Course offerings are subject to change and may vary by semester. Read on for more information about specific academic programs. Courses denoted with an * are open to all students regardless of major. Most have no prerequisites, but check the catalog or talk with an advisor for details.

ARCHITECTURE

Florence is one of the most beautiful cities in Europe and is an ideal place to study architecture, art, and design. The city has more than 100 museums devoted to the fine arts; and city center is a museum in itself, filled with meticulously preserved architecture dating from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Through Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) in Florence, students will encounter the rebirth of architecture in Europe and witness in person the historical evolution of European art, interior design, and urbanism – including the opportunity to explore the contemporary art and design scene in Italy.

Check out Kent State Florence's special architecture and interior design website!  This website will give a glimpse into what it will be like to study architecture or interior design in Florence.

Undergraduate Architecture

ARCH 30012 Urban Design

Course Name: ARCH 30012 Urban Design

Description: A combined lecture and seminar that provides a theoretical foundation for studio exploration. Topics include the history of urban evolution and figure/ground studies.

Credit Hours: 1

ARCH 30112 3rd Year Design Studio II

Course Name: ARCH 30112 3rd Year Design Studio II

Description: The focus of the architecture program is the design studio. Studio projects take full advantage of the pervasive wealth of historically significant art and architecture. The scale of these projects ranges from elemental façade studies and interiors to the larger concerns of urban design.

Credit Hours: 5

ARCH 46995 Reading Cities Field Trips

Course Name: ARCH 46995 Reading Cities Field Trips

Description: Lecture and exercises in the visual analysis of urban form. Various media are taught and encouraged: sketching, watercolor, photographs, video, etc. The course is focused on a series of field trips to cities of architectural and urban significance. These include Rome, Verona, Venice, Milan. The tours cover historical architecture and urban fabrics, as well as Modern and contemporary intervention that bear significant importance in the transformation of the existing context.

Credit Hours: 3

ARCH 46995 Video, Media, and Architecture

Course Name: ARCH 46995 Video, Media, and Architecture

Description: The course investigates the increasingly intertwined issues that link contemporary architectural research to the world of communication, to such an extent that the media are today very much part of the design activity itself. Class lectures will interpret architectural activity in the 20th century by exploring the relationships between the project and the press, cinema, television, and the Internet. Particular attention will be given to the investigation of the experiences related to the use of video and to the new media.

Credit Hours: 3

 

Undergraduate Architectural Studies (Fall only)

ARCS 20122 Architectural Studies Studio II

Course Name: ARCS 20122 Architectural Studies Studio II

Description: Studio allows students to further develop their design skills in relation to a theme or shared research topic that crosses the disciplinary boundaries of architecture and challenges conventional ideas of the role design can play in developing knowledge.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites: None

ARCH 46995 Video, Media and Architecture

Course Name: ARCH 46995 Video, Media and Architecture

Description: In the context of a wide survey on the evolution of media and architecture relations, the course will explore and reflect upon the critical role media (books, magazines, the Web, videos) played in the advancement of the architectural discourse between the 20th and the 21st Century up to today. Students will be offered the possibility of "reading" architecture in relation to media.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

ARCH 46995 Reading Cities Field Trips

Course Name: ARCH 46995 Reading Cities Field Trips

Description: Lecture and exercises in the visual analysis of urban form. Various media are taught and encouraged: sketching, watercolor, photographs, video, etc. The course is focused on a series of field trips to cities of architectural and urban significance. These include Rome, Verona, Venice, Milan. The tours cover historical architecture and urban fabrics, as well as Modern and contemporary intervention that bear significant importance in the transformation of the existing context.

Credit Hours: 3

 

Graduate Program

Graduate Design Studio I

Course Name: Graduate Design Studio I

Description: Graduate Design Studio I involves continuous critical dialogue/debate and constructive research of readings and findings in conjunction with student initiated design investigations. … The studio will aim at the construction of a grammar of the urban plan, able to create simple and complex conditions in the relationship territory/city/architecture, and of an architecture that can elaborate on the theme of the 'context'. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

ARCH 60301 Theories of Architecture

Course Name: ARCH 60301 Theories of Architecture

Description: In-depth analysis and discussion of contemporary architectural theories. Critical evaluation of major authors and architectural projects.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Cities and People

Course Name: Cities and People

Description: A sociological overview on the transformation of cities: the Modern City (urbanization and industrialization, social conflicts, private life and public experience…); the Post-Modern City (de-industrialization and de-urbanization, new urban social demand, gentrification…); issues of contemporary cities (new economies, competitiveness, cultural segmentation, integration, safety…)

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

UD 66995 Field Study on European Cities

Course Name: UD 66995 Field Study on European Cities

Description: "… an insight into the contemporary condition of architecture within the context of the traditional city. We will use three very different urban models... The cities are chosen as representative of a broad and complex condition of transformations that characterize cities across all of Europe."

The field study includes at least three field trips (one week each) to major European cities and places of interest, such as Berlin, Barcelona, Vienna, Portugal (Lisbon & Oporto) and the Netherlands (Rotterdam, Amsterdam, Utrecht, The Hague, etc.). Each field trip features an on-site speaker that can offer a particular insight on certain projects or urban areas.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites: None


Arts

ARTH 42095 Italian Art From Giotto to Bernini (1300-1600)

Course Name: ARTH 42095 Italian Art From Giotto to Bernini (1300-1600)

Description: This course will explore the development of art and architecture in Italy from the late Middle Ages to the Roman Baroque period.  Through an in- depth analysis of the art and history of these periods, we shall develop an understanding of Italy’s role in the overall development of Western civilization.  Particular emphasis will be given to Florentine Art.  Florence exhibits to this day a particularly well-integrated conception of painting, sculpture, and architecture.  Taking advantage of this, we will use the city as our classroom in order to examine the development of Florentine art and architecture in context.  In addition to “on-site” lectures, classroom lectures will focus on the art produced in other major Italian cities.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.


ARTS AND SCIENCES

Classes in the Arts and Sciences cohort are available to all students who meet the prerequisites.

Biology

Fall Only
BSCI 10001 Human Biology

Course Name: BSCI 10001 Human Biology

Description: The lecture portion of this course will study the scientific method and life's properties, emphasizing human biology. Topics include energy, genetics, reproduction, development disease, nutrition and physical fitness in humans. This course may not be used to fulfill major or minor requirements in the following programs: BA Biology, BS Biology, BS Botany, BS Environmental and Conservation Biology, BS Medical Technology, BS Biotechnology, BS Zoology, and the Biological Sciences minor.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

*Kent Core - Basic Sciences, Basic Sciences Lab, LER-Basic Sciences 

BSCI 10003 Human Biology Lab

Course Name: BSCI 10003 Human Biology Lab

Description: The lab is an introductory college-level laboratory in biology for non-majors. This course may not be used to fulfill major or minor requirements in the following programs: BA Biology, BS Biology, BS Botany, BS Environmental and Conservation Biology, BS Medical Technology, BS Biotechnology, BS Zoology, and the Biological Sciences minor.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites: None

*Kent Core - Basic Sciences, Basic Sciences Lab, LER-Basic Sciences 

 

Spring Only
BSCI 30156 Elements of Genetics

Course Name: BSCI 30156 Elements of Genetics

Description: Principles of organic mechanisms for expression and transmission of traits as studied in molecules, cells, organisms and populations. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: BSCI 10110 and 10120, and MATH 10772 or MATH 10775 or MATH11009 or MATH 11010 or MATH 12001 or MATH 12002 or MATH 12021

BSCI 30157 Elements of Genetics Lab

Course Name: BSCI 30157 Elements of Genetics Lab

Description: Consists of of hands-on experiments with modern computational and molecular biology experimental approaches.  

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites: BSCI 10110 and 10120, and MATH 10772 or MATH 10775 or MATH11009 or MATH 11010 or MATH 12001 or MATH 12002 or MATH 12021

BSCI 40430 Animal Physiology

Course Name: BSCI 40430 Animal Physiology

Description: This course covers the physiologic concepts and principles of animals

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: BSCI 30140; CHEM 10060, 10061, 10062 and 10063

Classics

CLAS 21405 The Roman Achievement

Course Name:  CLAS 21405 The Roman Achievement

Description: Romans accomplished outstanding achievements in fields such as political and social organizations, art and architecture, infrastructures, military innovations, urban living and commerce. This course is an introduction to the history and culture of the Roman world, from the origins of Rome through its ascent to domination of the Mediterranean world, the troubled changes from Republic to Empire, and the flourishing of the city and its provinces during the Imperial period until its crisis and consequent fall during the 4th-5th centuries AD. Political and military organizations, religious beliefs towards life and death, social identity, entertainment, private life, familial relationships, sexuality and the changes of these assets and values throughout time are examined in this course by means of the most recent archaeological and historical approaches and debates. As we search together to unravel the historical, cultural and social significance of the Roman achievement, primary sources in translation will be used to provide a fresh look of how some political events were perceived, how Roman urban life and its agents were captured by the satirical descriptions of Juvenal and Martial,  and how such a catastrophic event such as the eruption of the Vesuvius affected writers such as Pliny and Seneca. The examination of the Roman towns of Florence and Fiesole will help us to better understand life in small but lively urban settlements through the joint analysis of structures and artifacts. All classes will be supplemented by powerpoint presentations, and in many occasions by videos and documentary movies.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Kent Core

Open to all students.

English

ENG 39095 Special Topics in Literary History: Humor in European Literature of the Renaissance

Course Name: ENG 39095 Special Topics in Literary History: Humor in European Literature of the Renaissance

Description: This course will study the theory of 'humor' as one mode of expression of deeper cultural/political conflicts. Different forms of parody, satire, irony, grotesque, and physical comedy will also be surveyed. The texts will explore literature during the renaissance period beyond Italy and into England, France, and Spain. The texts to be studied may include Praise of Folly, Orlando Furioso, Gargantua and Pantagruel, Lazarillo de Tormes, The Heptameron, Much Ado About Nothing, and Don Quixote.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 21011

 

History

HIST 41014 Europe in the Renaissance

Course Name:  HIST 41014 Europe in the Renaissance

Description: This course covers a period of important social, political, and religious changes and developments in European history from fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. It starts with an overview on early Renaissance city-states and traces their evolution on Republics or Principalities. Through the study of political thinkers such as Machiavelli and More, this course deals with the creation of the modern world, considering the Renaissance as one of the crucial ingredients of Western identity. The study of the Protestant Reformation as a Christian movement in Europe is another crucial part of class discussions. The consequences of Martin Luther’s preaching on the Christian Church of Rome is the following chapter of this course, which goes on investigating the Council of Trent from its beginning in 1545 to its end in 1563. The scientific revolution, with all its consequences, is the last and crucial event of the course. The analysis is always concentrated on examining both the old and the new, both the origin of the modern world and the ‘world we have lost’. More in general, the course analyzes major European intellectual, literary, religious, and political developments in order to evaluate their contribution to Western culture. The course uses of primary readings, visits to nearby monuments, class discussions.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

 

Italian

ITAL 15201 Elementary Italian I

Course Name: ITAL 15201 Elementary Italian I

Description: An introduction to the Italian language in the context of Italian culture.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

ITAL 15202 Elementary Italian II

Course Name: ITAL 15202 Elementary Italian II

Description: A continuation of the introduction to the Italian language in the context of Italian culture. 

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites: Italian 15201 or equivalent

Open to all students prerequisite.

ITAL 25201 Intermediate Italian I

Course Name: ITAL 25201 Intermediate Italian I

Description: Continued development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills using a variety of cultural materials.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Italian 15202 or equivalent

Open to all students prerequisite.

ITAL 25202 Intermediate Italian II

Course Name: ITAL 25202 Intermediate Italian II

Description: Continuation of ITAL 25201 and speaking, listening, reading and writing skills using a variety of cultural materials.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Italian 25201 or permission

Open to all students prerequisite.

ITAL 35211 Italian Conversation & Composition I

Course Name: ITAL 35211 Italian Conversation & Composition I

Description: Study and practice of written and oral Italian with emphasis on acquisition of written and oral proficiency in the language.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Italian 25202 or permission

Open to all students prerequisite.

ITAL 35213 Conversation & Composition II

Course Name: ITAL 35213 Conversation & Composition II

Description: Advanced practice in speaking and writing the Italian language.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Italian 35211 

Open to all students prerequisite.

 

Politics

POL 40995 European Issues

Course Name:  POL 40995 European Issues

Description: This course will explore basic issues in the politics and political development of main Western European countries. We begin by inquiring into the political development of Britain, France, Italy and Germany over the past century. Why did democracy develop gradually, without major political conflagration, in Britain? Why did France experience a series of revolutions in its political development? How did Germany rebuild itself from wartime destruction and developed as the economic engine of Europe? We then turn to the character of democratic institutions and party competition in these countries in recent years. How does democracy work in parliamentary political systems? What do different parties stand for? What are the major lines of conflict in the domestic politics of European countries, and is this different from that in the US?  Moreover the course will explore other historical and political and social issues which marked the recent European political life, such as the end of the Cold War and its consequences for Europe.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

 

Psychology

PSYC 40111 Abnormal Psychology

Course Name:  PSYC 40111 Abnormal Psychology 

Description: Abnormal Psychology is the study of psychological disorders. We will discuss historical trends and current methods of identifying and classifying the most common psychological disorders (mood disorders, anxiety disorders and substance abuse).  We will also explore disorders with more unusual presentations (schizophrenia, dissociative disorders, somatoform disorders, etc).  We will explore factors that contribute to the development of the disorders and we will review effective treatment strategies.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: PSYC 11762

PSYC 30111 Forensic Psychology

Course Name: PSYC 30111 Forensic Psychology

Description: This course will survey the major areas of forensic psychology, including (but not limited to) mental health law, forensic assessment, criminal behavior and theories thereof, and law enforcement psychology. After completion of the course, a student should be able to answer the following question successfully: What constitutes Forensic Psychology and who is a Forensic Psychologist?

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: PSYC 11762

PSYC 11762 General Psychology

Course Name: PSYC 11762 General Psychology

Description: This course will provide students with a general overview of the field of General Psychology. In particular, the course will familiarize students with the basic terms and theories, as well as with some classic and recent research in fields such as learning, language development, intelligence etc. A particular emphasis will be put on the convergence of neuropsychological (e.g. patient case studies) and experimental evidence as a crucial aspect of the study of higher mental functions.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

PSYC 41532 Social Psychology

Course Name: PSYC 41532 Social Psychology

Description: Social Psychologists study how people think about, influence and relate to one another. In this course we will examine social psychological principles, theories, methods, and findings. We will explore the impact that the social environment has on an individual's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and we will gain an awareness understanding of the role that the social environment plays in our everyday lives.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: PSYC 11762

 

Criminology

CRIM 26704 Issues in Law and Society

Course Name: CRIM 26704 Issues in Law and Society

Description: General treatment of the legal system with special emphasis on its origin, structure, and functional consequences on issues and problems in modern society. The following primary objectives are the focus for this class:

1. Find an appreciation of the role of law in society
2. Gain a basic understanding of the courts, lawmaking, and criminal substantive and procedural law
3. Develop an appreciation of the concept of the rule of law
4. Grow your understanding of comparative law
5. Develop knowledge of the law's treatment of women, minorities, and minors

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

*Kent Core - Social Sciences

CRIM 37311 Minorities in Crime and Justice

Course Name: CRIM 37311 Minorities in Crime and Justice

Description: Focus on the role of social and ethnic minorities as victims, offenders, and participants in the justice process.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: junior standing

CRIM 33200 Criminal Law

Course Name: CRIM 33200 Criminal Law

Description: Developmental backgrounds and principles of criminal law; structure, functions of criminal law; rules of criminal liability and procedural requisites in criminal proof. Case analysis included.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: CRIM 12000 or permission


BUSINESS

As the world economy has become profoundly interdependent and even a small company may have customers around the world, those embarking on careers in business must understand the global marketplace and the issues involved in working with people of other cultures. The Kent State Florence European Business Program is ideal for students pursuing a major in business management or a minor in international business. In addition to coursework in Florence, students visit such European financial and business centers as Milan and Geneva. They learn from international business leaders and CEOs during workshops and guest lectures.

BUS 30234 International Business

Course Name: BUS 30234 International Business

Description: This course provides an introduction to different environments, theories and practices of international business. This course is designed for all students interested in international business, regardless of their principal academic discipline. Topics covered include globalization; international companies; sustainability; the impact and importance of culture; economic, financial, social, political environments; global strategies and structures; international marketing and entry modes. In order to facilitate these goals, students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom discussions. The course provides a broad survey of the theoretical and practical aspects of management practice in Europe, introducing you the major financial, economic and socio – economic, physical, socio – cultural political, labor, competitive and distributive forces that characterize business in Europe. The course will help you to develop an increased awareness of the differences between European and North American business practices, and a better grasp of the impact of differences in business practices on the conduct of business internationally. The emphasis in this course is both on understanding and applying one’s knowledge of different management practices, using national cultures as an aid to understanding the evolution of various management practices.
We begin by analyzing the international business environment that connects the phenomenon of globalization with the national and cultural differences that characterize the countries in this economy. Next we will analyze, how to first define a strategy to enter foreign markets, select then a global company structure, and define a global marketing and pricing strategies. We will delve into some strategic and functional issues that characterize the management of organizations in the global marketplace.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Micro and Macro Economics

Open to all students with prerequisites.

ENTR 37195 International Entrepreneurship - The Italian Perspective

Course Name: ENTR 37195 International Entrepreneurship – The Italian Perspective

Description: Entrepreneurship has become a guiding principle in most successful organizations. Entrepreneurship means more than small business management; it means identifying market opportunities and then marshaling the resources and designing the strategy and organization to capitalize on these opportunities. This definition cuts across types of organizations and industries. The course will focus also on the positive elements and possible threats of the “Creative entrepreneurial business model” (relevant in Italy and other Mediterranean cultures) as opposed to other international business models. One of the key issues of the course is represented by the possibility offered to students to compare different Entrepreneurial business models business model (through a series of conceptual frameworks, cases, guest speakers, field trips and site visits) with the prevalent business models present in the U.S. and have the possibility to integrate the two approaches. Approaching business issues from different perspectives is a key element of success in the current global economic scenario, where integration and blend of different approaches is crucial. The approach in the classroom is based on active learning. This means that what you will learn will be closely connected with its concrete applications. While you will prepare for each class by reading the relevant materials, I will highlight the major points and discuss any areas that seem unclear to you. Your responsibility will be to participate in class discussions, in the group exercises and in the projects. My responsibility is to ensure that you are exposed to the knowledge underlying made in Italy excellence, entrepreneurship, and understand how to use it. I believe that this material can be exciting, lively, and fun. the class will be a combination of lecture/discussion, in-class exercises, out-of-class exercises, case analyses, site visits, presentations and personal reflections. This will provide you with multiple ways to learn about entrepreneurial concepts related to International business excellence, and to demonstrate your capabilities.

Credit hours: 3

FIN 36053 Business Finance

Course Name: FIN 36053 Business Finance

Description: Analysis of financial decisions in business enterprise and interface of firm with capital markets.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Micro and Macro Economics, basic accounting or finance class

Open to all students with prerequisites.

MKTG 45060 International Marketing

Course Name: MKTG 45060  International Marketing

Description: The course provides a comprehensive overview of international marketing issues characterizing international companies in foreign markets. It will introduce students to the international markets and the principles underlying the development and implementation of marketing strategies across and within foreign countries. Topics include: political, cultural, and legal environmental changes as new competitive challenges for companies involved in international businesses, international marketing strategies (domestic market expansion, multi-domestic marketing, and global marketing), multicultural marketing researches, international segmentation and competitive positioning, and international marketing mix in terms of product, distribution, communication and price decisions. During lessons the students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom. In order to facilitate their participation, lessons include discussions of cases and the viewing of videos on international marketing experiences. The course is designed to stimulate curiosity about international marketing practices of companies, which seek global market opportunities and to raise the student's consciousness about the importance of an international marketing perspective in the international business management.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Principles of Marketing or Fundamentals of Marketing Technology or Consumer Behavior

Open to all students with prerequisites.


COMMUNICATION

CCI Florence (College of Communication and Information) offers courses designed to take advantage of the international setting while keeping students focused on their majors and progressing toward their degrees. Students can acquire or advance skills in such courses as Practicum in European Media, in which they work in small teams to create documentary films using advanced digital technology. Through CCI Florence, Global Communication majors can complete their study abroad requirement and progress in their language requirement, and all CCI majors can start and/or complete the Global Communication minor.

CCI 40095 Italian Cinema

Course Name: CCI 40095 Italian Cinema

Description: The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. In the first part the class will be analyzing Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. In the second part we will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of ‘new’ auteurs such as Fellini and Antonioni. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970s to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using films as ‘decoded historical evidence’. Together with masterpieces such as Open City the screenings will include films of the Italian directors of  the ‘cinema d’autore’ such as Life is Beautiful and the 2004 candidate for the Oscar for Best Foreign Film, I Am Not Scared. The class will also analyze the different aspects of filmmaking both in Italian and the U.S. industry where I had the pleasure to work for many years in the editing department on films such as Dead Poets Society and The Godfather: Part III. The films in DVD format are dubbed in English or sub-titled.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

COMM 45091 The Genius of Florence

Course Name: COMM 45091 The Genius of Florence

Description: Students spend a semester in Florence, but they spend so much time traveling that it’s not unusual for them to finish the semester with little understanding of Florence itself or what defines the city and its people. This course is designed to give students a brief introduction to the genius and uniqueness of Florence. Course meetings will take place mostly at relevant locations, such as churches, streets, and museums, rather than in the classroom, as the purpose of the course is to begin to familiarize the students with the city and to train their eyes to notice and comprehend what is around them. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

COMM 35852 Intercultural Communication

Course Name: COMM 35852 Intercultural Communication

Description: In the contemporary world characterized by globalization of goods, people and ideas, and by growing processes of internal diversification, intercultural competences are necessary requirements for every individual both for personal and professional life. Intercultural Communication deals with the relevance of difference (not only among cultures but also within a culture) that is approached both as a threat and as a resource. In our everyday experience the continuous reference to the ‘other’ (ethical, religious, political, gendered etc) is used to build up the very sense of our identities and in so doing dividing the world among ‘us’ and ‘them’, ‘bad’ and ‘good’, ‘friends’ and ‘enemies’. Diversity compels us to reflect upon our values, and the taken-for-grantedness of the social world in which we live. This course will move from the social constructivist approach trying to combine together sociology, cultural anthropology, and media studies investigating the role that diversity plays in our every-day life and the importance to acquire an intercultural communication approach in order to be more effective in our processes of communication, to solve conflicts and to better understand the interactions among individuals, institutions and cultures. Theories, concepts and problems will be presented through lectures and audiovisual materials. Interaction is strongly required and will be stimulated. Students will be invited to take part in the classes commenting on the topics presented, offering opinions, surveying and practicing ‘problem solving’.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

COMM 35852 Multimedia Experiential Learning

Course Name: COMM 35852 Multimedia Experiential Learning

Description: The Multimedia Experiential Learning course is designed to allow students a deeper understanding of their study abroad experience in Florence by projecting, developing and editing multimedia products (mainly articles, but also blog entries, pictures and videos) about their academic and extra academic experiences while living in Florence. Students will practice an activity of processing information related to their everyday life experiences, visits of exhibitions and museums and meetings with professionals by regularly developing content/stories about these experiences as well as about events taking place in Florence. The in-class meetings will help students to better focus on the different fieldtrips that will take place during the semester by providing background information about the Italian context. In-class activities are meant to support students editing their stories that will be published online on different platforms. At the same time, students will develop a direct collaboration with the editors in chief of www.flonthego.com one of the main destination for their multimedia productions.

The course is mandatory for all the CCI students enrolled in the Florentine study abroad program.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites: None

Practicum in European Media

Course Name: Practicum in European Media

Description: Practicum in European Media is a course characterized by the co-existence of theory and practice and the balance between the two. The theoretical aspect of the course has the purpose of providing information about general basics of film language, film history, and the history of documentaries. It will give the students the tools for being able to talk about ideas in terms of film language, through the analysis of existing documentaries and exercises shot by the students themselves. Without a good theoretical base, it would be difficult to find the right kind of themes, voices, styles and development. The practical aspect of the course is focused solely on teaching the students the use of technical equipment including still-cameras, video-cameras, lights, audio tools and post-production software. The course will be focused mainly on European Documentaries as a way of teaching the thematic and political difference between the cultures of the two continents. The combination of the theoretical and practical aspects will generate a solid base for the micro-production of well though-out documentaries, which the students will develop, shoot, edit and screen.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

JMC 40009 / COMM 45091 Comparative Media System

Course Name: JMC 40009 / COMM 45091 Comparative Media System

Description: Comparative Media is an interdisciplinary field of study dealing with the relevance of media, the so-called “old” media as well as the “new” ones, in contemporary society. The comparative method helps to recognize and clarify similarities and differences among specific media, historical periods, disciplines and perspectives. Comparative Media underlines social and cultural dimensions of the meaning and the use of technologies: each medium is analyzed as a technology, a ‘cultural form’, and as a part of a system (media system). The pervasive presence of the media in our everyday life will be critically discussed comparing the European (Italian) situation and the American one, trying to underline the most significant differences in terms of media systems, by the detailed analysis of some specific media with particular reference to the Internet. The context in which they operate will be outlined together with the influence they exercise in contemporary life. Classical theories will be presented together with a wide range of examples and audiovisual materials.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.


FASHION

The Kent State Florence Fashion program provides junior-level Fashion Design and Merchandising students the opportunity to take design studio and merchandising classes to complete major requirements, while exploring Italian fashion and culture through various study tours. During spring semesters, students attend premier Italian trade shows and visit Italian destinations known for fashion and textiles, such as Milan, Como, Prato, and Rome. In fall semesters they visit European fashion capitals such as London and Paris, as well as important Italian locations for investigating components of the fashion industry.

ITAL 15204 Basic Conversational Italian

Fall Only
FDM 30171 Florence Fashion Design Studio I

Course Name: FDM 30171 Florence Fashion Design Studio

Description: This is an advanced level design course for students who already have a basic knowledge of fashion design, in which design and tailoring techniques are very closely connected.
The most important aspect of this course will be to find the perfect connection of the design phase with the finished garment elements including construction technique, testing and fit, product development, finishing and details. Particular attention will be given to learning and improving the fast sketching of croquis and flats for an appropriate development of the garments made directly on the dress form, discovering new volumes and exploring contemporary shapes for an strong personal style.
Attention will also be given to learning different ways of style research used for new collections and during this course an important emphasis will be on personal creativity, architectural concepts, sewing technique ( alternative seams), and exploring contrasting shapes and volumes. The importance of accessories will be explored. Different kind of projects will be required during the semester and students (divided into groups) must be able to create collections based on a chosen themes and research.
At the end of the course students will be able to express design ideas based on research and creativity, translated through the tailoring technique to realize the appropriate silhouette in terms of shapes, details and fit.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

FDM 30260 Product
 Development in the
 Fashion Industry
FDM 30262 Fashion Merchandising Planning and Buying
FDM 35080 Fashion and the Media

Course Name: FDM 35080 Fashion and the Media

Description: This course aims at understanding the existing liaisons between Media and Fashion as central features of modern societies and significant expressions of the cultures in which we live. In fact, fashion is not only a medium through which we communicate our personal identities and our collective memberships: beyond that it enjoys and exploits the Media of Mass Communication in their extraordinary capacity of promoting, advertising and more generally informing on image(s), style(s) and lifestyle(s). Therefore, fashion business requires accurate and detailed capacities of communication both internal and external, as well as the ability to deal with media, institutions, interest groups and consumers. This course will provide students with the necessary knowledge required to operate successfully as fashion communicators within the ever-changing media field. Both the traditional media (print media, television) and the new ones (social media) will be analyzed in their specificity in relationship with fashion. A minimum set of ‘deal with the media skills’ will be introduced and examined in detail. PR and Media Relations, fashion journalism, fashion blogging, development of communication plan, Advertising and Fashion & Communication Promotion are examples of the issues that will be presented in class also thanks to the contribution of professionals and experts. Finally, we will also try to investigate the representation of fashion in the media, the way popular culture depicts and exploits fashion through media narratives (by discussing some audiovisual materials – documentaries, movies and television shows) and its complex and intricate relations with the wider cultural system.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: FDM 35900 Florence Orientation and Special Approval

 

Spring Only
FDM 30172 Florence Fashion Design Studio II

Course Name: FDM 30172 Florence Fashion Design Studio II

Description: This is an advanced level design course for students who already have a basic knowledge of fashion design, in which design and tailoring techniques are very closely connected.
The most important aspect of this course will be to find the perfect connection of the design phase with the finished garment elements including construction technique, testing and fit, product development, finishing and details. Particular attention will be given to learning and improving the fast sketching of croquis and flats for an appropriate development of the garments made directly on the dress form, discovering new volumes and exploring contemporary shapes for an strong personal style.
Attention will also be given to learning different ways of style research used for new collections and during this course an important emphasis will be on personal creativity, architectural concepts, sewing technique ( alternative seams), and exploring contrasting shapes and volumes. The importance of accessories will be explored. Different kind of projects will be required during the semester and students (divided into groups) must be able to create collections based on a chosen themes and research.
At the end of the course students will be able to express design ideas based on research and creativity, translated through the tailoring technique to realize the appropriate silhouette in terms of shapes, details and fit.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

FDM 30262 Merchandising, Planning and Buying

Course Name: FDM 30262 Merchandising, Planning and Buying

Description: The study of market sources, fashion buying techniques, vendor relationships, practices and approaches as a function of assortment planning and vendor selection. The student will gain an understanding of the Retail Environment where Buying Occurs, introduce basic concepts, principles and techniques used in today's merchandising roles, become familiar with the preparation involved when making the buying decision
, develop a professional vocabulary related to buying and retailing, gain an understanding of the Math used in the Retail Buying Process, become familiar with Microsoft EXCEL and gain knowledge of its use in retail calculations.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

FDM 30260 Product Development
FDM 35080 Fashion and the Media

Course Name: FDM 35080 Fashion and the Media

Description: This course aims at understanding the existing liaisons between Media and Fashion as central features of modern societies and significant expressions of the cultures in which we live. In fact, fashion is not only a medium through which we communicate our personal identities and our collective memberships: beyond that it enjoys and exploits the Media of Mass Communication in their extraordinary capacity of promoting, advertising and more generally informing on image(s), style(s) and lifestyle(s). Therefore, fashion business requires accurate and detailed capacities of communication both internal and external, as well as the ability to deal with media, institutions, interest groups and consumers. This course will provide students with the necessary knowledge required to operate successfully as fashion communicators within the ever-changing media field. Both the traditional media (print media, television) and the new ones (social media) will be analyzed in their specificity in relationship with fashion. A minimum set of ‘deal with the media skills’ will be introduced and examined in detail. PR and Media Relations, fashion journalism, fashion blogging, development of communication plan, Advertising and Fashion & Communication Promotion are examples of the issues that will be presented in class also thanks to the contribution of professionals and experts. Finally, we will also try to investigate the representation of fashion in the media, the way popular culture depicts and exploits fashion through media narratives (by discussing some audiovisual materials – documentaries, movies and television shows) and its complex and intricate relations with the wider cultural system.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: FDM 35900 Florence Orientation and Special Approval


HONORS

The Honors in Florence program is designed to offer Honors College students uniquely challenging and engaging experiences in this remarkable and vibrant historic setting. Students will gain an international perspective and learn about other cultures through a variety of curricular offerings and educational travel opportunities tailored for them. Students studying in Florence who complete the Honors Study Away Contract will receive three Honors credit hours for meeting all the contract requirements. They may receive additional Honors credit hours if they complete one or more of the Honors courses available in Florence. Courses available for Honors credit include

ARTH 42095 Italian Art From Giotto to Bernini (1300-1600) (Honors)

Course Name: ARTH 42095 Italian Art From Giotto to Bernini (1300-1600)

Description: This course will explore the development of art and architecture in Italy from the late Middle Ages to the Roman Baroque period.  Through an in- depth analysis of the art and history of these periods, we shall develop an understanding of Italy’s role in the overall development of Western civilization.  Particular emphasis will be given to Florentine Art.  Florence exhibits to this day a particularly well-integrated conception of painting, sculpture, and architecture.  Taking advantage of this, we will use the city as our classroom in order to examine the development of Florentine art and architecture in context.  In addition to “on-site” lectures, classroom lectures will focus on the art produced in other major Italian cities.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

BUS 30234 International Business (Honors)

Course Name: BUS 30234 International Business

Description: This course provides an introduction to different environments, theories and practices of international business. This course is designed for all students interested in international business, regardless of their principal academic discipline. Topics covered include globalization; international companies; sustainability; the impact and importance of culture; economic, financial, social, political environments; global strategies and structures; international marketing and entry modes. In order to facilitate these goals, students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom discussions. The course provides a broad survey of the theoretical and practical aspects of management practice in Europe, introducing you the major financial, economic and socio – economic, physical, socio – cultural political, labor, competitive and distributive forces that characterize business in Europe. The course will help you to develop an increased awareness of the differences between European and North American business practices, and a better grasp of the impact of differences in business practices on the conduct of business internationally. The emphasis in this course is both on understanding and applying one’s knowledge of different management practices, using national cultures as an aid to understanding the evolution of various management practices.
We begin by analyzing the international business environment that connects the phenomenon of globalization with the national and cultural differences that characterize the countries in this economy. Next we will analyze, how to first define a strategy to enter foreign markets, select then a global company structure, and define a global marketing and pricing strategies. We will delve into some strategic and functional issues that characterize the management of organizations in the global marketplace.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Micro and Macro Economics

Open to all students with prerequisites.

JMC 40009 / COMM 45091 Comparative Media System (Honors)

Course Name: JMC 40009 / COMM 45091 Comparative Media System

Description: Comparative Media is an interdisciplinary field of study dealing with the relevance of media, the so-called “old” media as well as the “new” ones, in contemporary society. The comparative method helps to recognize and clarify similarities and differences among specific media, historical periods, disciplines and perspectives. Comparative Media underlines social and cultural dimensions of the meaning and the use of technologies: each medium is analyzed as a technology, a ‘cultural form’, and as a part of a system (media system). The pervasive presence of the media in our everyday life will be critically discussed comparing the European (Italian) situation and the American one, trying to underline the most significant differences in terms of media systems, by the detailed analysis of some specific media with particular reference to the Internet. The context in which they operate will be outlined together with the influence they exercise in contemporary life. Classical theories will be presented together with a wide range of examples and audiovisual materials.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

POL 40995 European Issues (Honors)

Course Name:  POL 40995 European Issues

Description: This course will explore basic issues in the politics and political development of main Western European countries. We begin by inquiring into the political development of Britain, France, Italy and Germany over the past century. Why did democracy develop gradually, without major political conflagration, in Britain? Why did France experience a series of revolutions in its political development? How did Germany rebuild itself from wartime destruction and developed as the economic engine of Europe? We then turn to the character of democratic institutions and party competition in these countries in recent years. How does democracy work in parliamentary political systems? What do different parties stand for? What are the major lines of conflict in the domestic politics of European countries, and is this different from that in the US?  Moreover the course will explore other historical and political and social issues which marked the recent European political life, such as the end of the Cold War and its consequences for Europe.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.