Methods for Assessing a Candidate's File for Reappointment, Tenure, and Promotion | Department of Finance Handbook | Kent State University

Methods for Assessing a Candidate's File for Reappointment, Tenure, and Promotion

1.    Methods of Assessing Research

In evaluating a candidate’s research portfolio, the Department will consider both the quality and quantity of the research.
In assessing the quality of research, the Department will refer to the Department of Finance Journal Quality Index.  This list begins with the approved CoBA Journal Quality Index assembled by the CoBA Graduate Council. Each faculty member is then allowed to petition the Department FAC for one journal to be moved to one level higher than ranked by the Grad Council. Each petition must be approved by a majority vote of the FAC. No journal can be elevated to the A+ level without a unanimous vote by the FAC and approval by the Department Chair and Dean.  The Department of Finance Journal Quality Index will be revised each time the CoBA Journal Quality Index is revised.

Considerations in Assessing Research

The Department acknowledges that sole authorship signals a higher effort than jointly-authored articles, but sole-authorship is not a requirement. The Department acknowledges that the order of authors is not important, as most work in our discipline has names ordered alphabetically. The Department assumes equal contributions by co-authors without knowledge otherwise. The Department prefers publications in Finance journals or in closely-related fields, such as Accounting or Economics. This preference is particularly strong for untenured faculty members and less strong for considering promotion to Full Professor.

For tenure and promotion to Associate Professor, the emphasis is on research articles, with little allowance for books, chapters in books, grants, etc. For promotion to Full Professor, there is some allowance for books, chapters in books, grants and the demonstrated influence of the research.  External assessments of candidates for tenure and promotion are important to the Department and may influence the rating of a candidate.

Given the length of time required to establish a research agenda and the long lag time in publication, it is not unusual in Finance to have most of the publications come near the end of the probationary period. The Department will accept both publications and unconditionally-accepted papers.

For manuscripts published in journals not included in the Graduate Faculty Criteria list, faculty members may request Department recommendation and the approval of the Dean to appropriately classify the journal for tenure and promotion purposes. If possible, this request should be filed before the manuscript is submitted for publication.

2.    Methods of Assessing Teaching

Greater emphasis is placed on teaching near the tenure decision than on earlier teaching.

a.    Assessing the Quality of Course Design

Course design focuses on the structure of the course, assessments, and content.  The quality of the course design will be assessed based on the peer teaching reviews, quantitative and qualitative results in student surveys, course materials such as syllabi, exams, and assignments, and the faculty narrative about teaching.

     i.    Effective Course Design
A faculty member will have an effective course design if the course is designed in a manner that provides the student knowledge and skills required for basic application of the course content. Examples of this include a course that is organized, covers the appropriate content, maintains currency, and has appropriate assessments. It is expected that all courses will meet the standard of effective course design. Major design issues raised in earlier evaluations are expected to be addressed and improved.

     ii.    Exemplar Course Design
Exemplar course design exceeds the effective standard with courses that have intentional planning designed to help students achieve significant learning. While the nature of an exemplar course design may vary depending on the class enrollment, subject content, and program, examples of this may include a variety of assessment tools specifically suited for the course, the integration of material from a variety of sources, design features that facilitate advanced applications of the course content, etc. The faculty member must articulate in the narrative on teaching the intentional planning that went into the course design.

b.    Assessing the Quality of Course Delivery

Course delivery focuses on the act of teaching, including what happens in front of the classroom and other student interactions. For fully on-line courses, it includes the communication of material in any multimedia materials included in the course and interactions with students throughout the course.  The quality of course delivery will be assessed based on peer teaching reviews (for untenured faculty members) and quantitative and qualitative results in student surveys.

     i.    Effective Course Delivery
A faculty member will have effective course delivery if they are able to convey course content that provides the students’ knowledge and skills required for basic application of the course content.  For example, this includes being understandable, clear, organized, and respectful. Effective course delivery should be demonstrated by peer reviews and student evaluations that demonstrate effective communication of course material. Major delivery issues raised in earlier evaluations are expected to be addressed and improved.

     ii.    Exemplar Course Delivery
Exemplar course delivery exceeds the effective standard with delivery that helps students achieve significant learning. Exemplar course delivery should be demonstrated by peer reviews and student evaluations that demonstrate exceptional communication of course material.

c.    Other Factors Assessed in Evaluating the Teaching Portfolio

Although emphasis is put on the quality of course design and course delivery, published research on teaching, participation in teaching conferences, and professional development in teaching are also valued as part of the teaching portfolio of a candidate. While the criteria focus on quality of course design and delivery, a strong record in these other factors may cause a teaching portfolio to be rated higher.  However, it is not necessary to have any of these other factors in order to meet the criteria.

3.    Methods for Assessing Service

In assessing a faculty member’s service, Department, College, campus, University, community, and professional service will be considered. Both the quantity or service and the quality of service are important.
 

[1] A revised CoBA Journal Quality Index may be forthcoming.  If so, the language in this paragraph may not be needed.