Will Kalkhoff
Executive Director

Will Kalkhoff is currently a professor in the Department of Sociology at Kent State University. His research interests include neurosociology, biosociology, and social psychology. His most recent authored and co-authored publications in these areas appear in the Handbook of NeurosociologyAdvances in Group Processes: Biosociology and NeurosociologyEmotionPerceptual and Motor SkillsLaterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain, and CognitionCurrent Research in Social PsychologySocial Psychology QuarterlySocial Science Research, and Sociological Methods & Research. Current EEG projects focus on the neurodynamics of relational cohesion (with Shane Thye, Josh Pollock, Ed Lawler, and others), the neurodynamics of status processes (with Dave Melamed, Josh Pollock, and others), and team perception and performance under threat (with Josh Pollock). With Stanford W. Gregory, Jr. he shares a US patent based upon their studies of neuroscience and communications. He serves on the editorial board for Advances in Group Processes and is the current chair of the Evolution, Biology, and Society section of the American Sociological Association.

 

 
 
image

OFFICE
Department of Sociology
312 Merrill Hall

CONTACT INFO
Phone: 330-672-3712
wkalkhof@kent.edu
 
Joshua Pollock
Director

Josh Pollock is an assistant professor wiith the Department of Sociology. He received a Ph.D. in Adult Development and Aging from the University of Akron in 2014. His research interests include neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience, cognitive aging, and social psychology. His work has recently appeared in Frontiers in Integrative NeurosciencePLOS ONE, and The Encyclopedia of Adulthood and Aging. His current EEG projects focus on the neurodynamics of relational cohesion (with Will Kalkhoff, Shane Thye, Ed Lawler, and others), and the processing of identity discrepancies using event-related brain potentials (with Will Kalkhoff, Richard Serpe, Brennan Miller, and Matthew Pfeiffer). He also is currently using EEG analyses to research the dynamics of cognitive regulation, emotional regulation, and emotional arousal and the interactions between in healthy aging.

 

image

OFFICE
Department of Sociology
315b Merrill Hall

CONTACT INFO
Phone: 330-672-9788
jpollo10@kent.edu
 
Brennan Miller
Research Team Coordinator

Brennan Miller is a doctoral student at Kent State University. His research interests include race and ethnicity, social psychology, and neurosociology. His master's thesis was titled Emotional and Neurological Responses to the Persistence of Identity Non‐Verification, which examines how the amount of nonverifying feedback affects emotional and neurological responses. He is currently studying the connection between status characteristics and the ways status information is interpreted differently by race using resume evaluations. Before Kent State, he received his B.A. in Sociology from California State University, Fresno.

  
image

OFFICE
Department of Sociology
231 Merrill Hall

CONTACT INFO
Phone: 330-672-6373
bmill148@kent.edu

 
Matt Pfeiffer
Director of Operations

Matthew Pfeiffer is a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology at Kent State University. His interests include social psychology, identity, status, power, and neurosociology. His master’s thesis, entitled Status and Identity: An Electroencephalographic Approach, examined the neurological effect of a source’s status on identity non-verification. His current work, Responses to Expert Knowledge: The Role of Political Identity, investigates how the identity process can interfere with status processes to explain resistance to expertise. Prior to attending Kent State University, he received B.A. degrees in Sociology and Psychology from the University of Iowa.

  
image

OFFICE
Department of Sociology
231 Merrill Hall

CONTACT INFO
Phone: 330-672-6373
mpeiff5@kent.edu

 
Graem Sigelmier
Head Laboratory Technician

Graem Sigelmier is a post-undergraduate student at Kent State University. His research interests include sensory information processing, skill acquisition, social psychology, and cognitive processing in video gaming. His current project, The Role of Color-coding and Differentiation in Task Performance, studies how cognitive cues such as color-coding affect learning and performance of tasks requiring quick processing, particularly when these cognitive cues are removed. Previously, he received his B.S. in Psychology from Kent State University.

 

Graem Sigelmier

OFFICE
Department of Sociology
328 Merrill Hall

CONTACT INFO
gsigelm2@kent.edu