Workshops | Archival Education and Research Institute (AERI) 2016 | Kent State University

Below is the schedule of workshops for AERI, along with a description. Please note any requirements for attendance. 

Friday, July 8: 11:00 AM-12:30 PM

Applying to PhD Programs in Information Studies I

Presenter: Kelvin White

Inclusive Design: Working with Community 

Presenters: Joanne Evans, Leisa Gibbons, Narissa Timbery, and Sue McKemmish

It is an exciting time to be an archival researcher, educator and practitioner as we open ourselves up to the archival turn, with a plurality of memory texts and diversity of ways in which archives are formed, managed, used and sustained. Gaining rich understandings of the ways in which communities constitute, create and interact with archives is also challenging traditional approaches that force demarcations between researcher and researched, teacher and students, archivist and end user. In this workshop we explore methodologies for inclusive design using records continuum thinking as a tool for sense making. We will look at ways in which relationships with communities are developed, nurtured and sustained using ethical principles that embrace rights, recognition, respect, and reciprocity. This is a hands on workshop, so please do not bring laptops. 

Friday, July 8: 2:00 PM-3:30 PM

Inclusive Design: Working with Community Presenters

Presenters: Joanne Evans, Leisa Gibbons, Narissa Timbery and Sue McKemmish

It is an exciting time to be an archival researcher, educator and practitioner as we open ourselves up to the archival turn, with a plurality of memory texts and diversity of ways in which archives are formed, managed, used and sustained. Gaining rich understandings of the ways in which communities constitute, create and interact with archives is also challenging traditional approaches that force demarcations between researcher and researched, teacher and students, archivist and end user. In this workshop we explore methodologies for inclusive design using records continuum thinking as a tool for sense making. We will look at ways in which relationships with communities are developed, nurtured and sustained using ethical principles that embrace rights, recognition, respect, and reciprocity. 

This is a hands on workshop, so please do not bring laptops. 

Saturday, JULY 9: 11:00 aM-12:30 PM

Communicating You: How to Create Persuasive Academic and Teaching Statements

Presenters: Beth Yakel and Leisa Gibbons

This interactive and participatory workshop is designed to explore and discuss what it means to craft and communicate an academic identity at various stages of the tenure track process. The 90-minute workshop will cover key problems and issues in developing and articulating research agendas and teaching philosophies as impact statements. The workshop will also include peer review and discussion.

The workshop is aimed at those seeking academic positions, as well as junior faculty working towards their tenure applications.

The presenters request that those interested in attending this workshop must secure their place by sending draft research and teaching statements to the presenters by July 1, 2016. It is expected that these statements would be written and presented as if they were being submitted as part of a job or tenure application. Research statements are expected to be 3-4 pages and teaching statements 1-2 pages. Submission of statements by the due date is a pre-requisite for workshop registration and participation. 

Please submit statements to yakel@umich.edu or lgibbon3@kent.edu

SATURDAY, JULY 9: 4:00 pM-5:30 PM

Applying to PhD Programs in Information Studies II

Presenter: Kelvin White

Get 'er Done: A Workshop for Determined Dissertation Presenters

Presenters: Erik Nordberg, Snowden Becker, Christopher Colwell, and Jennifer Stevenson

So you’re a doctoral student. How cool is that? It’s just like being an undergraduate student, or working on your master’s degree, right? There’s just a slightly longer writing assignment, this thing they call a dissertation. But it can’t be that hard to finish, can it? This workshop is intended for anyone enrolled in a doctoral program, from those just entering their program, to others in the early stages of proposing or writing their dissertation, as well as those struggling to overcome their ABD status. The workshop is led by a group of suffering doctoral candidates, all in the late stages of their dissertation completion, but will also draw upon the collective experience of all participants in the room.

Structurally, the 90-minute workshop will include sections to introduce participants, describe their individual research projects, inventory obstacles to their writing success, and discuss a variety of techniques to produce a completed dissertation. The workshop will include some individual quiet exercises, work within breakout groups of participants at similar stages in their doctoral programs, and facilitated discussion and sharing among the full group. While everyone acknowledges that the writing of a dissertation is a project utterly unlike any other we might undertake, the tools and strategies we'll discuss for writing a dissertation will also help participants integrate their research into other work (like teaching or archival praxis) and shape a professional writing practice they can sustain long after the dissertation project is complete.

Sunday, JULY 10: 9:00 AM-10:30 AM

Got Faculty? Archival Curriculum Development for Small Archival Programs

Presenters: Donald Force and Edward Benoit III

The development and implementation of archival curriculum has been an ongoing debate for decades. These discussions, however, have seldom considered the number of faculty, or the lack thereof, within many archival programs throughout the world. The intent of the proposed workshop is to address specific curriculum challenges facing small archival programs, that is, those having only one or two archival faculty members. Not only must these faculty -- who are now, most likely to be junior faculty -- balance their teaching, service, and research duties, but they must also ensure that their programs offer a sufficient array of course offerings. How do these faculty members ensure that their students have the necessary archival knowledge in a competitive job market? Is there a curriculum corpus suitable for most small archival educational programs?

This 90 minute workshop will address these questions through an active discussion of existing archival curriculum and the SAA Educational Guidelines. For effective use of the workshop period, participants are expected to review the existing curriculum summaries (provided by the presenters) and SAA Educational Guidelines before attending. Attendees will co-develop curriculum corpus guidelines intended for archival education programs with one or two faculty members.The workshop will be structured as follows:  Presenter introductions (5 min)  Participant introductions (5 min)  Discussion of initial reactions to curriculum summaries & SAA guidelines (20 min)  Divide into small groups to identify necessary/required courses/competencies of archival education (15 min)  Discuss findings of smaller groups and prioritize curriculum corpus for smaller archival programs (30 min)  Develop a draft of the curriculum corpus guidelines for archival programs with only one or two faculty (15 min)

Please review SAA Educational Guidelines prior to attending the workshop. The guidelines are available on the SAA website

1)      Laptop/tablet for note-taking is encouraged but not required.

2)      It would be a good idea to bring something to write with (this could be a laptop/tablet for note-taking). Encouraged but not required.

Practical Strategies for Turning Conversations into Collaborations I

Presenters: Rebecca Frank and Joanne Evans

AERI brings together a diverse group of archival researchers and educators for one week each year with many stimulating and interesting conversations about possible connections across institutional, national, and other boundaries. How does one take advantage of the strong foundation that AERI provides to support collaboration and mentoring opportunities within our community? In this workshop we aim to explore some practical strategies for turning those ideas and points of connection into fully-fledged collaborations that extend beyond the institute itself. Bring along your ideas whether it be for a joint article, conference presentation, grant application, or shared curriculum development and we will help to explore how to make it happen. 

Part I of this workshop will be a panel featuring Anne Gilliland, Gillian Oliver, Ricky Punzalan, Heather Soyka, and Rebecca Frank giving a brief outline of their recent collaboration experiences - how they came about, what role did AERI play, what worked, what didn't, where to next - followed by audience Q&A.

SUNDAY, JULY 10: 11:00 AM-12:30 pM

"Distance" Education for Archival Studies

Presenter: Andrew Lau

All AERI attendees are welcome to participate. This workshop may be of particular interest to doctoral students and faculty who may be interested in developing or enhancing a fully online course, or those who may currently be teaching in-person and are looking to supplement their courses with asynchronous elements.

To register for this workshop, please complete this survey: http://goo.gl/forms/m0E9Ia1ibAHW3uVG2

This workshop includes two primary components:

1. Scheduled Workshop Session: Includes presentation and group discussion, covering topics like:

 Converting in-person course designs to online/hybrid

 Online pedagogy and instructional design

 Best practices for online/blended instruction

 Tips for production and curation of instructional assets

 Additional topics as surfaced in discussion and as time permits

2. Consultations with the workshop facilitator, by appointment

 Please email course syllabus (if you have one) to andrewjlau@ucla.edu for review by July 1, 2016.

 Workshop facilitator will respond via email to set up meeting time.

Required Materials: None, though workshop participants are encouraged to bring your own device (laptops and mobile devices) and/or note-taking materials. No special equipment is required.

Please direct any questions about this workshop to the facilitator Andrew J Lau, PhD (andrewjlau@ucla.edu).

Practical Strategies for Turning Conversations into Collaborations II

Presenters: Rebecca Frank and Joanne Evans

AERI brings together a diverse group of archival researchers and educators for one week each year with many stimulating and interesting conversations about possible connections across institutional, national, and other boundaries. How does one take advantage of the strong foundation that AERI provides to support collaboration and mentoring opportunities within our community? In this workshop we aim to explore some practical strategies for turning those ideas and points of connection into fully-fledged collaborations that extend beyond the institute itself. Bring along your ideas whether it be for a joint article, conference presentation, grant application, or shared curriculum development and we will help to explore how to make it happen. 

Part II of this workshop will be the chance for participants to work in small groups to brainstorm and plan a possible collaborative project. We have a list of possible prompts, including upcoming conferences, relevant journals, grants/funding opportunities, curriculum development opportunities and research infrastructure development projects to help guide this work, as well as hoping that participants will bring their own ideas to the table.

Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptop/tablet/etc.