Kent State Honors College Graduate Named 2014 Portz Scholar

The National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) has named Allison Moats, a recent graduate of the Honors College and the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, as a Portz Scholar for 2014. Allison is a native of Ravenna, Ohio, and received her bachelor’s degree from the Department of Anthropology. Each year, the Portz Prize recognizes outstanding undergraduate honors theses submitted by honors college students from across the country.

BIOLOGY PROFESSOR RECEIVES GRANT FROM NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Dr. Heather Caldwell recently received a $400,000.00 grant from the National Science Foundation to fund her research. This research project will examine how prenatal hormones can reorganize brain circuits and impact behavior.  Understanding how these hormones work during development will provide important insights into the species-specific behaviors that underlie social behavior and social structure.  The goal of this project is to determine how the neurohormone oxytocin acts during development to organize neural structures important for displays of aggressive behavior in adulthood.

IN AN AGE OF OBESITY, WHY DO SOME REMAIN THIN?

Imagine two lab rats in their cages – one fat, one thin. The larger rat pads around slowly or rests on the floor of wood shavings. She expends as little effort as possible to reach her water spigot, maybe even lying on her back and gripping it with her little pink paws so that the water drips into her mouth.

Her thin neighbor, on the other hand, darts around the cage, whiskers twitching, eyes alert. Taken out and placed on a treadmill, she picks up the pace and overtakes the top of the belt.

Kent State Student and Professor Find New Antibiotic Alternative

Jean Engohang-Ndong, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, and Kent State undergraduate student Jean Wilson Mutambuze are conducting research that has found a promising new alternative to manage a skin disease called Buruli Ulcer.

Kent State University undergraduate student Jean Wilson Mutambuze and Jean Engohang-Ndong, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, are conducting a research project that has found a promising new alternative to manage a skin disease called Buruli Ulcer.

Buruli Ulcer is a skin ailment caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium ulcerans that affects the skin and sometimes bone. Buruli Ulcer has been reported in more than 30 countries, including many African countries.

KENT STATE STUDENT AND PROFESSOR FIND EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVES TO CURRENT ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY OF SKIN INFECTION

Kent State University undergraduate student Jean Wilson Mutambuze and Jean Engohang-Ndong, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, are conducting a research project that has found a promising new alternative to manage a skin disease called Buruli Ulcer.enter photo description

BSCI GRADUATE STUDENT SELECTED TO PARTICIPATE IN THE 64TH LINDAU NOBEL LAUREATE MEETING

The scientific review panel of the Council for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings has selected Jennifer Remus from Kent State University's Biological Sciences Department's graduate program to participate in the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, to be held from 29 June to 4 July 2014, in Lindau, Germany. Only the 600 most qualified young researchers can be given the opportunity to enrich and share the unique atmosphere of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings. She will attend lectures and interact with 34 nobel laureates in Medicine and Physiology. Dr.

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