities to use additional treatment steps to remove the toxins. In August, nearly 500,000 of the city of Toledo’s customers were without safe tap water over a weekend due to the HAB in Lake Erie. 

Dr. Heather Caldwell recently received a $400,000.00 grant from the National Science Foundation to fund her research. This research project will examine how prenatal hormones can reorganize brain circuits and impact behavior.  Understanding how these hormones work during development will provide important insights into the species-specific behaviors that underlie social behavior and social structure.  The goal of this project is to determine how the neurohormone oxytocin acts during development to organize neural structures important for displays of aggressive behavior in adulthood.

A team of Kent State University students and faculty has been awarded a $15,000 grant as part of a sustainability design competition funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Last year, a group of faculty representing three disciplines — biology, geology and architecture/environmental design — submitted an application for the EPA’s People, Prosperity and the Planet (P3) grant competition. The P3 competition encourages college students to design innovative projects outside of the classroom in order to support the sustainability of the planet. 

The National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) has named Allison Moats, a recent graduate of the Honors College and the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, as a Portz Scholar for 2014. Allison is a native of Ravenna, Ohio, and received her bachelor’s degree from the Department of Anthropology. Each year, the Portz Prize recognizes outstanding undergraduate honors theses submitted by honors college students from across the country.

Aggressive behavior in animals may result in posturing, teeth baring or challenges related to protecting territory, offspring or food. In humans, it can lead to violence and death, and the causes are not always readily apparent. But where does it originate?

Kent State University faculty members have been awarded nearly $2.5 million in funding from the National Science Foundation for research over the next three years in biology, physics and the science of liquid crystals.

The awards will fund basic research on:

The University Fellowship is awarded annually to advanced doctoral students to recognize excellent scholarship and research potential.  University Fellowship recipients are able to commit their time to dissertation research or writing. Approximately 15 University Fellowships are awarded each year. 

Pages