Department of Biological Sciences

Kent State's Gemma Casadesus Smith is studying why women are more likely to develop Alzheimer's. 

There is nothing like it - holding a tiny baby in your arms. As a parent, you most likely know what it is like to get flooded with a rush of those ooey-gooey feelings. But why? How does it happen and what is the science behind those feelings for dads?

It could be argued that no science is more valuable to us than that which helps to ensure the survival of our species by solving the problems that challenge it.

It could be argued that no science is more valuable to us than that which helps to ensure the survival of our species by solving the problems that challenge it.

Physical activity is essential to fighting obesity, and scientists are constantly working to make this activity more effective and beneficial.

A $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health will help biology professor Colleen Novak, Ph.D., from Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences better understand how the body allocates energy and burns fat.

Kent State Biology Professor Studies How Selfish Genes Cause Male Sterility in Flowering Plants

Why are plants often sterile when their parents are from different species? How do species remain separate entities in nature?

Photo of Cynthia BarnettThe fourth annual Water and Land Symposium at Kent State University will be held Oct. 5-6 at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center in downtown Kent, Ohio. This year, the symposium is co-sponsored by Kent State’s College of Arts and Sciences and the Cleveland Water Alliance.

Thanks to a $100,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, two Kent State University professors are researching climate change in Alaska. Elizabeth Herndon, Ph.D., and Lauren Kinsman-Costello, Ph.D., assistant professors from Kent State’s College of Arts and Sciences, spent a week in Fairbanks, Alaska, in June studying how climate change affects the availability of plant nutrients in arctic and sub-arctic ecosystems.

The grant teams up two of Kent State’s newest researchers.

For decades, biologists researching a cure for Alzheimer’s disease have remained in the dark almost as much as the ailment’s victims.

A Kent State University professor, however, is looking to stop the disease before it starts.

Gemma Casadesus-Smith, Ph.D., an associate biology professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, studies Alzheimer’s through the lens of the aging process.

“In my lab, we’re trying to understand how age-related events can cause Alzheimer’s disease,” she said. “My work is not in treating existing illness but in preventing it.”

Photo of Richard AlleyThe third annual Water Research Symposium at Kent State University will be held Oct. 14-15 at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center in downtown Kent, Ohio. This year, the symposium is co-sponsored by the National Academy of Science with additional support from the Cleveland Water Alliance. The event is free and open to the public.

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