Art History Faculty

The School of Art's Art History program provides students with opportunities to study in a variety of areas. Our eight full-time faculty are experts in their fields, giving students insights to art, art practice and cultures from around the world. Read about each faculty member's expertise and research below.

Marie Gasper-Hulvat

Marie Gasper-Hulvat

Dr. Marie Gasper-Hulvat is a generalist art historian who teaches surveys, writing-intensive capstones, and upper division, specialized courses for the Studio Art BA program at Kent State Stark. She publishes on early Stalinist-era art, visual culture, and exhibition practices, particularly revolving around the late-life production of Soviet painter Kazimir Malevich. She also is active in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, with research on learning outcomes from active learning such as the game-based pedagogy known as Reacting to the Past. She has three Reacting games in development, including Guerrilla Girls in our Midst, 1984-1987; The Salon of 1863; and The Society of Independent Artists, 1917 (Fountain). 

Shana Klein

Shana Klein

Dr. Shana Klein is an art historian trained in the history of American art, with sub-specialties in African-American and Native-American art. She teaches courses on American painting, photography, and visual and material culture through the lens of race and social politics. She holds a Ph.D. in Art History from the University of New Mexico, where she completed the dissertation—and now book project—“The Fruits of Empire: Contextualizing Food in Post-Civil War American Art and Culture.” This project probes how the representation and cultivation of food participated in the broader cultivation of American empire. Klein’s research interests include: American visual and material culture, food studies, race and post-colonial studies, and art and social justice. 

Gus Medicus

Gustav Medicus

Dr. Medicus attended Earlham College for his undergraduate BA, studying Art History and Biology. He received his Master’s and Ph.D. at Indiana University, studying Italian Renaissance art under Professor Bruce Cole. Currently an Associate Professor, Dr. Medicus has published largely on sixteenth century artists, especially Domenico Beccafumi, and is currently working on an article exploring an overlooked aspect of Beccafumi's Nativity.  Professor Medicus is also working on a book length study of art and innovation in the Sienese Renaissance. Dr. Medicus has received recognition for his teaching at Kent State University, including the highest award in this category offered by the University, the Distinguished Teaching Award, in 2002. Dr. Medicus regularly offers courses at the Kent campus in Early Italian Renaissance, Mannerism, Venetian Renaissance, and Baroque Art in Europe. In addition, Dr. Medicus runs a very popular four-week Art Experiences in Italy program every summer, based in Florence, which gives first hand, direct experience of ancient through Baroque European art.

Albert Reischuck

Albert Reischuck

Albert Reischuck is a Senior Lecturer who specializes in Late 19th and Early 20th European Art and is a practicing fine art photographer. He delivered the first all‐online offering at the graduate level when he adapted his popular Dada & Surrealism course to an entirely online delivery and also offers the Renaissance to Modern survey course in the summer entirely online. Mr. Reischuck's interests in his upper level courses are the origins of the avant‐garde and the overlapping concerns of art, literature, philosophy and music in the formation of the notion of the modern.

Renee Roll

Renée Roll

Professor Roll is an interdisciplinary scholar working at the intersection of design, craft, material studies, and its convergence with art history and critical theory in the field of visual culture. Her current research investigates the relationship between critical making, hierarchical relationships in contemporary art, craft and design, and production of meaning through media affiliated with all genres of visual production—both academic and mainstream. An additional trajectory of this research includes investigation of the role or identity of artist or maker within global society, and how creative practice is valued or understood within diverse cultures.

Joseph Underwood

Joseph Underwood

Dr. Joseph Underwood is a scholar and curator whose research focuses on artists from the African continent and the Diaspora, with projects that focus on the mid-to-late twentieth century Postwar era: post-colonialism, nationalism, globalization, public art, and biennialism. Dr. Underwood teaches courses that cover historical, recent, and contemporary African art, as well as the history of exhibitions, curatorial practices, and the politics of display.

John-Michael Warner

John-Michael Warner

John-Michael H. Warner is an art historian trained in gender and sexuality studies. Dr. Warner teaches histories and theories of contemporary art, twentieth-century art, and contemporary photography as well as graduate seminars that examine aspects of environmental and eco-critical art history—each from a feminist and queer perspective. Professor Warner’s first manuscript Border Spaces: The U.S.-Mexico Frontera (University of Arizona, 2018), with Katherine G. Morrissey, is a series of art historical and environmental histories of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Dr. Warner is currently working on a manuscript that attends to Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s Running Fence: A Project for California, 1976. Warner’s research interests include: border/borderlands studies, landscape and land use studies, eco-critical studies, theories of modern sculpture, and social/relational art.

Hye-shim Yi

Hye-shim Yi

Hye-shim Yi is an art historian of late imperial China, with a minor concentration in Korean art. Dr. Yi received her Ph.D. in Art History from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), an M.A. in Art History from Seoul National University in South Korea, and a B.A. in Aesthetics from Seoul National University. Her dissertation, “The Calligraphic Art of Chen Hongshou (1768-1822) and the Practice of Inscribing in the Middle Qing,” addresses the emergence of calligraphic carving as a new avenue of literati expression during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in China. Her research interests include the intersections of literati arts and artisanal crafts, the interplay between multiple art media, the relationship between intellectual and manual work, the materiality of calligraphy and painting, and antiquarianism. Dr. Yi offers courses on East Asian visual and material cultures that cover a wide array of artistic productions including calligraphy, painting, seal carving, and ceramics.