Brain Aging and Neurodegeneration

Brain Aging and Neurodegeneration is a primary focus of the following BHRI members' research:

Hod Dana, Ph.D.

We develop new methods and platforms for enabling large-scale recording and manipulation of neurons in the living brain, and use it to study changes in the brain in several neurodegenerative conditions.

Christine Dengler-Crish, Ph.D.

We investigate how early disruptions in bodily homeostasis caused by midlife cardio-metabolic risk factors may confer future risk of developing Alzheimer's pathology in the brain.

Vanessa Fitsanakis, Ph.D.

Ernest Freeman, Ph.D.

Our research has been focused on investigating the impact that alterations in neuronal metabolism have on mechanisms of neurodegeneration, as well as on oligodendrocyte function and myelination. These include epigenetic regulatory processes.

John Gunstad, Ph.D.

Work in my lab focuses on: 1) strategies to promote healthy brain aging; 2) digital biomarkers to detect cognitive decline; 3) improving mental performance in extreme conditions.

William Lynch, Ph.D.

The Lynch Lab studies how viruses alter brain function leading to motor and cognitive deficits by their infection/expression within different glial populations.  

Jennifer McDonough, Ph.D.

Research in the McDonough lab is focused on epigenetic mechanisms in neurodegenerative disease. We are investigating the link between metabolic changes and epigenetic dysregulation in multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.  

Angela Ridgel, Ph.D.

My research focuses on how exercise-based interventions can promote neuroplasticity and improvements in movement. My primary model is individuals with neurological disorders and healthy aging.

Fayez Safadi, Ph.D.

Mary Beth Spitznagel, Ph.D.

Caregiver burden across different patient populations, with particular focus on dementia and older adults.