Kent State Team Awarded $15,000 for Sustainability Design Competition

A team of Kent State University students and faculty has been awarded a $15,000 grant as part of a sustainability design competition funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Last year, a group of faculty representing three disciplines — biology, geology and architecture/environmental design — submitted an application for the EPA’s People, Prosperity and the Planet (P3) grant competition. The P3 competition encourages college students to design innovative projects outside of the classroom in order to support the sustainability of the planet. 

Kent State Honors College Graduate Named 2014 Portz Scholar

The National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) has named Allison Moats, a recent graduate of the Honors College and the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, as a Portz Scholar for 2014. Allison is a native of Ravenna, Ohio, and received her bachelor’s degree from the Department of Anthropology. Each year, the Portz Prize recognizes outstanding undergraduate honors theses submitted by honors college students from across the country.

BIOLOGY PROFESSOR RECEIVES GRANT FROM NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Dr. Heather Caldwell recently received a $400,000.00 grant from the National Science Foundation to fund her research. This research project will examine how prenatal hormones can reorganize brain circuits and impact behavior.  Understanding how these hormones work during development will provide important insights into the species-specific behaviors that underlie social behavior and social structure.  The goal of this project is to determine how the neurohormone oxytocin acts during development to organize neural structures important for displays of aggressive behavior in adulthood.

Dr. Julio Morales-Medina Selected to Attend the "European Pain School at the University of Siena"

DR. JULIO MORALES-MEDINA SELECTED TO ATTEND THE "EUROPEAN PAIN SCHOOL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SIENA"

Dr. Julio Morales-Medina, a postdoctoral researcher in Dr. Heather Caldwell’s laboratory in the Biological Sciences Department, was selected to attend the "European Pain School at the University of Siena" as a Scholar.

In an Age of Obesity, Why Do Some Remain Thin?

Imagine two lab rats in their cages – one fat, one thin. The larger rat pads around slowly or rests on the floor of wood shavings. She expends as little effort as possible to reach her water spigot, maybe even lying on her back and gripping it with her little pink paws so that the water drips into her mouth.

Her thin neighbor, on the other hand, darts around the cage, whiskers twitching, eyes alert. Taken out and placed on a treadmill, she picks up the pace and overtakes the top of the belt.

Kent State Student and Professor Find New Antibiotic Alternative

Jean Engohang-Ndong, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, and Kent State undergraduate student Jean Wilson Mutambuze are conducting research that has found a promising new alternative to manage a skin disease called Buruli Ulcer.

Kent State University undergraduate student Jean Wilson Mutambuze and Jean Engohang-Ndong, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, are conducting a research project that has found a promising new alternative to manage a skin disease called Buruli Ulcer.

Buruli Ulcer is a skin ailment caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium ulcerans that affects the skin and sometimes bone. Buruli Ulcer has been reported in more than 30 countries, including many African countries.

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